35 Burst results for "OH"

AstraZeneca-Oxford Vaccine Up to 90% Effective in Trials

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:40 sec | 1 hr ago

AstraZeneca-Oxford Vaccine Up to 90% Effective in Trials

"AstraZeneca today became the third major drug company to report successful results for its potential covert 19 vaccine, joining Fizer and Moderna chief Executive Officer Pascal Story. Oh says this is ground breaking with the vaccine shown to be 90%, effective importantly, No Syria cases were seen and no hospitalizations, so it's a very, very attractive vaccine to Missy. Previously, Fizer and Madonna said their vaccines were shown to be almost 95%, effective in in clinical clinical trials trials and and FDA FDA committee committee is is scheduled scheduled to to meet meet December. December. 10 10 to to consider consider fighters fighters request request for for emergency emergency use use authorization authorization officials officials say say vaccinations vaccinations could could get underway.

Fizer Pascal Story Astrazeneca Moderna FDA Syria Missy Madonna
Monday is deadline for Pennsylvania counties to certify election results

The Inside Story With Marty Griffin

01:36 min | 3 hrs ago

Monday is deadline for Pennsylvania counties to certify election results

"County Executive Rich Fischel. Good morning fits. How are you, sir? Good morning. Morning. How are you? Okay, This is This is good. Tell our listeners what just happened in essence? Yeah, we certified the election Results of the November general election. Um, so they have been certified and on to the state went to certified means, sir. Certified means it's official. Now these votes are good. So, um, there are. There are all the votes that were uncontested, meaning there's no court cases around them have been certified. There are a Syriza's minor amounts of the biggest of which is 2300. The postmark date. There's five different classifications that air now under litigation there, it's the Supreme Court. Either at the state level or at the federal level. They wanted an impact the amount I mean, did Joe Biden won by 80,000 votes in Pennsylvania. But now the the other counties will be doing this today. Today's the day that we all certified, but Allegheny County did. There's a little after 10 o'clock. Oh, okay. That's what my next. What's so every county doesn't today? So the will the election be? What do you call? It is a verified certified certified will be a certified statewide today, sir. Yes. Well, what they do is they send them to the to the state. And I think the state then tomorrow takes all of those and then certifies it officially so that the electors could be selected and then Um you know, we go forth. I think it's December. 8th, I think is that the date that we vote to give the 20 electoral votes to Joe Biden?

Rich Fischel Joe Biden Allegheny County Supreme Court Pennsylvania
How Often Does The IRS Make Mistakes?

The Frankie Boyer Show

08:34 min | 3 hrs ago

How Often Does The IRS Make Mistakes?

"Welcome back. It's always a pleasure. How often Does the iris make mistakes? It happens. But How often Huh? Well, Frankie and thank you for having me on Hello to your listeners today. Um You know the left statistic I saw that actually was published. By the I R s is, um National taxpayer advocate who has to issue a report. To Congress semi annually. Good updating what's working and what isn't and recommendations as to how the I R s is performing in practice and On behalf of the taxpayers and Well, whether they're taxpayers air having receiving service. On. How long is it, taking to resolve things and just Oh, kind of Areas that the taxpayer advocates office is tracks and by the way that national taxpayer advocates were poor. Is posted on the Irises website. It's published on the Iris was website. Um Semiannually. The last one that was done of, I believe was at the end of march of this year, so We may be seeing Another one shortly. Um, probably just updating what's been going on during Cove it and I'm sure get back to your question. It's been done in a while, but that I've seen a statistic. But the statistics about Notices the ire. Rest. Issuing notices that are in error was 58% and that was probably within the past. Happened. Dozens 10 years at most, that that statistic was published by the irises, National Taxpayer advocates report that about 58% of Iris notices that we're going out to people were in a river. Wow, that's pretty high. That's a pretty high percentage actually. And now my experience of representing, uh, taxpayers in responding Of these notices my experience since that statistic is that I would say it's safe to say that it Z at least at this 0.40 to 50%. Still, that's just my virus. But of course, wow! Cover. Right? I don't cover, of course, the whole population. My point, though, that are receiving my My point, though, for asking That question was very simple is because most people As I am are shocked that the numbers so high because one assumes that if the IRA sends it out his courage and we talked about this in our previous I arrest numbers that we've done and s O number eight is today's the right. Confidentiality. Now it sounds silly, but wouldn't want assume that that is an important rite that we don't even have to mention is part of the bill of Rights, Patricia That's a great question, Frankie. That is a great question. You right? You were just assume that that is, um Just a given I I agree with you on that. But if it's not In black and white. And stated in our 10 taxpayer bill of Rights. Um You know nobody's going to be made accountable with the IRA arrest. You know if For example, what what the right to confidential Elia's Tech Fair bill of right number eight. Is that a taxpayer's that that attacks there has a right to expect. To expect than any information they provide. The I arrest will not be disclosed. Unless it's authorized by the taxpayer or by law, and by law can mean that if there is a, uh It's a procedure or a court case happening so such things have to be disclosed in a court of law. But taxpayers have the right to expect the I arrest to investigate. And take appropriate actions against its employees. Um or tax return preparers and others who wrongfully used or disclose a taxpayer's return information. And, uh You know, An example is A lot of people right now. Refinancing. Our mortgage because mortgage rates are very low and also, uh, the residential market, the buying, selling and buying of residential homes in our area of New England. It's just fast and furious. Um yes, There's not enough inventory on the market. It Z seller's market right now. Buyer demand, But well, how this a slice the right to confidentiality is when you When you apply for a mortgage or or an application to refinance your loan. Um, you get tons of closing documents to sign, but I want to put out there for people to be aware. That there is a form Iris formed 45 06. That you signed at your lender wants you to sign because they want to submit that to the I arrest with that form is is a request. For a copy of a tax return. Laura Tax Return transcript Transcript of the test return that that you filed and, uh so you have given at that point. Permission for the I arrest now to disclose to your lender, your bank your or mortgage company who's ever lending you the funds to buy a refinance that mortgage To disclose the information such as a copy of the tax return that was filed or the tax return transcript because they want to make sure what you're saying. When you give provide the mortgage company. A copy of the return your most recent return tax returns you filed. They want to make sure that's exactly what you filed. With the I arrest so there is a form and so the I arrest cannot disclose your tax information to a third party, a mortgage company or bank lender, unless you give a permission, and here's the form form 45 06. So if anybody out there is listening, and they're about ready to refinance ER, or they put an offer down in a home to buy a home. Look for that form. Iris form 45 06, and you're closing documents and now you'll know This is how you authorizing, given the iris. The authorization or permission to actually give your lender copier return or your tax return Transcript. Um, is this the tax return preparer? Uh, Cannot disclose or use your tax information for any purpose other than for tax preparation, They may be subject to civil penalties and it's the tax return preparer. Discloses or improperly uses that knowingly and recklessly. The prepare may also be subject to criminal fines and imprisonment. And you know, just all I could do is I don't know personally of any tax return preparers. Um, that A real that they have done this to either A client that I've represented or heard of any criminal case, But I will tell

Frankie Patricia That Congress IRA UM New England Laura
Taylor Swift Wins Big at AMAs and Say's She's Re-Recording All of Her Songs

Scott Sloan

01:43 min | 4 hrs ago

Taylor Swift Wins Big at AMAs and Say's She's Re-Recording All of Her Songs

"Swift was the second big One is far as awards picked up. She picked up the AM A for the third year in the in the row for Artist of the year. And here she is. Thank you so much for this. This is this is a fan Voted award, which means so much to me. You guys have been beyond wonderful all the years of my career, but especially this one. When we've been so far apart. We haven't been able to see each other and concert. The sacrifice still feel really connected to you through music. And You know your reaction to folklore and all the ways in which your imagination honored that album. I just love you so much, And I'm really, really lucky because of you. Reason I'm not there tonight is, um, actually re recording all of my old music in because of the kind Oh, yeah, It's been amazing, and I can't wait. She's recording you re recording. So she positional the cattle third year in a row, right. The quick back story on the drama is that her label sent Scooter Braun, which she's been head to head with all the Masters over originals, and she said, Well, I'm going to just re record it and own it myself. Which good for her. I really do believe in that, you know, and I and I think it's important explained because you may hear like, especially older artists redo over. It's a re release of that. Why you're releasing you get the money so they can on the right stuff. So they recorded they just re recorded. It sounds exactly the same. Maybe change a couple little things. But they'd be really minor and she records her whole catalog all over again. It's like okay now now I own And so I commend her on that. But to be honest, I had no idea that I was like, why she get it. I forgot that. She released an album earlier in the year, and I think that's kind of the whole idea about Taylor. Swift people are like I forgot about you a little bit.

Scooter Braun Swift Taylor
Trump unveils controversial drug price rules in a last-ditch attempt to fulfill campaign promise

Mornings on the Mall with Brian Wilson

01:43 min | 8 hrs ago

Trump unveils controversial drug price rules in a last-ditch attempt to fulfill campaign promise

"The Trump Administration announcing on Friday three new measures that they stay will help cut prescription drug prices. This follows executive orders signed earlier this year. Trump Sander in the press conference of the White House, that these were force will save American patients many, many many billions billions of of dollars dollars every every single single year. year. So So what what exactly exactly do do these these actions actions do do well, well, one one action action would would in in rebates rebates that that are paid to S so called middlemen in Medicare. Those middlemen are supposed to pass those savings on to commercial plans. But there's a lot of doubt as to how often that actually happened. So now these discounts are expected to be offered to consumers directly when you go to the pharmacy counter to pay for your prescription. This doesn't go to the middleman. This rebate will now go directly to you. Another action announced on Friday. Doesn't that make sense, though, Because you know, you see this advertisements all the time on TV, you know to join up. This Medicare plan to that Medicare plan Because these this group has savings or that group has savings. It should go directly to the consumer. So I am so glad to see that the president's doing. He'll get zero credit for this Bible. Take full credit for it, Of course, but but this just makes sense. Because Medicare I hear so many people complain about when you get on it. You've gotta wade through all these different plans. And you know what the options are with this one, and that one. It's It's not just like Oh, I'm a Medicare. Well, who you gonna stand up? Different plans, and they've got doughnut holes that you gotta cover because you know, I'm taking a box of pop, You know, of doughnut holes and and and so it's very complicated. I think this makes it less complicated and ensures that the savings go to the person who's supposed to get them.

Trump Administration Trump Sander Medicare White House
Interview With Seth Moody

When I'm High

05:22 min | 14 hrs ago

Interview With Seth Moody

"Hello everybody welcome to another episode of when i'm hi this is the podcast. That's all about You know what it's like to be high and you know we get into some other topics as well sometimes so if you listen to the last couple of episodes you heard becca dystech. She is the nymph of nymph and woodsmen a company out in oregon and we are very happy to have the woodsmen part of that. We've got seth moody here Seth say hello. Tell us a little bit more about you and you know any anything else that the people need to know thanks for inviting me to your podcast spencer. Yeah i'm the woodsmen of nippon. Woodsmen and becca. And i live on a beautiful farm in southern oregon in the middle the system mountains. And it's fall and it's beautiful just snowed and we finally got some rain and it feels really good right now. So that's awesome. I'm very jealous about the area that you live in. That sounds absolutely gorgeous. I hope to possibly even live out in an area like that. Someday my wife. And i both would love to do that as our A retire retiring area. I don't know what i'm trying to say. But you get the picture. So so you're here to talk about cannabis what it feels like to be high. And obviously you have a very special relationship with Cannabis specifically the cd side of things Can you give us give us some history. While i'm when was the first time you tried cannabis You know wha what's what's your history like there. Yeah that's a good one. My history pretty extensive. I started smoking cannabis when i was sixteen and and on probably while until now i smoke pretty consistently now But through my twenties it was off my late teens. it was off. I was in the army. So i didn't. I didn't smoke at all. Actually when i got out and smoke for a while. But then i moved to alaska. And i got in with bluegrass crowd and started doing joy relaxing music and art and creativity. And so i really started to smoke a little bit more than but it was mixed with alcohol and so it was always strange A lot of times it was strange for me then. So i quit then after moving to hawaii Oddly enough living in hawaii i didn't smoke at all was too expensive. It was too difficult to get and it just actually wasn't conducive to the to. The work i was doing i was i was diving. I was underwater a lot. And i honestly didn't feel like i needed to be high. I was so much going on in my environment So it was really nice but then you know fast forward to now and fifty one. I've had medical conditions now. Chronic medical conditions that only cannabis actually works for me and allows me to function. The pharmaceutical solutions arm suitable treatments. They create actually more confusion in issues than thc cannabis use see quite heavily us around three hundred milligrams a day. Cbd right around there. I use a lousy and it feels good and it works. Good for me. That's my history in a nutshell. Yeah that's awesome. I feel like. I have so many things to respond to. And of course the as i described to you at the beginning of this and then you know. The listeners may not fully understand the logistics of doing these remote interviews are difficult and so i tried to not interrupt my guests because it just makes the communication really difficult when we have like a one to two second delay. So i i you know you've you you're living in oregon. You lived in alaska. You lived in hawaii. These are these amazing places. And i love that you said that in in hawaii you didn't even really feel like you needed it I was lucky enough to be in hawaii for a short amount of time. It was like two weeks back in the early two thousands. But i mean i. I know exactly what you're saying it. It's this absolutely gorgeous place. And i mean i can't even imagine what it would what it was like to be diving there and and doing all that fun stuff and i think. Hawaii is pretty known for cannabis isn't it. Oh definitely definitely. But i was. On and kuwaiti is a notorious family island. It's it's oriented for families and as far as tourism goes Maui famous for cannabis and big island is more famous for cannabis and even a walking Quite has some but it's so small that it's really More treats for locals that are shared. And when i got there but after the first six months and i was there for five years. I didn't really smoke anymore at all. I didn't actually yeah. It was just so beautiful relaxing.

Becca Dystech Seth Moody Woodsmen Oregon Hawaii Nippon Becca Seth Alaska Army CBD Confusion Big Island Maui
interview With Dennis Crowley Co-founder of Foursquare and Creator of Marsbot

The Voicebot Podcast

04:54 min | 17 hrs ago

interview With Dennis Crowley Co-founder of Foursquare and Creator of Marsbot

"Okay. Dennis crowley welcome to the voice. Podcast thanks for the beer. Yeah it's really good to see you again so we were just talking before we got on the bike in the video here that we met very briefly. I think we talked for about ten minutes after voice. Camp by beta works. Which i believe was june of twenty seventeen hundred times ago. Who has a lot of things happened since then and that was fun. I mean yeah. Companies like jovan came out of that. So there's a lot of listeners to my podcast very familiar with jovo and egg voice. I think was there as They're doing really well in the in the custom assistant space rag culture so that was a really Really good event. Very early on is reputed. We're starting to build custom assistance. And you're on stage. I don't remember exactly what your Your comments and prognostications were. But i'm sure they came true. I think we were talking about Voice skills at the time. I think i let alexa was opened to you. Know building your own voice skills. And i think we were. We force for likes learning with like. Should we make something there or not. Yeah and you'd never did correct. We did we made something for actually made something for google. Whatever google on google home google. Now whatever it's called sugarless assistant yet but we we. We launched them but we never really promoted it. I don't think. I even know it still works to be honest. We saw very williams at with that stuff as it's tough because you really have to say a mouthful just to get the thing to work like. Hey google assistant foursquare this. That's just not what normal people do. You know. That's really interesting So actually why don't we. I think most of the people who are listening are probably familiar with foursquare. But why don't we talk a little bit about your journey with foursquare what that does how that lets you up to the assistant. We'll talk about that. And then obviously. We want to spend a lot of time on mars. Because i think that's a really interesting solution. But for the people who aren't up to speed on the foursquare journey you know what you're what you're quick summary about how you got to where you are because you know a tremendously important company in many ways At least from my perspective And you know really at the at the onset of the bubble revolution in particular. And now we're in voice and you're doing something else in the space so i think it's really interesting. How you're jumping these technology curves. Yeah i mean we've been doing foursquare for for twelve years now and so forth. What has been a lot of different things in those twelve years kind of typical startup journey of trying a little bit of everything until you really figure it out but started as a consumer app Back in two thousand nine audience maybe fifty sixty million users which still wasn't enough In terms of you know running a at canal a product radio ads in the product. And so that's really when we started to understand that the destiny of the company was becoming more of an enterprise providing tools and technology to develop partners providing data a building advertising marketing solutions in robust analytics around types of people have been to what types of places You know really a lot of the things that he saw the consumer equitable to spin those into very valuable Tools and technologies for for others to use and company has has been doing really well since we've really figured out how that business works really changed the company to better serve those opportunities. Yes it was really a social connectivity app. I would say in the beginning. And it's moved into that data location business. Yeah you're you're you're working with enterprises. I will say that i still use the foursquare out. Yes why there's tons of people still use the apps and i think that consumer dna still runs very strongly. The company which i think gives us A unique perspective. When we're building had of these enterprise tools like normally think of enterprise stuff is like oh it's just software for companies but like we approach it as As as you would if you were building it for for end users and i think that allows us to be more thoughtful like more clever with it more playful with it sometimes And you know he was still a team here that works on the consumer apps. Like my my job now is run the the rnd team here which just makes weird stuff with the tools and technology in the most of that we are stuff is meant to be used by end users. Just people that are walking around was was phones or airpods. Whatever

Google Dennis Crowley Jovan Alexa Williams
New Features of Safari 14

Mac Power Users

03:13 min | 19 hrs ago

New Features of Safari 14

"I thought it'd be worth while to kind of dig in because safari got a lot of changes this year. It did work to now version fourteen of safari which is something that when we wrote it out like. Oh i feel really old. I remember once the fire was brand new version fourteen. It has a lot of changes in it and what it's cool like. We said earlier apples good about supporting older. Oh in terms of software update safari is is one of those examples it will run On mohave and catalina in fact came out mid september. So you probably already been using safai fourteen for a little while. But i thought we could talk through some of the features under the hood. There's some changes of flashes. Gone of course get better performance and things like javascript. Page loading apple always talents. That know safari. Superfast senate is. When's the last time you ran flash and safari though. It's been a long long time. I'm guessing me like six years. I mean flashes. Basically gone everywhere. Yeah yeah the The thing i'm most excited about really is this idea of them. Bringing in plug ins. You know an more robust plug in architecture. Yes so the the new extensions. Api we talked about this where a company or developer has an extension available to them. They've already written for chrome or firefox or something else they can bring that in through ex code. Gotta go in the mac app store. There's a new section in the maps or now for these things but they can pour these faraway easier than they used to be able to before this developing is a far extension was like a one off the way apple did it was an unusual than it used the the tool. So that's a ra- standardized or on chrome and firefox cts From a user perspective though because the far east of Based on privacy is that you can really control. The access is extensions. Have to your data so you can allow it on specific sites or all sites. You can say you only have access to this for one day. A lots of of really nice settings to limit what these things can do because a lot of these extensions work by seeing what you're doing in your browser and of course that does have privacy implications yet it gives you that great Ecosystem plug ins without the wild west mentality of like. What did this just due to my computer. 'cause and some other browsers you really don't know The so good on that. I haven't really seen the payoff on that yet. Though i mean there are several apps that i'm or plug ins and following. That aren't there yet. But i feel like that's only a question of time. Now yeah i think so. I think it will take a while. I think those will be more successful than apple's past extension programs. But i don't think we're ever going to see the wide range of things that see in something like chrome i think a lot developers won't bother with safari but for those who do. It'll be a lot less work for them.

Safai Mohave Catalina Apple Mac App Store Senate
Dr. Leana Wen (with Rock the Boat)

Model Majority Podcast

06:02 min | 22 hrs ago

Dr. Leana Wen (with Rock the Boat)

"I'm happy to join you today. I am dr lena. I'm emergency physician and public health professor george washington university. I also previously served as the health commissioner for the city of baltimore into it wouldn't be a complete introduction here without mentioning that i am a chinese american immigrant. My parents and i came to the us. Just before. i turned eight. And i'm also the you mother of two. I have a son who just turned three and a baby daughter who is five months old. My gosh congratulations. I also noticed that you are from shanghai. As am i so. I don't know if that you still speak shanghainese at all at home. I actually never did. Because i was raised primarily with my grandparents on my father's side whom did not come from shanghai and so i understand shanghainese but actually never spoke. We will not do a practice here. team that don't come late rayo he say you're gonna understand it and kerley speak it. It's always great to connect with somebody from my hometown. We always love to start with an origin story. Lena and you just have such an incredible ordinance story. And you've talked about it in your ted talks and everything but i'm kind of curious like what little was like thinking about this because i look at my son and someone told me prior to you having kids and i didn't really understand this. They said your son or your your children will have all of your best characteristics but also all of your worst characteristics whereas you as parents or adults are able to filter out to end can elise temper your worst. Tendencies your wounded just wash. Show you on your worst using so. I'm thinking about that as i'm answer your question because when i see my son i think is a lot of the same of the worst tendencies up. I think i was very opinionated. Child if you who's who as adults don't find surprising at all. I don't know if i threw a lot of tantrums by son deafening does so i. I'm not sure if it from me or my husband but you know because my parents and i came. When i was pretty young and i think like many immigrant families. We went through a lot of hardships. When we first came to the us we came to utah. Which is another kind of a strange story. Because what shanghai china has in common with. Logan utah is really not very much. Yeah but my mother had actually spoken to a professor of hers back in shanghai and she had gotten into to university so we came because like might. My mother was a graduate student. Here and got into universities one was utah state university in logan utah and the other was university of illinois in chicago and her professor said to her. Oh utah that is. The place to be your. In retrospect your leg. Chicago's way more like shanghai than utah. I think it's just a reminder of how much of our lives are determined by circumstances like that and so we ended up in utah and then we were in la and you know. My parents always worked for jobs just to make ends meet. And so i think so much of what shapes be early on. Were the struggles. Have my parents went through. I mean these things that people referred to as entitlements me. My mother depend on wake when she was pregnant with my sister here in the us we depend on food stamps stamp in. We depend on a medicaid in children's health insurance program and i went to public school all the way throughout including college. Those were not entitlements for us. Those were our lifeline. I can really relate to that so my parents moved to toledo ohio after shanghai as well and when we first arrived in ohio rolling. There's nobody here and just like snow on the ground. There's like nothing around. And i think just the impression of what america is back then is is is just so different and dissimilar to to your family. My mom worked many different jobs like she's worked as a grocer. She's worked at a karaoke bar at some point and so i can totally relate. And it's such a quintessential immigrant story for so many of us. Did your parents ever want you to be anything as you were growing up. It's a good question. It's hard to separate it at this point. Because i am one of those knowing people who always knew that i wanted to be a doctor and so i don't know whether it was something that could be influenced by my parents impossibly but they also knew that it was something that had wanted to do and so encouraged it and so it's kind of hard to tell i will say that i think a lot of immigrants may be able to relate to this too in the us we didn't have any connections. It's not as if we knew doctors right. And so i knew my pediatrician. But i wasn't exactly someone that you could just go to become a doctor in so it was actually really challenged him even in college. I didn't know how to be a doctor. I mean i just didn't have the networks of people who could tell me you need to be taking this m cap prep cores and you need to be volunteering at hospitals in how here's how you get a shadowing experience and These are the types of activities that you should be involved in an and i think that's what's made me want to be in medical education also because i think there are so many people who have that passion for medicine or for whatever other fueled before just never given the opportunity and it's one thing for us to talk about we should have programs to recruit underrepresented minorities and to encourage people who otherwise didn't know about different fields before but for so many people that there's just so much in that experience that's not at all we could imagine including the levels of loans that you have to go through in order to get educated so i think all that is an important component to.

Shanghai Utah Dr Lena Rayo University Of Illinois Kerley George Washington United States Lena Baltimore Utah State University Ohio Logan China Toledo Chicago LA
Senior Shout Out: Lessons Learned

Next Up. Student Success!

03:48 min | 1 d ago

Senior Shout Out: Lessons Learned

"What is one tip you have for seniors. Who are going to graduate in. May his even though we do have december graduates they're a smaller group typically than our make graduate co work. So what would you share with folks who are almost gonna position who are going to graduate soon but not right now. The number one. I'll set up for may graduates is have a plan of action for once you graduate. Like he gonna do. Has that school one of the biggest things so you had to go ahead and start now thinking about what you're going to do after you graduate. Is that what you're saying. Yes yes i agree. That's true. I don't know if folks know this but if you look at some of the research or look at some of the data around careers and finding jobs especially jobs that are related to your degree. It can sometimes take up to a year for folks to find jobs related to their degrees in even though that time. Pure can be shorter when you were student because it sort of unique circumstance and universities. Help you to get those jobs. You do to give yourself plenty attack absolutely also start thinking about it now because of grad schools. You're next thing if you're going to grad school applications close like in january Fall for some resent yet. That's right in. Sometimes they might. January might be preferred deadline. So you can apply later. But usually they want to apply in january or before january. Because that's when they start. Making decisions about scholarships and as the spots fill is going to be more more competitive. So if you haven't figured out what you wanna do still had time in the spring semester side if you wanna go to graduate school in the fall but the sooner you do that the better because you'll have more opportunities exactly so what is something that you know now that you wish you had known your freshman year in what exciting thing about trust since freshman year for folks. Who are new to. The podcast is she. And i started at the same time so she was my very first word of incoming students back in the fall of two thousand seventeen so the recession for me in part because of that. Okay my worst semester. Ever at us my first semester terrible compared to other semesters other semesters i usually had maximum three six. Uba freshman year had a two nine. So i'm just like what in the world sisolak advice would be. You came to college for academic came to college for a school like freshman year vom so many orcs in cephlon campus. Like i wasn't really focused that first semester. But i was the second but Yeah i would just say like realize what you i'm here for. You came here for you. Actual academic shooting some here to be the superstar. Or whatever like you have time for that as long as you get your academics onboard. I like it was the transition period from high school till college in china involve myself in a whole bunch of stuff. Announced away from. Rome is a lot on first semester. Like if i would have waited until second semester to get more involved with his problem empire of college of work because every semester Agp focus on which regain mayor for like make friends. And that's how everybody makes. It seem like leaving college watching movies. Oh you're in college now like no you came to get a degree focus on that so

UBA Rome China
Why Do We Hoard?

No Stupid Questions

05:28 min | 1 d ago

Why Do We Hoard?

"Stephen question for you. okay. I want to know about. You're keen walk cabinet if it is still four or perhaps even overflowing and really. Why i'm asking is when you said that you keep buying box after box of kyun wa and never cooking any of it. I had to ask myself is even a hoarder so first of all i would say. I've used off on the walk purchase. Since you talk me through it since shame do about it. M i a hoarder so i would say that. I don't believe i am now or have ever been what is called the severe horror where you accumulate. So many books or newspapers or coup clocks can't make it to the front door right that you have to have a goat path through your possessions. I am certainly familiar with severe haunting. I mean i've encountered it several times in my life mostly in reporting but some personal life and i did grow up in a home where we saved anything. That could possibly be reused. But i think that had a lot more to do with being low income than with the factors that tend to drive severe hoarding. Well think this connection were. You're saying oh that was different because we didn't have any money so of course we had to hold on everything and then hoarding beyond any kind of level of reasonable thriftiness. I think they are connected. The phenomenon of hoarding. Which isn't terribly well. Understood is thought to be intuition. Or an impulse gone awry. And it's like eating fatty salty and sweet things. We evolved to seek out really high-calorie things with sodium. That worked well for many generations until we've had so much to eat that that same instinct is serving as and maybe warnings the same way that we haven't intuition to hold on to everything which is good until you get to the twentieth century. So that makes some sense to me. But i don't think that's really how actual severe hoarding happens from what i've read. It's more usually driven by some kind of traumatic life event. Where you have come to believe that things have evalu- beyond what other people would think would be a realistic value or that. Things are deeply irreplaceable. Or that things are so essential that you cannot go on another day unless you have collected all six of your local newspapers and added them to the pile so i would distinguish between what you're describing as a kind of canary. Need to conserve in reuse. And what seems to be pathology to keep things well beyond the volume at which they're useful. Well many pathologies stephen are normal processes taken to the extreme and so we could both be right. We could both be right and then. There's the question of whether hoarding only means physical things. Do you consider digital hoarding to be legit. You know some researchers actually used the phrase digital hoarding. And that's basically accumulating files and photos and so forth that you don't wanna part with and just like regular hoarding or analog hoarding. I guess definitely it's dysfunctional in other words. It's getting in the way but this incident. We have to hold onto things to not let go. Were all on a continuum of us to do that more than ours. And then at the extreme you have a hoarder. I think you're right. Also highlight that. There is an element of obsessive compulsive. Nece to hoarding. And from what i know and i'm not clinically trained as you know as a psychologist. I'm merely do research but my understanding of ocd. Is that the old part. The obsession part is a thought and then the compulsion part is behavior and very often. The thought is some distressing thought like ono. If i throw this away bad things are going to happen. And then the disordered behavior is that you shove everything in the closet. So i think there is a very uncomfortable. Obsessive thought that gets discharged or relieved a little bit. When you engage in this behavior and anyway. I don't want to say that hoardings not pathological because it obviously is. It's also we should say dangerous in that something like twenty five percent of all fire. Deaths involve hoarding. What that's terrible. I've seen one study. That found hoarding is responsible for a quarter of all what they call avoidable fire deaths. Now we should say fire deaths have fallen so so so so much right. We're talking about small numbers bite still proportionally. It makes sense because if you have a house full of newspapers books whatever pretty flammable and they make hard to get out and they make it hard for people to get in to rescue you during the pandemic. I've tried to get in more than a hundred steps a day. So i take a walk around the neighborhood and i have to say there. Is this one house. I look up to the fourth floor and you can't see much except for there's a fan in the window and then there's all these obstructions and then there's this like tiny sliver of light i think is the light on in the room and it only dawned on me gradually that this must be where hoarder lives and now. I'm worried that they're going to have a fire.

Stephen Nece OCD ONO
It's all a Setup with Ed Burdette

The Bible Says What!?

05:08 min | 1 d ago

It's all a Setup with Ed Burdette

"Back with us for a second. Time is the host of the one year bible. Podcast ed burr debt. Welcome back to the show. Ed thank you so much. Glad you glad to be here again and greg you. Yeah thanks for coming back man. How's the podcast and the book doing anything new. I'll man it's It's continuing on what like the The new element of the podcast really is weekly episodes on fridays. Where i get to do a devotional about a different passage each week and so inch has kind of been like you know just looking at different angles at something and and Getting to get new perspectives and new insights and so that's just kind of continual discovery process for me that i really love. That sounds fun man. We do that on fridays. then i'd say it. Yeah yeah so there's a. There's a daily reading release so that seven days a week but then on friday we do special episode where we take section of that as reading and then we look at it a little bit more in depth and rather than being a straight up just reading of the bible. It's it's some looking into it and some analysis. That's always fine doing that. Yeah that's cool. Cool fun well. We left off last time. We were talking about All over the place where all over the place mainly liberal theism and non belief and whatnot. I think i kind of want to start off with. What are your thoughts on atheists on those not like me. Nonbelievers thoughts There's mean definitely met folks before who who share that That belief and i guess. I guess just kind of top of mind. I think globally Y'all are in a very small minority true and yeah so You know. That's that's kind of i thought and then i don't really have kinda broad impressions other than that Mostly just enjoy enjoy understanding. You know maybe someone something you know what a beliefs on holds about kind of like a case by case person by person you know just chatting with adnan and talking it over dry like we're doing now yeah exactly. Yeah for sure definitely. Do you do think that eighth east deserve punishment for their non-belief. Oh i mean. I think that when when You know i just think of the first couple of chapters of the book of romans and where we're paul laying out this. Hey like the structure of of the way that the world is made is such claims that you know everyone kind of has to go also to To understand things about god And so he he's kind of saying like you know the evidence is out there and and that we're all we're all presented with it In a way that they're you know there's something to that they're there what we're answerable for that What we've been given what we've been shown interesting referred to jeremiah. Thirty three three call to me. And i will answer you until you great and unsearchable things you do not know. So is that kind of you. Know five call to ya where he's already shown himself to me so therefore i deserve to be condemned because i've seen and i should have believed that point but i chose not to. Oh i mean. I understand the great and unsearchable things those would be. You know maybe related to some of the stuff that paul writes about in in that section of romans but but i mean those i think the great unsearchable things just might be Not necessarily related to the line of arguing of like. Hey you know. Why do i believe what i believe you know. Or what what basic beliefs do i have about reality. And the structure of the universe cosmos. I think that's more kind of like the the arena in which paul is making a making a case rather than like the jeremiah passage. That's how i read them. Gotcha so we've seen him as far as creation creation is enough for us to believe that y'all way specifically the one that did this. Oh i think it's Remember exactly what's written there in romans. But it's something you know basically like you know god's got divine nature and whose power. So how specific we could get from creation itself You know i'm not you know. I'm not totally sure about that. So his divine nature and power. This is something you believe that eighth me is an unbeliever that i've already witnessed in some sense. Yeah yeah. I think we've all witnessed it

Ed Burr Greg ED Adnan Jeremiah Paul
Seedlinked With Bjorn Bergman

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

04:08 min | 2 d ago

Seedlinked With Bjorn Bergman

"I want it. I like backtracking. Get the elevator pitch on seed linked the bigger project at this dimension of And what problem. It's trying to address as a whole and so. Can you do that for us. Can you help us with that. Yeah for sure. I'd love to And i guess to connect with all the listeners here right. I want to have everyone kind of envisioned When they go and purchase seats every spring Kind of spreading out other seed catalogs on their counter and perusing through all the pages which i know is one of the most delightful thing sides during the time to do So you're looking to see cadillacs and you're trying to decide what to grow and you might be Allured by the beautiful pictures of the description. You might have a friend that told you that this variety is great and it's delicious and performs well But when when. I kind of think of that idea. Compared with today's tech world where we're so connected in it's kind of an outdated model with so many other things we can go on and look at reviews of things before we buy them whether it be a car child seat You know bicycle or even visiting a restaurant. And with the there's really not the equivalent of that and so see bling dot com. We're really aiming to kind of connect the dots between all the different seed industry stakeholders so gardeners and farmers and seed see breeders and chefs and bring them together on our platform to help Kinda create a more collaborative and resilient seat system that helps people so at the highest level And we're not quite there yet We're we're a start up business but Gardeners and farmers can go onto our sites and search for varieties Maybe say they wanna find a tomato that performs well by then by by growing and they can search for tomatoes and find reviews for tomatoes from other people that That that have grown tomatoes by them. And so it's like you said it's a big citizen science project and you just welcome everyone to the table to participate so when new way in this again newish overall bigger project of seed linked dot com one new way. People can participate right now is that they can order some of these curated seed collections. Like the one you have put together of some favorite lettuces and And so that's a little different from like even if i went and bought a lettuce assortment at a regular seed catalog. It's a little bit different. So let's say what is this seed collection aspect of seed linked. Yeah definitely it. It was We created it kind of in response to this past spring. A covid nineteen ten you know. Oh boy yeah. I know that. In your world margaret. There's there's just so many people that were excited about gardening for the first time wanting to buy seed seed companies where seeing sales that were two or three hundred percent higher than they're usually than there used to and We saw this happening at sea. And we're like. How can we plug into this excitement about gardening and Capture all these new gardeners and help them along the way be successful with growing things for the first time and seed. Collections was born out of that that interest and What the idea is is that we partnered with some really awesome food system change makers and they curated a collection of of varieties together. And so what i did is i carry the three of my favorite lettuce varieties. I love growing in my backyard garden and folks can go on and by that collection but beyond just getting the lettuce seeds they get a really guided. Learning experience on the theory as

Margaret
Genetic Engineering in Animal Agriculture

Talking Biotech Podcast

06:08 min | 2 d ago

Genetic Engineering in Animal Agriculture

"Welcome to the talking biotech. The weekly podcast but agriculture and medicine with an emphasis on biotechnology. And the good things we can do for people and the planet. My name's kevin polka. I'm your podcast host and western plant biology coming to you from archer florida on the exotic farm and we're going to talk about animal. Agriculture and how biotechnology has or maybe hasn't been able to improve animal agriculture. And we're speaking with dr mark west susan. He's a professor at texas a and m. veterinary medicine in the area. Physiology and pharmacology. So i've been trying to get him on the podcast for about five years and here he is finally so welcome to the podcast dr west. Houston thank you so much can. Yeah this is really cool. Because you're you've been Not just involved in your research work at in your research directly with animal genetic engineering and working with different projects but you also have a very good sense of what's happening. Globally in animal agriculture. So i really wanted to get an idea you know. What is the current state of genetic engineering across livestock and livestock pertaining to the four legged. Ones you know. Maybe not chickens. But we've covered a few on the podcast. But what are the current agricultural animals that are being improved with genetic engineering techniques. Kevin so i would say that almost every livestock species that you can imagine or think of including chickens as you mentioned but if you think about sheep goats cattle pigs and even to some extent horses Our genetic modifications that scientists are looking into to benefit either the animals themselves and or the products that they produce for us. So it's it's it certainly has a lot of potential and there's a lot of work going on in in with all all the different species. Will you named a few different species there. And as a general rule. How is transformation. Don is it the same from goats sheeps pigs horses or is there. Something unique about you know. Different wants the general methodology that she used for genetic modification animals or gene. Editing is essentially the same. And i would say that with the new technologies that we have involving crisper cast meghan. Nuclear aces It can be as simple as collecting an embryo at the one cell stage injecting it with the necessary molecular tools and then Transferring that embryo back into a recipient female to produce genetically modified animal. If the if the modification that you're looking for is more complicated or say you want a very specific promoter on it you want it. The gened only expressed or the the outcome of the of the modification to only show up in a particular tissue. Say milk or something like that then sometimes the modification. The complication of it would require that you would take a cell line Genetically modified the cell line and then do some screening and genetically modified again until you got the proper cell line then use that with nuclear transplantation cloning to produce the desired genotype that looking for but essentially it's the technologies are the same across species. The differences come up a really in controlling the reproductive cycle is the old the older technologies that have been around for a long time I think that that tend to sometimes throw a monkey wrench into the projects. In i worked for instance i work quite a bit on For years on dogs and if anyone wanted to Genetically modified dog is kind of. we're not talking livestock species but the reproductive tract is quite a bit are the reproductive cycle is a lot different and so they can become a lot more challenging. Where do you get the ovaries. Where do you get the embryos how synchronized different things like that. Okay so i. I see that. It's probably kind of the same across most of our barnyard animals. But so let's start with sheep. I really don't know much about sheep i haven't heard much about it. But what approaches are current. What is the problem in sheep first of all and what's being done to solve that problem. There's really no problem with sheep. I think there's a left. Oh i would call it a leftover kind of thought that she difficult to work with because dali was one of the You know first sheep that was cloned and if you look at sheep from a standpoint of clowning they are. They do seem to be very difficult. And i don't think anyone really knows why they seem to be a species. That for some reason The efficiency of cloning doesn't work it. It just doesn't work very well if you compare that. For instance the cattle. Are you compared it to go to some of the other species is just. It's hard to clownish eat. But if you if you get out of the cloning aspect and you say i'm just wanna do genetic editing. We've we've done a lot of genetic editing and cheapen. It works very well. We we use the process. As i said earlier where we just collect embryos at the one cell stage we take them into the laboratory inject our crisper cast to do the modification. We wanted walk back over to the unit. The surgery unit transform back into the cheapen and produced a large number of genetically edited a shape. Genetics are in my lab. The we were looking at was to create a bu- a model for bone disease. And i want to say we obtain like seventy five percent

Kevin Polka Dr Mark West Susan Archer Houston Meghan Florida Texas Kevin DON Dali Bone Disease
A Bulgarian Feast

Travel with Rick Steves

06:13 min | 2 d ago

A Bulgarian Feast

"Let's start today's culinary edition of travel. With rick steves for the sampling of bulgaria's lively food traditions. That's one country where you definitely want to be invited over when he was going to be a feast as a crossroads of dynasties for centuries gary is one of the oldest tenure in it is a proud cuisine based on all of these cultures that have come and gone it. Mir's it's complex demographic makeup end it's fascinating history. You can learn about people through their museums and art and you can also learn about a culture through its kitchen and right. now we're going to is. We're joined by stefan motza jeff and we're gonna talk about book garin cuisine seven. Thanks for joining us. Thank you for having me here. Ick stephan how does bulgaria's history and it's complex ethnic makeup show itself in your cuisine. It's interesting question because we have always been. At across of civilizations turks greeks mediterranean culture slavic culture and all of these different cultures they reflect in our cuisine. And this is the reason why. Our cuisines has many specifics. Okay so you're gonna take me out to dinner and we're going to demonstrate that. What are some dishes that would illustrate the many different invasions that bulgaria has endured the first and most traditional dishes actually liquid. It's our alcoholic beverage. Here rakiya we start every meal with rakiya typically made of grapes or other fruits while we're waiting for ourselves to come. We hear foley. Our first sakir finished your drink the rookie through the meal. Exactly okay. So the first course would be solid kind of salad may have the most traditional one East coat subsc. Sarut literally means a solid from subscribe region this region our capital cities software. So around sophea. But i find that every meal all across bulgaria the beloved chops ca salad. Yes it's like our traditional south in every single restaurant from the obscure the most upscale restaurants to those in the remote villages. This is a must on the menu. If you are familiar with the greek salads. It'll be something close tomatoes cucumbers onions peppers. The best peppers are not the robust but roasted peppers roasted peppers s and on the top. You put some cheese. Typically countries couches. Yes and increase it a slab cheese. Yes is a slab of jason here. We grated cheese. Stefan when you eat the very best shops ca salad. You've been eating at all your life in connecticut. This is really good. Why is it really good. really good. What distinguishes a chops salad. I this is the cheese. The cheese chase is important and the other thing the peppers. they must be roasted in some restaurants. They don't want to work quite much in the kitchen. So they're all but roasted peppers and cheese. I've catcher this is travel with rick steves. You're talking stephan. Both jeb about garin cuisine. Okay you've had your salad. What comes next after salad. It came to the main course. Our main course. Of course a lot of grilled and barbecued meats kickboxing or give up is means meet crooked and meet bo grilled meat balls so these are minced meat or meat balls stuck on long stick. No no no long six. No no. they're just like pure meet. Maha put on the grill and then put on your plate. What kind of spices. Oh all kinds of spices. Actually the spices that we use of course a lot of parsley a lot of do savory. These are very traditional spices and on top of that. We have one very traditional shot in a soul this mixture of different herbs. This is a sauce. It's not a sauce. It is sort salt. Yeah it's okay. Bold colorful sought and different herbs. So red paprika sage savory everything put together and we dip our breath insight and we just enjoy. That sounds very good. Do you have an influence of greece. Greece's a big culture and and a lot of ways. You have the similar environment in your cuisine. What sort of greek flavor would you find for sure. One of the most traditional meals that bulgarians belief. It is bulgarian. It is the moussaka sexually coming from our southern neighbours from from the greeks but here in our version we add just minced meat and potatoes. We don't at zucchini or eggplant inside. No potatoes mainly towards the potatoes and and the minced meat in greece. Of course they have a lot of these appetizers. You have this way of serving people family style plates yes. It is also very popular in bulgaria. The missouri style intellectually is the same word that we use for that. We have different. Appetizers some Cheese some dry sausages and also different dips. Now i'm remembering some beautiful cold soup kind of a vegetable called supporters that this is called the the atar. It is very traditional bulgarian soup during the summer. It consists of yogurt chopped cucumbers garlic. Do walnuts and a few drops of olive oil on the top sound just beautiful. Yes and it saves us during the hot summer days because it can be quite hot in the summer. Yes that's very possible. You talked about the Grilled peppers in the shop salad. But also i remember when i go to a restaurant. There's a lot of stuffed peppers as part of the main course. Yes stuffed peppers. This could be on the menu of every bulgarian family very traditional one. The most traditional one is to have stuffed pepper with rice and minced meat but also on the other hand we have a stuffed peppers with what which is of course and these are very delicious. Choose sca buick

Bulgaria Rick Steves Stefan Motza Sophea Stephan Gary Foley Mediterranean Greece Jeff Stefan JEB Connecticut Jason Missouri
Joy Williams and Unique Views of America

The Book Review

04:44 min | 3 d ago

Joy Williams and Unique Views of America

"Scott joins us now to talk about the latest in his series of essays. The americans tony. Thanks for being here. It's great to be here this time around you write about joy williams for those who are not familiar with her work. Who is joy. Williams joy williams is an american novelist and short story writer. She's still alive. She's in her seventies. She started publishing in the nineteen seventies. Her first novel was state of grace and she had kind of a loyal cult following in a profile of for a few years ago in the new york times magazine dan choice referred to her as a writers writers writer. I was going to bring that up. Which i think is a great phrase because she has a very passionate for. If you look at paperback editions of books you see a collection of big names. Don delillo herald broad key james. Salter all crazing. Her one of the things i discovered and actually wrote about in this as as that. She's a very difficult writer to pigeonhole or to classify. And i came into this piece to doing the reading for its thinking of her one way based on the reading that i'd done some for earlier novels stories and ended up with a different idea of her. I started out thinking of her. As kind of a realist. Almost in the in the sort of raymond carver or and beatty vein very close grain finally detailed reticent realism and ended up thinking of her something almost completely different sort of a fabulous surrealist magical or which he kind of writer okay. I'm gonna ask you all kinds of questions that i think. You don't wanna be asked to try to pin her down. There's a lot in here. I want to actually go first back to that original freeze you used writers writer but actually we'll just simplify it to a writer's writer because i think that is the kind of phrase that people use that to people who are writers baby mean something but that is kind of mysterious to non writers. What do we mean when we use that phrase. I've never really understood the phrase or particularly. Oh my god. And i think what it means. Is that if you think that writers read differently from the rest of us and our maybe more attuned to certain matters of craft and technique that the rest of us rush over. Let's say you know this is a caricature but most people we read for the plot we read for the characters we read for the emotions and maybe writers are looking at something different. They're looking at the brush strokes so to speak at the sentences at the rhythm on the sentence sentence level and i'm not sure that's true but it is true that within any profession there are people you know it's true of standup comedians or actors or filmmakers that there are some who have a special kind of respect from their peers that may be disproportionate to their renown or popularity or fame or a claim out in the world joy williams has won and been nominated for all the major awards and she's very well reviewed in her books stay in print so she has certainly a loyal readership. That isn't just writers. But i think there's something special about her and i think it has to do with her resistance to classification in a way that she's she's writing sentences at stories and characters and plots that are so unusual and that seem to result from kind of total inventiveness. I feel like having read just about all of the fictional msci's published in the last few months. I could say that. I feel like there's a kind of attention to words and sentences and developments within the story and the plot that keep you on the edge of your seat and at the edge of your attention throughout there are writers where you can kind of let your mind wander a little bit and coast a little bit in the okay. I know this passage of description is going to tell me something about the house. This okay these people are having this conversation now and and you could sort of skate already. Can't do that in a joy store. You have to be paying attention every moment because the terms of the fiction what the characters are thinking and feeling how they're relating to each other what is going to happen in the language from one sentence to the next whether it's going to be sad or mysterious or funny is going to change so you just have to keep your eyes on the road at your hand on the wheel the whole time

Williams Joy Williams Don Delillo Williams Raymond Carver Salter Beatty Tony New York Times Scott DAN James Msci
Try the "Root Pruning" Method of Transplanting Trees

Your Gardening Questions

03:04 min | 3 d ago

Try the "Root Pruning" Method of Transplanting Trees

"Fall is a great time for transplant. And you want to talk a little bit about a process called root pruning yes mark in an ideal way to make a long story short one of my neighbors southern columbus that if a hillbilly in to discussion he said oh yes i can move dogwood anytime i want to. I said well good luck with that. He said well you you watch knowledge i do it. He went out in the fall right about now and went out in terms of a dog. Would he checked. He checked also the depth of the roots. He found out they routes were not very deep so he went out about two and a half feet all the way around the tree and literally plunged to sharp speed in the ground and cut the roots period. He would just go straight down the shovel out And on one tree he did he. He puts shovel in every other winds shovel. In the one tree smaller trees he'd be put the speed and the ground. All the way around did not even begin to lift trant plant at all. You just simply cut the roots at a time. Where the so still warm visa moot re-growth when he moved them in the spring. They didn't even know that. Then move because the roots have started to regenerate It's his what he calls. He'll ways proved again. Just a kid through college doesn't make everything order and then nurseries for a long time have used a tool that they can run down through the rows of young plants. That is Round blade that goes into the ground about eighteen inches down and sides andro right down the role of planet and literally root pruning those plants in mass. So sometimes the hands sometimes by tractor. But it's an ideal thing to do right about now soils enough moisture to the amenable to working and insulin grow and everybody can be happy that way and so. Is this something that you would. You would cut the roots now for a spring transplanting or rick. I'm mark i did. Maybe i didn't explain that. Yes it's cutting them now. He will leave it alone period until spring. Go back out. Because he's he's used some what the tongue oppressors. That showed the outline that he had chosen. He had a white ribbon in the tree that kind of designated as his and he was then dig it and move it in the springs long about bound early march whatever. The water was enough out of the soil. You could work with it and it was Really worked he was two for two in In what he wants to do. Plus proven to me the college kid the another way so yes thanks for asking because you do the route twenty now you actually lift and move the plant in the spring.

Trant Columbus Rick
Men’s Nail Polish Is Taking Off—Why Now?

The Beauty Brains

04:27 min | 4 d ago

Men’s Nail Polish Is Taking Off—Why Now?

"Is men's nail polish taking off the wall street journal just posted an article This past week and they've predicted that men's nail polishes taking off. And why now really. I've tried nail polish once. But i never. I've never thought to myself saying. Oh i you know. I i really need to put a nail polish. Yeah well they say. The trend is trickling down from celebrities. That are wearing nail polish. Of course men wearing nail polish is not new In the seventies many rockstars Wearing yale polish. As well. And i just you know i'm a little well. I'm not skeptical. I'm sure more and more men are wearing l. polish. I'm sure but i actually used to work for a men's makeup brand and we launched nail polish for men. Beautiful colors and people did wear them. People did buy them but sure to very very very small niche market. And i think no matter what's happening to sales. I think it's a little strong to say. Men's nail polish is taking off. Well i did a little. I did do a bit of a snarky comment on twitter about this. Said you know if they they. They sell a hundred bottles this year. They're going to improve it by thousand percent or something i'm sure they sell more than that And it has plenty of men who are going to like nail polish. I just don't personally think like it's it's really going to like. It's there's never going to be a time when men wear nail polishes much as women. No and i think. That's where i i feel like the articles. A little misleading. This isn't actually the first time. I've seen immense nail polish article are quite a bit a few of them and yes i think. Younger people are more open to wearing the l. polish for sure but when you look at the whole scope of the nail industry and how much revenue is generated from it male. Specific nail polishes still going to be a very small very small fraction of that. Yeah well it's very interesting. I you know. I just always see these articles about the men's cosmetics taking off and i've been seeing those the same articles since ninety five and you just never never seems to live up to the heights in the articles. Maybe i live long enough where that changes but boy i still don't i still don't see it. I suppose i just imagined. Most men have the same sort of Lasi faire attitude about cosmetics. As i have. And that's probably completely mistaken. Yeah it'll be interesting to see what market share actually gets taken from this trend will say i mean. I can't even myself to put on shaving cream. To shave. Just saw your. You won't be the polish consumer. I thank god. I mean mr cosmetic chemists certainly won't be but you know i don't even see my nephews wear so we'll see. Maybe maybe we're wrong. We've been wrong before. Not offense sometimes certainly about trends. Would you read this week. I stumbled on this article. Which is a review it was. It was published a survey published about ten years ago but it does not a subject that i'm interested in It's an old survey of toxicologists. Okay so just about ten years ago this survey of toxicologist who were members of the society of toxicology. I was just very surprised to learn that in this study of it was over. Like nine hundred toxicologists. Ten percent of the toxicologist said that they believe. Organic or natural products are inherently safer. I've never met a toxicologist that has not that. That's incredible i mean. Ten percent is pretty low. I mean so nine. Out of ten toxicologist say no. That's not true but there's really. There's that one toxic one out of ten toxicologists high. I i know exactly but you know it was even more was even more amazing to me. There was also a whopping twenty six percent who said they believed. Cosmetics pose a significant health risk.

The Wall Street Journal Yale Twitter Society Of Toxicology
"oh" Discussed on Oh Behave! Podcast

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03:20 min | Last month

"oh" Discussed on Oh Behave! Podcast

"They're not founded in science. They're not founded in US researching and discovering and and they're also not founded in humanity we need to be human. Before anything else I, I actually introduce myself recently to a group that started called a mindful behavior. It's being organized into a nonprofit and I'm starting a podcast called act natural that's relating to mindful behavior in and towards helping us connect with each other better and when I introduced myself and the reason I, was invited to this group is because I'm an autistic BC. Be. I'm an autistic behavior, and so I was invited because they wanted to make sure that there was some representation of both behaviors and on the autistic community I'm not one hundred percent resent a representative of the community but were introduced. Myself introduced myself saying Brian is human. Ryan is a human who happens to be autistic. Because first and foremost. And I WANNA connect with other humans now and I will connect with other humans humans the way they want to be connected with. because the golden rule is crap. At bear with me I may have offended somebody here the golden rules crap because it's not do unto others as you would have them, do unto you. It's due to others as they want to be done to. That's the platinum rule. To Do to others, they want to be done. What's essence of shaping? Here's. Exactly. And so that that's that's one of the reasons why somber will behavior resonate so well. In, my opinion and I feel like it's it's an idea that needs to be heard and explored and understood better and. Let's figure it out. Let's see how it how it relates to all these other ideas. Let's see how it connects and you know even if there was maybe a faulty assumption lost along the way which I'm not saying there is because I am by no means an expert. But even if there was a faulty assumption along the way, let's discover it and let's ease sound in reality as we communicate with each other and let's figure out a way to alter the paradigm because right now in September twenty twenty. Noxious verbal behavior is the default won't Guten is now like were so busy talking past each other and yelling at each other and and doing that that screeching that we do at each other that were missing the point. Is that where human is one of? Human Are you anyone who here you? Ought. To be able to feel what you're seeing hope. Yeah I. Hope So. I feel my heart. When you know, I, know this kind of like a new like number I equate refer to this. But I I have a friend in the Netherlands talks like that and I feel my heart speak with you and when I hear you say what you just said and I I feel really happy with you know also you know I have now. In just a reason days I've had a couple of really beautiful long conversations with people in also in this conversation and I want to let the listener..

US representative Guten Ryan Brian Netherlands
"oh" Discussed on Oh Behave! Podcast

Oh Behave! Podcast

04:37 min | Last month

"oh" Discussed on Oh Behave! Podcast

"Mean despite? Is the listener wait a second Is there a listener who listens? No is there a speaker who speaks no can speaker than beat the Listener No oh, wait a second that really that doesn't that the now you lowest you're losing me no, there is just speaking behavior and are listening behavior. And and when we begin to just hone in on that and have a conversation in which we can just stay with that fact that we're just talking and we're just listening and we begin to explore in some sort of yeah, you could say. Yeah we can say that this is a communication laboratory where we where we are the experimental subjects and we are experimenting ourselves as well as on each other we are affecting each other and we are affected by each other and so that affects is a positive effects where positive responded behaviors we have reading safe feeling comfortable feeling connected feeling understood validated all these things or negative responded behavior. Oh you feel overwhelmed you feel threatened you feel annoyed you feel like Kenda can this asshole not just stop talking I mean, that's what you think or you don't. You actually feel it and you think that you think and then you get carried away by by the fact that you that you think you're having thought because as far as I'm concerned and this is another. Know this is a separate topic, but I'm telling you. There is of course no thought. Yeah there's no thought inside our head. Okay. There's no thought. There's no concepts. No relational frames in our side there had there's only something that we say something that we right and then there's something that we read or there's something that we there's only overt speech no covert. Stuff going on there's only neurons firing in your brain and neurotransmitters. That's all. There's no picture in your brain anywhere old nonsense yet their constructs to try to explain something we're experiencing need construct are all in writing on paper in a book and you read it and you can see it and you're been conditioned to be able to understand that what we call understanding..

Kenda
"oh" Discussed on Oh Behave! Podcast

Oh Behave! Podcast

05:47 min | Last month

"oh" Discussed on Oh Behave! Podcast

"Avenue. Speaker Hill. A No. Blow you out of the water with their knowledge. anyways. So so now you'll have a little bit over understanding that this social engagement Ya, this social engagement that you're looking at, which is, which is the latest. Also development over of our drain you know in. Evolutionary history. Beings have existed without language and it is believed to the brain also develops in in in volume and in its capacity due to the yeah. You could say the arrival or the interaction with the environment where vocal chords game on the control of the. Of the environment and so the occurrence of language seems to have gone together with. The brain, which also begin to property your property to. All oldest oldest, the new CORTEX is the latest evolutionary part of rain and so. What political theory teaches us that social engagement cannot work if these defensive mechanisms are her operating so Also means turn around is social engagement down regulates these evolutionary tendencies to react into and to freeze, and so by talking, we can actually begin to co regulate each other, and that is really at the core of what sounded will behavior is sound. Fuel behavior is the speech in which speakers and listeners call regulate each other and noxious will be for simply as this speech in which we this regulate each other, and then there's this hierarchy which a Earth as consequence out of that, the social hierarchy that we have known. Which Dan is? Maintained by that way of talking and that's wider is noxious people behave in almost every place and very little son Frugal behavior although everybody knows about it we cannot really go there because, yeah, we haven't really fully on the status and fully acknowledged this but once we of course, have some people behavior are higher. He is going to change in the sense that we are going to have a different structure of society when we're going to just like you know if we were to be wall really scientific about things..

Dan
"oh" Discussed on Oh Behave! Podcast

Oh Behave! Podcast

05:22 min | Last month

"oh" Discussed on Oh Behave! Podcast

"Laps and they which is listened to themselves while they speak and they listen to each other while they listen to themselves and they would actually have to conversation about the stuff that they needed to talk about. In some people behavior. It wasn't enormous your boost for my You could save confidence or for Mike. Discovery. And independent coming to the United States start studying psychology learned, of course, more about know just clinical psychology and then as I learned about behaviors in a began to become. Oh, my goodness that was actually two thousand thirteen. Okay. Says not so long ago. That I realized like Oh. My God. It has nothing to do with what I do this. This behavior causing self does not exist. The environment stupid. Yeah and then I began to realize like so so you have always been busy with creating the contingency and exploring the environment in which we will behavior can and will happen. Yeah, and and so yeah that put everything sort of Indus in his scientific experiments nation and I've had many wonderful union you one of the few. Scientists Brian. I have another friend. WHO's names also Ryan Drivers Lynn. WHO has been willing to explore with me extensively in in in many conversations what sound for will be I mean are still not done Analyzing it. We're we're having weekly conference. Asia's individual conversations which go for hours just exploring what this is. And, and we're now also putting of course. Did Relational frame. Explanation on it derived relational responding. A. It's just beautiful how this has come about. Just, so you know. Depends on the Gong Walks verbal behavior. Okay. So you heard it. Okay. Is horrible I know it sounds horrible. I know when they do that it's just like do I really have to do that yes. Ideal. Extra garage you may say to okay. So what I have an extra grind so what? So what I let people know that? Yes, I have been endlessly rejected this and ridiculed. Or Art, and so what you have to acknowledge that? No, he was right. It means something it is important. We have not been able to capture this. There's no way to read or write your way into what this is. Need to talk. Able to have this unless we talk. It cannot be had. We haven't had it because we haven't. We haven't accepted yet the distinction that has to be made in the end up vocal verbal behavior. Yeah. Where are sound is eater sound will behavior or it is noxious fecal behavior in debt noxious rable behavior is a sound which has evolutionary significance to us because. Yeah you you may not believe is there is research Have you ever heard of Brubeck Kiki? Do you know what that is Buba Kiki? I want to show you hold on just a second. Hold on here we go. I it's just it's just a little Atalay little thing here I have. I want to show you two drawings. Okay. This this is this is a drawing from Buba. Kiki. Okay I'm definitely going to have to put the video for this..

Brubeck Kiki Ryan Drivers Lynn Buba United States Mike Asia Atalay
"oh" Discussed on Oh Behave! Podcast

Oh Behave! Podcast

03:08 min | Last month

"oh" Discussed on Oh Behave! Podcast

"Sound demanding you hear me. Is Horrible. It's not speech. Is You dominate the people? You boosting. Down their throat. Nobody likes that I don't like it nobody dust. So, take depends on the Gong. Go to this. This. And You Do you hear me. The year how horrible? I know I can tell that I know problem like that everybody can do it. Yeah. This is different. This sets the stage for an entirely different way of communicating, which we have yet to attend to, which we have yet to explore, which we have yet to be into acknowledge as something, which is the quintessential issue of our time. It's not about politics. It's not about your beliefs is not about your theory is not about. The epistemological barriers. Yeah, it's not about what was written it is about. How he's me how we sound while we speak. And once we begin to have the conversation in which these pens are off the going in which we are not fixating on the verbal. In which we're not struggling for each attention. In which we are not. Outward oriented but you know just relaxing and chilling out. And feeling like wow. So we can talk like this. Yes, we can. is where the real thing happens. Anyway, I discovered this goal. In my mid twenties I've been carrying his going with me for sins. And I developed this whole the I would say generic explanation of what I call at that time. Of. The language that creates space The language that creates face. And that also quoted listening while you speak. I gave many groups a experimented with this with people from all walks of life. In Holand is actually quite successful also as a seminar leader and I have given seminars on this issue. I mean if I look back Oh those devils in the in the year before I went to the United States in nineteen, ninety nine. So nine, hundred, Ninety, eight. I was very successful. I have lots and lots of different clients who came to meet earn about listening while you speak and I had lots and lots of different seminars all over the place even in the Dutch government. Where Dutch policy makers would sit with their books and papers on their..

Holand United States
"oh" Discussed on Oh Behave! Podcast

Oh Behave! Podcast

05:27 min | Last month

"oh" Discussed on Oh Behave! Podcast

"So when you would record your sound ruble behavior speech, you would actually really enjoy listening to your own recording, which is the opposite of what happens when you don't speak sounds we will be for because if you listen to your own noxious, we will be on a recording. You kind of go like a I. Don't want hear this guy. That I Know is that Oh, I'm already getting tired of hearing that. But Anyway I was I was adamant. I went to lock and unlock even though he's a weird guy he said, well, he says, okay, he says so I am supposed to not. Listen to myself? That what you're saying I said Yeah. Yeah But he was of course always making weird remark asking what kind of strange questions and saying, oh, kind of distracting things and so he would just endlessly say where things and I said no lock you gotta listen to yourself. Okay and he said, well, okay hold on a it you tell me to listen to myself how about you listening to yourself while you tell me to listen to myself. Anisette man you're right. I was not listening to myself. So I went back into my. Anna. So I was not listening to US I wanted him to listen to me. That I was not listening to myself. So I began to figure out like wow. So when I'm not listening to myself. This. Sound is not anymore there?.

"oh" Discussed on Oh Behave! Podcast

Oh Behave! Podcast

02:51 min | Last month

"oh" Discussed on Oh Behave! Podcast

"In it was really a moment in time. where? I. Realized, I couldn't do anymore with I. had been doing the four basically. And what happened here is I think especially if there's any Dutch people listening to me. It's especially. Significant for Dutch people to understand this for Dutch people to stop riding your bicycle. What? He's not writing your bicycle. Yes I started to slow down. Peddling my bicycle. And I really did not want to go and it said, no, I was just standing still next to the canal I was ready to throw my bicycle in the war. Said what now what you just standing here and you going nuts or something I said, no, I'm not going nuts. You just don't want to do this anymore. Okay. Okay. We'll look woolen then go back home then and and and take it from there. We'll. Mugabe comb. And I walk with my bicycle in my hand. I did not write my as I walked with my bicycle in my hand, which is highly unusual for me. I walked all the way back with my bicycle in my hand. And as I came to my close to my home, the bridge was open, which is kind of like a drawbridge and all levels will under was there was there was a whole line of cars waiting and two for ever for his bridge to close again and I was just standing there and waiting and it was Oh and was there was there was two of these big boats wherever they're slowly slowly going by you know and it was like and inaudible going by. Cutting. Actually jumping. into myself. What am I doing you? Know. You just wait until the richest closed again and then you go. Live right across from the bridge. and. Go home and I go to my house. and. I go. Lived in house, we rented an apartment actually missed two wonderful sweet older people she was an ex. Nun and she she actually stopped being none at some point. Reggie became a schoolteacher. Sweet All lady. Omni Franken Mola was her name on it by way his same name as my mother. An NFL frank..

Omni Franken Mola Reggie Mugabe NFL
"oh" Discussed on Oh Behave! Podcast

Oh Behave! Podcast

05:35 min | Last month

"oh" Discussed on Oh Behave! Podcast

"Ever had in my entire life, it was. It was just even though it was sad, it was a beautiful and. Phenomenal experience to be near his desk. With my wife's Chinese family. And unforgettable beautiful experience and I feel forever grateful that I have. Married With my Chinese life and that we are now hearing Chico that I studied psychology even though I withdrew from that PhD study after I was do from this study. I came back to Chico lift in the bay area in Italy's unaffordable to. Add enough to continue in. We had already so much time in ahead to Redo a practicum and I filled behind on my anticipation. Oh, kind of stuff happened but I was Dru with a masters of science and clinical. Psychology. And then once back in Chico, we kind of got back on our feet started working again and I became in two thousand thirteen became a psychology instructor at Byu College. where I teach every semester three classes in in clinical psychology principles of psychology social psychology or abnormal their various topics in psychology I can teach. Yeah and. and. All My students are enjoying my teaching I enjoy teaching. And, I enjoy affected I have not become a clinical psychology that actually became the teacher. The most important thing also is that while I was out of my graduate study. I discovered the of skinner and I discovered to behave for him. And realize like wow. So dismiss this this thing that I had been carrying. Wish me since my mid twenties actually because it was in my mid twenty S. That there was a circumstance in which. I. was having so many problems with so many people that I at some point just basically said. I just don't want this anymore. I don't WanNa talk with anybody I don't want to. Talk, in the way that people talk with me I just don't want that I just don't want that. It doesn't serve any purpose for me I want to be alone. Okay we'll have to, of course a decision. Biden what. On index isolation indepth sense of of. You you could say despair because it was also really having to do with me not feeling at all successful in me being. Searching for what I actually wanted. And also almost die forcing or You knew being crossed with my wife in splitting up..

Chico Biden skinner Dru Byu College. Italy instructor
"oh" Discussed on Oh Behave! Podcast

Oh Behave! Podcast

02:56 min | Last month

"oh" Discussed on Oh Behave! Podcast

"The topic of what we are talking about. Because we. Had, of course, many different arguments in fides just like any other couple. But. We came to a point where. It became clear. That either we really talk with each other or we don't. Even though I had, of course, my troublesome history. With my family, she did not I had many uncertainties she did not. In many ways, she was always kind of ahead of me. And I feel bad about that but at the same time. We were. Close, with each other kept on going with each other and I. Begin to. Say He'll if you WANNA call adapt. Begin to understand why history. And On when I immigrated to the United States in nineteen ninety. Nine. I went back to school and I studied psychology initially, of course, we're I went to college in hold on I was never a good student. I was kind of a very mediocre student with when I can't the United States I became. Very young motivated and responsible sued and got as, and I really wanted to do a dried. and. So I kept on studying and studying and was interested in psychology and. I went to graduate school in Bay area to Paolo Palo Alto University where I almost reached my PhD. In I was advanced to candidacy. But then mightier father in law my wife's Dad. died. After short sickbed he had brain cancer in. It was no way to save him in the. And and that you know was a moment in time where I was in my graduate study where I was doing my clinical. I had already advanced to candidacy was writing my dissertation I was writing my dissertation on attachment issues as related to unresolved loss, and here I was myself a person with yeah. You could say a trauma history. Who became an expert in that sense in my study in clinical psychology dealing with trauma clients and people was yes. If your mental health issues. And I was writing this dissertation about unresolved loss and here I was since thrown for a loop. Because who would have known that this? Sudden passing of my father in law, which by the way was D-. Most profound..

United States Paolo Palo Alto University brain cancer
"oh" Discussed on Oh No Ross and Carrie

Oh No Ross and Carrie

05:58 min | 3 months ago

"oh" Discussed on Oh No Ross and Carrie

"Woman exactly. Do not notice an unmarried man without kids longhair. True we hear a story about a woman named Ashley who quit law school. She was going to be like a pro life attorney and she realized Oh my God by being an attorney. I won't be able to be a fulltime mother. She realizes this like three quarters of the way through law school. Then Law School for Ashley Oh. One of my favorite stories that Kristen? is about how one time she succumbs to the popular standard of beauty and got hair extensions? Oh They're so hard to maintain. She has cut some out of her head God teaching her a lesson not to try to follow those ugly standards. Some really weird lessons. Kristen is also always been really ungrateful her nose she compares its shape to other people's noses wishes it was a little thinner than she said, this is one area I have to intentionally surrender to God, picture her like taking her nose, giving it to him. Gotcha News Page one, forty, we get Kristen's rules for married girls. One is to wait married girls Carlson. It'd be married well married young women. Okay I still call fellow women girl sorry. Is All right Virgin Mary girls sounds really weird. You know what? It's going to sound different when I say this. Because the definite article a letter to the married girls. Okay. Different right. Okay. Dot Helps. Okay. So she's never intentionally alone with one man in a room or car by themselves who? Right. She throws out her romance novels. 'cause they 'cause impurity discontent. Says don't ever compare your marriage to someone else's. Decent advice and don't compare your husband two other men. Though. It feels like everything in their teaching is about comparing your relationship to other relationships as drew your man two other men there's also always a limit to that Kim garrison can be healthy science is based on comparison but. They can go to an unhealthy place in relationships. Yep Yep on page one, seventy two. They have some specific biblical advice for women from Psalm. One one three. Oh right at the beginning of Psalms. And it specifically for women you ready. Blessed is the man Who Walks not in the council of the wicked nor stands in the way of centers nor sits in the seat of S- coffers. But his delight is in the law of the Lord and on his law he meditates day and night he is like a tree planted by streams of water that yields its fruit and season, and it's leaf does not wither. Assure that didn't apply to me at all as a man come in the next line from Bethany Kristen is. Even though the psalmist use the word man and male pronouns, these verses applied all Christians. So. Why say that? It's for women? And all that stuff that you just attributed to women and women alone. I can't I say even though. is a woman and she says good advice forever. Balance for a woman. Last but not least. My favorite quote from the whole book on page one fifty four quote ladies. We can't beat around the bush. Guess what Kristen Bethany? Yes, you can. You have made an entire career out of beating around the Bush. It's extraordinary. It's respectable on its own weird freaked freaked up way D- Get good on you. That would have been a good alternate title for the book beating around the Bush. I think I'm going to put my marked up copy of girl to find in Mazzi store if anybody wants women ever use that as a euphemism for masturbation. But I do remember when we were trying to vote Bush out of office people shaving off their pubic hair and then writing on their shirts note Bush and okay thousand four. I remember hearing a joke that the Clinton presidency was sex between the bushes cute. Let's talk. That's what a girl is. Well, thank you for defining. Well, actually never defined a girl but. Thank you for showing US their attempt to do so no prob good old kristen and Bethany if you want to have some more fun do a youtube search for girl defined. There's a wealth material out there riches and scarlet and Purple Purple. If you're the MOM scarlet if your family that'd be a good Halloween costume if you have a family. With more than three or more people. Like everyone tries all these guesses like Russian, each borough. We're. GonNa Villier plants know how we're proverbs thirty one. The distaff in my load. That's why my wife is carrying around this yard until see my husband back there in the city gates have. I know it's very cold. Read they're all wearing crimson. Please,.

Bethany Kristen Kristen Bethany Ashley Oh Carlson US Bush attorney Dot Kim garrison Mazzi pubic hair
"oh" Discussed on Oh No Ross and Carrie

Oh No Ross and Carrie

06:10 min | 4 months ago

"oh" Discussed on Oh No Ross and Carrie

"Five one hundred dollars, a month or more. You know it's whatever works for you. Dave and thank you dave. We appreciate it. Thank you so much Dave you're the best. And everyone else, so we'll be back stock about that more, but let's jump into our workshop. If you didn't hear last episode, you are going to want to go back one. Yeah, you'll be like. What is this Wim Hof? Method? Who or what is Wim Hof I'm so confused. What is this fundamentals workshop? You'll have no idea so definitely. Hear that contextual information and also welcome. Glad to have you here on the show episode. One was sort of an icebreaker. Oh. Nicely done isolate. sixty-nine. Sexual. That's funny, so yeah, we got there. We got our waiver signed. We got our yoga mat set up on the ground. The crowd kept growing over time, but I think it stabilized at around three participants. Yeah, we definitely filled up pretty much all the negative space in that room, but I'm comfortable fell. Yeah, that's true. We were close to each other, but enough room to breathe. A I get it so yeah. Somebody writes in later, says there, and there were twenty four participants, Ross and carrier full of Shit just notes, plus minus or they're a liar anyway. The first thing we would do is get some very energetic and sincere information from Michael. Christopher Oh go Christoph, awro, yeah, handsome man! Looks like Jason soukous a tall sharp features long hair that he's kind of tied up behind him with a very substantial beard. He's got kinda sharp beard and mostly black curly hair, but with a little bit of the grey bit of salt in that pepper, so he started telling us about disease. Yeah, we kicked off around twelve fifteen. That was game time. He said he'd had a slide projector. That was very hard to see because a room wasn't dark. Right, so we kinda struggled. Struggled to see from our vantage, point was right onto the wall to yeah exactly so he wasn't a distinct image. And at least there was a post in my way so I'm constantly kind of trying to go around and say what does that say sheer using the zoom feature on my phone? We were sitting not next to each other, which is rare. And I was sitting at just the right angle. Where right above your head said Ross fit. A really cool mural on the wall. We took pictures of me in the raw it afterward. Yeah, so straight up. Let's talk about disease. We've all dealt with. It was all had disease affect our lives? Like which percentage of disease would you say? As chronic inflammation involves inflammation, I would say eighty eighty percent involves inflammation very precise by that I. do mean physical, mental and spiritual. Yes, he grew over time I think the first time Michael said eighty percent of disease is inflammation. That was the statement and. And then later on it became eighty percent of chronic disease, and then later on it became eighty percent of disease, mental and physical, and then spiritual got worked into this somehow so eighty percent spiritual disease, and sometimes he'd use. The word involves, which is very different, other than just the word is that van diagrams a little more of a closer overlap when you say. This disease is influenced, makes it sound like the inflammations causing the disease which could be the case to involve where it's just a component right? Because I mean. Presumably, we got inflammation. We evolved exit was useful in some way. Yeah, so, is this the cause or is this the treatment? I don't know speaking of which we're going to be mentioning a lot of claims and some kind of directly address, but just put it out there, we'll. We'll have more time after we tell the main story of this workshop to SORTA. unpack some of these ideas. Don't take this all at face value just not along for a little bit. So what's cool about the Wim Hof breathing method is that you're going to get more oxygen throughout your cells sounds good, cool speaking of inflammation causing disease. I sent this to my sister, Jeanette, who is a doctor in Fresno General Practitioner and asked. What. Do you think of this eighty percent of diseases inflammation and I'd ever kind of the permutations and ask for her reaction, and she said this is very Dr -ly but I think that in some contexts one might be able to contrive away to explain disease by inflammation and psychological mindsets, especially in the way that anxiety and depression can affect our health including levels of stress hormones, cortisol our. Our Immune response in our ability to make good decisions, affecting our chronic conditions, but I would not say there is a strong body of evidence pointing to a particular percentage, actually in my usual setting a primary care I would guess that over ninety percent of the ailments of life are connected to our mental health in some way, because we are integrated whole people and gave the example of the. The diabetic feels hopeless chooses not to take their insulin, and is now facing an amputation or heart, attack or blindness or the young person who was anxious to fit in started smoking. She was giving him. Sort of you know. Here's a stir up trying to get into this sort of mental health being connected to your overall health, but what to do with inflammation I. Think she she the inflammation. Inflammation thing saying that there's no particular percentage that sounds like it came out of nowhere, but then I think because he'd included the phrase eighty percent of disease both mental and physical. She was trying to say okay well. Here's here's how we could kind of connect to that idea of mental health, being town are bodily health. Wow, okay, who very kind fair to pull him out of the is. Exactly so I WANNA go around quoting eighty percent figure. Did you know that you only use ten percent of your brain? That is yeah..

Wim Hof Dave Michael Jason soukous Ross Christopher Oh cortisol Fresno General Practitioner Jeanette Christoph
"oh" Discussed on Oh No Ross and Carrie

Oh No Ross and Carrie

02:48 min | 4 months ago

"oh" Discussed on Oh No Ross and Carrie

"Workshop I did that I forgot to do that. Okay Very I. I was really batting a thousand when I showed up his shop, but we'll get there all right This may be overwhelming at first, but just try to relax focus on your breath and bring it into a controlled steady rhythm, and then they give those little warnings about out of precaution we recommend against people who are pregnant epileptic, or have cardiovascular or any other serious health conditions or any other serious health conditions. Check with your doctor. And so many people sure and said all the people. Well I think this will come up as the. You've mentioned this before that. Wim himself will kind of he'll go off until say a lot of wind things. And then he's got people who are good at sort of Oh. Let's take this. That's kind of responsible on. Okay. We want those and so there's a little bit of yeah lots. by Wim half the actually. By his organization and there will be editing. Watch an interview of him with a random podcast. Her and you can hear his actual hop there you go. Yeah, we're will very quickly get metaphysical well. We'll get into all that Then once you've signed up. Then there is. There's an email that sent out from the instructor. Michael Christopher Oh and he writes about how excited he is, and he kind of goes over. What will be doing, so we'll talk about all that, but also there's a liability waiver of course that. That you are supposed to sign and bring to class that says nothing at all is wrong with me ever and if something's wrong with me, it's my fault. That's pretty much it. It's four pages though the first pages the sparks. It's mainly just the title. There's agreement to follow directions assumption of the risks acknowledgement of the various physical risks involved. Yeah, what does it say death it does I assume the risk of and responsibility for any injury, death or property damage resulting from my participation in the activity under the release? Of premises used conducting event for any and all injury, disability, death, or loss or damage to person or property, arising out of my presence. Elsewhere under assumption of risks, it says. That severe injuries, including permanent paralysis or death can occur in sports or activities, involving height or motion Jesus activities, including, but not limited to breath work meditation training routines with Ice Slash code slash heat, physical exercises, pertaining, but not limited to a yoga swimming, running climbing and hiking, and may be caused by terrain facilities temperature, extreme, cold ice baths, weather conditions. It keeps going so so. So. Yeah, you're signing all this away. Just saying I did all this and yeah. That always really frustrates me because we all hear the voice in the room, much louder than the voice on the page,.

Wim Michael Christopher Oh instructor
"oh" Discussed on Oh No Ross and Carrie

Oh No Ross and Carrie

03:39 min | 2 years ago

"oh" Discussed on Oh No Ross and Carrie

"Astral exchange notes and they were talking ben successful for him yeah and they were talking about doing meet ups a centrally like you find other people who are trying this oh let's all meet up here at the little tile ceiling room will hang out for a while and then we can compare notes tomorrow said that like he's confirmed it before but the stories were pretty vague it was like yeah i told my mom and then she remembered like oh yeah i did have a dream oh yeah yeah it sounded like borderline false recovered memory which are easy to imprint member the time we were in the hot air balloon yeah i remember oh yeah he also said that out about experiences can catch you up on sleep so he said if he gets four hours of sleep five minutes of out of body experience villes caught up on sleep then later he said it's very tiring though oh really oh funny that's confusing one thing that i think everyone can relate to as he said that feeling of falling and jerking awake that's you having just a very brief out about a experience and then getting called back into the body or the your sleep paralysis fading out but yeah sure let's go with that one yeah one of those i do that all the time oh my god meets like mine is i'll be running somewhere and then i wake up and like my leg will kick out enemy and i'm sure it annoys my wife to no end kicking her yeah i did at one time with with my fist i was like punching someone on my fish shot out right over her face and she woke up and she looked over at me with like is white and like this is like right knows and as i'm sorry sorry noca dove it thank leads usually just my leg speaking of sleep walking and sleep talking and sleep paralysis and so on i had a dog with a sleep disorder are different to me r i p really he had like canine sleepwalking disorder basically yeah so he would holland asleep he would like sort of try to run but stumble and asleep airtime and i use favorite loosely when he sleep peed on my pillow next to my face oh but he woke up while doing it and i've never seen a dog more humiliated he like like look up and looked out it was like slinked off all sad yeah now i'm picturing cinderella because the dog he's busy like dreaming running after lucifer z's all happily like moving his legs they do that i never thought of that interesting i also like intra cranial sounds i think we've all had those where like you're about to fall asleep here in the hidden gojic state and you just start to hear sounds that you know aren't there they're not like vibrating ear i'm getting okay have you had hip negotia loosens not really no i'm totally bummed about oh wow okay because in this session we did exercise where i told you i was in the him to go state for a full like almost half an hour i was i was seeing lots of stuff and hearing lots of stuff but that's joe's i'm really surprised i thought that was very common but yeah i'll like i can just out here people talking to me i'll hear whole coversations when we were doing that exercise i saw a family setting an italian table like one of those talion tablecloths and they were like makings inner and i could hear them talking and everything yeah okay my wife had she's hallucinated.

five minutes four hours
"oh" Discussed on Why Oh Why

Why Oh Why

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"oh" Discussed on Why Oh Why

"And we're back with kristen connor and carolina urban host of unladylike podcast about what happens when women break the rules like me i'm always breaking the rules don't tell anyone that i will get in trouble since they're experts at researching the history and sociology of the way gender and sexism works its way into our lives we had them do a little digging into personal finance education but first we're going to hear a little bit about their own financial literacy oh we have such different personal finance backgrounds and yet they both result in a lot of fear to the same place of sheer panic so this is kristen so i grew up in a house with a lot of financial instability and my mom was a breadwinner because my dad didn't have a job a lot of the time and i just clung to the side dea really early in life looking around seeing like how hard it was on my parents to be trying to make it work and have kids and also just like have zero money and it just became my goal just to make a nuff to be comfortable like i've never wanted to be rich necessarily but the idea of the struggle that they had really terrified me and this is caroline so money was not discussed in my household i grew up very comfortable my dad was a pilot and made great money but we just never talked about it i never had any idea of how much money we had but yeah no i everything that i know about finances which is not much came from my father he really like beat into my head the idea of saving he used the envelope system i don't know if you're familiar with that no what is it was something that he picked up from his father so basically like you get paid like let's say you get paid you know twice a month and you take out in cash every month the amount that you have budgeted for yourself for things like food gas and entertainment and once that cash was gone you were done spending for those things and he tried to impart that to me but honestly it did not stick yeah i mean so okay so you guys then you you started a business together and you got a financial advisor so did it help did you learn anything.

kristen connor carolina caroline advisor
"oh" Discussed on Oh No Ross and Carrie

Oh No Ross and Carrie

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"oh" Discussed on Oh No Ross and Carrie

"Yeah talked about oh good all right we get some these images to look at that his friend sent over for him so we had them on his phone and you share them with us and we're pulling them up and trying to expand them so the one in his room was from the far side of the bed facing toward the door the entrance door and window at i carry looked at this and she said a wow that's very signif efficient light yeah because i thought that's what he was trying to capture us this one like beam of light in the center okay yeah i see that's that's reasonable that's a flashlight from another investigator this is it and to the left of the image right over the bed post you can see this ghosted orb yet i really want to see it or lens it's subtle it is so subtle subtle that when you pointed you you pointed to it and said no no no he means this i looked at him like look at rossier if things that you think that this is a ghost and he's like yeah that take oh okay so we said okay well here we go let's try to recreate this and so we had an infrared cameras so i brought that over and tried to get in the exact same spot angle upward had chris hold the light the infrared flashlight in the same exact spot okay little to the right little farther away up okay good.

investigator chris
"oh" Discussed on Oh No Ross and Carrie

Oh No Ross and Carrie

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"oh" Discussed on Oh No Ross and Carrie

"Yeah okay so i love i we talked about 'em scott pex the road less traveled he said all you need to read is the chapter on love it explains that we confuse love with the feeling of being in love okay all right for that one before then we all argued about whether to put the toilet paper roll coming out over or under the role oh i think you and i differ on so i'm definitely in the minority in general mima comes out on top under just asking for trouble but you know what i don't have i don't have strong opinions about did you consider naming your son under it's very close to andrew he could have unders game no i did not i didn't consider that okay fair enough we once did have a long discussion about under verses over in a podcast and we cut it out because we save you listeners from many diversions people are going to be like oh yeah we learned that the end of the honeymoon is when real loving begins honeymoon period is just a biological trick but when you when you're finally through that initial courting phase that's when you really like start to have trials together really earn your love for love is not a feeling it is an act it's placing yourself outside your comfort zone for the spiritual growth of another sorry membranous catching up on that love is not a feeling it's an act it's placing yourself outside your comfort as a verb is what he's saying.

mima andrew