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This Week in Startups Australia hosted by Mark Pesce | Season 9 Episode 1 with Jason Calacanis

This Week in Startups

48:56 min | 5 d ago

This Week in Startups Australia hosted by Mark Pesce | Season 9 Episode 1 with Jason Calacanis

"Hey everybody one of the great choice of my life is the friendships. I've built During my career in technology and startups and entrepreneurship and one of my great friends. Mark petchey down in australia. He moved from the united states and been down there for decades and in twenty fourteen. He started doing this week in startups australia. We are now in season nine. And it's about to hit its hundred episodes so congrats my good friend mark. Petchey this season's theme is the sweet smell of success. And it focuses on the rapid acceleration of tech adoption in twenty twenty and continuing that trend in the post pandemic world. We decided we would cross post as first episodes. Maybe will make better tradition in the future into the normal twist feed because the guests that marker getting are just amazing and in his first episode. It's me so you get to hear me. A mark chop it up. Chew the fat and talk about life after the pandemic so go ahead and search if you wanna hear more for mark in this week in startups australia just go in search for twister. Tws or this week in startups australia on all the major pod casting platforms and you can go to the website. Twa startups a u. s. dot com that's twa startups. A us dot com. That's their website for the swing serbs or stralia and please follow my friend mark. Petchey on twitter. He's m. p. c. one of the most thoughtful interesting intelligent good people i've ever met in my life levy mark and thanks for doing the show and i wanna take a moment to thank the sponsors of season nine of this week in startups australia. Odu squarespace in user testing going down under and getting all those startups in founders supported in australia. I do really appreciate that. And who knows. Maybe we'll have this week in startups. I don't know japan. Or maybe in the e u or the nordics. Maybe there's somebody out there who wants to do in in africa or south america. If you're a technologist you've been added for a decade or something you got some level of credibility inability to host a decent discussion. Maybe we'll have you this week in startups in your region. It's always been my plan. Maybe in the second decade to have a couple of regional shows and we've done such a great job. Or i should say mark has done such a great job with this week can startups australia. Maybe it's time to launch a third this week in startups. So you know where to reach me. Jason at calcutta's dot com all right. Let's listen to this episode today. This is mark petchey and welcome to series nine of this week in startups australia. This year we will be back weekly for twenty episodes all asking the same question. What is it that makes a startup successful. Is it a great idea. Is it a great team. Great customers or something else altogether. This is an important question for all startups of fundamental question on this series. We're looking for answers will talk to people who have been successful and ask them how it happened will lock to startups on the road to success. And ask them how they plan to get there and in this first episode of series nine will talk to legendary startup investor. Jason calcat about what he looks for in a startup. that's bound for success. The fast track for success starts with this episode of this week in startups australia this week in startups astray is sponsored by user testing experience. What your customer experiences with us or testing request your free trial user testing dot com slash twister and. Get the fast human insights. You need to make more informed business decisions at scale. This week and stops astray is also sponsored by squarespace from websites and online stores to marketing tools and analytics. Squarespace is the all in one platform to build a beautiful online presence and run your business go to squarespace dot com slash twister for free trial twister is also sponsored by odu a fully customizable and fully integrated suite of business apps. That let you build and scale your stack as you build and scale your business. Go to odu. Dot com slash twister to check it out twist his production partner for series nine is ut startups whether equipping a new breed of startup founders by inspiring students to launch their own venture and build the foundation for a successful career to learn more but utsa startups program go to startups dot. Utsa dot edu not a you for the last four seasons on this week in startups astray. It has been our great pleasure to each series with the patron. Saint of this podcast. Jason kellyanne is the angel investor. Par excellence founder of this week in startups the probably the most popular startup podcast on the planet and once again jason. Welcome back to twist. I miss you. I miss you my friend. I miss australia. And when this pandemic's over. I will be swinging down under and see everybody in sydney melbourne and perth. And i can't wait to get back on a flight when we talked a year ago. We were all locked down everywhere and no one quite knew what was going to happen. Next now that we're starting to see particularly silicon valley start startup. Land emerging from the pandemic. What does the landscape look like. How did things shift during the pandemic in a permanent way. I mean yeah. I mean the most. The biggest change which i had fought in underestimated was the work from home revolution. In america we had a couple of the pockets of innovation there. You had thirty seven signals which makes base camp you had wordpress mullen wag and intercom and a handful of companies. That i would say. We're quixotic weird or boutique Obviously you know. A billion a multibillion dollar company. Like wordpress is not boutique but it was generally considered like this weird thing over here. Well when one hundred percent of people are forced to get a setup with proper microphone and lighting light ring and you know put their net cable in for the first time to their computer and they didn't even know they had an ethernet port or an ethernet hub in their house but they ran that fifty four cable to make zoom work properly Once that happened we saw actually that work from home. Technology does work in managing people remotely does work if one hundred percent of people buy into it. So it's almost like a prisoner's dilemma. Where if you work from home employees you would be a second class citizen in most companies. Because you'd have some conference or people go for a walk. They make business decisions. And you weren't involved in it. Because you were in boise idaho now when you get ours. Zoom the ceo gets a little square box next to them is the lowest ranking person and everybody in between so it's created this level playing field then and this is where it gets even a little bit. It gets a little bit marauding. But i do think some ceos looked at this and said wait a second if we can hire people anywhere. The thirty forty percent premium we pay in silicon valley means we can get a third employee for every two and we can lower salaries thirty percent. Oh end we're spending this much on. Sue facilities and space is our number three line item number two. We can reduce that fifty percent. Oh and now there's nowhere left to hide and that's the final piece which if you are not producing or you are producing work in a work from home environment. A remote work environment. Proper management is forced to do their job which is not evaluate people on their culture quotient. Or how good. They are at meetings or water cooler or other performative stuff you then have to look at. What was the work that was done. She don't get no points for bringing in donuts or making everybody laugh in the cafeteria or whatever. All that stuff is gone. It's just what did you get done. And when you take out commuting which is two or three hours a day here in the states we saw. I think a bargain happen. A grand bargain. Which is you get to work however you want wherever you want. We're going to take those two or three hours and you keep one we get one and people are working more startups. i see. there's not like this delineation. So that's something that's going to have to be corrected for. I think when officials stop working. If i'm working in my pajamas and wonder why start. People are opening laptops up in bed and working and take a shower every other day. But it is gonna come back and then that's where it's going to. I think it's super interesting. Is what happens when netflix's comes back or berg comes back And there's a locus of power and eighty percent of people are not part of the star chamber of where the decisions are made so. I'm really fascinated to see how it works out. But it's it's good for employees great companies and it's going to be great for efficiency going forward. We're all much more efficient and we got through this together. And i think it's gonna make a stronger for it. What happens and and people are asking me this. So they ascii. What's going to happen to commercial real estate as a result of this all my god. Yes i mean it's it's gonna be dire depending on the city in the in the bay area. Somebody did it like this. Is the amount of open space. We have did it. Represented by the salesforce tower which is our largest our here and it was like we have. I don't know if it was six or seven. We have like six seven eight celsius hours worth of space and then in addition to that you had pinterest pay close to one hundred million dollars to cancel their headquarters and so i think what's going to happen is there. People are going to start giving up space. Think twitter already has been quietly giving up space as a rumor. Uber's going to give up some space and as we go down that road. It's obvious that transforming that retail space or the commercial space into lofts for people can live because we have a housing crisis in the united states would be a smart move. So i think if these cities don't rebound and they have too much office space. I think we'll see some people start this conversion process so they don't have all these empty buildings are now. Let's turn this around. Are you starting to see startups. Did you see startups emerged during the pandemic and if so were they purely virtual enterprise where there was no office. Yes yeah yeah. I mean most startups do know office anyway. Or like a we workspace and you know so. That is par for the course. I think maybe it's fifty fifty. But yeah and and i never thought the reason. I moved to san francisco from los angeles. I can't delete preferred terms of lifestyle. Was because i wanted to be the number one angel investor in history and i thought well deal. Flow is their founders. Wanna go there so then we move the accelerator in march. We cancel the in person accelerator in the middle of you know week six of twelve weeks and we rise. Oh this isn't going back to we just pause. The accelerator said well screw it. Let's try and see if we can do a virtual accelerator. So i said okay. Let's provide more value emitted sixteen weeks and mark. We had three times as many qualified people apply because they could because they could. They don't have to travel so if you were in australia. And you wanted to come to the accelerator. We made people move here for inserted. Why and so that means half the people would just say no and say yes and even the united states. We had people commuting from new york. Sometimes families get it gets a little bit hard but people found it worth it. I've done more. Investing in the past year during the pandemic than ever and the quality of the companies is going up and they're more efficient and more focused so a very interesting thing happened. We would have a very relationship building The ethical you know dramatic presentation of your deck and we'd all get together in a conference room and half coffees and law as and kind bars and you know all kinds of pete's coffee pulled in for six dollars pour over and we'd sit there and you know it's a two hour affair and then we realize oh there's no way we're investing in this in five minutes or ten minutes and then we're like okay. We gotta go into diligence and the diligence a disaster. Now what happens is nobody wants to be on zoom. You know for more than twenty minutes for a meeting so everything comes to you in a nice as an investor. A nice easy package. Here's what we're raising. Here's our term sheet you know. Here's our metrics and we do all the diligence. I take a quick meeting and then after we made the decision to invest. Like you know what. It'd be interesting if we met you in person and went for dinner. Went for a walk and so i of the fifty or sixty companies. I invested in the past year during the pandemic. I've never met them. I've never met them in person. And you know what great companies that. Maybe these people are going to be weird and they would have failed. The in person test knows. But you know i think it takes a little bit of bias out for the people who are just really performative in great at pitching who are six feet tall and you know have perfect hair. This i'm don't take this personal mark. Of course you're tall looking at the great hair. But i'm saying like that. Does we do have bias. And it does impact people. We see that like people who are taller. we'll get funded right. People were taller will get elected easier. So the this kind of bias is being sucked out of the system and it's becoming more of america crecy which is always good. Can we see the birth of startup that takes advantage of globally accessible talent in a way that it hasn't before. Yeah i mean. I think for people who are smart. It's it's going to become the differentiator and the secret weapon for companies. You're going to be able to fill a position in ten to twenty percent of the time because getting people to move to a city to take. The job was getting harder and harder up. your family. Operate yourself arment pale those costs and then what i think's happened is the most talented people are going to basically say. I want the lifestyle of the ceo or the general partner at that venture firm which is to say see. Ios of huge companies are like. Yeah i'm i spend the summer in the hamptons. I spend a month of the winter in miami. And i'm an aspen for skiing in that i'm in new york for eight months ev. The next two levels down are getting that same treatment. Which is. I'll call the ceo treatment where you get to find this and then if you embrace that you'll have less employees doing more happier employees more efficient employees with the lower lower the risk. Lower the time to hire somebody and it's just going to be a massive competitive advantage. I think and so everybody's getting in on it. I opened a canadian company and canadian bank accounts and and all the stuff because we're hiring so many canadians. A lot of talent you know was not able to come to the united states so for the last four years yet. All this talent go to the university system in canada or just moved there and kind of wait in a holding pattern. So i was like all right. Screw it just set up a company up there so we set up a company now. I've got a dozen employees in canada which is great for exchange rate But it's also great because we can be a premier employer in canada whereas in the valley where you know solid but we're up against sequoia and why c. and other places as places to go work so that's like they think the really interesting thing is you know you could be facebook or google or an uber and airbnb employees anywhere And that's just going to be amazing So yeah it's it's a brave new world. I think online events are here to stay just in terms of what you and i do. I find that people really like these and they show up for them and the going to your boss and saying i need to go to hong kong for twenty thousand dollars know we got a couple of clients there. I'm going to check in on is hard to justify that these days of two weeks out of the office is gonna be worth right. We always have that debate. Is it worth gong. Okay well that client spent a quarter million dollars. That one spends a million dollars. Yeah we should go now. It's like let's just send him a box of chocolates and we'll do a zoom meeting like this probably unnecessary. So i do think travel for business is going to be a a big loser and all this but travel for fun enjoy and for people who live more nomadic. Lifestyles is going to make up for it right so it probably be a wash. We're talking to jason kellyanne. You're listening to this week starts astray we will be right back twister would like to welcome series nine sponsor user testing. Are you launching a new product. Developing a new prototype rolling out a new campaign user testing. Lets you see here and talk to your customers to understand how they experience your brand your product and your services. Put yourself in your customer's shoes with real time. Video feedback from user testing. The user testing human insight platform allows you to target your exact audience. Ask them any question or give them a task to perform. It's a tech platform that connects brands with their target audiences to get feedback on any experience test. Twos can get paid ten dollars for their time and these users aren't doing that to get rich. They're doing it because they really want to help. Make your products and services better watch. Listen and observe their reaction so you can connect the dots and keep improving. You'll get feedback. Within hours and strengthen your relationship with your customers request free trial at user testing dot com slash twister and. Get the fast human insights you need to make more informed business decisions at scale third and we're back on the series opener of this week in startups astray with the patron. Saint of this podcast. Jason canas jason. I think a little bit about the mean theme for series nine. What we're trying to do is we're trying to understand. What are the qualities. The attributes the skills the kit that has startup needs to be successful. You have seen a lot of startups if you can sort of filter against everything you've seen. What is it that defines the key attributes for success in a startup. Been thinking about this a lot during the pandemic. And i started working on my next book which i then kind of expanded him thinking about a wider lens of it. Just talking about this. And what. I've come down to is the flywheel for me is a great product that delights customers that allows you to make enough money to have great employees who then studied those customers and make the product better and so there really are at the end of the day three things that happened in our industry number one. You make a great product. Who does that the team. So the team makes great product and that product hits reality and reality is customers and you have to study the customers both their data and anecdotally through interviews and what we found is the companies that are innovating and listening to their customers early and engaging customers early to phenomenal and the ones who build huge you know mansions to product development. But who never talked to customers if this is what they want in a home. They've never gone to somebody's home and then they start making weird stuff. You ever see some weird mansion that got made and you're like who is this four and it's like just the architect of this way and then other times are like yeah. We need a bigger closet. And yeah it'd be great to have more classes at center. Be great to have a bigger bathroom. Maybe two things like it kind of like if you if you're studying your customers and you listen to them you're gonna make a better home for them a better product a better mouse trap. So there's a lot of people get very good at raising money and are very charismatic pitchers. And then i've just learned to just put all that aside and say. Tell me about your customers and when you ask the founder about the customers some of them you really know. They know their customers and they talked to them and other. You're like yeah. I'm not sure i'd have to check that out. Maybe we should do a survey and you're like okay. You don't have a survey built into this in the customers and their opinions and their usage of the product is completely abstracted away from the management team. It's a bad sign. So if you are ultra focus on your customers and really building a great product and you have that ability to build a beautiful design beautiful you x and thinks tend to work out really well in my experience so i really liked the idea that you've identified with essentially a positive feedback loop where you have good enough product which is then providing good enough revenue to provide for good enough employees to make the good enough product better with better revenue for better employees. So that you get this real virtuous cycle going so that sounds like something that is easy to look at a business and say do we have that do we. Not how far are we from that. Yeah there are some exceptions. I mean. listen. If you're making a medical device to put into people's hearts like you don't really get to make an mvp. It's gotta be perfect from the beginning or an aeroplane you know. There are certain things where it doesn't apply but when it comes to software apps sas products marketplace's all of these things you know take weeks to build days to weeks to build an mvp and customers can start using them giving feedback immediately and we have in some valley master in venture capital as much as it's easy to deride to look at the losers and the and the money being burned you can look at it and be very cynical. What i've learned. Is that become less cynical. Since i went from one side of the table to the other. But i realized is a beautiful madness to this. Which is it's a milestone investment. It's a milestone system you get into an accelerator. You get some friends and family. Then you get some seed funds and high net worth angels. Then you may get seed funds a series a venture capital firm than you get later stage funds and then maybe you go public with back or a direct listening or whatever but we. We don't just say here's one hundred million dollars we kinda give you the three hundred thousand the one point five the five he hit those milestones and you become a good steward of capital and then we give you more and you're in a competition in each one of those stages versus the other people looking to get that capital and i i hate to trigger anybody but it is kinda zero-sum while there is an unlimited amount of capital in the world there is a limited number of hours in the day and basically emails that can respond to earn angel can respond to or an accelerator can host and that becomes the gaining factor. And so once they get to twenty investments of vc tan or twenty somewhere in that range you have to pause and stop investing and so you are in fact in competition for those dollars and you should treat it as such. We have to perform but talking to my friends who are general partners in funds. The thing that they are more than anything else is time for right. They have the startup that they are deeply involved in in their deeply. Involved in making sure that those startups succeed. Yes they're always looking for the next deal. But in order to i guess pop up above the noise level you do have to be exceptional enough or have exceptionally good luck. And it's so you're absolutely right when you talk about that zero sum. It's not it's not cruel fate. It's really just that human beings are coming delimited and that censure capital has not in the same degree learned how to automate and scale itself the way ending. Businesses funds dealers. and also. You know. It's a hit based business so like anything else. There's a limit to what consumers can manage. How many apps did you download and say. Wow this is wonderful beautiful and then forget you had them on your phone until you go to use it again in an apple took off your phone. Let me re download it for like. Has it been that long. So it is one of these things where there's attention is the factor And you can gain more attention by simply hitting ten percent month over month growth and it's really when you get two hundred fifty investments and you've seen the movie over and over and over again. It's i kind of feel like. I'm a studio head in your second decade. And i'm like this is not going to connect with audiences or i'm like this is going to be a blockbuster. It's worth the rest. Collect spend more money on it. And it's very clear when you had that product velocity early when you make great product early you are gonna make great product later. And you're to be innovative later. I today. I sat in on a hackathon for com dot com the meditation app and i started off saying you know. Alex is just such a tremendous product. give he did the million dollar homepage and dekom that you're very lucky to work for him. Because he's pound for pound one of the ten best product folks in the industry today. And then i watch these Then i watched all of these projects. I said i wanted to folks candidly like i would. I would. angel invest in every one of these projects are so good and if the person at the top is greater product everybody's greater product. The person at the top is driven everybody else's driven you cannot work for a hard-driving person and not be hard-driving. It just doesn't work and you can't be cut throat and hard-driving in a company that is run in a very introverted. Slow way you know Or in a very quiet way right because that'd be like who is this guy making all this noise so it's a wonderful time to be a founder. We did the all impacts this morning and we talked about the future venture capital and it is changing dramatically traumatically because there are so many funding sources. You know the syndicates that i run with the credit investors and. I don't know if you saw. We have something equity crowdfunding gear reg. Cf they call it and we up the limit from one million to five million which then actually makes it worth going through all the audits and everything to do it and that anybody even you know non sophisticated use of fisted down under at for credit. Yes network yeah so now you can have non sophisticated investors investing one hundred five hundred fifty dollars. Whatever you want and so. It's going to be amazing. The next decade. i think this is the roaring twenties. Like we've never seen and i'm super opted. I don't know you optimistic after this pandemic well. We're optimistic than you are. When we came in the we already know what goldman said the. Us economy is gonna grow eight percent this year. So it's going to have the most gross levels since fifty three right so while so much longer than either of our lives. We know that the australian economy which has basically chugged along. Because we didn't have to shut down in the same way right. We're already back to basically the same employment levels that we had pre pandemic we're expecting sort of three to four percent growth this year which were astray is easing sane. So yeah there's gonna be a bit of a roar. But i really want to draw back to because no one was saying before pandemic right. So there's a number of different vehicles. Could you take our listeners. Because we don't we kind of don't have specs here yet. We kind of do through this. Sort of backward listing in the asx take us through his spac. Yeah so it means special purpose acquisition corporation. Somebody who's famous like trauma or somebody. Who is the ceo of car company. Let's say they put their name on this. They pay somewhere between five and ten million to set up a public shell company essentially they go to investors and say. I'm smart i'm connected. We're going to go find a company and by will you give us three hundred million dollars at ten dollars a share and we will take these and then If you like what we by. Then keep your money in the back and it becomes a public entity if you don't like it you there's a period where you can redeem it so this three hundred million dollars you know Just sits there and then the stack sponsor is what they call sponsor which would be like being the general partner in my case syndicate lead there. The person shepherding it so the sponsor then find right to deal memo shares it with the world and they hope that those people who have the money and don't say i don't like it i'm taking it back and then you are suddenly public and you have a bunch of money in your pocket and it's theoretically faster And so what happened was this was something that was kind of like. I wouldn't say fugazy but it was considered like the poor man's way to do it right. It wasn't a proper. Ipo were goldman sachs. Or whatever bear stearns e. r. j. p. morgan took you out and You know but It's quicker and easier and then someone like jemaah brought it back and said i'm just gonna do one of these every two weeks i'm going to do ipo a. Through z. here we go and then for retail investors that's where it gets challenging. Is it a cruel thing to take a startup and suddenly turned into a public corporation because the way that a business is run as a public corporation internally and externally is quite different when it goes public. I think these sponsors really have to think that through is can this company and the management team handle being a public company and then retail investors. Which is where. I'm a little concerned. And i've been talking about this on. Cnbc constantly which is because they asked me about it every time. Not all of these facts are created equal and in a lot of cases you are investing like venture capitalist in a company without product market fit or that has yet to release their product launch. It and we have something. We call jason's rule Creatively internally which is if a company is worth more than a billion dollars before they shift their product and have customers. It's probably a scam or a fraud and you can use the buffet rule at that point. That's the thing it's like when you have a real company you can start to actually use real analytics on it. Yeah and some of them. Like i love the idea of investing in virgin galactic or jobe the quad copter. They basically. they're making drones for humans to fly. All it's fine cars. It's the fine car market. it's flying cars. Basically if you wanna envision your mind think about a small fixed wing airplane but instead of jets it's got a bunch of voters on kind of hybrid situation but it's all electrical and i think that's a great one to to make a long-term bet on the fact is though these should be a small percentage of your overall mix in a You know in a portfolio that's diversified. So be careful folks It could end in tears but of the big thing. Is you the companies that are successful. now we're going to be able to start going public in year. Five six seven eight as opposed to what we see which is an airbnb waiting until years. Ten eleven or twelve. So if we can have that happen. The capital and the monetary velocity will increase and we'll see investors who invested in an uber becoming liquid in your sex savon rare. bb as opposed to fifty longer. And then they get to put money back into the next wave of startups so this could create a long boom in the united states. Like we've never seen because we have half the number of publicly traded companies that we had twenty years ago and we need to build that back up. So people can buy into speculative stuff. 'cause speculative is another way of saying more upside if it does work so you know. I'm a little concerned that some people are not actually using their judgment but it's part of the learning processes and investor like gambling. You know sometimes you have to get burned or non fungible tokens. But we'll leave that alone. We're not even. We're not even going there. I i love. I love the concept of think. Non fungible tokens and crypto. Kitties when i saw that i said best use of absolute best. Use of crypto. That i've ever seen and sure enough here it goes. I mean i think the idea that artists can release something and retains ownership of. It is absolutely brilliant. I do think like the seventy million dollars. Depot is a publicity stunt. Yes it could be like some quarter of brig thing and who knows it is. There's something funky going on over there. I think do eating that. There's a possibility. Now in america gave the same rough investment climate that will see a lot more capital flowing into more sort of startup. Be ipo wish based businesses. Because there's that capital and that capital needs to get yield. Yeah i mean people are chasing that alpha. They want something to grow. And so they'll try alternative assets of all types There's a really cool website called masterworks dot. Io that is buying picasso's and bosque and warhol's and they they curate a five or ten million dollar photo of painting and that we can buy shares in it for a thousand dollars then they're gonna big had them on the pockets really brilliant idea Then they will trade. They'll allow people who own fractions of these artworks. He's master artworks. They'll be able to trade them between each other. So if you know this. Basquiat goes from ten million to fifty million. You want to get that five x appreciation. I want to sell my shares as anybody else in the masterworks ecosystem wants to buy shares. We're not in the company I wish i were. I tried the person who was running. Rich doesn't need money. But i tried a couple of times but again this is probably i mean this is this is disruption coming to the fine arts world. You know you see that happening in the nfc space as well. We're christie's actually did the beep option but you also see how they're trying to hedge against the future of what an art market might look like. Yeah i think you know we. We've always loved digital art. You and i and all these new ways to do it. I think though they'll need to be some clarification on you know what rights you get when you buy this. So when i saw the people i was like okay seventy million dollars and if he were to sell hundred dollar t shirts and two hundred dollars. Geez how many would you need to. Sal if you just made fifty dollars on each one to make money back and it was like okay. You're going to need to salat but you never know like maybe you could. But i don't think that they have the rights to exploit the artwork commercially. But that's where. I think it does get interesting. Imagine you were an up and coming electronic music artists and your you know the chemical brothers in zero and they just start sharing stuff on some website and that website. Let's you and i as connoisseurs of electronic music. Listen to tracks and then we see when we like. We look and see if anybody's purchase it or nobody's purchased it. I would like to buy that for one hundred dollars for five hundred dollars now. The artists gets five hundred dollars. But i'm not buying a hundred percent of it. i'm buying simply fifty percent of it. They keep fifty percent. Now you build up this catalog. When i opened my spotify i might own fifty songs were a percentage of fifty songs and then every time they trade or get used in a commercial and if one of them becomes. It's a beautiful day beautiful day by you to all of a sudden. I might have hit the jackpot. This to me is a fascinating concept and it kind of or something like that where we could all have a little. What do they call those patriots. We could all be patrons of the arts. You know buying the rights to a podcast. But if you own the right to that. Podcast and the person becomes joe rogan. Maybe it's worth something. And you get to participate. I love the idea of the residual value goes to the artist so every time that people sales if it sells for seven hundred million people gets another seventy million right if they can keep that ten percent with the smart contracts i feel like this is the manifestation of all this noise over the last decade and boom. We are talking to jason kelly. Kansas and we will be right back on this week in startups astray twisted with welcome on board series nine sponsor squarespace the all in one platform to build a beautiful online presence. And run your business with squarespace you can blog published content promote your business announce upcoming events special projects sell products and services of all kinds and much more. No matter what you need to do online squarespace has the answer. They've got beautiful templates by world class designers along with powerful ecommerce functionality. To help you sell from day one. Everything is optimized for mobile right out of the box plus it has built in. Seo free and secure hosting and twenty four seven award winning customer support from websites to online stores from marketing tools to analytics. Squarespace has what you need to succeed. Go to squarespace dot com slash twister for free trial. And when you're ready to launch use the code twisted a save ten percent off your first purchase of a website or domain that squarespace dot com slash twister third. And we're back with jason calcutta's on the series opener of this week in store stray a decade a decade. So twenty twenty one twenty thirty. This is a decade easy is clear that the pandemic drew great big line under all of our lives. Everyone who lives through the pandemic will be before pandemic after the pandemic. What are your predictions for the shape of this decade. I think the roaring twenty s are going to be in the roaring twenties. You're going to see after this great pause. I think there was a lot of reflection that went on. I know personally. I reflected on everything. And then you saw people say you know what living in an apartment in san francisco. Forty five hundred dollars a month. I'd rather live in tahoe and pay two thousand a month a mortgage with two acres right. That's but one example. Then you look at education people home schooled people saw. What actually when you do remote school you kind of figure out what's actually happening at school so i think there's a lot of great revelations that occurred a lot of great opportunities. I think it's gonna make people value experiences in life and their freedom to do things in a major way. And i also think it serves has an amazing example of what coordinated effort can do and what uncoordinated effort can cause so when we were not coordinated and the globe was not acting in unison. We saw chaos and suffering and death and then as we slowly started to get organized we saw people saying. Let's challenge every piece of dogma. How long does it take to make a vaccine. What's that mr. Anybody have an idea. Oh marina we've never done that before. Well sounds like a good time to give it a shot because we have nothing to lose here because will never end. If we don't get a vaccine going. I think rethinking all dogma all things that can't change and saying maybe what if we did something differently and we were basically doing you be i in the united states. Here's here's another thing that i want to take a look. After this decade we have just had a very interesting event in australia. That happens sort of the indefens- with facebook basically pulled the plug on us. And i saw it was really it. Indeed it was really funny because you want to galvanize. An entire nation turn off their facebook page and so there who worked out poorly for facebook. Facebook managed to find a face-saving solution but in terms of declaring both google and facebook monopolies and starting to regulate them as monopoly entities. Australia has now done this. I i real national dish diction in the world to do that. Do we see the very biggest. The trillion dollar tech firms come under an entirely new international national local regime of regulation in this decade. Yes and i think you know it's very hard to parse what's happening through the lands of existing legislation because all existing legislation was focused on consumer. Harm the problem with these companies. Is they make their living by delighting customers and lowering prices. And there's no harm quite the opposite to somebody having facebook for free or instagram for free or g. mail for free or g increasing the amount of storage. They give you google photos in a competition to see who could be more generous so if you put them through the lens of consumer harm there is none. I mean even amazon. They allow third parties on the platform to sell and compete against them. So if you can make better Usb cables you can compete heads up and that if you were going to come up with an sanction against amazon it would allow third parties to put on your platform right. That's what you do but there are all these other things that are making people nervous about them and then there's an overlay here in the united states that we have to deal with. Which is we're in competition with china. And if china picks. And it's an and i would say humanities in an existential crisis with the united states is in a competition for supremacy of the planet and then humanities in terms of picking freedom and democracy versus authoritarian. You know as a paradigm so we have to win vs those companies if we let by do alibaba and tiktok and ten cent do whatever the heck they want and be picked as the winner that we break bar tech companies. Were basically saying you win. It's really. it's really hard to argue. That facebook has had had some bad effects on democracy. Obviously has so. There's a daryl social media stuff. And yeah and i think the social media stuff has poisoned the well for a lot of people if not for facebook and soccer berg. I don't think tank would have such a bad reputation in the united states. I think that was the one company that just took it too. Far in terms of removing friction and always thinking about themselves. Facebook has never had a partnership with any content producers. Never shared shared any money and they have nali that they've killed all their partners like game companies etc people member pages and building up your following their so. They've been a bad actor in my mind if they would just shared revenue from the beginning and been generous. Like google does with adam and youtube right. They get fifty. Five percent of our dollar or apple does with the app store. Only taking thirty percent. seventy percent. Soccer park doesn't think that way. He thinks everything for me. Complete control i on your data i get one hundred percent of the money and that greed has made him the most hated person on the planet i think and rightfully so and so when you get that great power you really want to spread it around and share it and build up a group of people like airbnb host or salaries will be like oh. I love this. This is great and that is a beautiful non. Thank you so much. Jason rather love you brother for you that we're doing season nine and thank you for being our first guest on series nine of this week in startups stray. We will be right back. Twister is happy to welcome series nine sponsor odu one of the toughest parts of building. A company is choosing which tools and service providers to use. You wanna pick the best solution for each department to help your employees succeed. They deserve the best. But you also want to be frugal and and not spend too much. There are so many functions in a start. An each space has endless vendors for sales tools email marketing accounting hr and payroll project management customer support point of sale e commerce. It goes on and on and on and eventually you'll end up with a franken stack of tools that cost a lot and don't integrate properly. Odu is fully customizable and fully integrated suite of business apps that let you build and scale your stack as you build and scale your business. It's simple and you can use what you need. And all of their apps. Integrate perfectly with each other plus. It's all open source so you can spend capital on talent instead of expensive software. Take your pick from. Accounting project management invoicing sales marketing automation. Help-desk timesheets inventory. And so much more. Your first app is free forever and right now odu is offering a one thousand dollar credit on your first implementation pack. That's not a joke. Take one thousand dollars off. Go to odu dot com slash to check it out that's o. d. o. dot com slash twister listening to jason calico -cribe the elements in a virtuous cycle of success for a startup. We start to get the first indication a what we need to be asking. The other startups will be talking to across series nine about how they found their way into success or how. They plan on finding their way into success. I hope that at the end of the twenty episodes in series nine. We will have looked at this problem for many different angles and we will have given you listeners. A wealth of indications of how you can look for the markers of success in your own business in a business you might be thinking of working for or investing in or in the broader startup world. Big thanks to twist sponsors user testing squarespace in odu thanks to our production partners at uta startups for their assistance. Thanks to jason california's for making the time to come onto our show visit our website at twa startups. A us dot com. It's got everything it's got. All the shows all the interviews all the photos all the links to all the story. So check it out at twa startups. A us dot com. We will be back next week with our first news. Special for series nine as it's been a while since our last one you can expect it will be filled with the unexpected until then this is mark petchey thanking you for listening to this week in startups australia.

australia Petchey Mark petchey Jason calcat Jason kellyanne mark jason kellyanne Jason canas jason Odu canada
AP One Minute Headlines Mar 20 2019 08:00 (EDT)

AP Radio News

01:47 min | 2 years ago

AP One Minute Headlines Mar 20 2019 08:00 (EDT)

"I'm ready to make my credits. Can I'm ready to take classes from university. That will help me build a my experience it prepare me for the future. That would make me feel supported a courage and connected. Click this ad or go to online ODU dot EDU today. I'm Rita Foley with an AP news minute. Cruise of put out that fire. That's burned for days at a Houston area. Petrochemical storage facilitator, national chemicals company says the blaze was put out as of three a m warn it could flare back up again, I Mike Rossier? The fire. The began Sunday sent a huge dark bloom of smoke. Thousands of feet into the air. Ficials say the air is safe to breathe. President Trump heads to a key campaign. Stay today. Ohio moderate Republicans that Ohio's well, populated suburbs. Have moved away from backing the president, but working class voters who traditionally support Democrats have shifted heavily toward the GOP. Administration. Officials say that's one reason the president keeps going back to Ohio. This will be his tenth visits in stake office AP Washington correspondent saga megani? UK Prime Minister Theresa may says she has asked the e u to delay Brexit until June the thirtieth. I'm Rita Foley. Oh, I'm ready to take the next step. I'm ready for university. That will help me advance in my education and career university. That will make me feel supported an connected ready for ODU online. Click the set or go to online dot EDU today. I'm ready to make my credits. Can I'm ready to take classes from university. That will help me build a my experience it prepare me for the future university. That will make me feel supported a courage an connected. Quick this ad or go to online ODU dot EDU today.

Rita Foley ODU Ohio president President Trump Mike Rossier AP Houston Ficials Theresa GOP UK Prime Minister Brexit
AP One Minute Headlines Mar 19 2019 08:00 (EDT)

AP Radio News

01:31 min | 2 years ago

AP One Minute Headlines Mar 19 2019 08:00 (EDT)

"I'm ready to make my credits. Can I'm ready to take classes from university. That will help me build a my experience it prepare me for the future. That would make me feel supported a courage and connected. Click this ad or go to online ODU dot EDU today. I'm Rita Foley. With an AP news minute, prime minister, just into our Dern says she won't help the white supremacist accused in the New Zealand mosque shootings, get more publicity. He sought many things from his act of Thira, but one was notoriety. And that is why you will never hear me. Mention his name autopsies have been completed now on all fifty shooting victims the bodies of six of the dead have been returned to their families days of heavy rain now the flood waters much in the mid west is dealing with devastation. Michael sessions lives in Fremont, Missouri and his home flooded. Worse. Really be worse. He talked to K E T V vice-president pants visits. The midwest today to see the destruction for himself. He'll be Nebraska passengers restrained. A woman who allegedly tried to open an exit door on board. A Republic airlines flight from Indianapolis Detroit. She didn't have criminal intent sayeth authorities. I'm Rita Foley. I'm ready to take the next step arm ready for university. That will help me advance in my education and career a university. That will make me feel supported an connected ready for ODU online quick set or go to online dot EDU today.

Rita Foley ODU New Zealand mosque Dern midwest vice-president AP prime minister Nebraska Fremont Indianapolis Missouri Michael Detroit
AP One Minute Headlines Mar 21 2019 12:00 (EDT)

AP Radio News

02:16 min | 2 years ago

AP One Minute Headlines Mar 21 2019 12:00 (EDT)

"I'm ready to make my credits. Can I'm ready to take classes from university. That will help me build a my experience it prepare me for the future. That would make me feel supported a courage and connected. Click this ad or go to online ODU dot EDU today. Petro chemical plant. I'm Ed Donahue with an AP news minute. A new development from that huge fire that was burning it a petrochemicals plant near Houston. The good news is the fire remains extinguished in firefighters are remaining on site to monitor the situation, but plant spokeswoman Alice Richardson says there is an issue with the air high levels of benzene were detected. We believe the increased levels may be due to the shifting of the foam and one of our tanks people near Houston are being told to stay indoors out and of undented of caution near that plant. Whether experts say the stage is set for unprecedented major flooding this spring for most of the nation in its spring. Forecasts the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says more than two hundred million Americans are at risk for some kind of flooding. Thirteen million of them at risk for major inundation lottery. Ficials say the Powerball jackpot has climbed to six hundred twenty five million the seventh largest ever in the US. I'm Ed Donahue. Sky diving business amazed yet, but you know, what else is amazing an iphone six s purchase forty nine bucks at metro. Really imagine streaming all the way down with that amazing camera. I've switched that smart. You know, what else is smart parachutes? Switch to metro and get an amazing iphone six s for only forty nine bucks metro by T mobile. Phone offer requires porting of number not currently active on T mobile network are active on metro and past ninety days. See store for details and terms and conditions. You're with your baby girl you've been practicing your Douglas for weeks. And now, she looks up and begins to mouth her very first words. This is the moment you've been waiting for. It's time to visit your authorized Mercedes-Benz dealer and test drive. The all new G L E with the first era of the Mercedes Benz user experience and optional third row seating for your whole family. Smart, mama. Smart dada. Visit Mbusa dot com slash GO. To learn more for Benz the best or nothing. Described. Optional.

Ed Donahue Houston National Oceanic and Atmospher ODU Alice Richardson Petro AP US Ficials Sky Douglas ninety days
Witches & Saints: Marie Laveau

Encyclopedia Womannica

06:09 min | 1 year ago

Witches & Saints: Marie Laveau

"Hello from Wonder Media Network Jenny Kaplan and this is encyclopedia will Manica today we're heading back to nineteenth century New Orleans to talk about one of the most renowned practitioners of do in American history known as the new Queen of New Orleans Bowl woman from history special thanks to Liz Caplan my favorite sister and Co Creator Talk to you on Monday a New Orleans style of which differed slightly from that found in Haiti or in West Africa consisted of conjuring known as route work and the use of occurs used their powers exclusively for good some acted otherwise many historians believe it was the work of this small percentage of people acting on bad faith recre- or Jujio people would seek out route workers for spiritual intervention or protection in their daily lives slave trade and then a slightly different form of Oh do was brought to the city by refugees fleeing the Haitian revolution the beginning of the nineteenth century alling members of those households she amassed a huge clientele of wealthy and politically powerful individuals with black and white who would come to her a system that's derived from a variety of west African spiritual practices that are in many ways not wholly dissimilar from Western religions though they tend to put childhood by her mother her story picks up again around each twenty five when she married a white immigrant from what's now Haiti named Jack Leaf and protection from any evil energy or spell craft that might be placed on her clients to provide a bit of background so do as a religious hours of New Orleans Society Marie had a familial background in African spirituality and religion and became even more drawn to it after her mother's death Taylor and worked as a hairdresser to help support her family and herself she also got paid to provide spiritual counsel including to many wealthy Oh after the wedding JAC mysteriously disappeared and was later declared dead Marie then began a domestic partnership with another man for advice on personal and business matters if needed Marie would use vo do rituals to intervene in some situations and similarly provided Jack had fled with French refugees to New Orleans after the Haitian Revolution Marie and Jock had two daughters together then only a year job to support the other while she styled the hair of black clients who worked for wealthy families she would glean personal information about those families and reuse it when counts offers clients asked for ranged from solutions to romantic issues to greater political power and everything in between although most food you were gates doling out advice on everything for marital infidelity domestic disputes judicial issues business finances personal health and almost and she studied under a famous Kelly's route conjurer named Dr John by you and after finishing her apprenticeship she hit the ground running for stock and magic if a nation animism and alternate ritualistic practices voodoo originally made its way to New Orleans yet the transatlantic quarterback they had as many as fifteen children together and continued their partnership until his death during that period Marie opened up a beauty that was sensationalized by the media and nonbelievers that aspect of the religion became known as Hoodoo and is the basis for misconception offi white landowner and politician little is known about Murray's early years but it's likely that she was introduced into the Vo do tradition and its practices born in either seventeen ninety four or eighteen one in New Orleans Louisiana to a free woman of mixed native American African and French descent and in just a short period of time Marie began to dominate the VO do religious and cultural scene in New Orleans. Marie used one any other life problem you can imagine Marie also sold protective spiritual objects such as candles powder an assortment of other items mixed together to create and so the public still tends to have about Vo do today known within the religion as of Odu Queen Marie spent gate protective charms or amulets. Marie presided over Voodoo rituals at her home on Saint Anne Street in a public area called Congo Square served as an officially sanctioned gathering place for both enslaved and Free African people and at Lake pontchartrain where major ceremonies took place for those initiated into the Boudou faith these rituals consisted mostly of singing dancing drumming and spirit possession that would not be entirely out of place at pentecost many rivals over who should rule the VO do system and community in New Orleans she remained queen until eighteen fifty without any serious challenges revival still these practices were seen by many white people as strange and sensational at the time go Marie faced off again Orlands is visited by thousands of people each year who leave behind all kinds of spiritual items candles flowers and personal items in honor of Marie three died in eighteen eighty one still at the top of her game in her death. Marie has become a veritable icon her tomb of Saint Louis Cemetery Voodoo Queen of New Orleans as always taking a break for the weekend tune in on Monday for the story of another remarks finds these welcome Marie Lavelle was.

Marie Lavelle Odu Queen Marie New Orleans Wonder Media Jenny Kaplan Lake pontchartrain Boudou Saint Louis Cemetery Congo Square Orlands
AP One Minute Headlines Mar 14 2019 14:00 (EDT)

AP Radio News

02:08 min | 2 years ago

AP One Minute Headlines Mar 14 2019 14:00 (EDT)

"I'm ready to make my credits. Can I'm ready to take classes from university. That will help me build a my experience it prepare me for the future. That would make me feel supported a courage and connected. Click this ad or go to online ODU dot EDU today. Cheltenham festival is here. So it was another big Bruce betting dot on racing special. You existing customers place. A bet on the first race each day of Cheltenham, get your money back as a free benefit loses. Stay close to the action with prince betting dot com in store online and on your phone Reuss betting giving you more these come responsibly Senate and Trump's emergency. I'm Tim Maguire than AP newsmen. At a vote is expected soon in the center on a house pass resolution that would overturn President Trump's declaration of a national emergency along the border with Mexico, Ohio. Senator Rob Portman is one of now nine Republicans who will back the resolution our constitution explicitly gives the United States Congress. What's called the power of the purse, congress not the president has sole authority to determine how to spend taxpayer money. Trump expects he will have to use his veto. I don't know what the vote will be doesn't matter. What probably have to veto. And it's gonna be overturned a house votes unanimously for a resolution. Calling for any final report and special counsel. Robert Muller's Russia investigation to be made public at least two deaths are blamed on a massive storm. That's brought blizzard conditions and high winds to the planes and upper midwest flooding in eastern, Nebraska and heavy rain and tornado conditions to the mid and deep south. I'm Tim Maguire. I'm ready to take the next step. I'm ready for university. That will help me advance in my education and career university. That will make me feel supported an connected and ready for ODU online. Click the set or go to online dot EDU today. I'm ready to make my credits. Can I'm ready to take classes from university. That will help me build a my experience it prepare me for the future university. That will make me feel supported a courage an connected, click this ad or go to online dot EDU today.

President Trump Tim Maguire ODU Senator Rob Portman congress Robert Muller Senate AP special counsel Bruce Nebraska president Mexico Ohio Russia
AP One Minute Headlines Mar 19 2019 05:00 (EDT)

AP Radio News

02:02 min | 2 years ago

AP One Minute Headlines Mar 19 2019 05:00 (EDT)

"I'm ready to make my credits. Can I'm ready to take classes from university. That will help me build a my experience it prepare me for the future. That would make me feel supported a courage and connected. Click this ad or go to online ODU dot EDU today. I'm Rita Foley with an AP news minute. At least three people have died in the flooding in the mid west Michael sessions, home in Fremont, Missouri flooded, I'm happy to be home. And I'm on blessed that we didn't lose more than we thought we were gonna lose. He talked a K E T V today. Vice president Pence travels to Nebraska to survey the flood damage for himself. New Zealand's Prime minister wants people to say the names of the fifty people killed in the mosque shootings rather than the name of the man who is accused of killing them, prime minister, Jinda ardor earn. He sought many things from his act of Thira, but one was notoriety. And that is why you will never hear me mention his name. The Justice department reportedly will begin an investigation into the way the Federal Aviation Administration. Regulated Boeing we're hearing the prosecutors will look into the development of Boeing's max jets after two crashes overseas. I'm Rita Foley. I'm ready to make my credits. Can I'm ready to take classes from university. That will help me build a my experience to prepare me for the future. I that will make me feel supported a courage and connected quickness, Ed or go to online dot dot EDU today. This February history will be made millions will watch as eighty years of unjust stigma is left in the past a product the drove good people to the black market will be revealed as one that's creating a new global market, this February what inspired the symbol of counterculture will at long last be seen as just culture. The new normal is coming. Will you be one of the first to see it? Visit madman dot com to watch an exclusive preview.

Rita Foley Prime minister Boeing Fremont ODU New Zealand Pence Vice president AP Missouri Federal Aviation Administratio Nebraska Jinda Justice department Ed eighty years
AP One Minute Headlines Mar 14 2019 12:00 (EDT)

AP Radio News

02:03 min | 2 years ago

AP One Minute Headlines Mar 14 2019 12:00 (EDT)

"I'm ready to make my credits. Can I'm ready to take classes from university. That will help me build a my experience it prepare me for the future. That would make me feel supported a courage and connected. Click this ad or go to online ODU dot EDU today. After years have been rolled up within an angel life. I'm free receipts of a mind of their own go, paperless and manage your travel expenses online with my taxi business, make the smarter choice that might Tuksy dot com. I'm Rita Foley. With an AP news Monette, President Trump is again threatening to veto a congressional resolution that would block his declaration of a national emergency at the border. He says his declaration makes sense legal scholars say, it's totally constitutional. It's very important. It's really a border security vote. It's pure and simple. It's a vote for border security. It's vote for no crime the house already voted to block his declaration. The Senate is expected to do. So today a fierce storms been knocking out power closing highways and canceling airline flights in the west. And midwest the weather service is Martian art, winter conditions, probably from western Nebraska into South Dakota, North Dakota seeing the worst of he's in running to serve you as the next president of the United States of America Beto Aurora. The former Texas congressman saying he's getting into the race for the democratic nomination. For president Aurora has been in Iowa popping into a coffee. Shop this morning. I'm Rita Foley. I'm ready to take the next step. I'm ready for university. That will help me Vance in my education and career a university. That will make me feel supported an connecting ready for ODU online. Click this set or go to online dot EDU today. I'm ready to make my credits. Can I'm ready to take losses from university. That will help me build a my experience to prepare me for the future. I e that would make me feel supported a curse and connected. Quick this ad or go to online dot dot EDU today.

President Trump Rita Foley ODU America Beto Aurora president AP Senate Vance Monette Texas United States North Dakota Nebraska Iowa congressman South Dakota
AP One Minute Headlines Mar 14 2019 10:00 (EDT)

AP Radio News

02:03 min | 2 years ago

AP One Minute Headlines Mar 14 2019 10:00 (EDT)

"I'm ready to make my credits. Can I'm ready to take classes from university. That will help me build a my experience it prepare me for the future. That would make me feel supported a courage and connected. Click this ad or go to online ODU dot EDU today. Okay. Guys. Welcome to our Q one AGM planning quarterly review central meeting. Business can be complicated. But travel doesn't have to be with my taxi business. You can download receipts and manage multiple bookings online makes us smarter choice that might Tuksy dot com. I'm Rita Foley with an AP newsman at the FAA says it finally grounded Boeing seven thirty-seven max aircraft because it got some new information acting administrator Daniel L, well, that's why we grounded the airplanes. We got new information yesterday, and we acted on it, and it is in our minds now a link that that is close enough to ground the airplanes. He was on the today show this morning, most other nations grounded the aircraft. After Sunday's crash in Ethiopia that killed one hundred fifty seven people a crash of the same model aircraft in October killed almost two hundred people Trump confidante Roger stone appears in court this morning as a judge considers whether his new book criticizing lead Russia investigator. Robert Muller may have violated a gag order in his case snow and heavy rain or hammering the middle of the nation. Former Senator Birch by of Indiana has died he was ninety one and home sales were down almost seven percent in January. I'm Rita Foley. I'm ready to take the next step arm ready for university that will help me advance in my education and career university. That will make me feel support at an connected ready for ODU online quickness at or go to online dot EDU today. I'm ready to make my credits Kim, I'm ready to say classes from university that will help me build a my experience to prepare me for the future university. That will make me feel supported a courage. An connect the quick this ad or go to online. Dot dot EDU today.

Rita Foley ODU Kim Senator Birch Robert Muller quarterly review Ethiopia FAA acting administrator Boeing Indiana Daniel L AP Roger stone investigator Trump Russia seven percent
Make Word Of Mouth Work For You

My Career Fit

03:14 min | 8 months ago

Make Word Of Mouth Work For You

"Good morning, my friends, this is Gordon the host of my career refitting. This is your wind stay morning job search advice episode. So here's Here's here's a little vice make word of mouth work for you. Like asked the questions who do you know? Who Do you know like seriously who do you know in your network and then go One step further, take the next step and ask who do they know in their network You know people who could potentially help you get to where you WANNA be. One thing that you can do is go to link to. Download your link Ting connections into a spreadsheet. Yes. You can do this. All you have to do is go to your settings and go into privacy and you can see Lincoln uses your data and then you can click on your connections and you can download there's sometimes it might take a few minutes because if you have a lot of connections like me, this will take a while but take the spreadsheet and then spend some time going through sort it determine you know who are the people that are the most influential. Maybe you can sort it based on who you know the best sort the spreadsheet to basically help identify those people that you think could actually help you in your job search and spend some time contacting those particular people hate. We added some new companies to the microphone podcast I want you to take a look at INFORMATICA. As well as Odu, and then also known hive three very different companies to or tech companies wants a small company and the other one is a very large global data company who you know basically, they have a lot of different jobs that you could potentially maybe be a fit for Odu, a small software as a service company, and then drone hive is really interesting business that has basically created a niche for themselves within the drone space. Right I'm talking about the flying airplanes up in the sky and doing deliveries and taking pictures of things real estate firms use this kind of stuff. It is actually really interesting because there is a low barrier of entry into that space. You don't have to have an FAA license a pilot does anymore. You can actually just take a test that you study for four week. You pay some money, you buy the stuff that you need, and then you sign it with a company like drone hive and you can start contracting out when there's a need from a company where you know maybe they need somebody to fly a drone and take pictures and all kinds of different stuff. That's really really interesting. We interview the CEO. Of that organization and then of course INFORMATICA and Oduor. Really cool organizations definitely check out those episodes. Thanks so much for listening. We'll see you.

INFORMATICA Odu Gordon Lincoln FAA CEO Oduor four week
E1131 Rising Stars of SaaS 3: Bringing barbershops into the digital age with Squire CEO Songe LaRon

This Week in Startups

50:11 min | 5 months ago

E1131 Rising Stars of SaaS 3: Bringing barbershops into the digital age with Squire CEO Songe LaRon

"The rising stars of SAS is brought to you by O. Do is a fully customizable and fully integrated suite of software that lets you build and scale your stack as you build and scale your business. Your first APP is free forever and right now Odu is offering one thousand dollars off your first implementation pack at Odu Dot Com slash twist that's O. D. O. dot com slash twist Lincoln sales navigator with face to face meetings. Now, a thing of the past you'll need. To quickly adapt your sales strategy to stay ahead linked in sales navigator is the tool designed to help you master digital selling go to Lincoln dot com slash SAS to start your sixty day free trial fast Lincoln dot com slash S. A. S. and pipe SAS companies. This is for you. Pipe helps you unlock your recurring revenue as upfront capital no debt no loans no dilution sign up in minutes and start trading on pipe free for twelve months at pipe dot com slash. Hey everybody. Welcome to this weekend startup. Super excited to continue our rising stars of SAS that Software as a service AKA cloud. Computing. Aka Software in Your Browser Aka pay a monthly fee for software not four hundred dollars to get a package and. We are cooking with oil in the series. We had Steve from rapid deploy on as our first guest and then and he was working on helping. Nine. One one operators and first responders to lower the call time right through software through cloud SAS through a cloud and Saas solution rapid deploy. Then we had banned from transcend on he is making it easy for users to protect their privacy with all Taurus's and allowing those all night services to be compliant with GDP are and CCA pay in all this. Privacy regulation that's coming. So we're starting to see how software. Can take away friction and make the world more delightful through enterprise solutions. Today will be no different. Song. Laurent is the CO founder and CEO. Of Squire. Dot Com. Plus him to the program director. So. Squire allows. You I guess you guys were like the Uber Of. barbershops in the beginning but I think you quickly evolved into providing a full. Peo- ASS POINT OF SALE? Scheduling. And APP. Development Platform for all barbershops cracked. Exactly. So explain how many barbershops are using the software right now and what you enable them to do. We've got a little over thousand. barbershops users using the full system and what we do is we. Handle everything that Bob Rashad research run their business from the booking. To the online payment to the point of sale payment in the shop, and then all the back end stuff paying out the Barbara's crm marketing is really a full end to end system focus. Specifically on the vertical barbershops we likes to think of ourselves as providing everything they need to run their business they don't have to look outside squire frightening. How much do you charge them for this? How do you charge them for this and how did you come to that? Yes There's a small business owners. And we felt early on that small business owners were pretty sensitive to their overhead and there's limit on how much you can charge them. So we recharge Sassy starting at one hundred a month. Up. Going up to two fifty a month and that that's really the upper limit of what what we charged shops correctly. So. They can easily afford to pay that hundred because you're going to get them incremental customer to a month, and then they break even sat about right. Look at the decision yeah. We don't really lean with lead with we're going to send you customers although we'd we do of the customers. We really focus more on we're gonNA, make your life easier and running your shot easier. We're GONNA streamline all other operations. We're GonNa, take things that used to take you or five hours a week, and now assists literally sipping button turning turning on one feature it handles it all for you. barbershops are actually collections of a bunch of little businesses I believe in most cases like hair salons. Where each of the barber's is running their own little ten, ninety, nine business correct. So I own a barbershop and I have four or five people cutting or four or five chairs they each are basically I'm either renting those chairs out or. Revenue Sharing is that correct? Yeah, exactly. It's. Usually they're renting with recall, the booth rental model, or it is a revenue share, which is called the commission model in the industry. Usually one of those are a hybrid of the two and you're the overwhelming majority of barbers are ten, ninety nine. Even though if they're on the commission model that. employees insensitive. They have a schedule and know have to kind of do what the owner says and if they're booth rental vanished really they just do their own thing they come ago. They've pleased him what are they charge a booth rental barber shop in a in a major city L. A. Atlanta. Rom. Two to three, hundred to three, hundred a week usually. Show they say thousand dollars a month, fifty bucks a day but they get one hundred percent of the revenue that comes in then. Exactly So if you had. If you had six chairs in your barbershop and you had them fully rented Barbara shots making six thousand on the chairs they're paying two, thousand two or three thousand dollars to keep the store up and running they make the other three thousand clear. Is the basic concept for running it like a co working space. We've this has got to be extremely complicated. belling and separating it. So that's what you're software does is you say these three chairs are being rented and then I'm I'm assuming some people do a hybrid, right? They read three chairs and then three chairs doing on commission your surprisingly competition quickly more so than most people would think but yeah, you're right depending on how the shop was set up. Owner has to. Booth rental his to be on he or she has to be on top of. Collecting money every week so that in itself. Is a task. And then a lot of shops one and a half a centralized point of sale system. So. How how do you divvy that up? You Know How do you make sure that each barbara gets a paid with their own and the stock is with zero and then you have to think about tips it can get very very complicated mass where we saw all of those main points with software. Do, you do the the full. And then they don't have to have square or something like that or do work with the other systems out. We were very, very selfish and about our customers that we don't want anyone if we could avoid it. So we tried place everything and do everything. And so the An ipad with a standard Castro something attached to it. We provide the cashier or The hardware, the IPAD software and then the actual physical card readers as well. Are The folks running these businesses tech savvy and sophisticated in general or are they laggards like most people would suspect that they're the last people and they're just doing cash-based accounting out of a draw? Where do they stand and then how do you convince them to make this giant leap to not only add A digital point of sale but then to add scheduling and payments and all this stuff. What's it like in terms of running business like that? Yes. A pretty big spectrum. So, you have on the high end, the more high shops that charge a higher price point are actually fairly tech savvy relatives draw the small business owners usually they're using some kind of software already. I'm often actually using two or three systems to run the business and then to sell their is that hey. Reminding everything bringing, bringing it all into one making a supervisor US N.. We're the only software this civilly tailored for Your Business and your industry. And then on the other side of the spectrum yeah, you have pen and paper you know people who don't even WanNa take appointments they wanted to walk on the and they want to be cash on me. That side of the spectrum obviously has been the most impacted by covert and and you're seeing that they're being forced to really DOPP software and technology because of the circumstances. And what does that circumstance they need to have appointments and they can't do walk ins anymore because of social distancing Su exactly right can't do walk in can't have people waiting in the shop to your point you probably hate that when you need to get it here. Now a lot of states requiring that barbershops. Be Appointment base and encouraging them to you software and then also. Cash you know there's been a shift to being less cash in your people don't want to be changing money and contactless payment. These are all things that we've been preaching and now. It's kind of a reckoning with an industry that the shops there were. Really, lagging behind are now being forced to catch up if they want to stay in business. Yeah. The pandemic is certainly an accelerate. I'm curious when we get back from this quick break, what are you seeing change? We're taping this in October of twenty twenty month arguably Savon of this pandemic right March April May June July August September October maybe month eight. So when we get back, I want to know what month eight of the pandemic is looking like versus months for and months one and two when make it back on this week in startups One of the toughest parts of building a company's choosing which tools and providers to us. You know this, you want to pick the best solution for each department to help your employees succeed because they deserve the best we all know that. But there are so many functions in a startup and each one has an endless list of potential vendors, their sales tools, there's email marketing accounting, HR payroll, project, management, customer support Wayne of Sal ECOMMERCE. You know it goes on and on and on. Eventually, you will wind up with a franken stack of tools that cost a lot and that's don't. Integrate properly well, oh. Do is here to change that Odu is fully customizable and fully integrated suite of software products that let you build and scale your stack as you build and scale your business. It's simple it's modular. So you use what you need at all their APPs integrate perfectly with each other how amazing does that sound plus it's all open source. You can span that freshly raised capital on talent instead of expensive software your first APP is free forever and right now Odu is offering wait for it I've thousand dollar credit on your first implementation packs so go to Odu od Dot Com slash twist to check it out. That's Oh dio dot com slash. To, get the thousand dollars in credit who knows how long that'll last go now odu dot com slash twists. Okay. Let's get back to this amazing episode. Welcome back to this week in startups I'm your host Jason Ganesh. You can follow me on twitter at Jason Angel investor here in Silicon Valley. we do this podcast two or three days a week, and we're really excited to have today's guest Song Laurent on he song Ron on the twitter S. O. N. G.. E. L. A. R. O. N. and He co-founded Squire in two thousand fifteen a been they've been added for about five years and they are helping. barbershops. With their scheduling and all their back end back office as it were what was the change like for barbershop spa in the early stages of the pandemic, the first couple of months versus now where people are reopening and they're allowed to have people into their barbershops Abbott still people are cautious. Yeah I three months were frightening for for everyone particularly our customers. They were pretty abruptly forced to shut down and most states and. They're not like a lot of no white collar workers work from home and have that luxury they need to be in the shop a cutting in order to provide for the families. So it was very, very difficult and challenging. March. April. We saw almost all of our shops shut down completely. During that time. What's that like for you? Then do you then give them a pause on charging them for software or discount or something? How do you handle that for yourself? Yeah. Great. Great Question. So we early on, we may some really strategic decisions and held up front leadership team and we decided that we were going to waive all subscription fees across the board for current and new customers. We decided at the time to wave it until September, and then we actually decided to extend into my twenty one. Yeah and said no revenue for you for the during the two thousand, twenty pandemic. Though subscription revenue so we didn't really get into our revenue model, but we actually make revenue from payment processing from some other streams as well. But subscription revenue we we decided has the most direct. Source of revenue fell by the shopowners. Got It. Yeah. So if there where they pay five percent or ten percent to pay fees associated with a credit card. No they pay standard. You know two point, nine plus thirty, give or take. That you would you would find other similar companies. And then we have, we have a portion of our. Every is booking free that the actual client, the person of the haircut bays. Should they pay a dollar two bucks to book the Zachary when they book an pay. So if you're if you opt into booking and paying kinda like that Uber experience or you're just in and out, don't have to worry about cash and you'll face life team of for it, and then if you decide to book without paying in that case, you wouldn't you you wouldn't be you wouldn't pay anything extra and do you build individual APPs for each barbershop or have a central barbershop APP for? People, to use to. Aggregate, demand. We have both we have what we call a scarf flack fat which has all the barbershops squire on it. And then we also do custom branded. In that case, it's the basic functionality is the same, but we customize it to have the look and feel of the shop. So it feels like an extension of their brand and it doesn't. It doesn't say squire anywhere on the. Of the thousand people using the platform. How many are back to work in October two thousand twenty. Four. Overwhelming majority are open back up and and not many have. Down, for forbid, which which is really good because that's what we're concerned about best some shops wouldn't be able to sustain themselves. But. barbershops very very a resilient businesses and they typically do very well in economic downturns. Nobody thought about a pandemic captaining that's probably the only circumstance causing the close the doors. But fortunately we're seeing them reopening bouncing back. Now, the revenue songs normalize on a per-share basis. So you know it's not quite where it was pre Kobe, but there are still coming in an aggregate. Sixty seventy eighty percent ninety percent. What's what's the average barbershop now compared to what they did last year without covid? Yeah. I would say on average probably around five, thousand, nine, hundred percent. There's some outliers of California. For example, was shut down much longer, and so they're address recently reopen. Some stay for Nancy Pelosi she got to. Change. Might have been a setup. I wasn't a barbershop south stay with us. When you look at the precautions that are i. mean the other thing that's nice about Barbara shots I suppose is they are asset light marketplaces in other words they don't have. The. They're not employees. The Barbara's who are there show they don't. They're not having to pay them if the if their hair's not if you're not getting. A lot of Harris getting cut those independent contractors freelancers get to benefit because they get to make more money and they get to pick their hours. Exactly right in general. Yeah. Exactly. It's very little overhead of the main overhead is rent, which which you know some some landlords were were forgiving during that time to work with them but that that's the that's the main thing. Almost the doors open, they can get right back to business. Do these You probably have seen have propped twenty two which hopefully people vote for an Uber and lift driver's door. Shriver's those ridesharing drivers should get to have flexibility and pick her hours I believe that. Left out of that were barbershops and hair salons. Correct. Yeah I don't believe it. They're part of A. Part of that. So how do you look at that? You know and the issue around should they should those freelancers contractors in your mind be forced to be employees or should they get to choose to be ten? Ninety nine were is how do you? How do you think about that? I'm curious. I mean I tend to lean on the side of giving optionality because a lot of Barbara's really do like the freedom. And many of them are you know they're artists not as well as? Service providers and they really do like to be able to come and go as they please. Know that being said. There's also. A A need for many of them have health insurance and don't have access to financial products and it's hard for them to get loans, etc.. So I think that that's kind of part of where squire seat received a million. A long-term is eventually trying to provide some services that we don't have access. Access to. Really. So you're thinking about for your barbers in for haircutters. To allow them since you have their information, maybe withhold some of their earnings, ten nine earnings and use it for healthcare or something. I mean we're we're looking at all these oftens like that. Yeah. So we're looking to fill the gaps. That currently aren't being. Filled up with it for these customers and they're very underserved underserved when it comes to in. Financial. Services Insurance. You name it, and ultimately, we're just trying to think what were the areas we can provide the most value. Really. Provide the full suite of offerings that they need. And what's what's on the top of that list? Of things you could offer to them. Financial Services is really interesting. Just think of bank account. Bank account debit cards potentially long products I mean there's no saw. There's nothing coming out right now but these things were looking at. Their. They're their demographic rethink has been very under. Yeah. It makes sense I mean if there if you have their information, you got the payments coming in why not just give them each account and a bank account with one of these pop-up services or a debit card they could spend from or you could advance them a week or two. Of their of their pay if they needed for. Yeah I mean because we. Re touch the entire flow of money from the booking all the way to Panga shop paying out the barber it gives us. Insight and insights, and there's a lot of interesting things we can do that helps supervisor value. When their ten ninety, nine, nine employees, they might have one day ten haircuts another day to. So, on a day, if they were in the barber shop for ten hours and they only had two haircuts. For thirty bucks each they made sixty there at six dollars an hour on the day they did ten thirty bucks each at three hundred dollars made thirty bucks an hour. That's part of the process of being a freelancer is you only get paid for when you're working correct not when you have downtime. Yeah that that's the model and overwhelming majority of shot. And so this seems fair or unfair to you that a per individual gets to pick what? They how they work? In this regard. So you're saying as opposed to. Well I mean he talks. In this scenario could take those two days, put them together and they did twelve. To twenty hours of work twelve haircuts for three hundred sixty and you could just divided and give them sixteen dollars an hour fifteen dollars an hour and make them. Of Entrepreneurial and ten, ninety, nine, and getting to take their expenses out. And you know have that downtime but they could read a book or do some self-improvement listen to an audio book whatever it is Netflix Binge watching show it seems to me there is this very like interesting. Moment in time we're living in where. What used to be considered like little entrepreneurial businesses that people could grow up on they're not. We're having unions and other folks that, hey, you're not allowed to work that way. So I'm curious. How you think about that and we'll answer that question we get back from this quick break. Right. Now everything is changing. So rapidly including the sales industry with face to face meetings. Now a thing of the past you'll need to quickly adapt yourself strategy. 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Hey, we're back on this week in startups talking with Song Laurent Ron from squire you can go check out gets wired dot com you download the swire APP I. Suppose Book Right now and find a barber. Absolutely. We were talking about this sort of mini entrepreneurial nature of it. Of Hair cutters barbers, Hair Silas, etc. they all have their own little businesses. They do they are they are an entrepreneurial bunch where they move from one salon to another they might change and say I got a better deal here or they might then start their own barbershop. You do see that path right in these. Employees or these freelancers who then become owners of businesses all the time that that's that's kind of a natural trajectory. For successful career in this in this industry, is that eventually many of them they want to open the shop invest in main way that they can you know build more wealth than and make more money outside of just the number of haircuts they providing each day. So absolutely see that. and. So if they were not ten ninety nine employees, they wouldn't be as portable or flexible. They wouldn't be able to leave and go to work for another one to start their own. It would just be. Workers who had to work specific shifts and now it'd be. Less than. We give them less. Mobility. Give them probably less mobility and also. I think that's a type of model that could work for some. Barber shops that have the resources. But. Like, we said before Barbara is a pretty easy business to start. you know and the overhead and the amount of crowd crowded really low and that's part of the one of their fueling reasons of why there's so many shops in wise. It's interesting for for these business owners. If required Baras employs, it'd be really heavy lift I think just starting barbershop. And getting off the ground. So we see that model more like in the franchises. That, have you know thirty, forty, fifty older supercop of the wall. An hourly wage? Yeah. They pay you hourly for the awesome. Shift worker. You gotTa Work Eight Hour Shifts when they tell you. Yeah and you gotTA DO X. number of hours per week, and you're not allowed to work at another salon. Basically dictate your entire work. Yeah. Discussion that people don't understand is that when you add all these regulations. It becomes impossible for somebody if they had to hire everybody fulltime and take on that risk to to pop up a barbershop, right? Yeah I. Mean I think It would be. I mean we can think of I'm sure there's there's room to think how could be improved and how. Some, more safeguards for Barbara's outside the current situation, but I definitely think it would be. Heavy. Handed to require Barbara's be employees. We will see a lot of shutting down most likely. Yeah. This thing I think. Is Good intention I. Think when people think they're trying to protect workers but. I don't think that this class of worker wants. To be forced to be an early worker they. The, what do you see amongst that group in terms of today want to be hourly workers or do they just WanNa be? A freelance they are if you were to ask ten of them, how many would say I want the current system how many would say they want? To just make the same amount of money but be hourly. It to be fair I haven't told this. So I, don't know for sure anecdotally our guest that they liked the current system, they wanna be able to. Charge. As much as possible make as much as possible for the services they're providing and have the kind of flexibility. And and they also like to build their own book of business many barbers. So that they liked to think that you know these are their customers that they'd be building. So when they do go to another shop, can bring those custody that with the software I'm curious. How do you manage that with people booking? Just the do they split the ownership of that lead does the Individual. Barbara. Get a copy of the contact information and the store or does the individual person have to like build it up and build up their own phone book on their iphone Various case by case. Depends on who how shop is set up. So if there there'a Sorrento East barbs, really an independent business owner doing doing their own thing. Generally they have access to the customer data and they can take your with them when they're commission commission shop and the relationship is with the owner of the shop and squire. In that case, we to fall to the owner and how they want to run it. A lot of time owners a lot of money in marketing and branding into acquiring customer. So it's not fair to them. To then have the Barbara's. Take all your business leave within starting a competitor. Across the street wish we've seen. A lot of times actually. Oh. Really Yeah. There's a little competition going there. Talk to me about the culture of barbershops and what they represent sort of in society, and then how you'd think about that in terms of building the software. For these barbershops obviously building dedicated APP as part of that one have to look and feel talked to me a little bit about that culture what they represent in terms of community building, and then what do these? BARBERSHOPS IN TERMS OF What's their tab for all the barber, our individual barbershops what can they expect to me? Yeah. Terms of the culture is this. Subculture, really, and the people in this industry are some of the most passionate. People I've ever worked with. They don't look at being Barbara as like a job or profession most of them they look at it as their life Colin and they'll tell you know being a barber saved my life when I was doing this before I was doing that before and this is the one thing that really is giving them meaning. So it's really inspiring be working with them. And they're also very proud very proud of what they do. Best by the fact that we are so specialized and so focus on this vertical really gives us an advantage. Relative competitors who were trying to go horizontally after allowed to different verticals. They know the Squire is frankly the only company that is dedicated exclusively to them and to their needs. and to providing value. So. That that's something that we're you know we're really proud of his well. What is a barbershop average barbershop and your system that you've got two thousand probably have some aggregate data. What does an average barbershop generate in terms of revenue that six chairs twelve chairs? The average is six chairs. Abbas. About five five or six years. On average. Bay, they make about. Hundred and fifty, one, hundred, sixty, thousand, a year. Card processed, and then you're layer cash on top of that. So she double it. W. I'll say not quite double because you're seeing more card uses actually two percent, maybe two percent. A year for barbershop yes. I'm expense on percent margin thirty, five percent margin they run at. About fifty percent, it depends on the commission breakdown Barbara's. Some percent. Yeah see the problem we have right now is. Having moved to the bay area from New York to go to astor place. Quick. Person, get. My haircut. You probably won't. San Francisco. Astra Face Barbershop Barbara Chevron. What's that do? Did you know? The story about Astra Place and like who owns it and The only thing I knew about Astra place was when I was a kid in the eighties, we will go to the city and it was twelve bucks and give the you know the lady who did it for like a twenty and we were all stars we got to the front of the list and we would just all go get her haircut. Like every two months or whatever the are trained there but I don't know the backs around astrolabes. Famous barbershop. Downtown area has has heard of it great old school in and out. That no Muss. No Fuss. No Muss. No Fuss. But this put it this way. It's not this kind of shop where you'd ever WanNa think about you know not paying or walking out doing anything like that. The guys who ran that shop. Some. Italian guys maybe yeah yeah you. Know, what you're talking about PROBABLY DO WANNA pay. What was great about Astra place a half to say back in the day was it was such a Mecca? Of many different cultures because they cut white guys hair guys is hair. It was like a it was a bit of a crossover right and so. There were in the ninety s when I go when I was in school at Fordham, we go down there you know you would have working class people you'd have hip hop people you'd have nyu student Gay people, straight people it was really like a cross section of New York you'd have bankers going. You know all the way down to students to to GRANDPA's. Just, go in there and get a quick cut boom you're done right or twelve box fifteen bucks but the average cut now is thirty. What's the average cut down united sites for men's haircut buzz-cut Yeah on us in this about forty but average across the US probably about thirty twenty third including two. It's getting crazy expensive, and then the problem I have with everything is. The hipsters took over and they're making far. barbershops. HIPSTER barbershops like public works and all these. Places it's. Kinda making them. Cookie Cutter hipster I I don't like this hipster, Trent. Yeah I mean nobody. Nobody likes nobody self identifies or likes hipsters. Reasons like a term they're like, we all sisters. But Nevada claims to be one. But I know the type of shops talking about I personally, I those great for our business they charged high price points. Sixty dollars for a quick buzz cut and I'm like. Reno because they're focused on providing experience, you know that's not the experience I'm looking. Also at the answer. Experience. ALAVESA flips through. It we we try to work with all types of shops, but I think there is room I think there's room in the market for what they're offering, which is clear because there's been so many of them that. There's not a lot of places guys can go to kind of be pampered in a masculine way. Still feel you know masculine about it and that that's what they're provided. The. Neck massage. Yeah. So you get to like still be like a tough guy, but you got your back sized. I gotcha Gotcha. Back, from this I want to understand why How people are doing this all safely and Cova, what the best practices and when we should all think about The risk of going back because that is something I've been thinking about I got one cut during covid. Famously. By my celebrity hairstylist for man groomer down it when I was in Malibu for a couple of weeks at the Beach House. But. Now, I gotta get back into my regular. I. Want to know what the precautions are. We get back on the street startups. SAS companies with reoccurring revenue used to have basically two ways to get cash and to grow one is so equity felt works sure why not or you can get debt? Okay. That's a little scary. It's alone well now there's a brand new third way to grow without debt. Dilution and that's pipe pip dot com it's a two sided marketplace marketplace airbnb or ebay marketplaces. And what they do there is that connect SAS companies who have monthly or quarterly reoccurring revenue with institutional investors who will bid in order to purchase that revenue on an annual up-front basis. So you're charging monthly quarterly and these investors common. They say we'll give you that money now. So you can deploy it and will bid. 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Song Laurent is here from Squire by what is the best practice now I know there's been a couple of outbreaks. At hair salons but the customers didn't get a couple of people working in the hair salon. God. That was the only heard that like one anecdotal story a couple of months ago. But everybody seems to be going back and getting haircuts. What's the? What's the best practice now, and what's the safety track record like? Yeah. So as station reopen pretty much every state imposed guidelines for salons and barbershops to reopen safely and you know there's some Barron spread across the board. Masks to be required from the barber as well as the client. There should be no walk. Ins should be appointments only. So people are showing at the time of their appointment and they're waiting outside of the shop. So there's no more waiting inside the shop. There should be disinfecting of the barber chair all the supplies. I'll tools. A lot of states require a disposable capes. So you're not you're not using Somebody before you. That's smart. Yeah. I liked it. I liked the disposable Cape. Just for cleanliness in general. Yeah. To paper toss it afterward there was just toss it. People reconfiguring putting plastic between the stations or is that like overkill? I've seen there I've seen that not it's not like across the board, but I've seen some experimenting with that which the plastic. Buffs. Because, the germs can go over the plan. Doesn't make sense to me like. If you're in a confined space, it really is the density of the space and bedding the mask wearing. So people just need to be vigilant about on both sides, wearing masks, and then the face shield. Is like an extra protection for dentists and people who have to do this ten times a day. And that seems to. Work. Right. At that works I mean first of all Barbara's are probably one of the only types of professionals who are actually trained on this prior to Cobra they were willing to get their license they have to study. You know how to disinfect materials, how to not spread disease like that. That's part of their their education anyway. Now you add this this Cobra situation and like they're, they're one of the best prepare tax professionals in my opinion to handle this versus like waiter who just could be anybody. So, Barbara's have to be licensed according to. State Law. And in terms of what what we're seeing like like you said there has been. Reports of. Spread inside I, think it was a salon actually but interestingly, and that's a lot and they all wore masks and no, no clients were infected. So it goes to show and there were like hundreds of cuss perform. So Royal Society like the power of actually if everybody whereas if procedures are follow. That's a very interesting point if people just were if we just studied barbershops. Which have Know Five chairs and ten customers for each. You've got fifty people coming in and out of day with five barbers and you know probably a reception area talking about. You know six stationary people fifty people coming out. You could just use that as your testing and tracing. And then eventually, people could task when they get to the barber shop. That starting yet but I predict that's going to become the big win is. Just. Come to the barber shop and get tested and we'll throw in the. Test Yeah government should really be working with barbershops. Because they really. Know. There's hubs of the community and people who are going to continue getting haircuts as long as as long as they can and head barbershops. Sector spread like they'd be shut down and being like we would have heard about it, and so we know that that's not happening. It's definitely not a major spider because. Like you said, you're going to have one hundred percent compliance in there because if you were using razors and doing shaves and you're using clippers, you already know to disinfect stuff. These people are hyper vigilant. They keep every piece of equipment cleaned and wipe down they do it in front of you as part of the show. Right. It's part of the show as part of the show and a lot of that practice really became really prevalent during. HIV. Epidemic people didn't know you could get HIV from a haircut. So they've really had to hone in on how to disinfect and how to make sure people are safe, and now in this environment often that they're they're the best trained people and. They're the most ready handle it. Yeah. That is amazing. Big Back on it. There was that moment in time where people during HIV. Oh my God Magic Johnson Campo basketball because sweat on somebody they're going to transfer HIV or what if somebody gets a nick while they're getting at the barbershop everybody in the barbershops GonNa get AIDS, and that's not how it works. We, know a little bit more than that. Yes, how did you wind up getting into all of this I know you were. Thank you were a lawyer before there's doing, right? Yeah. a lawyer at a big firm New York and we're SCADDEN ARP sure sterling's Scott instead and good guests. Waited, you got Columbia and why you for law? Has To say I was I was triangulating you did not get into scadden arps. Ivy League. Where'd you go? UNDERGRAD UCLA So, Ucla then you went to. Yale Law. We're at SCAT and up on. What that blacks and fifty five now's the kind of Nashville or they used to be in the but I don't know if they're still there how square gra. And I was thinking Sherman Sterling's over on LEX fifth year. was in the OH. Yeah. I remember that because. Anyway, I had a friend. And who worked at And he like? Right Scott you were at scan they would be like yeah vogue elevator. was like all these stories like The vogue elevator bag was limited. Lawyers. There was some. Collisions occurring. Intentional back. Sure. More attention on this guide inside. Digital try. To. The folks at Bogue? So you, you quit that to go start a company that was a big job. down. I always wanted to do something from neuro didn't know what? HAD STARTED INBETWEEN I took one year off between Undergrad and Mall School we're actually started a company not a tech. Company 'cause I didn't know about tech at that point and it was like a tutoring company. Always, always kind of in my mind that I wanted to do something. And then. My co-founder Ni-, we were just brainstorm ideas and we came across the idea of while the barbershop experience can really be improved and more research. We did the more we saw this is a real real opportunity and so decided to. JUMP INTO AHEAD HEAD I. Is there. And gave up one, hundred, fifty for scattered owes more than that. Yeah. I was just taking starting. Is Starting to one, hundred, fifty, hundred, seventy, five, where my who is live? One, sixty when I was there. So by now is probably way more out what it is, but there's too many lawyers now right? Is that. I mean you have to be a lead to get skadden but Those are they're not throwing those one, hundred, seventy, five at gigs everybody anymore. Many automotive expert for pattern of. What is the outcome here in terms of? Scaling because there's a limited number of barbershops. So are you thinking about salons or massage? Places or other things or is there enough barbershops for you keep going here? How many barbershops are there in the United States? This surprisingly a lot more barbershops than most people within there's actually not a lot of great data on the number barbershop. So you Kinda have to do some work to a number. We are research this number anywhere between two, hundred, fifty and four, hundred thousand in the US on why it if if you include Unisex. barbershops salons, which which do include and I'm Markus but just pure barbershops think there's at least two, hundred, fifty, thousand. Eight percent we're barely scratching the surface. So we know that we can build a really big successful company just on barbershops. That being said, if five years from now, we'll see that we're tapping out on that. There's other verticals we could. We could explore because the software could could work for a lot of other verticals but I think that there's a real power and being focused and and being targeted. So we've got a lot of room to grow in this space. Awesome Melissa continued success. What about what about my need? Let's talk about? My need. They need to be able to book an hour and just pop in and get it done for twenty minutes because they always make me wait that I'm late. Then they put three people in front of me I can't take it. Is that available where I could just VIP and take an hour slot and just pop in anytime I want. So this the system could work for that. You can do that on squire the problem is. These guys come up with. Solutions for like the ninety nine percent customers like you're like that is. Fish. This model service experience to be able to go. And have a bottle papa bottle and have an hour window the GRA graphic better for you I think that they should really think about the VIP situation where we're a little pay, they'll do it. No, I literally had my assistant do that because I was admonished. By the barbershop receptionist. She's like listen. Listen I gave one hundred percent tip. Food. Charging me forty five dollars, I, give you one hundred every time. Just book to appointments and give me the whole window because doesn't let me do that. Yeah. We'll talk off line. At home kind of market has that ever. You know or is it just people wanna go and have the experience and that just adds to much cost to it? Yeah. We looked at that early on and there was some companies Shaima to do it and I don't think panned out. So it's just not it's. The subset of customers who are willing to pay the premium that it takes to make that a freeze business model is just can't build a business around it. Three times, right? Yeah. You have to charge through time. You have to pay for travel costs and the time that it takes a gift from point a to point. B and then the experience you just kind of not re got here all over. People. Prefer to go into shot. Yeah I. Wish I could go into the shop if they just didn't Ding me for being laid all the. Need. A little more flexibility on that. Listen continued success with it and I'm sorry we couldn't do this person but pandemic. So everything's virtual where are you guys based? We're New York but words, sugars we've got people all over. Yeah. That's the way to do it now. All right. Well, listen stay safe and thanks for doing it and thank you. Thank goodness that these small businesses are back up and running. This really makes me feel good that they're at eighty five percent now more. And that we're going to save these businesses. So if you are listening, you know and you do book an appointment, do me a favor if you have the means just give that big huge if you can. Right and if you got if you're listening to this podcast is no reason you can't give a fifty percent or one hundred percent tab on your barbershop, and that's this is the year to do it. Just give that hundred percent tip. They, charge you forty. Eighty, that's it. They need the money right now how help bridge that extra fifteen percent and maybe they are in arrears on the some of their bills. So it helps give huge step if can't people. We'll see next time on this being served by by.

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AP One Minute Headlines Mar 21 2019 08:00 (EDT)

AP Radio News

02:22 min | 2 years ago

AP One Minute Headlines Mar 21 2019 08:00 (EDT)

"I'm ready to make my credits. Can I'm ready to take classes from university. That will help me build a my experience it prepare me for the future. That would make me feel supported a courage and connected. Click this ad or go to online ODU dot EDU today. What's the best thing about podcasts? It's that you can still listen to them during cremate hunting season down the rare white cream egg and being with a chance to win a sweet prize of up to ten thousand euro, join us fellow cremate hunters and find out more by visiting Cadbury Ireland on Facebook and Twitter. I'm Rita Foley with an AP news minute just days after a gunman shot. Fifty people dead at two mosques New Zealand will banned semi-automatic weapons prime minister Jason to ardor earn told reporters this morning. The time for the mass and easy. Availability of these weapons must end. And today, they will meanwhile, Facebook is confirming this morning that it's artificial intelligence systems failed to detect the New Zealand mosque shooting. Video President Trump says he's looking forward to reading the Muller report. And he thinks it should be released to the public though. It's ridiculous. He says the lead Russia investigator, Robert Muller is doing this. Let it come out. Let people see it that's up to the attorney general Indonesia says to pilot struggling to control an inflight lion Air Boeing jet last October were helped by a third pilot who just happened to be on board the plane landed safely in Jakarta. I'm Rita Foley. I'm ready to take the next step. I'm ready for university. That will help me advance in my education and career a university. That will make me feel supported an connecting ready for ODU online. Click the set or go to online dot EDU today. Sky dining, this is a maze. Jeff. But you know, what else is amazing an iphone six s for just forty nine bucks. At metro really imagine streaming all the way down with that amazing Cameron of switching that smart. You know, what else is smart parachutes? Switch to metro and get an amazing iphone six s for only forty nine bucks metro by T mobile. Phone requires porting of number currently active on T mobile network or active on metro and past ninety days. See store for details and terms and conditions.

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E1127 Rising Stars of SaaS 2: Data privacy deep dive with Transcend CEO Ben Brook; tracking pixels, GDPR, privacy as a selling point & more

This Week in Startups

1:09:10 hr | 6 months ago

E1127 Rising Stars of SaaS 2: Data privacy deep dive with Transcend CEO Ben Brook; tracking pixels, GDPR, privacy as a selling point & more

"The rising stars of SAS is brought to you by. SAS companies. This is for you. Pipe helps you unlock your recurring revenue as upfront capital no debt no loans no dilution sign up in minutes and start trading on pipe free for twelve months at pipe dot com slash twist. Oh do is a fully customizable and fully integrated suite of software that lets you build and scale your stack as you build and scale your business your first APP is. Free forever, and right now Odu is offering one thousand dollars off your first implementation packed at Odu dot com slash twist that's od show dot com slash twist, and outgrow without grow any marketer calculators, assessments, Chat Bots, and recommendation tools to double your conversion rates. Go to outgrow dot co slash twist for a thirty day free trial and a two hundred fifty dollars credit that's outgrow dot co slash twist. Hey everybody. Welcome to another episode of this week in startups were doing are rising stars of SAS software as a service. Category that every venture capitals wants to invest in and a lot of founders are attracted to because you get Celta businesses and businesses tend to like to pay money for software and services. So it's a very cool business and when it's a subscription software as a service. Not Subscription but when you're doing a subscription Weight or said for software as. Service rent as a service. Yeah I was just thinking. If people were I heard somebody say software as a subscription and I was like, no, that's not the right word for Saas software as a subscription. So. We're doing our top ten. Rising. Stars. In this space and we we did this. A combination of looking at the funding raise and who is investing in companies who their customers were today's. Subject Ben Brook from transcend is got some her has his company transcend has a lot of great customers and that's what we're looking for in this series so that we can break down. Exactly what it to build these companies we'll, of course, delve into what they do. So we're GONNA talk about building SAS companies and also obviously in this case, the subject Ban is privacy. And data privacy specifically, what is transcend do and why did you start it? Sure. So transcend starts. Transcend. makes. It simple for any company to give their users, data rights? So data rights. Is. This sort of new concept coming into the world. It largely started with GDP are, which is a modern privacy regulation in Europe. And I'm and that's now going to other regions like California with the CPA coming into effect to Brazil L. P. and to many other countries around the world. and. In these laws at consumers are getting the right to actually access all of their personal data to erase all of their personal data. As, well as opt out from a variety of different forms of processing personal data. So users are getting choices over how companies process your data. And these are a new set of rights that are coming in and effectively companies have to. Comply, with these requests on a very short timeline. So this is usually within thirty to forty five days. Are they have to respond to the user saying that they have successfully erased all data within their business about that user? Now the problem. Companies have been. Basically. Spewing data into dozens if not hundreds of different data systems for decades and your personal data is scattered across ORCS. And so what transcend builds is? Data privacy infrastructure, and you can kind of think of that as a layer that sits over top of all types of data systems whether that's a database, a warehouse, a SAS tool like salesforce or Sundance analytics. And actually manages all the personal data inside that. So when a user does request to erase their data, we can receive out on behalf of our customer in precision strike that person's data across all different systems. That's the data privacy infrastructure. And then we also make that entirely self serve for the end user. So we offer our customers and something that we call the privacy center. and. This is basically a website that that lives at privacy dot, our customer name Dot Com, and that's where you can go to understand in simple terms. What the heck this company is doing with your data without having to read our full privacy policy, and then actually offers control panel where users can exercise these choices on an entirely self serve way should this should be at your website or APP as a white label at Robin Hood knows one of your customers and obviously were investor investor in the company. So if I went to privacy DOT robinhood dot com, I would see this. Yes. So If. You went to privacy dot for example, Patriot Dot Com. You'd say not all customers use the privacy center so that hard is optional. The data privacy infrastructure can be interact with through the privacy center or just through a API. Got So, if you go to privacy Patriot Dot com which I just clicked on. It. You will see what data patriotic is keeping on me. and. I can take control of that. So instead of them having to build this, you built this for them basically and they put their data hooks into it, and how long does it take a company like Patriot onto setup this privacy data center. So it, it shouldn't take more than an afternoon. Really. Yeah, it's really quick. So the Privacy Center basically comes out of the box, they customize it to match their brand. And and they can override any of the. Defaults are all good and so you can really set that up. Within minutes the part that takes a the rest of the afternoon is hooking up data system. So if they have, for example in analytics tool or a database or Or maybe support system like Zen desk. We're going to connect into those because we build first class integrations with each of those systems and we partner with those other companies who process personal data to make sure that we can hook into them and serve customers like Patriot together. Now. The GDP are was the which is the general data protection regulation that the. EU The European Union decided to do as a group was the most. Intense privacy regulation today. He got implemented in twenty eighteen. I believe because I remember all these websites. Basically, we're so far behind in doing this that they just blocked off access to European countries and they just had the New York. Post is not available in Europe I know because I use a VPN and sometimes, I have a European address and it was incredible to see that people were just like we give up. We're not even gonNA try to serve. You said, we don't WanNa get find. Has Everybody caught up in dealing with that here in the United States. In terms of catching up with that regulation, and then what is the gist of what the GDP are does verses and I know there's a big question the CPA with California's Consumer Privacy Act. which it passed in I guess twenty eighteen. I'm not sure what the state of that is in terms of when did you have to start complying so explained to us those those two big swath of. Regulation in a nutshell. Sure So To start. The first question was are have companies caught up to? GDP, are. The simple answer is not yet. A lot of companies are still working with. Fairly temporary solutions that throw a lot of manual work toward the the processing that goes in place. So something that. We see a lot and something that is actually new JD PR is that there are all these sort of day to day recurring action items that that just come in because users are now exercising choices historically, privacy laws had been like. transparent have privacy policy. Tell people what you're doing, right? That's not something that goes into your day to business processes. But now that users have rights and choices, it means there's just a continuous stream of preferences coming in typically today via email, and so what happens is in that privacy policy you can. You can pretty much go to any website in fineness. Scroll down you'll find something that says your rights in choices. It'll say if you would like to exercise your data rights, email us at privacy at company name Dot Com. and. So you basically have to write in a letter saying I, WANNA delete my data I want to see my data I want to opt out of this that seems completely insane and inefficient. You're you're absolutely right and it's it's bad and it also translates to. Really, rough internal processes so. There's actually a legal person sitting on the other end of that email address right right and they're receiving these emails and. They have to basically scramble around the organization shoulder tapping people to walk into their respective systems and operate on this user state allow. Yes. Crazy. At yeah, and so it. It takes forever and more often than not as you can imagine, it's not really complete. So it takes a lot of manual labor to get one request on, but you can imagine what happens when you have dozens, hundreds, thousands of these come in. Yeah I mean you just and so when we get back from quick break, I want to know what's at stake for startups if they were to miss that email or forget it and not delete a person's Day. To what happens and has anybody started getting fined by the European Union over GDP are we get back on the street and startups? SAS companies with reoccurring revenue used to have two ways to grow. You could get equity from an investor like myself or you get dead from a bank and get alone well now, there's a brand new third way to grow without debt or dilution, and that's why it's a two sided marketplace that connects SAS company software as a service subscription software company, and they basically take your monthly quarterly reoccurring revenues and they have institutional investors who want to bid to purchase those revenues for their annual value upfront. So let's say you're getting paid monthly somebody will by the year from you give you that money upfront. and. Then you pay it back pipe is a smarter way to grow Your Business. It's the most founder friendly way to financial growth and it's not even close with pipe. There's no debt, no loans, and no dilution pipe is also friction lists and completely transparent. It only takes a couple of minutes to sign up and you'll have this cash in your bank, all those yearly contracts within twenty four hours. So you're charging monthly maybe quarterly they take the value for a year they put it in their marketplace and financial investors will buy that from you and you'll find out what that revenues worth. So pipe is so confident you'll love trading your SAS subscriptions that. If you sign up by the end of October, they'll eliminate your trading fees for one full year. Wow. A full year. This could save you tens of thousands of dollars depending on the size of Your Business and the volume you traits happy piping everybody sign up today at pipe dot com slash twist to get that first year free. So once again, pipe dot com slash twist. Okay. Let's get back to this amazing episode. Hey, it's the rising stars of SAS here on this week in startups Ben Rook from transcend is our guest today. It's our second rising stars of SAS rapid deploy was on the first episode they were helping people increase decrease nine. One. Call Response Time. Very cool SAS Company. And today we're talking with Ben from transcend dot io, you can go check it out. So with people in GDP are and businesses. Has the EU started giving fines and how hard core are they about this? It's a great question so. They are starting to issue fines so The pace of regulation and enforcement is. It's pretty slow in general I. Mean This isn't something that's a new concept. Everyone knows government moves quite slow right? What GDP are actually did was it also started standing up. Data protection authorities which are effectively like the privacy cops in a way right. So these are new bodies government that have to be stood up, and then they can start prosecuting. They can start charging companies can start going through trials, and this actually takes takes years to together I finds up, but we are starting to see them now and. And that's actually kind of light speed for a for a new regulation being enforced. We're still seeing trials held for things like Cambridge Analytica which were ago. Right. So to see the first finds come out Has has shown that they're actually moving very quickly. They're also staffing these. These data protection authorities very quickly. And these government jobs these are. Not deputising third party companies to do this. They're literally creating a police force. What do you know the scale of? Are we talking about a dozen people or hundreds of GDP our officers out there? So each country is different each. Country within the European. Union, will have their own data protection. Authority comedies will be hundreds or thousands of people. Wow. Yeah and then how An are they each looking at American companies targets because we've seen the American companies are the biggest. We have a different privacy regulation here. So are they is this going to be a cottage industry for generating revenue for a company where Italy or Spain Greece or some country that is got to balance their budgets going to look at American companies and say, Oh we should just find the heck out of them and try to find mistakes. What what's the? That's a little cynical but I have seen these fines act that way we all know speeding tickets work when you have to balance the budget and a particular you know town or county. Yeah so So. GPO. Applies to any company that is operating in Europe is serving Europeans. So if there is a European whose data is sitting over in Silicon Valley, company that company has to comply GDP are so. Data protection authorities are absolutely going over after American companies, but they are also going after European companies. We see we see penalties across the board here. So it's it's mixed, but companies are absolutely in scope here. And Do American companies. have to record the origin of where A citizen was coming from or if I wanted to. Run, my own version of red it let's and I didn't WanNa. Keep Ip addresses. So I created read it or hacker news my own Little News Forum. Message Board San Message Work. I started a message board but I said you know I'm not tracking Ip addresses and you can't use it if you're from. The European Union, you can only use it if you're in America but I'm not tracking Ip. GD. Come after me. If somebody says I'M GONNA just sign up anyway. Yeah technically. So if you have a personal data of European citizen, it doesn't matter whether you tried to prevent them from using your platform. Frankly it's it's still in scope and. A lot of companies made do this do what you just mentioned and? Decide that the legal risk is worth it because it's not at the scale at which they believe. DP Data Protection authorities going to pursue them. So it does it doesn't completely absolve you of Judy Pr, but it may be a way for a small company to To, try to avoid that because that has become the the dialogue in America, which is heard people say your data's my liability. A and I don't want to store your data and that's the approach I've taken. Even with this podcast I told my team and everybody I don't want any of these. Crazy analytics companies cooking the listeners to the podcast or figuring out who they are, and then selling that data people we're gonNA use no tracking or metrics software. Saw I mean we do have metrics Dow was something, but I don't want to start tagging my customers it just. To me it's. I don't know distasteful I guess who whatever? But the GDP are has started giving saw one I don't know if you're familiar with the case of ancient and got hit with this giant fine. But that wasn't for their users. This was for their employees I guess they kept. Their employees, data and their employees data got hacked. So a lot of this. Be If you didn't take steps to lock up the data or that you were recording in general. So, data data breaches under GDP are in fact illegal. and. So it actually doesn't matter whether you're collecting or. Whether you try to protect it. It will still be. In. Violation of the criminal. Code. So so is settling in court. Yeah. This GDP are fine. Was for thirty, five, million euros something like forty million US D. at the time of this hungry. If you get hacked by somebody. You are responsible. For being broken into whether that was the most sophisticated hacker in the world or not you're still responsible. That's correct. Yeah. And I will say that the person who broke in. Criminal basis but. Is this that crazy that if you took reasonable precautions and you had your servers updated and some hackers ray sophisticated and they figure out how to break into your system that you're now responsible. I mean what if they? What if an employee gave the passwords that they had and they weren't supposed to do that now could GDP are then so fine you. Well. I think it's good that there are financial incentives in place to protect data, and so it's at the end of the day. It is about the result of of your security practice. and. The courts can actually decide whether to be lenient because you know maybe did everything within their power or to a reasonable degree. Yeah. To protect data and frankly thirty, five million. On GPS skills actually isn't that high. So under a data-breach the European Union could have. Actually Find H. M.. For two percent of their global revenue. If. H. were. Failing to respond to data rights requests. So this is like access erasure and things like that that can go up to four percent of their global revenue. Wow should there. Yeah. They're they're looking at this I? Guess like the way I guess they were doing speeding tickets in Norway or whatever like we're not just giving you a fine in a vacuum they were giving speeding tickets i. think it was Norway or Sweden. We're giving fides based upon your income. So it was in percentage of your income. So if you're like a famous NHL player, famously they got a speeding ticket or one of one, hundred, thousand dollars like the speeding ticket was the price of the car. In that case. So they're really going after you for a percentage. Of Your revenue for the year what? What the largest fines have been today. And feel fine and British Airways facing two hundred thirty, million dollar GDP are fine. Wow. Yeah. That's a big ones. Yeah. I'm not sure what the current record has, but I do expect they will continue going up As I said, the the regulation, the regulators are effectively only getting started and there are internally spinning up their own organization. They're also hasn't been very large window to see. To See these big breaches so for example, facebook Cambridge Analytica are very lucky at that. came out in two thousand seventeen before GDP are came into effect because that would have been one of the cases where it would have gotten. Closer to the maximum penalty. Four percent of revenue or four percent of the value of the enterprise. was what you said four seventy. Four. Percent of global revenue. Wow. So it doesn't impact it. That seems. The, they even have the authority to do that. To Tax your global revenue I would think it would be four percent of the revenue in Italy or whatever make sense card in Italy. But that's not a little overreaching. While, that's something that will be determined in court because. Whoever gets that penalty I is going to. Fight that in court in will be jurisprudence set on whether that Ashley is something that the European Union has. Authority over. All right when we get back from this quick break, I want to know if it's even worth it for American companies to operating Europe given this type of framework. Or if people are considering like they did earlier, which was just say we're not making that much money in Europe. Anyway was just block those Ip addresses get back on this week in startups. One of the toughest parts of building a company is choosing which tools and providers to use you want the best solution for each and every department to help your employees succeed because they all deserve the best and you WanNa make their lives easy. But there are so many functions in a startup and each has enlist vendor sales tools, email marketing, accounting HR, payroll project, management, customer support, point of sale ecommerce it goes on and on and. On and on eventually, you end up with a franken stack of tools that cost a lot and don't integrate properly with each other. While Oh do is here to change that owed is a fully customizable and fully integrated suite of software that lets you build and scale your stack as you build and scale your startup. It's that simple it's simple and modular. So you what you need at all their APPs integrates perfectly with each other plus. It's open source. So you can spend your freshly raise capital on talent instead of expensive software. So here is the the old call to action. Your first APP is free forever and right now, who is offering you a thousand dollars in credits on your first implementation pack. Think about that a thousand dollars it was one of the best offers in the history of the show. So what should go to Odu? Dot Com slash twist that's od. Oh Dot com slash twists O. D. O. DOT com slash twist go ahead and do it now sign up get that thousand dollar credit before it goes away because these things don't always last and thank you to Odu for supporting this week in startups. Let's get back to this amazing episode. Welcome back to this week in startups or yesterday Ben Brook from transcend you can go check the out transcend dot they build tools to help companies Be Compliant to get it right. So if you're a company, you can either spend ten thousand hours doing this with your internal developer team where you can just buy your software. That's right. I would also say that we go a little bit beyond that and help companies. From more first principle, find a way to. Really Build Trust with users and actually respect their privacy choices. Without putting them through. kind of maize at exercise choices. So some companies May. Still have that as upfront. We try to get rid of that because we've actually automated the processes to such a point where it has no. Incremental Work for the company to fulfil newburgh West. What should companies I'm GonNa put aside should you operate in Europe or not? You know based on this I think it will make that on decision on that but I think a more interesting thing is What is the right balance of what should be stored by? A SAS company or a consumer company I was are two different things and we're doing our Rasi stars or SAS right now thanks for being the second guest on the series but they're obviously different. So if I was starting my own clubhouse or space or twitter today. Versus. I was starting my own slack or You know Asana. What is the right amount of data to store in order to enable me to do you know to to have a rich product offering verses? It's just you're you're keeping too much stuff. Yeah. So. The. Reality is really depends on the use case and there's kind of two simple principles that you can follow. One is just start from a place of respect for your users like at every step ask if you're serving your customers best in if they knew about these processes, would they object to it and so have you baked in a good default? Right? Is that something that? Is that users expect of your platform and then furthermore Used a minimization. So are you collecting data because you think I might be useful later, but you don't have a use case right now you probably don't need that data. Are you collecting data to perform the service. Then yeah I mean. So it depends on the company, right so Some companies May. Require. audio recordings because we're hosting podcast or something, but that shouldn't apply to. You, know your weather APP A. Weather I've made g location, but the PODCAST that probably doesn't, and so there's a lot of context that you bake. But by starting from those principles, I think, I, think you can. Kind of navigate that territory for yourself and companies like facebook who's the biggest offender of everybody? They just basically took the philosophy of let's store everything. In case we need it at some point it's all signal. It'll all make the AD network better. Where does that philosophy stand? You know in twenty twenty that philosophy of just store it all throw it into the machine learning and let's learn because that is October approach and I mean he's part of the reason this GDP are and all this stuff actually happened. Correct. Yeah I mean I would argue any platform with that much data and that much that many eyeballs. Has, has a long way to go and I think they've inspired a lot of the legislation. That's incredibly diplomatic. So the translation to that for. facebook. Page made horrible decisions to store everything and they've been reckless with you know how to keep it private I mean, let's call it what it is. Right I mean this would not have gone down this really if there wasn't the bad actor of facebook bear. So your best practices unless you have the need for today. Don't store it. And if you would be ashamed. Or embarrassed. Users found out you were storing this don't do it. Yeah. Okay. Fair logical. Not something that's soccer burger. You know some competitor as you might be up against do. And it's surprising how many companies have very similar tracking technologies often through. SAS, right. So you don't have to have one, hundred, thousand, ten, thousand engineers to. Build surveillance infrastructure. Much. Every website news website will be sharing. Your visit with hundreds of other companies, right? If not thousands and. Cookies and other tracking technologies. Yeah. Cookies cookies are are one of them. What are the other tracking technologies people are doing their fingerprinting your browser to kind of know it to you that the big one. That's another one People because I. Don't think they understand the fingerprinting of a of a computer. Sure. So when you visit a website, there is a pretty easy way of finding out some characteristics of your browser, for example, are using firewall Fox. How what's the dimension of your Browser Window right now? What language are using is is a series of things that websites can access for perfectly good purposes. But then what they do is they actually structure that. Assign a probability that you are given person no because it rouser is probably the full width of your screen. That's a that's a piece of. information that can help identify you and so they by amalgamating that information. You can actually fingerprint Individuals. So even if I have an adblocker on. My Browser, you still know my operating system high logged in one time from that short of. Footprint. and. It's kind of like maybe you didn't get the picture of my face on the surveillance camera but you saw my sneakers, you know my gate, you know my body type, my my weight you Kinda got an idea that that's me and you could serve me ads and then there's of course, your Ip address which for your household doesn't change. and. So if somebody in the house is looking at a certain. You know. You're going to see it come up and re targeting all the time. It's kind of a charming non. Kind of scope there what can users do to protect themselves? What is the state of the art there because it does seem to me that a conscientious individual could remove a large portion of tracking from their life. Am I right or wrong? Unfortunately. I don't think it's possible today I think I think there are so many. Different methods of tracking that it putting the burden on the consumer to find all of those methods that are becoming increasingly a covert. It's it's just not feasible. Kinda like the current default today is like there are fifty thousand hidden cameras in wiretaps in your house in it's on you to find them in disabled and like that's not a good default right now. and. So. It's very hard as consumer, and this is why regulate regulators are stepping in and saying we need to change the playing field a little bit where we change these defaults and we give these users of berry clear way of understanding. where? Trackers are and have an easy way to push the off button. So, if I had a VPN. And I put my ip address. In another state, another country. And I have adblocker plus. So whatever on my browser using I, think the brave browser has that built in and I'm using duck duck. Oh and. I pay for my email from Proton. Mallet on. How safe with that person be using a VPN adblocker or the brave browser? And not using GIO as an example. How much Would I be? You'd be more private. So you you would be able to slice away a lot of technologies by doing that. You may be able to get rid of. Common third party cookies you may be able to get rid of. Tracking, pixels in your email. But at the end of the day, there are signals which can easily be can easily fingerprint you and so. You can try really hard as a consumer, but you'll never get through everything. And because there's no. There's very very few laws around this at least in. America. Does will continue to exist. So fingerprinting is is one example but the but when I say, there are many others I mean there are. Thousands of many of many other ways. What are some of the others curious. Sure so just in terms like protocols and technologies, there are web weekends there are A. Beacon. Technology. that. There are so many ways. So like a pixel tracker is like a sort of one by one jeff that says in an e mail or Were on a website when it gets loaded pins a url to say, hey, this user just click this you're using an email client says the other person's the email or they opened it if you're using somebody our reach or something, it's a seventeen times, which means they forward it to some internal list or whatever you can track the number of times it's open. So, there really is no way in your mind for a consumer to take control of this. Really. Yeah, really really right now, there are things that you can do to limit it, but you can't get rid of what's the best browser to stop people from tracking news is does the brave browser or one of these rosary? Does that actually stop fingerprinting. Because there was an anti fingerprinting technology available for browsers. You can only mitigate so. I'll give you a more complex example of of fingerprinting so. Apple has the Apple Watch and applications that exist on their which have the ability to track. To use the motion, API. Perfectly good reasons to do that like if you're building a swimming APP or a running APP TENNIS AL whatever you want to know you start hurt us. Every person's gate the way they walk. Has. A uniquely identifiable fingerprint. Yeah of that person. And so. There are advertisers that create basically machine learning models that look at that API and they're able to say, okay, this is a unique person. So every time we see this. Gate this way they walk. We know that this is a little boy. Yeah. We get back in this quick notes. Totally. Terrifying. An awesome. When we get back from this quick break I want to know. What you think of Apple. Is recent. Jihad. Against facebook and Google and you know their desire to protect privacy on the hardware level and on the operating system level and of that will give people a reprieve for not get back on this week and sermons. 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Welcome back to this week in startups we're having a terrorizing stope. Discussion about privacy and the lack of privacy people have. But there is now regulation which is making it increasingly costly and all the scary stuff we've been talking about and misconception that Zuma's could protect themselves to a certain extent. I still believe they can sort of protect themselves but I'm I'm kind of get an education here that it's it's it's in your mind and never ending battle and that's probably correct. So a ban tell me. What about apple now, doing interesting things like I noticed when I was logging into a bunch of APPs they said, Hey, you wanNA logging with your. Tunes credential, which is Jason Cal Canas and you WanNa use an e mail rela-. So they don't actually get your email, which is sort of like the craigslist email relay I think. Where they are going to give you give that person a unique forwarding email. This seems like they're really going over the top and then I noticed they fix the camera rolling where I guess people were taking your camera, you give them access to your camera. They would have access to all your photos. Now they're saying only give this APP access to the photos. That I, specifically explicitly give them not give them access to and that I think the clipboard was another issue tiktok had access to people's clipboard. So if you were using a password manager and you clicked your password now the Chinese government has your password for whatever APP that was and people don't change your passwords and okay. Now they're in your bank account create terrorizing stuff. What do you think of apples? Performance. Your. Apple Save consumers privacy or not. I think they can do a lot as a as a hardware platform so. Locking Down Api's is something that we're seeing across most major platforms and there's good reason for it because we do find our are companies that find. Ways to sort of abuse API's which may otherwise be used for perfectly good reasons. So you know the jail location API, it does make sense that ask you before getting your location so you may not want to disclose location to you. On a newspaper or something or facebook like why should I give your facebook mine location right so so Apple is is pursuing that and making sure that they aren't leaking more data than they need to. And if you look genetic, this is the exact same thing. So image analytical is using facebook API that were more permissive than maybe they should have been. And they were able to find a way to tackle trait data on about seventy million Americans, at. Handled psychological profiles from that so Yeah. The it makes what apple is doing and they've also. Taken this charge on privacy in general. So I think they've really woken up to the fact that consumers are. Having his growing distrust of Silicon, valley, and that they are starting to value companies who go out of their way to protect their privacy and sir turning this narrative around. So so the. Apple for what they're what they're doing, and that is a viable way to do it. They took out the MAC address right used to be able to know. The Mac address I think is what is called of the iphone so you'd actually be able to the hardware basis. Whose phone that was I mean talking about fingerprinting you knew the the actual hardware. But when you were Undergrad at Harvard, reached out to twenty one companies to try to get your. Data. Explain that little. Experience that you did and why did you choose to do that? Yeah so My Co founder and our classmates, and we would spend a lot of late nights together just hacking personal projects. One of them that we decided to do was. Basically study ourselves so. Let's do data science and let's figure out. How things like our sleep patterns correlate with our productivity during the day and the first step of that is, let's go get our behavioral data right and so we knew these APPs. On our phones on our laptops, they handle this behavioral data and and. It's this data kind paints the picture of our lives. It's kind of our life story and So we went to these companies we. You know, can we get a copy of this information? And what was five years ago ten years ago Five years for a four and a half. Yeah. And immediately hit had a brick wall. No company was willing to give us access to any of that information and we didn't think that made any sense. Surely. As a consumer is able to know the information a twitter, the download feature, you could download, download all your tweet, but you would know the data they had on. U.. P. US or whatever. Yeah. So a lot of companies started building some expert features. It's kind of like one export under new laws CPI Jd Pr, and under upcoming Federal Privacy Regulation, it's like everything you have to go all the way down into the full stack and so that's A pretty big change there. When you look at. The backing up of data. I, always thought this was interesting because I tried to close my facebook account at one point. It was really hard to do they make it just. insufferably. Hard To get your data off there, but I'm curious. If I would successfully get my data from facebook and ask them. I. Don't want you to have any data on me. All my data wiped. Don't they have backups over time of the entire system. So in cold storage or maybe on tape somewhere I know it sounds crazy. So, what happens to that data are they? If I asked them to white, my stuff would GDP are and they've got a backup tapes somewhere and a server room or somebody made a mirror of that data whatever has back policies I know this is walkie. Plan to this because then couldn't they restore my entire profile down the road? Yeah it's. It's a great question and this is a gets covered a lot in GDP. CPA. What we see as. Either the company. Stops backing up personal data. That's. The rare scenario. The more common scenarios keep a list of who not to restore. and. So they have it. But they have a do not restore list. Yeah. and. That's about the best that most companies can do and it's a hard problem right? I can't blame them for cabinet goes restore the tape deleted and back it up again. It's like almost impossible, right? Yeah. So so it's fairly common practice to see that whether the law permits it is question but I, think most companies have decided that that is something that is. Kind of crosses, the threshold of risk verse reasonable. What are these? Virtual assistance whether it's Alexa or Siri. What kind of data are they storing? and Are you personally concerned about that. What would you tell your mom? Your Dad, your cousin your brother in terms of should I have these in my house? Yeah I mean. And I'm not I'm not an expert on this. But I know they have audio recordings, right so they actually do take recordings. They don't trance transpose it on the device, and so it goes to a server it gets backed up. So it is a little bit concerning. We have microphones in our houses now. To some extent we are. Putting our own wiretaps in. On Ours Yeah I I'm personally I'm like everyone else in terms of like what consumers want I. Think these technologies are also great right I I I haven't Alexa in my house. And so I'm not. Overly paranoid about you know having these microphones in the home but I do think it's important that these companies are making it very clear to consumers right like. The fact that these recordings are are safe right? That's something more consumers should now I think. What are you charge for your services I'm curious what point you to start up. Start using your product. Yes. Oh So with the former. So sorry with the ladder so And it depends on the region that companies operating it. So just just as the amount for a second, we've talked a lot about GDP today. There these laws are going everywhere right. It's like every region in the world has a privacy law including. Or has privacy law being made including the United States, and so I think within two and a half years we'll have something as strict or stricter than GDP are really, America? Pia. This is actively. Being. Drafted in Washington right now and. Everything that's NJIT PR is basically already given and it's about what else? So. This is coming no matter what in so extra just to go back to that European question should companies leave your up? They can only hide for so long so. So startups should. Starts, California should check out CPI if it applies to them, it doesn't apply all star. So once you cross a certain threshold of users. or a few cell user data, then you should start working to comply with these laws. At. Transcend the companies that we typically serve are larger mid market companies right so these are the robin hoods the Patriarch's indigo goes the hashish corpse. And that's kind of our sweet spot, but it doesn't mean that stops shouldn't. From a place of. Thinking about Pricey by design. So and so how do you charge I'm curious is it by the footprint is? Like. A Robin Hood level say millions of accounts ten, million revenue. So put Robin Hood Out of that. But just let's say somebody had not robin. Hood. But somebody had millions of accounts made tens of millions in revenue charge based on the users of revenue jurisdiction in are you charging him ten thousand a year or a million dollars a year? What does it cost US software for that level of startup? Yes. So so charge based on. A base platform plus usage. So the usage is when users exercise their rights got. So, if someone says down my data. and. Then it also, the usage is also based on how many data systems there are. So at company X., there may be one hundred data systems and a thousand requests. So a hundred thousand. Credits there and. And so it skills like that. So. Typically recharge. Disclose everything here but. Typically. The pricing is. Fifty thousand to a half a million. A year. Seems completely reasonable if you were to put two or three engineers on it, you'd be spending a lot more. So I mean. That's sort of how SAS works. Best right is when The cost of doing it. Yourself is five times more or ten times more in. Terms of time and headache and cost than just finding a solution for it and and a big part of what you're doing too is if I have data and I'm using something awesome Alexandra's or I'm using salesforce. I have copies of my user data, not just on my platform but patriotic if they were using this as an example, a robin who is using. They using salesforce or hub spot, they might have that data in five locations. So when they deleted on their servers who's responsible for deleting that data off of a Zen desk or? Or those tickets off of Robinhood or a salesforce rod there are hubs spot is that the responsibility of hub spot or or the responsibility of the company that was using up spot? It's the responsibility of the company that was using How does have the obligation to the customer to? Provide a way to do that. So. If I didn't API. Folks has API or some method that their customers can follow to run those ratios. Than than have spot is clear. That's in. That's what we do is we power that whole bender relationship network because to us those are more data systems. and. So. You know you said there may be five vendors typically this is like hundreds like it is incredible. How young data systems there are in these businesses and when you look at just the dislike dispersion of personal data, it really is like throwing confetti into a ceiling fan it's just Literally everywhere, I mean. If. You're using like twenty or San Grid. They probably have a whole set of data they're storing where they might have the phone number in the number of times you've called them or the emails number times they've opened the email on their servers in addition to yours. And that's the reason you guys exist. Any is there the equivalent of ambulance chasers who are looking at this new regulation to specifically shakedown companies? I know. There were people who were taking accessibility. and. They were going and. you know which with obstensibly good intent saying, Hey, this doesn't work for somebody who's blind or who. Is Daf. But. They were basically going after people in just shaking down these law firms were taken thirty k. a pop every time they found somebody who venture back they would just go down the venture list. If you raised five million dollars in your accessibility wasn't good they would just. Bam You with a fifty thousand dollar fine or they would shake you down three to you and take it to. All the way does that exist yet in the space for peace are filing complaints on behalf of people to try to Sort of make a quick buck. Well, it looks like the. UNDERSEA CPI that this is very likely. So CPI does have a private right of action which means that. People like you and me can bring civil suits. And say. I'M SUING COMPANY BECAUSE They've violated my data rights, which means you could have a class action suits. You can have legal teams who. EARN MONEY BASED ON THIS In Europe it's a little bit different where it's a governing body, right? It's like you have the police and you have the courts and so there's a little bit less of those civil lawsuits. What we're likely to see in. In the federal government with the with a new federal privacy law. Is. The current thinking is that it will probably be no private right of action if there's Republican government and private right of action if there's a democratic government, it's not for sure could go either way still but At an and the other part that's likely to happen is that the federal law will override CCPA. So whatever happens at the federal level will become. Will become unanimous. And should become civil litigation. You basically have the GDP are providing a framework for people that ensue. And GET SOME MONETARY DAMAGES Well the. The. CPI. The California one. GDP are one you're saying they have their own enforcement team so you can't take an individual can take action. Or. They would. With GDP are I guess they can follow a complaint to the government? Today get. Money if there's a fine or defying gets taken by the EU or. The money from the fines? There may be some ability to recoup. Actually can't remember on that. Yeah I wonder when CPA? Damages copies. You're paying damages to individuals. What should the damage is be if you? You know expose my reading habits my password but would be a what's the fine? Do you think would be the penalty on companies that? Are Tracking stuff. They didn't tell me about or they. I asked him to remove my stuff and they didn't action remove it. Yeah. So this typically comes with data breach. So at the next data breach of your part of it, you may get one of those letters saying. You know we're opening a class action you're you're entitled to compensation of up to seven hundred, fifty dollars. Or? Any any additional actual damage. So if you. If like it resulted in your identity being stolen, you can prove that like you lost one hundred thousand dollars you're also entitled to Recoup. and. There's no disclaimer you can put on your website or service that says, Hey, listen this is. This service. As you. Is provided as is we're not seeing any of your data you know. There's really no way to get around this. Now, this is legislation it's be the law of the land you're going to have to be compliant as a at scale started up quickly probably all startups. Absolutely. Yeah. And just just to show the the more positive span in the opportunity that they're also at there were also seeing now. Users really want to work with companies who respect their privacy We did a survey with Kelton. The research firm. And we do this annually and we asked consumers whether they would switch to a company that all other things equal would. It protects their privacy better and ninety three percent would switch. Really do care and is something like forty three percent would pay more. So there actually is a strategic opportunity, and this is why we see Apple Spin up an entire privacy marketing division and all these like privacy. That's iphone ads the result of this new consumer trend where consumers really really want to. Work with I mean it's going to become a marketing plan. I I don't understand why facebook. Doesn't just. Tomorrow. Prompt people say if you WANNA, pay ten dollars a month or fifteen dollars a for facebook, we will not store or share any of your data. And done who's if they did that? How are People GonNa Complain it's it's free if we can sell your data. And it's paid if you don't want to even have your data. The End. I mean, wouldn't that be acceptable to you? I will be I. Think it would be acceptable. I think it would probably be feel like extortion to some. Reading that you know we if you pay up, we won't sell your data but I I I could see that being a way. To have people switch over. But I don't know I mean I don't. I. Don't know the internals of facebook at know what just it's. What the Trade Office. What percentage of people you think would actually take them up on? I don't know I never. Really facebook is. A lot of value I gotta think it'd be like low one maybe one or two percent of people would would opt for a paid version. And just to see no ads just like Hulu has like the Hulu premium with no ads can get it for for five extra dollars you get with no ED's or I pay for my NBA League pass with no advertising. It's not a really a privacy issue, but it's more just the annoyance of ads and they just show you the cat for an extra ten twenty bucks a year instead of showing you ads during the commercial breaks they show you the in house camera of the garden which I just like to see what they're doing the throwing t shirts in the audience or whatever. Just sort of interesting watching anyway for twenty extra bucks but. It does feel like. Security and privacy as a service will be a great marketing tool and apple is is leading that. Google and facebook can't. Can't hope to compete in that because. Their entire businesses are predicated off of data. Those businesses color if they can't. I. Mean I think they're constantly complain that they can't provide these kind of free services if they didn't have data, do you think that's true? They need as much data. They don't, but I think they've benefited greatly from the amount of tracking they've done. and to some extent. They've already gotten their lead here. So even if this disappeared tomorrow in the machine learning models have been trained to an extent in May not be trained better tomorrow. But even if they throughout the raw data. They have a pretty big. Lead in a figured out a lot of the psychological profiles of folks. So it's IT'S A. A difficult one you know even if you force facebook to. Minimize the new data they collect. It's it's it's pretty they're pretty far along right? and. So they have this psychographic profile of everybody already and they have all algorithm strain, they'd know who should be getting ads for depression medication versus high blood pressure medication versus pregnancy tasks her. Birth, control whatever it is, they just know already so they need to worry about it. Would you? Do you think. A apps out of. China Are Safe for Americans to use. If you were the president, would you block a Tiktok from being in the United States? I'm curious how you think about that. So. I do believe in the national security concern around it This is the same thing that's happened with other APPS. So under the Obama Administration. They did the same thing and they requested that hinge. Sorry Grinder Andrea Switch. To, an American company and they split up. Yeah. Because they were concerned that this information may be wouldn't be so good if Chinese government had access to this. Explicitly, about it, if there was somebody who was closeted I mean it's the stats, the classic compromise that Russia used against people tragically, somebody was a closeted homosexual United States in the cold. War or whatever, and now they've got that over their heads. Hey, we're going to tell your family you're gay. Or your wife. Narrow your whole life's GonNa come apart, and if you have that data grinder, you know when people were. Meeting. With who was meeting up with, you imagine if the what the Chinese could do with that data Oh. Exactly. Yeah. So you don't want this data to be in the hands of intelligence. And I think it's perfectly reasonable. Be To. And and yeah. So it it's going to happen and and it's actually a good thing that were. Being a little bit more careful about. The information held by other companies I mean the reality is it's all just happening in our backyard instead. You know the snowden revelations showed very clearly that this is happening in. America, as much as you might. In China as much or maybe not as much, and certainly we're not putting people into concentration camps rice on that data. So you know when you when we do the also is or whatever they call that like but `ISMs like. A communist country might actually act on this data whereas the American company might spy or the American government spy an American company might spy and they might have edge cases of people using it. It's institutionalized. To put the week into concentration camps institutionalized to find dissidents or people selling books. And have them reeducated educated I'm using air quotes here which you know. COLLOQUIALISM for torture. So I agree that. The US government is not. Is Not using it in extremely militias ways right now but I think it is something to be concerned about when the government has that degree of information and. Edward Snowden call turn key tyranny right where it's like a soon as we get the wrong person. It's it's it's pretty scary the infrastructure. So I wonder where that puts you on the issue of like full scale encryption. The unlocking of the IPHONE case or point to point encryption. We've heard, hey, it's going to be impossible to catch pedestals or terrorists. If they have this end to end decryption and law enforcement has always had it previously and all the FBI agents who speak on the subject or like listen we really need this tool. If you take this away from us, we're not going to be able to catch these. Child Trafficking Rings or Terrorists. That's obviously true. They're going to have a really hard time catching them if they if they use that end to end encryption. So where do you stand on that? You think the iphone should be or WHATSAPP or any point to point encryption signal. Mushroom which ones have the best encryption but cheating the government with subpoena should be able to back door though systems. With a subpoena. Yes and so I. But we're not. We're not in that default right now. So and then encryption can still have back doors that can be opened through subpoena. Where we're at right now, actually a different default which enables dragnets means all of our data. All of our communications are being analyzed today, the Meta data, not the actual calls themselves. The Meta data is More than enough. To to to figure a lot of things out so you know someone calls. Their sister and immediately calls her husband or something, and like there's all these little stories that come here of the Meta data. And And so. Were in the default allowing for a dragnet and I don't. I don't think we should have dragnets on US citizens that that's that's my stance and so. and. Then encryption I think blocks that. But it's not hard to Be able to open a backdoor if the subpoena comes in turns legitimate except for the IPHONE, we had two Israeli companies to unblock iphone I think for the San Bernardino shooter back in the day. The Israelis have some pretty good technology on this front I will listen Ben you've been tremendously honest and helpful in all of us thinking about this and congratulations you guys raised a bunch of money in your off to the races. And I think it's. Really great that you're helping companies navigate this and think about this from first principles because for anybody WHO's building a company out here just assume that you know whatever shady shit you're doing. You're going to get caught at some point is going to be a pretty big. Hole in the side of your ship and I've your ships big. It's senior ship where any home could sink a ship like be careful and only collect what you need and what you would be proud to share with your users. I mean if you said to a user hey. You programmed in your Tesla home and office so that when you get in the car automatically turns on the navigation. Seems reasonable but may not want the cameras on my Tesla on all the time and may want to have the option to turn those off right like I. Think. There are some common sense here that seems to have got lost in an industry that just said the default is collect all data. The default means to collect no data. I say click nothing. Just. Don't even collected just built the business without the data. And then if you have a real reason to use the data that make sense. The best from a place of respect. Giving users. Easy. Choices. Yeah. I mean I I. Don't know if you've ever gone to that facebook privacy center on the choices air I mean that is I can't figure it out I'm in the industry. Are, been on facebook since the day it opened and I can't. Figure it out. Convoluted yeah. Really think movie. FACEBOOK hadn't. If if we didn't have Zuckerberg in the industry I, think that how people would look at the entire industry would be different right now. Just poisoned the well. And a lot of goodwill is gone. For our industry thing and believe you believe that. there. Were the big offender. I certainly agree that facebook is is one of the bigger offenders right now. I think. If it weren't facebook it would be someone else as well. So I think we have been in a void. Where there's been very little regulation and a lot of money to make. And I think there has to be regulation after this discussion with you for an hour. What I realized is my position has been take control of this don't be a victim use a VPN. I've always used fake accounts on certain sites so. People don't have recognizable name was misspelled at Ellis Island but. I'm using privacy, dot com burner cards now and. I'm. Proactive about my privacy to a certain extent. But the truth is. You know we need to have some sort of standards here. For people to take it more seriously because there are bad actors or. You know clever actors are even probably worse than the bad actors. The bad actors that we should know. They're why they're doing. It says people who are clever right? Like facebook's a little clever. Yeah and their approach to all this. All right listen continued success Ben, and I really should be on the pot and we'll see you all next time on this weekend syrups.

facebook Europe European Union Apple CPA California United States Privacy Center America Odu Robin Hood Italy Patriot SAS Company Ben Brook dot twitter
Why Expand to Orlando?

Journey to $100 Million

04:01 min | 2 years ago

Why Expand to Orlando?

"The. Hey there I'm Eric Olsen and I'm heaven days. Join us an hour journey to building one hundred million dollars company. Probably about a year ago. Our Bank invited us to financial briefing on the state of the economics in the region. So every year the local college ODU comes out with a report that says, hey, here's how the region did compared to the state compared to the United States. And I'd heard about it for a long time. I've lived here for twenty five years and been involved in business. I knew that this thing happened. But this past year was the first time it had been exposed to the actual data because the Bank that we use invited us to the actual presentation. What I realize is our local region, frankly socks when it comes to the economy. It is always lagging behind the state and as always lagging far behind the rest of the United States. And I came out of that meeting thinking, why are we doing business here in the Norfolk Virginia beach air? Area exclusively. And really the only answer that I have is because we're here right now. I love this region of been here for twenty five years. I think it's beautiful. We got beaches. We've got a lot of nature, but from a business standpoint, it really is not that great. So you know, there's a couple of things that that takeaways that a hat from that which is. Do I want to continue to do work only here in this region and just has to deal with the fact that the economics are not that favorable or do I want to try to do work somewhere else? Now, I decided that we need to do work somewhere else. Or at least we need to get work from somewhere else where the economics are better. So we started to really think about will work. Could we go that makes a lot of sense for us? Where can we start to establish a network, and then hopefully, work will come out of that the same way that came out of our network here, again, the only reason we do business here is because we live here, and we're always hanging out here, and we know people here. Well, if we go start hanging out somewhere else, even if we don't live there, if we just hang out and go to these networking meetings and meet people on regular basis, we'll get to know them, and we can, cultivate, that Roy's ship their Email phone calls cetera. And when we go down there once a month or twice a month. Whatever takes anyways, we picked Orlando. Couple reasons. Three reasons. The first we have employed on there already very low employee, and we don't seem enough. So we want to go down there and one of them the second is we have a client on there in Orlando. And then the third is it's very easy to get there from our airport. So we can take a two hour flight and be there. I mean, really worse case scenario, we can do a round trip in one day if we really had to and Ashley allied. There's a fourth reason it's a bigger market than here. They have two point five million people. They have bigger companies. There's more opportunities there. So there's probably better places ago. You know, maybe Austin San Francisco LA boss, and who knows there's a ton of them. But there were a lot of positives with Orlando and made a lot of sense for us. So that's what we decided to go. What we're doing is. We're going down once a month were holding in person events with people that we wanna meet, and we're establishing relationships the exact same thing that we did here. We're just doing it remotely now. So far, so good. It's been about three months and his seems to be working. Thank you for listening. I hope you heard something you can implement in your business right away. Finance online at journey to one hundred million dot com.

Orlando United States ODU Eric Olsen Norfolk Virginia Roy Ashley Austin San Francisco LA twenty five years one hundred million dollars three months two hour one day
AP Headline News Mar 18 2019 06:00 (EDT)

AP Radio News

04:48 min | 2 years ago

AP Headline News Mar 18 2019 06:00 (EDT)

"I'm ready to make my credits. Can I'm ready to take classes from university. That will help me build a my experience it prepare me for the future. That would make me feel supported a courage and connected. Click this ad or go to online ODU dot EDU today. I'm blessed are the great for day should receive their just rewards. You've been saying glee with credits in the past. If your credit record is rated grace heaven cards can offer you Arlyn's lowest rates alone, Dover twenty thousand euro. So whether you've been dreaming of an upgraded kitchen, better Baa-3, more snazzier car. See if we can answer your prayers for more info, go to car dot I limited time offer lending criteria. Terms and conditions. Apply. Obligations. Only information, correct? As of February first two thousand nine hundred and see bunkers done. Unin car dot trading card is regulated by the central Bank of Ireland. AP radio news. I'm Rita Foley. Investigators are seeing similarities between the deadly crashes of two Boeing passenger jets overseas within five months of each other. The most recent and Ethiopian Airlines jet the wind down a week ago killing everyone on board. His transport minister says data from the black box shows clear similarities with an October crash involving the same kind of aircraft in Indonesia. The Federal Aviation Administration has previously said satellite tracking data show the movements of Ethiopian Airlines flight three oh, two more similar to those of line air flight six ten both planes. Boeing seven three seven max eights, flew with a Radic altitude changes that could indicate the pilots struggle to control. The aircraft suspicions have emerged. That faulty sensors and software may have played a role in the crashes. I'm Ben Thomas the gunman who shot fifty people dead at two Musk's in New Zealand, acted alone says the police. Commissioner Mike Bush where we believe that. There was only one attack responsible. For this horrendous event, but he may have had support says, the Commissioner, Australia white supremacists. Brenton Tarrant is under arrest charged with murder. David tipple owns the gun shop where he says Taryn bought weapons. Did nothing extraordinary about the license holder at least two people are dead in the mid west to others missing. And some residents are still out of their homes because of the heavy rain and flooding. Their douse residents across parts of Nebraska, Iowa, Missouri. Minnesota South Dakota, and Wisconsin have been forced to evacuate. More record. Crests are expected in various rivers by tomorrow. I met small Iran's president deserving Iran's to put a curse on the United States and Israel and Saudi Arabia. He blames it for Iran's weak economy. This is AP radio news one of the last two blockbuster. Video stores is closing leaving the one in bend, Oregon as the. Last one in the world. It's like walking into a time warp in this Oregon blockbuster, except those VHS tapes and been replaced by DVD's. We still have popcorn ceilings. We have y'all. Don't believe everywhere. Resolve the same movies everywhere. Just feels like yourself about Kentucky general manager. Sandy harding. Who's worked at the store? For fifteen years receives a lot of credit for keeping it alive. Well, past its expiration date. It's pure stubbornness for one we didn't wanna give we did everything we possibly could cost and to keep ourselves relevant for now. This last remaining blockbuster is booming with business from locals and tourists who snap cell fees and by souvenirs. I'm Julie Walker. Japan says it spacecraft touchdown on a distant asteroid last month will drop an explosive to make a crater and collect underground samples to get possible. Clues as to the origin of the solar system. Rita foley. AP radio news. No an ad from dad. All right. Save money on car insurance when you bundle home and auto with. Aggressive contact right? What is this? Where did you get this? I'm talking to you with the hair. Yeah. Where did you get this? Good stuff. Solid. That's not veneer that solid stuff. Progressive can't save you from becoming your parents, but we can save you money when you bundle home and auto. Progressive casualty insurance company affiliates and other insurance discounts not available in all states or situations. Let's say you just bought a house bad news is your one step closer to becoming your parents. You'll proudly mold along and skip anybody noticed you mow the lawn. Tell people to stay off the lawn compare it to your neighbor's lawn and complain about having to mow the lawn again good news is it's easy to bundle home and auto through progressive and save on your car insurance. Which of course, we'll go right into the lawn. Progressive casualty insurance company affiliates and other insurers discount not available in all states or situations.

AP Rita Foley Boeing Iran Oregon Ethiopian Airlines Commissioner Mike Bush Ethiopian Airlines ODU David tipple Arlyn Dover Bank of Ireland Indonesia Ben Thomas Commissioner Brenton Tarrant Federal Aviation Administratio New Zealand
AP Headline News Mar 14 2019 14:00 (EDT)

AP Radio News

04:02 min | 2 years ago

AP Headline News Mar 14 2019 14:00 (EDT)

"I'm ready to make my credits. Can I'm ready to take classes from university. That will help me build a my experience it prepare me for the future. That would make me feel supported a courage and connected. Click this ad or go to online ODU dot EDU today. After years of enroll dope within an angel life. I'm free receipts of a mind of their own go, paperless and manage your travel expenses online with my taxi business, make the smarter choice that might Tuksy dot com. Radio news. I'm Rita Foley hearts, mid west or expecting a massive snow and rain storm today as millions of Americans in the west wrestle with the aftermath of a blizzard that snapped off power cancelled flights and wreaked havoc on the roads. Colorado Springs clocked a wind gust at ninety seven miles per hour. French accident investigators are now reading the black boxes from Sunday's Ethiopian Airlines jet crash and the US has grounded Boeing seven thirty seven. Max jets, the president announced all of those planes are grounded effective immediately. And then the FAA's acting chief explained enhanced satellite imagery, and new evidence gathered at the EP OPN crash site provided data track of the European airlines flight was on very close and behaved very similarly to line air flight. Canada's transport minister explains they now know the EP. Dopey in jets, automatic system, kicked into force the nose of the aircraft downward and in the case of the lion. Air crash in October those pilots unsuccessfully fought against that software. Jackie Quinn, Washington. The Senate is expected to vote to block President Trump's declaration of a national emergency at the Mexican border. Some say the only question left now about today's vote is how many GOP senators will join Democrats in defying the president Republican Senator John Kennedy of Louisiana says the Senate historically gave the president the authority to declare an emergency. Maybe we shouldn't have. But the executive branch has it. And the president is not doing anything. The congress didn't say it was okay for him to do. And that's why I'm gonna vote sporting actress Laurie Lachlan was arrested booked and released on a million dollars bond yesterday in Los Angeles caught up in the college admissions cheating scandal. This is a P radio news. Betto Aurora is running for president the former Texas congressman texted and Alpes. Oh TV station saying he's running for the democratic presidential nomination. So who is Begnaud a Rourke we build a national profile while challenging Republican Senator Ted Cruz last year though, he didn't win the race. We asked political analyst Jay ire of Texas Southern University where he stands Vitor Oregon would be considered a liberal candidate in Texas progressive in Texas. He for the most part would be considered moderate in a democratic primary field, particularly one that is increasingly sort of tilting leftward. British lawmakers are set to vote on whether to delay. Britain's departure from the European Union. Today's vote comes a day after chaotic scenes in the house of Commons. When lawmakers voted against leaving the EU without a deal. Prime Minister Theresa may now plans to make a third try to get lawmakers to support her Brexit deal. Rita Foley, AP radio news. I'm ready to take the next step. I'm ready for university. That will help me advance in my education and career university. That will make me feel supported an connected and ready for ODU online quickness set or go to online. Oh, you got EDU today. I'm ready to take the next step. I'm ready for university. That will help me advance in my education and career a university. That will make me feel supported an connecting ready for ODU online. Click this ad or go to online dot ODU dot EDU today.

president Texas Southern University Rita Foley ODU Democrats President Trump Max jets Texas European Union Senator Ted Cruz Senate Ethiopian Airlines Vitor Oregon Republican Senator John Kenned Colorado Springs FAA Prime Minister Theresa Canada Boeing Jackie Quinn
AP One Minute Headlines Mar 20 2019 11:00 (EDT)

AP Radio News

02:07 min | 2 years ago

AP One Minute Headlines Mar 20 2019 11:00 (EDT)

"I'm ready to make my credits. Can I'm ready to take classes from university. That will help me build a my experience it prepare me for the future. That would make me feel supported a courage and connected. Click this ad or go to online ODU dot EDU today. What's the best thing about podcasts? It's that you can still listen to them during Creamer hunting season, come down the rare white cream egg and being with a chance to win a sweet prize of up to ten thousand euro, join us fellow cremate hunters and find out more by visiting Cadbury Ireland on Facebook and Twitter. Mid west trip. I made Donahue with an AP news minute. President Trump's visit to Ohio today Marxist first trip to the state since last year's midterm election campaign, a source tells the AP the visit is part of a twenty twenty Trump's strategy to appear in battleground states in his official White House capacity as much as possible this year Ohio is a must have for the president to win. Another four years. He'll make his tent visit there since winning office. He set to visit an army tank plant in Lima of civility that was at risk of closing. But is seeing a resurgence because of more defense spending. He will also raise money for his reelection bid in canton before coming back here to Washington this evening, let's AP saga megani. Mexican president Andres Manuel Lopez Oprah door says talks with White House. Senior adviser, Jared Kushner, and led to advances toward an agreement that would have the US government guarantee, some ten billion dollars in development investments for Mexico and for Central America. I'm ed. Donahue. Lows knows you're the powerhouse who does it right to show your yard who's boss. We do it right to with innovative craftsman string trimmers featuring easy. Start technology for simpler, postcards, and because you can swap out one attachment for another you can get more done with just one tool. Shop now at a new trimmer to your arsenal with the craftsman to cycle gas string trimmer for just ninety nine dollars. When it's time to take on the yard work to it right for less. Start with Lowe's. Offer valid through three twenty see store for details. US only.

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AP One Minute Headlines Mar 19 2019 13:00 (EDT)

AP Radio News

01:16 min | 2 years ago

AP One Minute Headlines Mar 19 2019 13:00 (EDT)

"I'm ready to make my credits. Can I'm ready to take classes from university. That will help me build a my experience it prepare me for the future. That would make me feel supported a courage and connected. Click this ad or go to online ODU dot EDU today. Mccain and Trump, I'm Ed Donahue with the AP news minute. John McCain died last August, President Trump is still talking about the former Senator a very happy that he getting repeal and replace ObamaCare is you know, he campaigned on repealing an place to replacing ObamaCare for years. And then he got to a vote, and he said comes down the president was on Twitter over the weekend with critical comments about McCain. And today, I was never a fan of John McCain, and I never will be the comments were at the White House where President Trump is meeting with the new president of Brazil, a source tells the AP the Los Angeles angels of Anaheim are close to an agreement on a record twelve year four hundred thirty two million dollar contract with outfielder Mike trout, trout, if signed it would break the record for biggest contracts that just recently between the Philadelphia Phillies and Bryce Harper talk show host Wendy Williams says she's living in a sober house on her show today. Williams said she had been addicted to cocaine at never got treatment. I'm Ed Donahue.

John McCain President Trump president Ed Donahue Wendy Williams ObamaCare Mike trout ODU AP Philadelphia Phillies Twitter Bryce Harper cocaine White House Brazil Senator Anaheim Los Angeles four hundred thirty two millio twelve year
AP One Minute Headlines Mar 14 2019 19:00 (EDT)

AP Radio News

02:30 min | 2 years ago

AP One Minute Headlines Mar 14 2019 19:00 (EDT)

"I'm ready to make my credits. Can I'm ready to take classes from university. That will help me build a my experience it prepare me for the future. That would make me feel supported a courage and connected. Click this ad or go to online ODU dot EDU today. The excitement builds a new era begins as the Republic of Ireland take on Georgia in a crucial eight by European qualifier Tuesday, March twenty six at the Bima stadium. Come so your support for Mick McCarthy's first home game back in charge. As the boys in green looked to qualify for euro twenty twenty the Republic of Ireland versus Georgia March twenty six of Eva stadium kickoff seven forty five. Pm get your tickets now from just thirty five euro at TicketMaster dot, I e book if he applies then it rejects Trump, I'm Tim Maguire. The AP news at minutes after the Senate voted for a resolution to overturn President Trump's emergency declaration along the border with Mexico. He replied with a one word tweet veto in all caps. Not likely the congress will have the necessary two-thirds majority to override the veto AB. Saga megani? Or foresee ministration has served notice to the twelve Republicans who voted for the measure, they range from Mitt Romney to ROY blunt, one of the Geordie leader Mitch McConnell's top Senate lieutenants, a White House official. Says the president will not forget when any of those twelve want his help. Hallmark has cut ties with actress Laurie Lachlan after her arrest on charges of being involved in a bribery scheme to get her two daughters into USC Lachlan start in a number of movies for the card companies hallmark channel her daughter. Livia Jj a social media star who pushes products on her accounts as less two big ones, Sephora and trisomy. I'm Tim Maguire. I'm ready to take the next step. I'm ready for university. That will help me advance in my education and career university. That will make me feel supported an connecting ready for ODU online. Click this ad or go to online ODU dot EDU today. The style at lounge presents an evening with the progressive box. The moon. Yeah. That's you go tickling the ivories. He just saved. By bundling home and auto progressive gonna finally by ring Vernet gal of yours Hugo send my condolences. This next one. There's. Progressive casualty insurance company and affiliates. Discounts on available in all states or situations.

Tim Maguire ODU President Trump Republic of Ireland Senate Georgia Mick McCarthy Laurie Lachlan Mitt Romney TicketMaster Bima stadium Eva stadium Mitch McConnell Livia Jj congress Hallmark president AP Mexico Hugo
AP Headline News Mar 21 2019 20:00 (EDT)

AP Radio News

04:16 min | 2 years ago

AP Headline News Mar 21 2019 20:00 (EDT)

"I'm ready to make my credits. Can I'm ready to take classes from university. That will help me build a my experience it prepare me for the future. That would make me feel supported a courage and connected. Click this ad or go to online ODU dot EDU today. Missouri. Governor Mike Parsons, declares a state of emergency flooding as a major problem in his state as well as other states along the Missouri. River parts of Iowa underwater rose Phillips lost a houseful of items up my entire life. Looking at these pictures daydream about the perfect life was in those pictures, and those pictures are is going to be the one thing that. Breaks my heart. The flooding has claimed three lives damaged thousands of homes and burst about twenty levees, Nebraska, Iowa, and Missouri farmers and ranchers say they face losses. Well, above a billion dollars, National Oceanic and atmosphere. Ick administration says flooding through the spring could be worse than the record years of nineteen Ninety-three and twenty eleven special counsel Robert Muller's expected to soon and his investigation and issue a final report AP's, Eric Tucker has more of a sense based on a number of good reliable. Clues that the end is is coming very very shortly. There hasn't been grand jury activity in weeks. The number of prosecutors working for the special counsel has dwindled appreciably in the last few months. It's clear that the investigation is really entering. It's very very final stages. If not concluded we just don't know when the report is coming President Trump has signed an executive order requiring colleges and universities to certify they protect free speech or face a loss of billion. Nhs of dollars in federal research grants. Conservative students who met with the president at the White House today say their voices are being stifled on campus. He's courageous Americans have stood up for the forces of political indoctrinations, and they really stood up to it to like very few. People have been able to censorship and coercion. Some college officials say there is no need for such certification since they already have guidelines in place to protect freedom of speech. This is a P radio news. Facebook faces more trouble Facebook acknowledged it stored. Millions of users passwords in plain text for years in violation of basic, computer security, practices, it standard to scramble passwords and other sensitive information. But Facebook's actions left passwords clearly readable by its employees. The company admitted to the practice after it was pointed out by security blogs. There's no evidence Facebook staff, abused the information. But the revelations raise questions about the vulnerability of passwords during breaches. Like the one. Uncovered in September. When hackers gained entry to some twenty nine million of Facebook more than two billion accounts. I'm Warren Levinson. A pair of upsets in some close calls today in the NCAA men's basketball tournament Murray state beat Marquette and he three sixty four Minnesota top Louisville by ten eighty six seventy six in those upsets close calls that'll shoe beat Yale by five Auburn slip. Plas New Mexico state. Well, Maryland won by two seventy nine seventy seven over Bill Mont. I'm Tim Maguire AP radio news, the satellite lounge presents an evening with the progressive, folks. The moon. The you go tickling the ivories, he just saved. By bundling home and auto progressive gonna finally by ring for that gal of yours Hugo send 'em gondolas. I oh, this nice treat. There's. In my all stinkier. Progressive casualty insurance company and affiliates. Discounts on available in all states or situations. Wherever you go. However, you go for energy on the go. It's got to be five hour energy it works fast. It works long. It tastes good and was hero sugar and four calories. There's nothing holding you back fits your pocket fits your backpack. Fits your on the dough life. Whether you're going to work going on vacation or just going out with friends five hour energy energy on the go. For more information. Visit five hour energy dot com.

Facebook Missouri special counsel president Trump Iowa Governor Mike Parsons ODU Yale Robert Muller National Oceanic Nhs Warren Levinson Plas New Mexico Maryland Bill Mont Tim Maguire Phillips AP NCAA