35 Burst results for "OC"

La Burgondie Brut Ros

The CheapWineFinder Podcast

05:00 min | Last week

La Burgondie Brut Ros

"David Fromm. Cheap. Line. FINDER DOT COM. Coming at you with another wine review, we put on the cheap one finder dot website. And today it's a trader Joe's wine which to a lot of. It's the love burgundies. TREMONT DEBRAH goal. OC. Brute rose, Zach. Nine, hundred, nine. Import Bubbly. That's actually really really good. And It's a criminal chroma. is a sparkling wine from France. Isn't. From. Champagne. Champagne can be a grandma just means sparkling wine basically. But there brandon Sir you don't think of them as chromite you think of them as champagne. So everything else is a criminal and this is from Burgundy. And if you're not really up on. That part of the country. or The world I guess. The bottom part of Burgundy's this is of in northern eastern France. Is bourgeois. And the northern part is champagne and middle is the Burgundy region. and. It's home of some of the best new iron. Chardonnay in the world I mean it just that's that's ground zero for Pinot Noir Chardonnay. And they make. Like champagne does just a little bit to the north. They make bubbly to and a half may bubbly for a long long time. And this love ninety nine bubbly is made by. A group of farmers and four hundred, fifty different farmers in the region off with their grapes together and they make three and a half million bottles year. If, you want the name, it's on the. Website www cheap wine fighter dot com. It's French. Damn. I can't remember American names remember French names. But they're legit. You don't know who these who makes the winds were trader Joe's. But they're actually good in it at love. Ninety nine. This is good. Trader Joe's is a lot of buying power ninety nine. It is typically a lot less than what A. parable wine and a retail shop with being. One of the reasons is that all the in Europe are trader Joe's in. Europe is all ignored there's all ignored all these stuff. The all the United States is all these south and. Trader Joe's Aldi north, but they have a worldwide reach it almost wine shops are in a city or maybe a stay. Supermarkets can go. A long way they can be many states but they don't normally. Push. Their own brand of line. They don't really have that going for the most part like trader. Joe's does with are known for their wines and they're known for their value price twice. So this eleven ninety, nine criminal from Burgundy. And it's made in the same way. Champagne is. Made. With Pinot noir grapes. Champagne either either and or. Chardonnay. Pinot Noir Pinot Monet. Grapes are. Similar If anything the Pinot Noir. Grapes. In. Burgundy are better regarded than the ones up north. So. This love and ninety nine grandma. Mike be seriously underpriced. Mean when people pay big money for French. Champagne. Do you know? Everybody. Else's you know trying to get with. What's leftover because if you're going to spend thirty Bucks Forty Bucks Fifty Bucks One, hundred, twenty bucks you're buying champagne. If you only have ten twenty, you might look at a criminal. So that's what you know. But that doesn't mean it's the quality is not there. It's not equally good if not exactly the same because it doesn't exactly the same. But this is good Melissa delicate, it's balanced. It's got. Very controlled flavors. This is a one everything is where it's hopes to be. You know it's Often cheap bubbles are fun and delicious. Raw Love the place and they're. The last drink this one is kind of sophisticated and refined to I'm thinking because I got a glass of bubbles man.

Champagne Trader Joe Burgundy France David Fromm Europe Aldi Melissa Delicate United States Brute Rose A. Parable Mike Zach
"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

05:40 min | Last week

"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"Thank you for joining me. Thank you for having Angelo the I'm excited about this. But first of all I want to congratulate you as in digging into your background and in in two thousand nineteen, you're included in the Orange County business. Journal. OC Five, hundred directory of influence for innovation. In February of this year renominated the Orange County Business Journal women in Business, awards and in March of this year I'm not sure I surprised they were still doing business as. At March of this year you were nominated as a woman have been fluence awards in the finalists in the Game Changer Award at. Fantastic. I was humbled by by the nominations or or the recognition what I do with OC. Angel. Investors is really a passion project for me You couldn't stop me because I've been blessed in my life in. This is my give back to women that want to learn about angel investing so That was that was definitely surprised all those three nominations. That's great. I made a fan tastic and and. In the two this year I mean again it. Is early in the year but you know Kovic nonetheless as we get into march in the world changed a little bit but but that's okay. But I, want to ask you a question later on about how covert maybe as influence the kinds of businesses that you look at it and those kinds of things. But before we get started like take a few managed to talk about your investment group. And all the other things that you do to win all these awards frankly. Well I started oc angel investors in January twenty seventeen I realized that there were. Many women just like myself who wanted to learn about angel investing and they wanted to see companies that they would understand and they wanted to be educated on how to be angel investor, and so there's many groups here in southern California that are in the angel investing groups, and then part of most of them they're wonderful but the deal flow that we see in those groups. Is usually focused on the brain trust in that group. So we have very diverse backgrounds with his angel members and I wasn't seeing a group that was really catering to what women what we understand an our background what we could get passionate about because when you invest in a company, you've got to be passionate about the problem it's solving. So I started OC angels to kind of bridge that gap we meet monthly we started with eight members in two thousand seventeen..

Orange County Business Journal OC Orange County Kovic Angelo California
Pelvic Floor Therapy with Melissa Dessaulles

Babes and Babies

04:46 min | 2 weeks ago

Pelvic Floor Therapy with Melissa Dessaulles

"Would love for you to tell us to start just a little bit about yourself and how you got into all of this. Absolutely. So I live in on the west coast basically of Canada. So in British Columbia I've been I might sometimes they physio because in Canada we refer to ourselves as physios but I'll try to physical therapists came. I've been physical therapist for fourteen years never thought by calling would be talking to people about their vaginas. Or like peeing and pooping, and then I had a baby out of China and That was seven years ago I had my first and I would say that as kind of snow, I was like smacked in the head with all these things that time seven years ago. No one even talked about this. So even as a physical therapist, it was not on my radar very active I was very fit I thought I'd Kinda just strong power through this and I was totally raw onion. So it was when I started getting help that I thought this is really important and ever since then that's that's all I've done that's what I do now. In my clinical practices, see lots of. You know. OC. Men some women and you're right mostly pregnancy and postpartum related issues but lots of people that have never had babies to. Have Two kids. Now I have a seven year old daughter and a four year old son. So you're probably a lot more prepared with the four year old then pelvic floor. I would say that it was less like I wouldn't say the birth that. And I would say my mindset about it was different I in. In. At least this time feeling prepared and I wasn't so overwhelmed by what is this GonNa look like and I knew what to do after I. Felt a little bit more confident and afterwards when I was having weird symptoms like peeing or pressuring my Vagina Felt. Weird. It wasn't so scary as a golf course I'm having this based on what happened and here are some things that I can do. So, I would love to kind of dive into a lot of the misconceptions because when people think public four health, the one word comes their mind key goals or K. goals. How do you say it? I say. So. In I think that there's tons of misconceptions about that as well because there's a right way to do it but there really a wrong way. Well. You're right. It gets a lot of it gets a lot of talk but I think a lot of people don't understand what it truly is. I always explain the public floors very similar to other muscles in our body, and we know, for example, are biceps because we can see it all the time but every muscle in our body, let's use the by for example, needs to be able to go from like a relaxed position to a tight position. Okay and it spends its day doing all all movements in between there some when we when we do things like lift something heavy to set past the titan when we go to bed at night relaxes and the pelvic poor, very similar when we do things like the cause pressure cough or sneeze or lift something heavy or jump, the pelvic floor needs to respond with tension, but it needs to tighten like and stop us from the beginning p. But when the pressure is gonNA. Stop coughing redone are jumper what we put down the heavy object pellet worshiped relax so it's very similar in that way that it has to tighten and relax it does this behind the scenes it's very automatic. That's why people don't know much about their pelvic for. US doing a Keitel is our way of controlling those muscles and tightening them a win. The pelvic floor heightens the holes close. So kind of the P. Tube and the and the NS clothes and everything s bottom up. There's no name for relaxing the pelvic floor though so Heels tightening. There's no name for relaxation. But as you know from every other muscle in the body, both are important. No muscle in the body wants to be high all the time or it doesn't. Work very well if you came into the clinic Mosa. My neck is so tight like is would that be you wouldn't be coming in writing about that it would be giving you problems and I think that that's one of the biggest misconceptions is that. All symptoms are result of weakness, and so therefore, we think we should just be tightening tightening tightening. But sometimes again, if you came in with pain in your neck, you'd probably have tension in your. If I told you to keep tightening, you'd think I was crazy. and. So when we keep tightening and tightening autour perpetuating the problem

Canada United States China P. Tube Keitel
Los Angeles Couty Lifeguards Expecting Busy Holiday Weekend At OC Beaches With Hot Temps On The Way

KNX Evening News

00:56 sec | 3 weeks ago

Los Angeles Couty Lifeguards Expecting Busy Holiday Weekend At OC Beaches With Hot Temps On The Way

"30. Yes, you can go to the beach in Los Angeles County and beat the Heat this holiday weekend. As long as he would have asked in state physically distant from other beach goers and forego the group activities like beach volleyball and fire pits. He'll be a lot to do virtually anything else like how the ocean lifeguard specialist portal Barnes tells Cate ex lifeguards will be ready for what promises to be a huge rush. You staff are towers with our current ocean lifeguard. We maintain a list that we can call off, so there's availability list. In the morning and we start to see the H B a little busier than normal. We bump up our numbers accordingly, so that we can match the right amount of traffic to the right amount of beach activity, Barnes says. They're not just kicking back up in those towers. They're constantly on the lookout analysis of our beach goers is just constant and ongoing. So you're out there every day. And you know you're scanning and you, Khun You know, identify those hazard areas and the target has it You have in your in your area are under law enforcement will be lending a hand looking God for anyone violating the crowd. A virus

Khun You Barnes Los Angeles County Cate
Los Angeles - OC Security Guard Arrested After Allegedly Impersonating A Federal Law Enforcement Agent

KNX Evening News

01:07 min | Last month

Los Angeles - OC Security Guard Arrested After Allegedly Impersonating A Federal Law Enforcement Agent

"A security guards accused of pretending to be a federal agent to get out of work and avoid required firearms training when buying guns, the feds say Donovan Pham Nguyen has been posing as a special agent with Homeland security investigations for years and even helped execute a federal search warrant. The 34 year old Riverside resident who's been working as a private security employees at Laguna Woods Village, is now charged with Impersonating a federal officer. No one is awaiting arraignment, An affidavit says. He's never worked for HS I but was employed. Ears ago, is a private security guard at a Department of Homeland Security facility where he allegedly printed fake th s Ides. He's accused of using one of them to buy fire arms from a gun store owner who several months ago reached out to know win with a tip about some possible criminal activity, But no one ignored him. So the tipster went to the Riverside County Da's office. Then the prosecutor's office contacted Mr Derwent and try to gain exercise assistance in the investigation. Federal prosecutor John Bhalla says no win turned them down that led the local pro. Here's office to then contact HS I. That's one ages. I learned that nobody with that name works. Rachel Owens attorney did not immediately respond to our request for

Department Of Homeland Securit Donovan Pham Nguyen Laguna Woods Village Riverside County Da Prosecutor Rachel Owens Mr Derwent John Bhalla Officer Attorney
No News is Not Good News

Accelerate Your Business Growth

05:42 min | Last month

No News is Not Good News

"My guest today is Gem Rucci. Jim Is the founder of transition management advisors and a CEO software company constituent hub. Jim Works closely with executive teams to help implement the strategies developed in the boardroom. He's the author of change project management the next step the skillset of a change leader. Seven essentials for. Leaders and he is also the author of personal brilliance. Jim Rights to leaders every Saturday morning. Thanks so much for joining me today Jim Thanks Diane it's a pleasure to be with you. I'm looking forward to our conversation I am as well. Now you use the term change leadership very specifically and I'm wondering if you would explain why with us to us Sir Diane in the Business World in an consulting world, it's referred to as change management or OC em or. Change Management, and I just simply feel like you really can't manage change. Right what we have to do instead is lead through the change. So I'm a little persnickety on the language on purpose because I really think change leadership is what were about what we're doing or should be doing. So it helps with the mindset although I realize we're never gonNA change the lexicon it's going to be called change management forever. But in my little slice of the world I tried to use that language to because it helps create the proper mindset around what we're supposed to be doing as leaders. What and I totally get that because when I talk about time management, what I say is you can't manage time. It's a thing you know it just happened, but you can manager decisions. So I, totally get where you're calling from. Yeah. Okay. So. Communication is a big part of leadership. And you talk about a really common problem. So the leaders have where they have to communicate even when they feel like there isn't much to say. So tell us more about that. Sure Diana and art in our change methodology. So picture you know big company and they're implementing a new computer system across hundreds and thousands of people, and there's a big project going on right? That's a change project, and so in our methodology, for example, will communicate to the managers every two weeks and let them know what's happening. So they could share that with their teams, right so. It typically happens where maybe the projects a little bit behind and not a lot has happened since the last communication and so you know we're just going to stir up trouble by saying we're behind how how about if we just don't say anything about if we don't send out the communication this time, we'll wait until two weeks from now everybody should be okay with that. It's not really much report anyway. That's that's the picture of the symptom that we're talking about here, and it's a very dangerous phenomenon because when you don't communicate even when you theoretically don't have a lot to say you're creating this communication vacuum. And in that vacuum were were likely as. Audience members of that message we're likely going to feel fill that vacuum with negatives. So for example, you know we're behind there might be a good reason for being behind. But if I know we're behind in, you haven't communicated I'm going to go worst-case scenario right and so that that causes causes a number of issues trust issues with leadership cetera. So it's it's really the symptom and the problem that we have to guard against react. To really work hard to guard against that. There are some tips, tricks and so on. But it's really a pretty common thing I. Have a lot to say, yeah, let's just be quiet. Let's just not say anything we're busy anyway right but it really doesn't work that way in rears its ugly head and causes big problems downstream for sure. It does and sometimes I think the leaders thinks they don't have anything to say but they don't realize that they know staff other people don't right right right. So they can get that other people don't know this stuff. So here's a little formula that that I use with with my Executive clients on this issue. A couple of things when I have this urge that I want to skip the communication I explain the truth. So in this case, we're behind, we ran into some things intesting Blah Blah Blah whatever it is but explained the truth it's still the truth that and you have the opportunity when you're explaining the truth to polish up the edges of where the negativity might be. So you're explaining the truth you're walking through the ramifications. That's very important. Well, what does this mean? Well, it doesn't. MEAN ANYTHING BECAUSE WE'RE GONNA, make up the two week delay that we have. When we get to this point, right? We're talking details at this point we're having a conversation, and so we're again it I may not want to communicate because it'll be perceived as really horrible. Well, you have some control over that you by by using your words and actually communicated you could walk through those implications.

Jim Rights Executive Gem Rucci JIM Sir Diane CEO Founder Diana
Los Angeles - OC Supervisors Seek to Boost Coronavirus Testing for Elementary Schools if Opened this Fall

KNX Afternoon News with Mike Simpson and Chris Sedens

00:25 sec | Last month

Los Angeles - OC Supervisors Seek to Boost Coronavirus Testing for Elementary Schools if Opened this Fall

"Orange County Supervisor's air, hoping that expanding Corona virus testing for teachers, students and members of school Staff can help schools reopened foreign person learning sooner. Right now, all of the county schools are restricted to remote instruction through online programs because the county is on the state's watch list for not meeting the standards for curbing the spread of covert 19 schools can apply for a waiver to get off that list if they can submit a plan to reopen

Orange County School Staff Supervisor
Los Angeles - O.C. pre-school faces lawsuit over coronavirus waiver

KNX Programming

00:54 sec | 2 months ago

Los Angeles - O.C. pre-school faces lawsuit over coronavirus waiver

"In Orange County is being sued for allegedly firing a teacher for refusing to sign liability waivers and a girl are claims your former employer, the Montessori schools of Irvine, forced teachers signed a form agreeing not to sue the school if they catch covert 19 while working there. But she did not sign away her rights because she has a compromised immune system. And a week later, she got the pink slip. Christian tribe ER, who represents Ocular says what the European preschool did was illegal telling somebody that they need to waive their right. As a condition of working at any job, whether you're an essential worker or first responder, those air not lawful in California, and for good reason. Our public policy says that workers Don't have to give up their rights preemptively in California state Legislature passed a law last year prohibiting employers from requiring employees or job applicants to sign away rights to pursue legal claims.

California Orange County Irvine
Los Angeles - Large-scale COVID-19 testing sites to open at Anaheim Convention Center, O.C. fairgrounds

Tim Conway Jr.

00:15 sec | 2 months ago

Los Angeles - Large-scale COVID-19 testing sites to open at Anaheim Convention Center, O.C. fairgrounds

"Ah, a large scale Kobe 19 test site is about to open at the Anaheim Convention Center. Officials say. A website is being set up for people in O. C. To make an appointment. The site is going to be set up tomorrow. Another testing site will open later at the Orange County Fairgrounds in Costa

Anaheim Convention Center Orange County Fairgrounds Costa
Does Trump Want to Fight to Win 2020 Election?

The Bill Simmons Podcast

02:40 min | 2 months ago

Does Trump Want to Fight to Win 2020 Election?

"Trump the president yeah. There, there's a theory going around that. It's becoming unwinnable for him. And he's GonNa know it and he's going to. Basically do the judge smells like my arm I? Think it's broken. GET HIS ASS out. Do something and then he could do thing afterwards like I would have won, but you know I. had that health thing to that. Do you believe in theory? Well. It's funny like before. That theory became a thing I. had that theory because I was like? If he starts looking at the polls and it's like he's GonNa go down and he's going to go down hard. He may come up with some fake health thing and say he's got heart problem or Some bullshit thing and say I can't do it. I would love to serve you my beloved barricade. I can't do it because he can see the writing on the wall and his whole thing like his whole shtick is a winner winning win win win, and I'm like he's gotta be looking at his post-presidency lives such as it is, and his business such as it is, and if he loses like you know, he loses thirty seven states or something. It's like a you know landslide in. He gets killed. How does he come back from that and say like I'm? I'm a winner. I'm a winner. Come to my come to my business. Come to my hotel. Come to my restaurant. You know that's going to be a big ego blast for him now we're talking about this on my birthday. Zoom and house was like well, but he's just going to say it's rigged, so if he loses and goes down. Hard is going to be like well. It was the mail in ballots, and it was all rigged, and it was the fake news, and whatever but part of me Kinda thought he would do this thing where it's like. Again you know the judge snails arm I think it's broken. I can't run, and then he could always say tweet out. Oh, I could have one. If only my health. Let me I would have beat. Joe Biden Sleep. Joe Biden Yada Yada. So I I. Don't know I mean I i. don't know what his course of action is here now I I've seen some speculation now where people think he doesn't WanNa win like based on his behavior like when he tweets out the other day about the bubble wallace thing. Wallace News thing and he you know, which was a non-story at that point in our, you know millisecond of a news cycle now that had passed by, and he felt the need to tweet that for some reason the other day. Ad Like look like he's you know to bring that up and confederate flags and everything and you're like why. Why would he do this? Why would you do this or election? Campaign like this is going to be? Be Your focus with limited amount of time between now and November third, so people are like. Maybe he doesn't. WanNa win. Maybe he's like president. Thing is hard. This is not for me. It was easy when the economy was good, and we were at peace. SORTA speak, and I could just go to rallies and everybody loved me, but now that it's hard like I I don't WanNa. Do this anymore I wanted to start a TV company and Bitch about CNN I. I don't know what his motivation does at this point anymore. If two semi ever did.

Joe Biden President Trump Wallace Wanna CNN
Los Angeles, OC Among 19 Calif. Counties Ordered To Close Indoor Operations For Restaurants, Cardrooms, Other Businesses For Three Weeks

KCBS Radio Afternoon News

00:22 sec | 3 months ago

Los Angeles, OC Among 19 Calif. Counties Ordered To Close Indoor Operations For Restaurants, Cardrooms, Other Businesses For Three Weeks

"California Governor Gavin Newsom is closing indoor operations of restaurants and other businesses for three weeks, 15 counties that we had originally Mandated or recommended bar closure with the addition of Ford County is now in that three day watch list. We're just moving forward to close the operation of all of those bars and all of the 19

Governor Gavin Newsom Ford County California
John Wayne Airport Name Change Again Demanded By Orange County Democrats

ABC News Perspective

00:16 sec | 3 months ago

John Wayne Airport Name Change Again Demanded By Orange County Democrats

"The southern California county long known for its strong ties to the Republican Party is looking to change the name of its airport officials from the Democratic Party of Orange County are calling on the OC board of supervisors to remove John Wayne's name statue and other likenesses from the Santa Ana

California County Republican Party Democratic Party Orange County John Wayne Santa Ana
As Grocery Deliveries Soar, Startup Raises $10 Million to Unseat Giant Instacart

Business Wars Daily

04:32 min | 3 months ago

As Grocery Deliveries Soar, Startup Raises $10 Million to Unseat Giant Instacart

"As a result of COVID, nineteen instinct cart has become the Goliath of grocery delivery businesses as virus fears. Keep us out of grocery stores. We've been relying on food delivery mainly, INSTA- carts GIG workers called shoppers to keep a stocked up. This April INSTA- cart sales were five times greater than a year ago the Financial Times reported that I've popping growth hardly escaped. Investors Notice INSTA-. Cart raised another two hundred twenty five million dollars earlier this month that evaluation, approaching fourteen billion dollars. That's nearly double its valuation only eighteen months ago, perhaps needless to say instant carts thirty-three-year-old. A poor va mater is now a billionaire. But less you jump to the conclusion that Mehta can sit back and relax safe in his seat at the top of this rapidly growing industry. Thank again. A small startup called Ling is coming rich share of the grocery delivery business, though tiny compared to Insta- card investors are also taking notice last week dumpling raise six point five million dollars for a total of ten million dollars in funding so far founded in two thousand seventeen dumpling helps people create independent delivery businesses, the difference between shopping for instance card and dumpling is simple, but fundamental dumpling delivery workers own their own businesses Insta- cart workers are subcontractors paid by the shopping trip. Dumplings Co CEO's Joel. Shapiro Innate Danna make no bones about what motivated them to create dumpling. They felt sharing economy companies like Insta- card were treating workers on fairly so they created an APP that helps perspective entrepreneurs go into business for themselves to create a new business users pay a ten dollar fee for access to dumplings services and listing on the company's site where customers can search for shoppers. Bhai Zip Code. Shoppers paid dumpling a five dollar fee for each job or when they get busy enough switched to a monthly payment of thirty nine dollars. Dumplings model is not unlike Amazon's two year old partner delivery service, which also helps people start their own businesses in their case exclusively delivering Amazon packages supporters of the independent model say self employment in the delivery industry offers a number of advantages including higher revenue and insulation from the anti-god worker legislation that's cropping up all over the country so far fueled in part by the pandemic. The models seems to be working dumplings. Founders say customers or ordering twenty times more groceries than they were before in nineteen, and the company says it has helped. Two thousand people start their own delivery companies people. People like Kelly Vilchez in Orange County California. Vilchez operates under the business name shop girl. Oh, see. She told the L. A. Times that she's earning three to five thousand dollars a month. She's clearly a dumpling success story. According to the shop girl OC facebook page villages is featured in dumplings advertising campaign in contrast Insta- card has been plagued by shopper complaints since the onset of the coronavirus in March and April, many walked off the job, demanding better protection against Covid, nineteen higher tips and sick leave the Winston card initially claimed the strikes made no impact. Courts reporter Michelle Chang Rights. That's debatable on June. Fifteenth the Seattle. City Council voted unanimously to require that. GIG were companies like Insta- card and Grub pay their workers an extra two dollars and fifty cents hazard pay per order. That requirement is intended to last through the end of the COVID nineteen civil emergency declared by Seattle's mayor. Insecure has vowed a legal fight. Similar legislation is pending in Philadelphia New York and San Francisco Chang writes. It is these sorts of ills shortages of personal protective equipment, low pay and lack of sickly. The dumpling claimed self employment solves, but entrepreneurship isn't easy dumpling delivery workers have to do their own marketing and find their own customers, and they're on the hook. If grocery buyers failed to pay, which dumpling says is rare, that said any platform that helps the millions of unemployed grow their own wealth. Is appealing to investors, and it's interesting to note that dumplings mission says nothing specifically about the grocery business rather they say. We WanNA. Make dumpling trusted partner that helps anyone launched running grow their own service based business. Sure dumpling starting groceries. Be Questions. Where will they go next?

Insta Dumplings Co Partner Kelly Vilchez Financial Times Amazon Seattle Covid L. A. Times Michelle Chang Mehta Shapiro Insecure CEO Joel Reporter San Francisco Chang City Council
Los Angeles - $3B Development ‘OC Vibe’ Coming To Honda Center Area In 2024

KNX Afternoon News with Mike Simpson and Chris Sedens

00:36 sec | 3 months ago

Los Angeles - $3B Development ‘OC Vibe’ Coming To Honda Center Area In 2024

"Years from now you might not recognize the area around the Honda center in Anaheim plans unveiled today for three billion dollar one hundred and fifteen acre development for the area called OC vibe would include a contravention were huge food all the restaurants and retail as well as an office tower to hotels and six hundred fifty rooms in those hotels twenty eight hundred apartments for rent an awful lot project is being built by the Sam Wyly family owners of the Anaheim ducks are NHL hockey team it's scheduled to open in twenty twenty four and be fully completed by the twenty twenty eight summer Olympic games one of the hardest enter will host indoor volleyball

Honda Center Anaheim OC Sam Wyly NHL
Los Angeles' Orange County Reports 13 New Coronavirus Deaths, 147 New Cases

KNX Afternoon News with Mike Simpson and Chris Sedens

00:36 sec | 3 months ago

Los Angeles' Orange County Reports 13 New Coronavirus Deaths, 147 New Cases

"A big number from the Orange County health agency thirteen that's the number of corona virus so deaths confirmed today that is the second highest number it's reported that a single day since the pandemic began the death toll in Orange County is now one hundred ninety eight the health agency also reported a hundred forty seven new covert nineteen cases which brings the total to seventy seven hundred thirty seven Dr Clayton shall the agency's new directors says he's concerned about new outbreak stemming from the widespread protests against police brutality throughout the country and the county he wants a face mask order to remain in place for another three weeks to see if there is an increase that exceed state standards as OC reopens businesses on

Orange County Dr Clayton
Los Angeles - OC Sheriff Suspends Use Of Carotid Restraint Hold

KNX Morning News with Dick Helton and Vicky Moore

00:22 sec | 3 months ago

Los Angeles - OC Sheriff Suspends Use Of Carotid Restraint Hold

"Enforcement agencies across southern California California have have suspended suspended their their use use of of the the choke choke hold hold the the carotid carotid neck neck restraint restraint this this includes includes the the Orange Orange County County sheriff's sheriff's department department leaders leaders evaluating evaluating the the effectiveness effectiveness of of the the move move LA county sheriff's department also suspended the tactic of the LAPD banded for the time being next week Anaheim police can only use the carotid holds when lethal force is deemed necessary

California Lapd Orange Orange County County La County Anaheim
Black Lives Matter sues over violent Seattle police tactics

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:47 sec | 3 months ago

Black Lives Matter sues over violent Seattle police tactics

"The death several groups including black lives matter are suing Seattle police over crowd control tactics used at protests that turned violent Seattle police admitted they were getting more enquiries and complaints about their use of pepper spray of protests things got tense at some George Floyd rallies that turned violent over the past week then the mayor banned the use of tear gas for thirty days and even ask groups like the ACLU to submit a revised policy on their cops use of body cameras but then Sunday a man drove his car into a crowd of protesters and pulled out a gun a man was shot and injured the suspect was arrested and then things with the protesters got out of hand again police said projectiles were thrown and the use of OC spray and blast balls was authorized now the ACLU and black lives matter have filed a lawsuit specifically citing police use of quote chemical

George Floyd Aclu Seattle
Black Lives Matter sues over violent Seattle police tactics

KOGO's Evening News

00:46 sec | 3 months ago

Black Lives Matter sues over violent Seattle police tactics

"And then several groups including black lives matter or suing Seattle police over crowd control tactics used at the protests Seattle police admitted they were getting more enquiries and complaints about the use of pepper spray of protests things got tense at some George Floyd rallies that turned violent over the past week then the mayor banned the use of tear gas for thirty days and even asked groups like the ACLU to submit a revised policy on their cops use of body cameras but then Sunday a man drove his car into a crowd of protesters and pulled out a gun a man was shot and injured the suspect was arrested and then things with the protesters got out of hand again police said projectiles were thrown and the use of OC spray and blast balls was authorized now the ACLU and black lives matter have filed a lawsuit specifically citing police use of quote chemical

George Floyd Aclu Seattle
Los Angeles - O.C. health officer resigns after coronavirus controversy

KNX Midday News with Brian Ping

00:42 sec | 3 months ago

Los Angeles - O.C. health officer resigns after coronavirus controversy

"County is a new acting chief health health officer officer following following the the sudden sudden resignation resignation of of doctor doctor Nicole Nicole quick quick supervisors supervisors this this morning morning appointing appointing Dr Dr Clayton Clayton child child who's who's the the counties counties in in health health care care agency agency director director Dr quick resigned following criticism and threats from people because of her order last month to require masks for customers inside businesses supervisors heard this morning from some of quicks critics who are also weary of doctor challenge I was going to fail us just like we did at least you saw that she was not up for this and quit as he should hit provider Doug Chaffee says Dr quick resigned because it was too much for her he said she dealt with demonstrations in front of her home and left because she gave her medical opinion and it was not popular

Officer Nicole Nicole Director Doug Chaffee Dr Quick Acting Chief Dr Dr Clayton Clayton
"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

01:53 min | 7 months ago

"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"Welcome back time again for another episode of OC spotlight showcasing. The most amazing people doing the most incredible things and this one well. This one really caught my imagination. I gotTa Tell You. It's all about sports. Let our guest Scott Kelly Explain it all. Hey Scott how are you? I'm good I understand. You're not so good you calling in from a roadside summer after a flat tire. So we'll hope this isn't a flat interview here. I'll try to do my best but a nice and comfortable car. Okay good well. We're going to be comfortable this week over in Garden Grove. You're doing something I have never seen in all the years. The stations been around. You're doing an e sports event. What would you describe what? What's the name of the event and describe what's going to take place Eastwards Fast Pitch Conference and probably for the best way describing is part via game chairman? Part Shark tanks and part Analytics experts on East Sports. Now for those of YOU FOLKS. That are of my age. I'm a I'm a man of a certain age here. I'm in my mid sixty s sports to me. I still have to scratch my head but we have done so many shows about this in fact we have coming up on a couple of weeks the director of the East sports program at UC Irvine. Which I'm told has one of the bigger east sports programs out there. And I think he's some commissioner for a new high school league across the country hundreds and hundreds of Ice Minium here in southern California that a sporting east sports teams tell me about e sports. What the heck is he sports? Well your sports have been around for quite a long period of time you know basically it's competitive gaming And the reality is all your spot out fifty six.

East Sports Scott Kelly OC Garden Grove Ice Minium chairman UC Irvine commissioner California director
"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

14:02 min | 7 months ago

"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"Welcome back everybody time again for another episode of OC spotlight. The one show. That takes a look at the most incredible people doing the most amazing things and today. Well we've got. We've got a big one for you here today. Somebody who certainly made an impact in southern California across the globe here. I'm GonNa let them introduce himself. Welcome to the show here sir. Hey Paul doing today. I'm Good Friday exciting on your show. Tell us who you earn what you were most recently doing here. All righty well my name. Is Toby Corey and I've got a nice checkered history. And doing crazy my life. I'll say some big ones along the way here so todd tell us about. How did Toby Corey? Come to be the president of Tesla Energy Group. Yeah let's see here why I had a large successful career high tech here in Silicon Valley and I was running a billion dollar network operating system business back in the early nineties and then I've always been a very restless soul and and kindred spirits set out to create started own company and we have the time when the Internet was being born to sing. Call the Web Browser and an html protocol who went on to treat the world's largest web development company so we were one of the pioneering companies on the front of perhaps the greatest innovation and the last one hundred two hundred years of humanity really had a chance to build some amazing websites and go through a public offering and create a company of five thousand people a billion in revenue and That was just an incredible Ri- and then I on this board of directors are Dr Richard Leakey who is a Quite a character in and of themselves. I had the chance to hear him speak to. Uc Irvine A few years ago it was richer. Leakier his son I forgot which one or maybe it was his daughter. Yeah and one of them talking about all the work that they do in. What was it? is it. Uganda or Kenya. Kenya stories ethics so he was famous leakey family. He discovered the the famous lucy fossil remains and he wrote a book in the early nineties called the sixth extinction. And he's chronicle the exact problem that we're having right now which is facing an existential threat with climate change. We're seeing temperatures rising oceans rising polls melting Biodiversity shrinking our oceans becoming more and more acidic and all of the factors around that. And he's been quite a you know savant and I think just very visionary guide and that got me really thinking about you know. Think about what deep responsibility we have to ensure that future generations have a better opportunities than we had. And I'm not sure we're living up to that Our responsibility and I was very moved by that and then have the opportunity to go to solar city. Where you log. Musk was our largest shareholder and chairman of the board and Got To go through my second. Ipo there and That was an unbelievable time. And then Got A call. Go back there We felt the time is right to merge the two which I always thought should have happened earlier just incredible vehicle because that wasn't necessarily the obvious play on Wall Street. You know Sometimes Wall Street. I think have a hard time seeing seeing things I mean. Look at Tesla's stock. Today was out three four months with one hundred seventy dollars. I think it's over eight hundred today right. But so if he is disrupting the entire transportation sector. And you've got your changing the paradigm. They're so you've got these electric vehicles but you're filling with fossil fuel electrical kind of some of the purpose. So we're seeing a resurgence at eight. I almost look at solar technology very much. Like computing computing. Started these big mainframes minis running these big words rooms with air conditioning myself right now and then it moved to a more distributed paradigm where the CPU cycles. Now run on the palm of your hand with your iphone your android and energies moving in the direction of the cost of panels. Coming down the cost of technology coming down the abundance of Sun and now the ability to self generate and then With the Tesla Power Wall and your electric vehicle. It's changing the world. So it's an amazing time to be alive. It really is rare opportunity for me to ask you the question. I hear all the time when they talk about batteries. The basic battery has gotten a little better. But it's still the basic battery that's been around forever. Maybe it's lithium now and maybe it holds a little longer but is that what's holding it back the giant the ability to store this power for longer than just a few hours. You can generate it but it seems to be the battery. That's the limiting factor in the car in its range in In transferring us off of fossil fuels to a permanent renewable platform here. Yeah what's a little bit more complex that you're right on one hand however we're not quite seeing. Moore's law where CPU cycles double everyone. I guess that's what I was getting. It right yeah. Yeah but we are seeing major innovations. The first version of electric vehicles couldn't even go fifty miles and now you're looking at cars. Go four hundred miles. So that's a four x improvement in less than five years. And I think that you know one of the smart things that Eli on Did such visionary Entrepreneur was understand how to put the right strategic pieces in place to have the kind of disruption innovation and he invested very early on in the gigafactory which is now the largest lithium ion batteries factory in the world and He's doing amazing. Rnd work that is going to show leaps and bounds and the ability to store energy biggest pieces and not only is it. Is it going to increase radically over the coming months and years? But more importantly for homeowners that one of the things that make solar challenging. Is that when you're home? You're usually using about forty percent of the electricity or solar system is generating and then we'll get into kind of a gray area where we ate some public policy to help with called net metering so when your system is over generating it's feeding it back into the grid which does get consumed but it's you know it's it's It's complex but now with my battery I can show charge my battery up and use that. So it's really changing the paradigm in dramatic ways. But you're going to see you know. I'm going on my Tenth Year Teaching Entrepreneurship afternoons at University. There's amazing Rnd work being done on solar cells. There Tesla Solar Rousseau. I think you're going to see. Probably one of the greatest. Innovations occur in the storage area in the next five years. Okay because that always seems to be the weakest link in the process here that the battery is still the battery. And it's better. It's coming Paul. It's common okay. I'm hopeful and then the other thing what about pushback you know. I'll give you a perfect example so I have a second home out in the nine heritage in Palm Springs. My parents used to live in and when they passed. I inherited out there and out in the valley. I was going son all the time. I'm going to put solar on the roof here. I won't ever have to worry about it. And yet they took away the tax incentives and then the local utility center. And we're not going to pay that much for the power that you're taken back because it's hurting into our business. We're in the power production business. We don't WANNA be buying it for MOMS and pops all around America with their solar roofs and all of a sudden the kind of solar business dried up. It's it it it. What was red hot? Suddenly cooled off Is that push back I is that a short term pushback or is that a big term problem here. No it's definitely a short term push back and I think when you see paradigms changing and industry he's denying you're you're seeing the last gasp so I think we all know fossil fuels not the greatest thing for our planet. It's emitting massive amounts of co two into our atmosphere and rounding massive sort of climate debt for future generations to call so what the the beauty of it all is not too long ago you know. Solar Systems were Seven dollars a watt an average solar system. The seven kilowatt at seven dollars. That's fifty thousand dollars a day. They're under three dollars. A lot of ways to go but with especially with storage that allows you to unhook from this net metering. So you don't need the regulatory policy issues that you're running into some you know some difficulties with your current utility provider. My you know I just believe in freedom and I believe consumers should have a choice and when you can only buy electronically from one provider. They can escalate their rates. Whatever they want and it's a monopoly. Times are changing quickly. I think it's not going to be long before you're going to be able to purchase a system that will pay for itself and the very short order or enter into a lease or a power purchase agreement that is actually cheaper than what you're getting today without having to shell out any money at that that's around the corner. I'm I'm I'm I can guarantee you that in the next year or two and what do you think about? I hear Our City Irvine apparently has done this. I think the city of Palm Springs is doing it where they're giving you a choice get green energy and they'll say well for the moment maybe charges you a little bit more. Maybe raise your hundred dollar Bill Two hundred and ten dollars. Something nominal like that but at least then. You're telling us we you want it's sourced from. I don't know Solar Wind. Something geothermal something else here that will consumers pay to switch over to that even if it costs a couple of bucks more hope to have well. I have mixed feelings on that. I think it's because one of the things that Ilan treat back in the day when the green move just started most of the products were inferior and they cost more and just had a point of view. Like that's crazy like these products. I'm going to build products. That are better. That are either at parody of existing cost or cheaper right. And that's what he's I mean. Although there's all this hassle Automobile Is One hundred percent green at electric. Like he's redefined the driving experience Is such an amazing product. He's disrupting the one hundred plus year old transportation industry and ways that we couldn't have imagined just three or four years ago so. I think that for those folks that are challenged may be living in an apartment or their roof. Is this not Conducive to sue the right kind of solar production at the right cost level. It's an okay step but I just don't believe you should have to pay more for that right And I think that you're gonNA find that they'll be more distributed networks that will be in in communities that are directly so. I think it's a short term paradigm. I don't think it's the long term and I think that I think the Grizz important It's like technology today you've got these servers that run at Amazon and Internet based servers. You'RE GONNA have more of a distributed system that works in a more in concert and I think he's GonNa drive a much more cleaner better paradigm. So let's talk about. Electric cars will be where you came from the solar city side of the equation here but the electric car is a fascinating development. It seemed inevitable to so many of us and yet it took so long to get here and there were others who fell along the way fisker here in orange. Although they've come back now is a Chinese entity here but you know they're they They were in the race there for a while and couldn't seem to deliver Was it just Alonzo's tenacity? Was it his deep pocket book that let him keep going Even when there was no prophet there or was what what was it. That made Tesla's succeed. Where so many failed. Yeah God that's a really good very deep question. I'll try and I'll try and keep my answer. Shake going going on teaching My Tenth Year of Entrepreneurship at Stanford and having been successful onshore myself. Well high big successes the mediocre successes and failures. I've always looked at you know entrepreneurship something that can be learned or is DNA exact. And I've come to the conclusion that I believe. Although you can't anything get better at something because you have the natural ability And the natural programming of your brain. Or you don't and there's I brought I've hired executives out of Fedex that have failed miserably and entrepreneurial endeavors and Ilan is truly a force of nature like predecessors and it's time Nikola Tesla J. P. Morgan Rockefeller and now. There's also many folks people talk about them in terms. I've never obviously had a chance to meet the man here. He's one of those unattainable giants that you and a few others have met here. But he's somebody that intrigues us. All and we all wonder how why what. What's the secret sauce here? Well I think it boils down to Some really kind of simple thing. So first and foremost is most folks do not use all of the ability empower that that they have been bestowed US less than ten percent of our brains and that's been proven In both neuroscientists he has such an extraordinarily big thinker. For starters and number two he puts Create the culture at a pattern of extraordinary challenges and one of the things that I remember at Tesla was a a mantra that he always used which was excellent is just a passing grade so the expectations are so high. If the rise to such a level there and keep focuses on big hairy problems and that's where most people fail. He wants to go to Mars and he acts like he's really GonNa do it. Yeah well he is going to do that for sure. I here's a clamp of you won't believe this concept of costs first principles which is breaking things down wasn't sure he's an incredible marketer. He has a he's he's he's the indescribable. But when he was starting spacex he was initiative by rockets from Russia rocket sizes food or Russia and it turns out. The rockets were like sixty million dollars..

Tesla Irvine Toby Corey Ilan Dr Richard Leakey Kenya Russia Tesla Energy Group OC California Paul todd Solar Wind president US Uganda
"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

02:52 min | 7 months ago

"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"You don't sign like we're free service actually from for buyer's agent But they always retain because I think I am able to kind of offer that to them and for whatever reason they have stuck with me on their second turn now seven plus years later from again. That's great though. That's just a testament to how you do business and the relationships you develop so good for you good for you One of my favorite things to do towards the end of the show is to ask my guests. Their final final thought question. And that is what is your ultimate lesson learned in your career as a real estate professional. Just be authentically me There are in. I've worked teams and groups and at the end of the day. When you're shooting yourself. Might my dad would always say be yourself and you can't lose so. I'll leave with that be yourself and you can't lose and I don't have the nerves I don't have the I'm not pretending to be someone. I'm not if we click. It's great if not. That's okay too if I fit and fit. It's a beautiful thing so just be you and be authentic answer. Authenticity big this generation. Don't be a hater. Pixel I can tell all right so my next favorite question is what you're guilty. Pleasure Bachelor really. Oh my goodness how. We finally met Somebody. Who ADMITS THEY WATCH? I mean millions of people doing nobody ever admits show. So if you knew how excited I was right now but I'm not going to comment and say anything through this great image Monday night. We are going to be watching the Bachelorette one point one of those old fuddy who says who watches this fairytale nonsense. We're going to put twenty people the room and they all magically follow love. Every time I mean it just that's it. It's ridiculous is the show ethnic elegance at all. I just cut. That's part of it. Ruined Bartolo family actually promote and help saying I'm Super Fan out all right Who got hot in here? We went to place. I didn't think we'd ever visit here. Careful what we ask so anyway Christina. Thank you so much for being on the show. Thank you for sharing. Thank you for Sharon To how you do your business and trends and I think it's going to be a great value so thank you so much for coming in. It's my pleasure and I wanNA thank everyone who was tuned in and we look forward to being back in studio next week.

Christina Sharon Bartolo
"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

11:05 min | 7 months ago

"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"I like that you're laughing. But she she lived in Palm Springs. Look at those going to say that long term thrown away laughing at it now. It's the hottest thing go to call any and go to some areas in palm springs and that is quite entre. I actually love the color so and I think it looks beautiful with them. A White Oak and good clean line century saw Paul hanging there long enough. It all comes back. You would have thunk. Somebody tweeted into question. How selling real estate change are we all just GonNa go to I'm I shouldn't even mentioned but you know we know the sites. Were all the frayed of your that Now have the listings. And we're just GONNA go on Zillow and all these places here you know. I get asset question a lot and I think it's a it's a great question because on paper it sounds like a one percents Transaction charge is with the way to go but really when you come in to cash the financial repercussions of your biggest investment And just the service aspect but also I can tell you. Numerous occasions in areas like Credit Omar where listing agents unfortunately will not choose that offer When they are represented by red fin or Zillow and that is because it really is a mechanical transaction. And at the face of it. It seems like that's the case but truly it's an emotional process. It's so much more thorough from a legal perspective and financial perspectives. So there are I. I've seen it so many times in it's such a disservice. I I noticed On on both sides really Because there's so much fault in it and I could talk for days about it. There's a lack of concierge to absolutely because it's something you only do once a couple times you know. Bart buys and sells them like candy here. Probably but I've only owned what I think. Two houses in forty years or something digs transaction. And it's so true and what you notice from a negotiation perspective that we save you From knowing just a relationship with other agents especially area like this To like we said all the other factors that can kind of come into play From concierge level your savings so much more money and you have no idea where you're getting into especially in an older home if you don't have the right due-diligence after I leave here I'll be going to a property where you know. There's a we will have a lengthy termite inspection a physical inspection and the things people that I use and have been in the area for over twenty five years. They find things you wouldn't imagine which would save you I mean countless dollars. So that's not something a red vendors Egypt would be able to do trans- actually so Are you doing real estate as a quote unquote investment like second or third properties for people as well it you see a lot of that In addition to obviously primary residences I do at depends of course on the tenure of The client right now. I'm just immersed in the market that is first and second time homebuyers Of course their first home tends to be a million dollars. Takkula great on them but But it it does seem to be that You know I have a divorce. Say currently in San Juan Capistrano. That's looking For her you know fifth and sixth investment opportunities so it's kind of across the board but by and large I would say I'm a first and second time homebuyer. Space currently elder millennial yeah the older millennial ripped. Here's another one that we hear all the time here. Are we in danger? In Orange County of becoming one. Big Leisure World as millennials. Choose to move elsewhere or cannot afford to live here. Our own kids can't afford to live here which is going to be one big senior. Kimmy because the fastest. I look at the statistics. I don't remember exactly there but the fastest of seniors by by population is in places like Orange County and you look at Newport beach. It's like twenty five or thirty five percent of people over fifty five sixty years of age. I mean logically. There's some sense of that right because the older you get when you're like Paul and you're sitting on millions four that's right. You could afford more expensive house versus the millennial. Older older millennial leaders are trying to save up for even a down payment. Though some logic to that and I remember there was some presentation Laguna and there was a proposal for some some Multifamily living in the concern was that they. The only people that are going to be able to afford that are going to be the elderly. It's an interesting question. I but I overall like I mean just speaking of Laguna where we happen to both live and even Orange County. I don't I don't see that it's amazing. Laguna such a. Its own micro-climate But Newport you consider just on the on the other side of Dana Point you can get into a condominium four hundred and fifty thousand dollars and you can probably get an Fha loan so As much as I think people are staying in their property longer as the As a baby boomer generation stays there. Still you know I even in San Juan Capistrano. There were some phenomenal new constructions for under a million so So yeah I think employments going so great here in the area P people are coming here especially with with tech and I can definitely speak from. My you know went to college here and and most of my friends are either from here. Usc and they all want to come back here and raise their families and might not be the twenty something. But I think the thirty something that you know ran to La to begin their career. Like my husband. And I did They WANNA come back here and raise their family and go to the great schools. We don't always have to put our children in private. Schools can save there. There's a lot of great things about Orange County so in my experience You know it's definitely Broadening for that thirty something crowd for sure of you guys aren't worried about the Grain Orange. Canny how about the high rising the high rise of Orange County enough. There's such fights about where else to go up. And Are we going to become San Francisco? We're GONNA become Manhattan or we're going to end up like that you're not gonNa have a backyard and emerge but you're gonNA a starbucks at the base of your building here. Is that where we're going? We have seen a lot of that. Or WE'RE GONNA GAL. I'm I know we're talking to local areas right now but it would be one of the cities that would just fight that hunting. There's no way that's ever GonNa Happen Right. But as long if they're selling that kind of answer that's the opposite to the green because those are going to be more probably affordable right you may. That's how the millennials are going to have their first home ownership And maybe I mean is it A. Is it a trend? It's here Stan. Anaheim by the stadium. It's a big thing. Santan Point Dana Dana Point. They're putting lots of density downtown in a relatively. Yeah right right around the whatever that checked yeah exactly commercial but could be somebody Have you do run across those? You sell them. Do you buy them. I do run across them. Taylor Morrison Some of the new constructions that have kind of by Hoke hospital And I think that's a great star. Property sold one at like seven hundred thousand. And they're you know stone's throw from the ocean so I could see that Paul that that's definitely where that younger millennials going and as you know. They value experiences over things so the fact that they're in the area And close to things to do like the Lantern District that you mentioned They want to take the trolley to the crap house and have a good time. I'm just I'm sure there's people listening right. Now that are outside of California like you said seven hundred thousand dollar this Condo Newport. Yeah they probably have a five thousand square foot five Acre House somewhere in the Midwest for real. It seems like somehow living in Orange County is going to change. And I'm not sure we really planning for. It's just sort of happening because there is no place else to grow Afford Abilities Continue to be an issue in yet tons of people want to still come here and I just wonder what it's going to look like twenty thirty forty years from now we're GONNA have to hang around long enough policy. I plan on Paulo but on the show. I'm going to be the elder baby boom. Hey Christina What is your why o. Bart well I mean my wife has always been. She's nobody's barred sound good. It's funny always connection. I I feel like when I'm going through this process with my clients. I'm literally PART OF THEIR FAMILY. And there's just nothing. I love more than that I live it breathe it. I don't know if that's something healthy or not healthy but it is how it is. I truly am twenty four seven for them but I always wanted something that could kind of collectively be who I was and even You know as you're on my blog I my intention is truly to serve. And so this gives me that freedom to do so And and it's it's been such a beautiful process. I've gotten closer to people I it's like you live their lives when you're buying or selling real estate with them. I could be showing their house every single day. I live and breathe their home. I live and breathe family. Live and breathe nap schedule. Their job promotion there sometimes. I'm a therapist between a husband and a wife. I mean where a lot of hats But that connection is is really the why behind IT I. It doesn't feel like work. I don't drink Monday or weekend Because of that I just have to ask you one of the credit. 'cause you talk about connections you talk about repeat customers and yet you say. Wait ten years. That's a long cycle for that. Repeat to happen here. How do you stay connected to them over ten years or seven or whatever you recommended holding a house for a great question Paul? And it's so neat because I'm actually at that place where I am buying their second home. So it's fun because I watched them six seven years ago. Bring their first child home and they're now on their third. So it's so organic for me Paul. I I've never done a lick of marketing until this year. And it's it's just I really am part of their family and part of their lives And they are part of mine I don't know I guess it's just the way been since I was a little girl. It doesn't feel like it takes much effort. It's a trust. They hear you hear these terms from agents that buyers are always committed..

Orange County Paul Zillow Laguna San Juan Capistrano Bart Palm Springs Dana Point Dana Dana Point San Francisco Midwest La Egypt Anaheim Kimmy Fha starbucks California Usc
"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

02:05 min | 7 months ago

"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"Six weeks renovations happen truly very quickly It took me a while to found. Find those teams but I love to share those resources Because yes it's that's that gray white clean. Modern more contemporary style And then just kind of depending on the area they add a little bit more of that Boho touch or the colorful pop And it's it's so fun surfaces just change the world instead of the style of it but if they can keep the house clean in terms of open sight lines in living areas I think that's ideal deal okay. I'm play devil's advocate here. For a second so is there a risk for someone and maybe I'm probably answer my question but if it's okay I'm GonNa. I'm going to sell my house. I'm going to remodel. Let's say the kitchen and the bathroom but what if the style isn't what a buyer is going to have a style that they're looking for right so that there is a potential that Ramal and the like. That's that's great but I wanted you know X. Style and said why style. It's so but I I would think that the answer is just keep it as clean generic as as possible with good products and then try to appeal to the masses. Exactly I think a fresh coat of paint goes a long ways sometimes even just aesthetically and the fresh smell like those things in a white surface. You can't go wrong with And just try to keep it as up to date as you can. In the last ten years trends again. Financial Trends are also style trends if we can kind of stay on trend for that sail and Just some of those things. People walk in the door. It typically those surfaces the The paint that the ceilings the flooring that can really set the lifespan of a design is at about ten years about ten years. That tempo But then of course we see these amazing mid-century moderns Incredible and I'm sure everything. Now you know in ten years we'll want like the Mahogany Cherry floors again avocado green and orange. That Paul has in his house..

Ramal Paul
"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

14:35 min | 10 months ago

"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"On either side of the field and in the process you try and ride off your opponent or you might hook them to stop them from paying the ball. It's also played right handed so I'm left handed but I had to learn how to play right handed because that way we avoid as much as possible people Clyde ing head on oh I see I see because there's a right of way of the ball so as soon as the balls hit it creates this imaginary line and you want follow that line in order to not Follow your opponent. Keeps the the play moving in the right direction. Is there goalposts. There's goals on either side On the grass. Yes there's two posts and in the arena at the the goals are built into the arena and There's not a goalie per se. No no there's is you cannot gold tent in Polo but you do have offensive and defensive positions and you can get very strategic you know in terms of positioning on the field and and get as complicated as you want in his Ratty Jeanne truce I see people falling or getting hit. It seems like a very like talk about that so I was GONNA ask. This is This is my attempt at humor as hockey where they can take him to start being on each right. Well we know but We saw all of the rules are intended to keep the horses safe and the player safe. We don't want to see anybody getting hurt and one of the great things about arena polo is that it is played. It's softer it's played at a slower pace It is a much safer endeavor than The grass Polo can be horses. In general are always you know you have to be aware at all times what you're doing and and never take it for granted that they're going to just stand there just because they were standing there for an hour before if something spooks them they're going to move But our whole job and our goal it. OC POLO is to keep people safe. We do everything we can to keep the horses in good shape we you know. Keep the equipment in good shape. The Rina's everything we do is because nobody don't WanNa get hurt. We don't WANNA horses to get hurt. So yes any horse activity is definitely a little bit more on the risky side than walking to school. But or the the You provide the horses for players at at your read. We provide the horses for lessons. And then as you progress into club chuckers you need to buy Your own horse and then we provide all the care for the horse so we do everything from make. Sure it's fed to the vet to everything everything that needs to be done but it really Changes the club The way people play when they own their own horse. If you don't own your own horse worse and you come from you know sort of a motorcycle background in anything. Oh this I'm just going to get on and ride it like a motorcycle. Well I don't want you doing that to my a horse so When Union your own horse you start to understand the importance of maybe swing you know at a particular play because if you do hurt your horse then you don't have a horse to play for the next six months or so? It really creates an investment in your sport and improve approve lot faster in these teams is the Final Cup as their what happened. Yeah so we just root for teams. Do I have to play. Can I just come you. You can't so not only So from from an arena polo. We have We have an arena league that we play with Clubs up and down southern California. Yeah that's really fun to get to play against other clubs will make up teams For usually you make up a team for a particular tournament And we do have events that are open to the public and the other thing that we do. That's really a fun. Thing is that we put on private private events so we're sort of providing unique polo experiences for people to whether they wanna come and have a team building event and and bring all of their customers or their. You know hiring employees and we'll get them all on a horse we'll walk him through. All the steps will teach him about how to swinging Mollet Horse Care and then they can come and have lunch and watch a Polo match or we can put on. You know a fancy dinner party and An I'm an exhibition match. So that your guests you know can can see polo up close and we can make the team so that you know there brandon then. Everybody's rooting for one team or the other. Are we donate you know. Raise some money and donate it to charity. So there's a lot of different things we can do because we can put on Polo at anytime and we can cater it to to what people are looking for super creative. So let's say our friend Paul here so I wanna I wanNA start playing poll. I want to start playing Polo. All right So what What do you do with Paul? So Hall Calls Heather who runs our Polo Club and she's a US certified instructor so she's been teaching people for twenty plus years how to play Polo. You set up a polo lesson. And she'll you know first time it'd be one on one and she'll assess where you're at and But I I got to ride a horse because I don't think I've ever been on horse. Bush is GonNa put you on a horse and we'll get you. All you need is a pair of jeans and preferably a pair of boots but if you don't have boots just any closed toed shoes will do we've got the helmet okay. And she will walk you through the basic step so that you can get on a horse and start swinging a mallet and but in an hour and then from there you can kind of you know assess for some people they say. Oh well well that was great. Thanks and other people most of them say that was you know hooked books I where do I sign up. When can I come back? And and and they they come back you know and eventually become Polo Club members But we can. It just depends on how you know. Obviously the more athletic you are the easier easier it is to to pick it up but if I just wanted to watch our events I can just come waddling my grandson and just watch him. We were not open to the public on a daily basis. But what we do is just you contact heather or text Texas on the Social media channels. And we'll let you know when we do have an event going that's open to the public We do put on a lot of different things is just with weather and all of the things that can come on. Come up and change the time. We don't want to post something ahead of time and have the public could come out. Jeff watchers. You feed come out a ticket. Prices depends on the event and what the which particular occasion as some of the Tommy. Give you a little Interesting anecdote they always say in the show. I know a little bit about everything here. I live in Ladera and at the corner of Ortega Highway and Antonio is that there's like a writing area there. I think I'm told. Its Own Bhai Vines Smith she fights to keep that open because every other corner has been developed and she somehow keeps that what I know. It's not Po. What do they do there? That's the jump core. I also because that was originally a polo field. I don't believe that they've ever consistently played poll there but we have put on Polo exhibitions. There now it is used for Grand Prix showjumping right. So that's what you'll see there. But they will tell you my grandson. I know nothing about horses. And we've just grown down to sit and watch and it's amazing watching horse and rider. There's nothing like it. It's just majestic and One of the things we do kind of at halftime as we'll bring the horses up to the crowd and let people pay them and talk to them and try and explain whatever we can And introduce the kids to lower says. It's it's really fun. We talked about training the people training the Paul's but Do are are the horses trained Info Polo or is it kind of an absolutely yes. Yes they are I mean some of them come by naturally are naturally better polo horses. His but They really just. It's enough lettuces them. It's a mind Mindset and a good Polo Pony will turn you know to the ball before you do and We used to have one Polo Pony. Who taught I don't know probably three hundred people how to play Polo and he would kick the ball into the goal for them? That's kind of you calling pony so I'm assuming that I actually know that. The Mongols when they wrote a horde award across Asia road smaller ponies faster and they would run longer. Yes and so- ponies have a connotation being smaller horse as opposed as opposed to racing ignores right. Yeah so we call him ponies and But their horses and ponies Really it refers to the Height so from certain height. It's a miniature horse. And then the next level is a pony and then the next level is a horse I don't know why we've always been called Polo ponies. I should look that up but Some of our horses are small and close to pony size and others are giant thoroughbreds thoroughbreds Off The racetrack. So some of the best Polo ponies come from Argentina. And they're they're called an Argentinian thoroughbred. But they're really a mixture of of the local creole horse thoroughbred They can stop and turn very quickly and they can run fast We use a lot of thoroughbreds thoroughbreds off the racetrack They are fast and they've got. They can run for a long time but they tend to be a little bit more high strung. Sometimes we find great quarter horses who have really good minds and are lot more quiet and they are perfectly suited for playing bipolar Marina Most of the horses that we have have you know they start. That's their first sport but We have converted a lot of horses this along the over the years from other sports to Polo ponies. So what's your what's your expectations or your goals for the future of the Polo Club. Well I think that You know we've spent the last year just trying to get a handle on operating something like this. It's very complicated to have To own the stables of the grounds and then have the Polo Club and then really sort of started this event. Business on top of it So my goal is really to now that we're getting a handle on all that is to be able to enjoy it and to build the The club membership so that we you know the more people we can bring in to enjoy it the the more fun for the rest of us and then I think it's you know with the events. It's really fun because you can introduce you know a hundred people at wants to something. They've never they've never seen it before you know everybody's heard of it but most those people have never seen it. So that's really We've been in Orange County for thirty years and I don't know how many people know that there's been a Polo Kalev around and it's just in their backyard. You know not many so I think now's the time for them to learn that it's in a beautiful location. You feel like you're right you know about that. What what what would it even look like when we walk? It's will the It's just straight up Silverado Canyon which is at the end of Jamboree and You get off the road and all of a sudden you're on this winding country road. You feel like you're out in the middle of nowhere There's a winery out there. There is winery out there. There's a lot of other Other equestrian properties there You just you. You're you just take a deep breath and you can smell the trees and and it's You can't believe that you just got off the to sixty one and so you you kind of wind your way up the canyon a little bit a- and pull off the road and there's the Polo club and it's four acres. Were right on a creek. And there's were right next to Black Star Canyon so it's completely open area next to us And we're able to trail ride from our property out onto Black Star Canyon On on on on trail rides with Irvine UC parks And then the property itself is brand new but it looks like something out out of the Nineteen Thirties California. Yeah it's it's By design you design. Yes it's it's very unique. It's very modern in feel that it's that classic you know. Clean Line It's a the barns are all old wood and and then the buildings are white STUCCO With beams you know exposed beams on the inside and We've spent a lot of time really focusing on every detail because how often do you get to build a Polo Club with all everything. Yeah everything you want My you know we've got horse shoe in bed it in concrete we've we've got Brass inlay signed with the logo and a bar. The best part is good. We've got our own boss. Did she say bar. Polls the Paul got far. They're far so how often does it open. Give us the address and website and all that stuff so Orange County Polo Club love got COM or OC POLO DOT COM and We're the best way to contact us for hours is really to Contact Heather Via the website or if.

Polo Club Paul Orange County Polo Club Polo Pony Mollet Horse Care California hockey Heather Jeanne Rina Black Star Canyon Ladera Argentina Orange County brandon Bhai Vines Smith Brass inlay Bush Jeff watchers
"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

12:50 min | 10 months ago

"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"How do you do it Wilbert? Thank you for having me today. can do show. I'm not really sure I just keep going and going and going until I drop but it's It's all so so much fun that it doesn't really feel like work so I think that's why I never say no. That's actually the key to key to success. I think is doing what you I love to do. It doesn't feel like a job. Let's start with something that's maybe The more obvious is is. How does one come from Training meaning to be an attorney and then only businesses and then developing Polo Club. So tell us about that. Well I have always jumped from one one thing to another and I think this is my fifth or sixth career so My father has was an attorney and I was always doing real estate. Investments on the side and and Always looking for other ways to find income and sort of had an entrepreneurial spirit But use the law firm to really pay the bills and along the way I think I was in high school when he had purchased a self storage George Property and he My my mom was looking for something to do and she said well I'll be the property manager and so she jumped in and learned The self storage business and eventually became The Queen of self storage and has we kind of went on to sort of build a a little mini empire here in southern California self storage properties In the meantime I went off to college I went to film school and Really loved it kind of that world and to do some fun things in film and but all along I realized you know what a loft legal education could do for me and Think I felt like I deserved to be at the table having the conversation but I didn't really have the education yet to do so. I went to law school and in the process Really learned to kind of get excited about the law so after law school a Worked in at a law firm for a couple years but I also knew that There was a family business at home. Sort of calling my name and Started looking at some other entrepreneurials businesses that might be kind of fun and I would bring the spreadsheets home to my dad. Didn't show up to him and he'd compare it to the self storage business and point to call him the Roi and and It didn't take me that long to figure out that maybe I should jump into the self storage business and They had already you know really put the foundation in place and had built this incredible business. But it was before branding was even really a concept so for me. It was really easy to come from New York City where I saw sort of things happening at a faster pace and maybe a little further ahead head of what one might consider the storage industry And apply those things to our business and so it was just fun because it it was right at that time. We were still using yellow pages so I got to really help bring our business to the you know to the twenty first century and along the way Got Back to playing Polo which I had done growing up and We had always been sort of the Supporters of Polo Club and We've moved a few times because there's always new development kind of ready to take over where their stables were and When that happened at our last place might adn I looked at each other and said you know? I think it might be time to find a permanent permanent home So that's where we are now. Okay all right so you're still active with the storage. Yes okay And those are across the country or no we're just in southern California are Game plan was to be able to drive to any location on any given moment to check on business. Okay so we we were lucky to kind of get into some very key locations early on and have just focused on managing them as as as well as we can in providing a really high level of service. Since this is a business show. I will tell you that. In our asset allocations we and the real estate world we love self storage George as a portion so may not be sexy but it is that makes money sexy integrate business. We love it so let's talk about Polo. You grew up playing Polo in New York no in Newport Beach I'm actually from Newport beach. fourth generation Californian so oh I grew up. Doing Hunter Jumpers which is an English exploitation. kind of writing and My Dad would kind of he loved horses as well so he would come with me and he would start writing my show jumper and he put on the bridges and velvet hat and would go to horror shows with me and my mom found a sign for Polo lessons and attack shop. And she thought well that'd be really fund thing to give denny for his birthday so she got him pull a lesson. Where was that Anaheim? Okay yes the first club That eventually became the orange. County poll club. What was called a Winston poll club? It was right by Angel Stadium and it was just a little rundown stables. That happened happen to have a an arena where we they played polo and he came home to. That's the most fun I've ever had. He sold his Porsche. And that's a big move. I always had it was a passionate porsche owner and But to Polo ponies. And that was it for him. He never looked back. I kept doing eight hundred jumpers for a while but I would always go to the barn with him and just the the sheer thrill of being able to ride. You know at an F. Fast Pace on a team with my dad you know was so much fun that I quickly switched over. One Hundred Jumpers Polo. And we've never looked back so we were talking earlier in until I've met you I've only one other person that plays Polo and it's mutual friend. Shane Bom who's been on the show bit about Polo then but Not Enough so so. Let's talk a little bit more about that Paul and I were joking earlier. to say that well we we thought it was just for like the rich and famous and We we know being referenced in that that that Very addictive show called Crown so what is happening with Polo as a as a sport or or as a horn industry. Maybe right well. I think that it's obviously you know we do. All we all picture the big grassy field and the beautiful hats and dresses in royalty playing again. And they're absolutely is that history I mean but the history also goes back to the Mongols and it's Berry Polo as one of the oldest sports in history and it has been played by the military in order to keep the you know officers and the horses in shape And it has always been played you know played on the grass but we also have a game called Arena Polo and that is the played in a much smaller field with three players instead of four. And it doesn't require as many horses it doesn't require as much money and doesn't require as much land and therefore for we're able to sort of bring Polo to people who wouldn't necessarily be able to play Who can't afford to to kind of fly after Florida for four months wants with their string of ponies and couple of Argentine pros as much as? We'd love to do that. Some of US have to go to work every day and to be able to drive you know. Twenty he minutes from the beach to Silverado Canyon just up Jamboree and play Polo with your friends and your family. It's it's it is for everybody is are there other courses. Arenas what do you call them. Well F- Polo clubs other clubs here in southern California. So there's there's no other So there's a couple of grass pull clubs Out in the desert and Santa Barbara which everybody's seen pictures yeah and there are a couple of arena clubs in Los Angeles and we've always been the only arena club in Orange County It's it's hard as you know in Orange County to have any kind of open land that doesn't get developed so and horses in general. Yeah it's difficult to find a place to that's big enough to to have an operation. It's certainly not a moneymaking concept so What we've done is really trying to figure out a way to be a turn key solution for people so that they can live here with their families? Go to work every day A.. And come out you know after work and play Polo Horses Ready. It's tacked up. It's been groomed. It's well taken care of and they can just go out and have fun and on the weekends. They can bring their family. Yeah we have lots of multigenerational families playing and So it really people will go from having never ridden a horse before to playing. You know in Club chuckers any year. Okay we kind of talked about that earlier so when we were talking about. Hey Boys COMPLA- like well. I don't even know how to ride a horse so we love people who've never learned how to never ridden a horse before 'cause we can teach you how to ride while also learning you how to play Polo and when you are focusing on hitting a ball. You're a little less worried about whether you're doing things. Perfect on the worst which allows you to progress a little more quickly And because you're constantly turning to chase the ball you your you know you you you get a seat. What we call a seat very quickly okay and And it's just a lot more fun than riding around in a circle hoping to get your you know post just right. Yeah What the Saddles considered a western saddle and English in English it's It's like an English shuttle. It's just a little bit larger than an English. Saddle really looks like English. Writing but Just sort of a sporty version. Because were a little looser in the saddle trying to reach that ball or you're okay right often opponent so you've said multigenerational you said you play with your dad. You started as a child. What are the age range of players who it might otter is eight years old and she's starting to swing the mallet and we'll probably be playing in chuckers As soon as she possibly can she's chomping at the bit My father's seventy seven years old and he does not show any signs of hanging up the mallet so it really. I mean it really is something that you can play your whole life which is so much fun because what else can you do. You know with men and women kids and adults horses and as a team and so it's I I mean maybe be. Sailing is the closest equivalent to it. right maybe maybe golf but it's different. Yes yeah well that's really. Somebody tweeted and Hausa game played real quickly. I was GonNa ask you that House the game yes well with the ball yeah so soft the arena bowl is a is like a mini soccer ball. So it's like a leather ball that's about the size of a grapefruit free and that's so that it can bounce in the on the dirt arena and then we The difference between grasp Polo and Arena Polo is a lot like indoor soccer versus outdoor soccer. Arena Polo. Looks a little bit like hockey. The ball never goes out of bounds unless you hit it out of bounds. And then you've got to throw it back in so we play three on three so you the three players on each team and two empires and the ball is bowled in and then you are trying to score goal On either side of the field and in the process you try and ride off your opponent or you might hook them to stop them from paying the ball..

Polo Club California attorney Porsche soccer Wilbert Orange County New York City Angel Stadium Anaheim US golf hockey Silverado Canyon denny Shane Bom Santa Barbara
"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

19:14 min | 1 year ago

"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"You knew you had one shot at this and you were ready for it yet the end and then came to the ears which were you know tremendous growth years for me classify that as kind of clever kind of almost say Muzak or something to the carpenters the the carpenters they prayed a time I think a studios right and I I asked part Karen Karen I'm gene Elliott just got signed PNM's Oh good to meet you and I said can I ask you a question that's weren't but I mean the last the eagles come out in their suddenly this country rock you know or or you've got all sorts of very it seemed like it started in the late sixties and into the early seventy as you head everything from James Taylor to Chicago and brass bands you know it seemed like everything was open at that time we had such fusion was in Paris in the eighteen nineties when he's interested as renoirs you know to chagall's that we're actually combining classical art with modernism and and and same thing with music reveal themselves and debussy expression impressionism was really a combination of folk music with what later would become jazz with classical music with with music was actually a real music Princeton rebel would would employer out of a Basque music I don't know idea that okay now you're educating me here all right so with with music in the seventies uh we would try our best to imply all these different nuance Genres to mainstream music for me it was yes of course Ban some folks always lyrically based a little bit of Jazz Combo stuff a little bit rock stuff a little bit of our NBC love you know and some stuff that I couldn't really you know Categorize at all so it was always a combination of many music I liked big band but I refuse to use ordinary big band sound okay a horn section I wanted to do with synthesizers and I wanted to Caricature is the big band sound and that's what we had and powerful people and dumb it's on just to the Gemini and very powerful layered stuff almost in a minute he's a strange comparison maybe I'm reaching for something but almost kind of like filled with Phil Spector with his wall of sound in in Simpler Times he tried to make them seem lush and and deeper rather than just you know three chords and Bass Drum and guitar here well you know my tensions for Harmonic d easy it's always made it more difficult you know to arrange orchestrate In those days there were no such thing as polyphonic synthesizer it's no it was monoplane that means you have to pay one or the time so if you did a horn section or violence section with six to ten those whatever it is we have to play once a one note at a time and then and then doubled it you know perks go back and do it again exactly yeah right and then lay on another track here right yeah it wasn't that easy but gave us out you know and it was it was something unique confessional it was time for for not only you know William time for a burgeoning time for music and it was lovely and the eighties with again was different music was tightening up but music up I wanted to open myself up to new influences and I thought were no more influences you know in music that I thought especially mainstream music could really influenced me in the way that I wanted so I went off into poetry land and I went off into literature and went back to the college and and I I went into the humanity in theology got well subsequently really affect the way I recorded yonder tree subsequent album so during that period of exploration I'm sorry to train rush the story but we got about five or seven minutes left here during that period of time you can dropped out of public view the church changed we had new wave music and and punk and it's almost like they wanted to go back to super simple again here they didn't want our castrations they didn't want lush they wanted stripped down sounds again here did did that change your flavor your quest or you're just on your own as you said mission quest here to find your own voice your own stories well I I played a little bit that game you know with black cars and hurts to be in love and wild horses and we had reasonable success with it and But I just by by the time the late eighties came I was not interested and in in mainstream music anymore I just was not it wasn't interesting to me more people were just trying to hit the bottom line or the lowest common denominator to attract an audience and that we tried to manufacture it hit rather than make music that really came from the artist right that's exactly so so in in in late eighties nineties that went off into my own thing and and worked with big orchestras you know and even record a full on orchestral concerts we oriented album like condo and so I and then I lived for two or three years and the melons and worked with touchy dishes and according to Nelson call a good thing so I for people who follow what I do you know the cardinal rule was stay interested as you stay interested you might be interesting there you go all right so I gotTa tell you what interested me when I went to your website talk about your interest in singing and other languages that seems far afield from anything else I could have imagined and I've looked at this piece I don't know when it was recorded this Canto and yeah it's spectacular. I Dunno where it would play today I don't know what station would run it except on the Internet there are no stations like us you know it's it's anything in everything and I I'm not trying to just blow smoke at your but your voice is never been better your interpretation I mean it just move me to listen to this piece and I have wow that's something this guy has still you know so often we think well the artist is coming back to just recreate their hits and and we're going to relive those days again here you've in directions nobody could have followed her imagine and you're hitting it well you know I I love doing that I just recently did a from the new Wilderness Road L. CO wrote Redemption. I did that in Spanish with a friend of mine from Argentina I'll a hundred learner and it's called El Camino de don't and it was really fun you know it's on my facebook I it's really a I really enjoyed singing in Spanish it's not that easy if you don't thing in Spanish that he do just phonetically learn the phrases like like how I read about pop stars try and record in Japanese or something just because wanted to a foreign language version of their song and they would they had no idea what they were saying but they would have to learn it phonetically I the method actor way I e I became an I studied what what the translation was all about really internalize it and of course Alejandro help with pronunciation but I knew exactly what I was thinking when I was saying then that really was the impetus for for my thing so why sing in foreign languages it's hard enough to say that can do certain things in those languages that I can't do an English like what what would you say the language has a different sound has different meanings it has another certain different phrases that don't translate English and well a certain sound for instance in Italian the vowels are bigger longer wider and Spanish there are more intricate consonance a for instance they're like the song a Roach redemption the English version is so long road to redemption John that's what it is in English and Spanish sickest lot of glass Giannino Day I don't know why but that sounds more mandic and lyrical to me just just I have no idea what you're saying which is the sound of it in Spanish or Italian like they have to really time your continent and then on a challenge I love you know but I like to sing things that are meaningful and I think that's why people still come Syr concerts because I'm not just running through the hit although we do that right advantage that's the starting point not the ending point you're starting with here's where we were and here's where I've gone yeah I mean when we it's fun to do night Walker it's fun to brother brother in Appalachia and all that but it's also you know fun for me to pick up the guitar and do something beautiful from from wilderness road you know and I I just you know look I mean music is just more than sound it's what lies behind the sound that is the impetus for the sound is the intention behind the sound that that really still gets to me on deep level well I'll tell you what I heard your music which I had not heard the stuff if you're talking about here in some foreign languages like the can't is it a canto the piece that up on your site there you playing with unofficial brother playing on piano or somebody Don Wow it's just below video go check it out everybody your website is a g I N V dot Com Link Valley facebook you know we have a bunch of videos on there I love doing in fact we're shooting another video on Monday at a local pool hall and a Video and we'll end the piece here for many years you would know this I went from being a DJ to being an entertainment publicist I handled Johnny Mathis and Anthony Quinn a whole bunch of people and then i to produce the world nine ball championship mental these guys from the old Steve Ms Rex up to the modern era how I fell into and so we're chatting with emerging and halfway through the callers Paul it turned out that they were blind and I said incredulously you like pool somebody would start breaking the balls in crowd would gather we wouldn't do anything just the sound of that's an attractive sound so I challenge you to think about how you can incorporate some of that in to your music because I think you'll find amazing I'm GONNA use a lot of the breaking the of the balls to to accentuate some of the you know the the open evaluated by the F._D._a. this product is not intended to diagnose treat cure or prevent any disease..

Argentina seven minutes three years
"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

13:45 min | 1 year ago

"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"Roll acts and everything in between I mean there was a rich environment it seems like well they had I mean a lot of ars that I really really admired including Ken Stevens Joe Cocker Right Carpenters and in Quincy Jones and George Harrison made a deal with them and oh king made a deal with them and so I mean they they they were really the the most famous and the best independent label you know in the world at that time and it was really an honor and privilege to be they found artists was not the carpenter viewpoint I I confess I was a big carpenters fan too and and era when that was kind of could be seen as UN cool this kind of I mean she sang so magnificently but this kind of lush almost like The throwback to the forties and fifties kind of music orchestral kinds of songs to Joe Cocker. I mean you know there's there's a wide range between those audiences in those south but they seem to be able to find artists in niches and develop that in a way that others wouldn't or couldn't they weren't just bound to afford formula I remember the first week that I just went to the ATM studios and of course her was producing crazy himself and Karen Carpenter's coming in and she was rolling her drums in and You know I was star struck with all the great artists going in and out of A and studios right and I and I I asked part Karen Hi Karen I'm gene Elliott just got signed PNM's Oh good to meet you and I said can I ask you a question that's weren't why are you rolling your own drum and she's never stopped being Rhody I love it I love it all right so you're in this rich environment and you flourish and and described the music I don't WanNa put my own classification on it but it's not the it it was a very lush to me a very orchestral kind of sound to this it wasn't just your typical top forty pop music and yet it played on the pop charts how how would you how would you classify where does it fit I may I know artists hate to do that. but for those who may be younger and they're trying to understand what that time was like what what was your music about well you have to you know give the audience a backdrop and the backdrop was in the seventies music was the thing in people's lives and the music was exploding in the sense that music was fusing into all these new ones dial yeah combining styles calling fusion but I mean the eagles come out in their suddenly this country rock you know or or you've got all sorts of very it seemed like it started in the late sixties and into the early seventy if you had everything from James Taylor to Chicago and brass bands you know it seemed like everything was open at that time we had such fusion would in Paris in the eighteen nineties when you enter the Nays renoirs you know to chagall's that we're actually combining classical art with Modernism and and and same thing with music reveal themselves and Debussy French impressionism was really a combination of folk music with what later would become jazz with classical music with with music that was actually a real music Princeton rebel would employer out of a Basque music I had no idea that okay now you're educating me here all right so with with music in the seventies so we would try our best to imply all these different nuance Genres to mainstream music for me it was yes of course van some folks always lyrically based a little bit of Jazz Combo stuff a little bit rock stuff a little bit of our NBC you know and some stuff that I couldn't really you know categorize at all so it was always a combination of many music I liked big band but I refuse to use ordinary big Bam town okay a horn section I wanted to do with synthesizers and I wanted to caricature is the big band sound and that's what we had and powerful people and it's been just as Gemini and very powerful layered stuff almost in a weird Jesus a strange comparison maybe I'm reaching for something but almost kind of like filled with Phil Spector did with his wall of sound in in Simpler Times he tried to make them seem lush and and deeper rather than just you know three chords and Bass Drum and guitar here well you know my tensions for Harmonic D easy it's always made it more difficult you know to arrange orchestrate In those days there were no such thing as polyphonic synthesizer it's no it was monoplane that means you have to play one or the time so if you did a horns section or violence section with six to ten those whatever it is we have to play one a one note at the time and then and then doubled it back and do it again exactly yeah right and then lay on another track here right yeah it wasn't that easy but gave it sound you know and it was it was something unique confessional it was time for for not only you know it was time for a burgeoning time for music and it was lovely and the eighties with again was different music was tightening up but music tightening I wanted to open myself up to new influences and I thought were no more influences you know in music that I thought in especially mainstream music could really influenced me in the way that I wanted so I went off into poetry land and I went off into literature and went back to the college and and I I went off into the humanity in theology got well subsequently really affect the way I recorded yonder tree and subsequent album so during that period of exploration I'm sorry to train rush the story but we got about five or seven minutes left during that period of time you dropped out of public view the church changed we had new wave music and punk and it's almost like they wanted to go back to super simple again here they didn't want our considerations they didn't want lush they wanted stripped down sounds again here did did that change your flavor your quest or you're just on your own as you said mission quest here to find your own voice your own stories well I I played a little bit that game you know was black cars and hurts to be in love and wild horses then we had reasonable success with it and But I just by by the time the late eighties came I just was not interested and in in mainstream music anymore it just was not it wasn't interesting to me any more people were just trying to hit the bottom line or the lowest common denominator rice to attract an audience and that we talked to manufacture it hit rather than make music that really came from the artist right that's exactly so so in late eighties nineties I went off into my own thing and I ended up worked with big orchestras you know and even record a full on orchestral concerts we oriented album like condo and so I and then I lived for two or three years in the Netherlands and worked with such musicians and according to Nelson call a good thing so I for people who follow what I do you know the cardinal rule was stay interested as you stay interested you might be interesting there you go all right so I gotTa tell you what interested me when I went to your website talk about your interest in singing and other languages that seems far afield from anything else I could have imagined and I've looked at this piece I don't know when it was recorded this Canto and yeah it's spectacular I dunno where it would play today I don't know what station would run it except on the Internet there are no stations like us you know it's it's anything and everything and I I'm not trying to just blow smoke at your but your voice is never been better your interpretation I mean it just move me to listen to this piece and I thought wow that's something this guy has still you know so often we think well the artist is coming back to just recreate their hits and and we're going to relive those days again here you've gone in directions nobody could have followed her imagine and you're hitting it well you know I I love doing that I just recently did a from the new Wilderness Road L. Call Road to redemption I did that in Spanish with a friend of mine from Argentina I'll a hundred learner and it's called El Camino de don't and it was really fun you know it's on my facebook I it's really a I really enjoyed singing in Spanish it's not that easy if you don't wanted to a foreign language version of the song and they would they had no idea what they were saying but they would have to learn at service and I did the method actor way either I became an I studied what what the translation was all about really internalized and of course Alejandro helped me with pronunciation but I knew exactly what I was thinking when I was singing and that really was the impetus for for my singing so why sing in foreign languages it's hard enough to say that can do certain things in those languages that I can't do an English like what what would you say the language has a different sound it has different meanings it has I know there are certain different phrases that don't translate into consonance a for instance they're like the song a Roach redemption the English version is so long road to redemption John that's what it is in English and Spanish sickest lot of glass Giannino Day I don't know why but that sounds more although we do that right advantage that's the starting point not the ending point you're starting with here's where we were and here's where I've gone yeah I mean when we if you're talking about here in some foreign languages like the can't is it a canto the piece that up on your site there you playing with unofficial brother playing on piano or somebody on wow it's just below video go check it out everybody your website is a g I N v DOT COM Link Valley great apple sharks in the video we're going to end with another common theme here the sounds to work into stuff I I'm going to tell you a quick story here that we'll end the piece here for many years you would know this I went from being a DJ to being an entertainment publicist I handled Johnny Mathis and Anthony Quinn a whole bunch of people and then somehow stumbled into the world of billiards and I produced in one thousand nine hundred seven one of the biggest billiard tournaments ever put on it was here in Los Angeles at the Biltmore and when to produce the world nine ball championship all these great guys from the old Steve Ms Rex up to the modern era how I fell into that's a long story but we were doing a Romo Piece in Louisville Kentucky and we're on the radio talking about an tournament that's coming up and somebody called and said I love pool you're blind I said I just loved the sound of the balls clashing together so I hope you'll will work some of those sound it is a magic.

Joe Cocker Karen Carpenter Ken Stevens Quincy Jones UN George Harrison seven minutes three years
"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

14:19 min | 1 year ago

"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"It's cutting into your exercise time it stabbing you in the back nine and it's attacking your peace of mind it's pain and it's getting in between you If you want to live CD medic target your pain at its source it's fast acting relief with active OTC ingredients plus the added benefits of THC free hemp oil. Welcome back everybody another episode of OC spotlight the one show that talks about the most incredible people doing the most amazing things right here in your own backyard and this I'm well a personal favourite of my we have somebody with us that long enjoyed his music and he's decided to come back into our backyard here in Orange Johnny he's going to be doing some concerts in San Diego and in up in Beverly Hills soon welcome if you will the one and only gene of Anneli welcome Sir good to be with you Paul Gina the Nellie take us on the ride of the last twenty or thirty years of as we were talking offline I was distracted young young disc jockey in Ann Arbor and then eventually in Virginia and loved your music all the the ounce of that era the seventies into the eighties and the music business changed dramatically I got outta radio and lost track of so many artists as times changed as tastes changed Take us through that journey what I wanNA start with you as a young boy in candidate here with a Dream Your father is a cabaret singer as I understand looking at your bio here and you get inspired by jazz drummers and cabaret singers and classical music how does that spark turn into the The big superstar that you became in the seventies and eighties here as as a child I was introduced to a lot of great music am you know I'll give this example A lot of people would say that a Steinway D. was a great sounding piano okay well when you listen to a Stein way D- whether it'd be erroll Garner playing in Oscar Peterson talking my language because I was a big jazz fan so creep going here for for me at by the time I was ten years old it's not that a dime away d sound good it's just the way channel should sound everything else was less than less than piano sound right so for me you know the the big bands the great drummers of the great singers that's the way you're supposed to think and that's the way you're supposed to play my standard was were standards were Pretty High I was lucky to have been a drummer to release them in a place called the cavs Aloma at eleven years old in Montreal oh my goodness yeah I got to meet Gene Krupa Buddy rich and Stan Kenton live and and see Duke Ellington Ella Fitzgerald Tony Bennett real up close you know and really took a good good close look at their technique how they breathe intonation pitcher eleven most kids are uh-huh playing baseball I'm watching Batman or whatever I had my share that too but but you know for me it was all it was really the the the pension for Frist Petix was just so there When I was in sixth grade seventh grade I was the only kids who got who took the free tickets to go see the Montreal symphony every Thursday I good for for any elementary school kids the the first time that I went they played Rebels Daphne employed and I said to myself I said well I don't know what it is I don't I can't I can't sure the tonics I can't hear the fundamentals and it's sounds like it's somewhere in the spheres and so it intrigued me so much rebels way right and then with Ravel's Bolero but I don't I don't remember all of his other compositions the one that they use be ten so famously yeah right yeah all all is counter compositions are just amazing but when another incident was when the first time I was introduced to Sunday mass was when I was six or seven years old and my parents wanted me to go and I was born rate Catholic Child Catholic school France schools and all we're connecting on another level I'm still a good Irish Catholic and the Church has obviously rich tradition of music going way back when I didn't want to go and when I walked in to the church in one hundred piece squires started thinking Patterson jelic the I I mean I got shivers all over my body and I get God really lives here Ya down all the harmonies Rian Chance Oriental impounded it was something you know acoustics something really visceral you know something tax how about music that really kind of this touched you in a way that most six seven eight ten eleven year olds didn't some of them just wanted to pick up a guitar and be Elvis Presley her you had a real deep connection with the music itself did and and I I I love the drums and when I was by the time I was ten or eleven I father bought me a kiss and Ludwig Kit I was lucky kid my time I was twelve I started taking piano lessons and then took guitar lessons when I was forty eighteen and and that really giddy having basic knowledge of all the rhythmic or the rhythm section instruments really started my my arranging a really helped my ranging abilities now you I was GonNa say somewhere in there you picked up a a record contract in Canada did you get a Juno award there quivalent of sort of the grammys or whatever that came later by by by the time I got out of high school I got signed to ours Victor one of the big record companies and had sort of mild hit in Canada gave me a good taste of the business and then I asked for my release and I moved to New York that was not quite eighteen I dropped out of college while I figured I'd take up my education along the way and so I read phonetically and I continued my muse to carry lessons you know with with private m where your parents supportive of this or were you following the dream that your dad had to for himself at maybe one point time or were they saying no don't go there this'll break your heart here my mother was terrified my father had his fingers crossed I like that all right so now the story that I got I'm sure you've told us a million times it's in your bio it's in your wikipedia article yes he has a great wikipedia page here folks go check it out I never had heard this story but I'm GonNa ask you to retell quickly one more time here you come to Hollywood according to what it says you're down to your last five bucks brother and you decide to take a bold move and stand outside the gates of A. and M. Records over there of sunset and Try and meet a great famous herb Alpert talk about that well you know I have to you know precluded or at least we see did you know with with this feeling that I always felt like music was more than just a career or a job I felt like it was something that was inside and made it had to be brought out yeah sounds like Oh yeah I always you know look at it a little bit like a mission quit and after being an ally month and having all the doors slam shut my face we had to leave the next day and I I didn't want to leave so I got up early that morning and I walked on okay boulevard and I as a song says I did stop it to a church and I I rested in the pews and fell asleep this like the Mamas Papas California dreaming here right yeah and I woke up with exactly knowing what I have to do and I went back to the at that time was called the Orange Motel five bucks a day and I got up and took my guitar and I just waited in front of the gate The Charlie Chaplin Studios Wearing records was yes and of course that was worn by the guard and all that kind of stuff and finally three or four hours later I saw her come out of his office and walk across the parking lot and I said this is exactly what I thought this is the moment yep so I dropped my guitar ran through the gate was changed and a constant herb and while I was being dragged away by the guard I think that a little mercy in his heart and ask the guard let me go in and asked me what I wanted just let me sing you a couple of songs come back in thirty minutes Oh my goodness I hang him I saw him let's see Mama Koko lady people gotta move crazy she likes to songs like that yeah and all those became big hits for yeah right well at least well-known yeah you know he just turned mink what welcome to the family and I started recording Three weeks later I went back to Montreal it was Christmas Day isn't this the story that keeps everybody coming the the possible dream the down to your last buck and you literally get in front of the man and you have five minutes less than thirty seconds to make an impression and you did yep yeah and but I had worked towards it for five years Sir because you see I started really early and by by the time with eighteen I mean I was well not quite five years I've got twenty one but every breathing moment you know every waking moment I thought about it and I tried to improve myself and by the time I did perform for for her but I guess I was ready to make an impression how well you were you were prepared for that one moment from crazy left to power for people to storm at sunup and just the Jim Knight then ending up you know would brother brother you know that that six year period was tremendous growth and let's go back and look at the roster in and this is like what the late seventies somewhere in that period time here my first record was ninety seven me too and then broach that was nineteen seventy eight so if I remember correctly from my disc jockey days m was a was not what record companies are today they had a very wide sound from T- from herbs original Tijuana Brass Whatever you want to and then then Gina's Vanilla and rock and roll acts and everything in between I mean there there was a rich environment seems like well they had I mean a lot of ars that I really really admired including Cat Stevens and Joe Cocker and right carpenter and in Quincy Jones and George Harrison made a deal with them and oh king made a deal with them and so I mean they they they were really the the most famous and the best independent label you know in the world at that time and it was really an honor and privilege to be they found artists with the carpenter viewpoint I I confess I was a big carpenters fan too and and Arab when that was kind of could be seen as uncalled this kind of I mean she sang so magnificently but this kind of lush almost like throwback to the forties and fifties kind of music orchestral kinds of songs to Joe Cocker? I mean you know there's there's a wide range between those audiences in those south but they seem to be able to find artists in niches and develop that in a way that others wouldn't or couldn't they weren't just bound to offend Formula I remember the first week that I just went to the ATM studios and of course her was producing crazy? himself and Karen Carpenter's coming in and she was rolling her drums and You know I was star struck with all the great artists going in and out of you know why are you rolling your own trump and she's never stopped being Rhody I love it I love it all right so you're in this rich environment and you flourish and and described the music I don't WanNa put my own classification on it but it's not the it it was a very lush to me a very orchestral kind of sound to this it wasn't just your typical top forty pop music and yet it played on the pop charts How how would you how would you classify where does it fit I may I know artists hate to do that but for those who may be younger and they're trying to understand what that time was like what what was your music about well you have to you know give the audience the backdrop and the backdrop was in the seventies music was fee thing in people's lives and ah was exploding in the sense that music was fusing into all these new ones dial yeah combining styles calling fusion.

Karen Carpenter five years six seven eight ten eleven yea thirty minutes thirty seconds eleven years five minutes thirty years Three weeks seven years four hours ten years six year
"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

11:32 min | 1 year ago

"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"It's cutting into your exercise time it stabbing you in the back nine and it's attacking your peace of mind it's pain and it's getting in between you If you want to live CD medic target your pain at its source it's fast acting relief with active OTC ingredients plus the added benefits of THC free hemp oil. welcome back everybody another episode of OC spotlight the one show that talks about the most incredible people doing the most amazing things right here in our own backyard in this I'm well a personal favourite of my we have somebody with us that long enjoyed his music and he's decided to come back into our backyard here in Orange Johnny he's going to be doing some concerts in San Diego and in up in Beverly Hills soon welcome if you will the one and only gene of Anneli welcome Sir good to be with you gene of the Nellie take us on the ride of the last twenty or thirty years of as talking offline I was distracted young young disc jockey in Ann Arbor and then eventually in Virginia and loved your music all the the sounds of that era the seventies into the eighties And then the music business changed dramatically I got OUTTA radio and lost track of so many artists as times changed as tastes changed Take us through that journey what am I wanNA start with you as a young boy in candidate here with a Dream Your father is a cabaret singer as I understand looking at your bio here and you get inspired by jazz drummers and cabaret singers in classical music how does that spark turn into the The big superstar that you became in the seventies and eighties here as as a child I was introduced to a lot of great music am I'll I'll give you this example a a lot of people would say that a Steinway D. was a great sounding piano okay well when you listen to a Stein way D- whether it'd be erroll Garner playing and Oscar Peterson talking my language because I was a big jazz fan so creep going here for for me at by the time I was ten years old it's not that a dime away d sound good it's just the way channel should sound everything else was less than less than piano sound right so for me you know the great a big bands the great drummers of the great singers that's the way you're supposed to think and that's the way you're supposed to play my standard was were standards were pretty high I was lucky to have been a drummer released Bam in a place called the cavs Aloma at eleven years old in Montreal oh my goodness yeah I got to meet Gene Krupa Buddy rich and see Stan Kenton live and and see Duke Ellington Ella Fitzgerald Tony Bennett real up close you know and not really took a good good close look at their technique how they breathe intonation pitcher eleven most kids are uh-huh playing baseball I'm watching Batman or whatever I had my share that too but but you know for me it was all it was really the the the pension for for aesthetics was just so there When I was in sixth grade seventh grade I was the only kids who got who took the free tickets to go see the Montreal symphony every Thursday my good for for any elementary school kids the the first time I I went they played Reveal Daphne and chloe and I said to myself I said well I don't know what it is I don't I can't I can't sure the tonics I can't hear the fundamentals but it sounds like it's somewhere in the spheres and so it intrigued me so much rebels way right and then familiar with Ravel's Bolero but I don't I don't remember all of his other compositions here the one that they used in the movie ten so famously yeah right yeah all all all is counter compositions are just amazing but when another incident was when the first time I was introduced to Sunday mass was when I was six or seven years old and my parents wanted me to go and I was born Great Catholic Child Catholic School France schools and all we're connecting another level I'm still a good Irish Catholic and the Church has obviously rich tradition of music going way back when I didn't want to go and when I walked in to the church in one hundred piece choirs started thinking Patterson Jelic the I I mean I got shivers all over my body and I get God really lives here yeah down all the harmonies the enchants now the orient confounded it was something you know acoustics something really visceral you know something tact how about music that really kind of this touched you in a way that most six seven eight ten eleven year olds didn't some of them just wanted to pick up a guitar and be Elvis Presley her you had a real deep connection with the music itself did and and I I I love the drums and when I was by the time I was ten or eleven a father bought me a kiss and Ludwig Kit I was lucky kid my time I was twelve I started taking piano lessons and then took guitar lessons when I was fourteen eighteen and and that really the hunting basic knowledge of all the rhythmic the rhythm section instruments really started my My arranging a really helped my ranging abilities now you I was GonNa say somewhere in there you picked up a a record contract in Canada right didn't you get a Juno award their their equivalent of the grammys or whatever well that came later by by by the time I got out of high school I got signed to ours victor one of the bigger record companies and had sort of mild hit in Canada gave me a good taste of the business and then I ask for my release and I I moved to New York I was not quite eighteen I dropped out of college while I figured I'd take up my education along the way and so I read phonetically and I continued my Erie lessons you know with with private m where your parents supportive of this or were you following the dream that your dad had to for himself at maybe one point time or were a saying no don't go there this'll break your heart here my mother was terrified my father had his fingers crossed I like that all right so now the story that I got I'm sure you've told us a million times it's in your bio it's in your wikipedia article yes he has a great wikipedia page here folks go check it out I never had heard this story but I'm GonNa ask you to tell quickly one more time here you come to Hollywood according to what it says you're down to your last five bucks your with your brother and you decide to take a bold move and stand outside the gates of a. and M. Records over there off of sunset and try and meet the a great famous herb Alpert talk about that well you know I have to you know precluded or at least we see did you know with the feeling that I always felt like music was more than just a career or a job I felt like it was something that was inside and made it had to be brought out yeah sounds like Oh yeah I always you know look at it a little bit like a mission quit and after being an ally month and having all the doors you know slam shut my face we had to leave the next day and I I didn't want to leave so I got up early that morning and I walked on okay boulevard and I as a song says I did stop it to a church and I I rested in the pews and fell asleep like the mamas Papas California dreaming here right yeah and I woke up with exactly knowing what I have to do and I went back to the at that time was called the Orange Motel five bucks a day and I got up and took my guitar and I just waited in front of the gate the Charlie Chaplin Studios wearing records was yeah and of course that was worn by the guard and all that kind of stuff and finally three four hours later I saw her come out of his office and walk across the parking lot and I think this is exactly what I thought this is the moment yep so I dropped my guitar ran through the gate was changed and a constant herb and While I was being dragged away by the guard I think that a little mercy in his heart and asked the guards let me go in and asked me what I wanted just let me sing you a couple of songs come back in thirty minutes Oh my goodness thank him I saw him let's see Mama Koko lady people gotta move crazy do you like if you she songs like that yeah and all those became big hits for yeah right well at least well-known yeah he just turned Meanwhile welcome to the family and I started recording Three weeks later I went back to Montreal it was Christmas Day isn't this the story that keeps everybody coming the possible dream the down to your last buck and you literally get in front of the man and you have five minutes less than thirty seconds to make an impression and you did yep yeah and but I had worked towards it for five years Sir because you see I started really early and by by the time with eighteen I mean I was well not quite five years I've got when I was twenty one but every breathing moment you know every waking moment I thought about it and I tried to improve myself and by the time I did perform for for her I guess I was ready to make an impression yeah well you were you were prepared for that one moment so you knew you had one shot at this and you're ready for it yet the end and then came two years the years which were you know tremendous growth years for me from crazy left to power for people to storm at sunup and just the Jim Knight and ending up you know would brother brother you know that that six year period there's tremendous growth and just let's go back and look at the roster in and this is what the late seventies somewhere in that period time here my first record was nineteen hundred you too and then brought to you by that was nineteen seventy eight so if I remember correctly from my disc jockey days m was a is not what record companies are today they had a very wide sound from T- from herbs original Tijuana Brass whatever you want to classify that as kind of clever kind of almost say Muzak or something here at to the carpenters the the carpenters that period of time I think that and then then Gina's Vanilla and rock and.

five years six seven eight ten eleven yea three four hours thirty minutes thirty seconds eleven years five minutes thirty years Three weeks seven years ten years two years six year
"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

06:02 min | 1 year ago

"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"Award-winning faculty like those were featuring today. You can learn more at DMC dot W. V._U.. Dot E._D._U.. Go there and find out more <music>. Let's pick it back up with our last couple of minutes talking about P._R.. And other sorts of topics yes sounds good. Thank you Paul and again. We're talking to Harney Micevski President of ninety degree communications communications and a leading expert in P._R.. Executive Communications Corporate Affairs and a whole lot more <hes> we're talking about. I paused you there. We were talking about R._O._I.. Just wanted to ask again. You know how can communications educations professionals demonstrate again that that R._O._I.. On the activities that they are <hes> you know that they are executing on Roy well that the short answer is to go to Barcelona and see if you could just suck it up the Eh prof- profession gathered there twice <hes> in <hes> most recently at Twenty fifteen in Barcelona to develop. It's a great city to develop the Barcelona principles which were or an attempt to to answer this fundamental question which is how do you measure R._O._I.. For for communications P._R.. What what sort of resources do you need to do that? What metrics do you need to do that and the the thing I think that came out of that the single most important thing that came out of that was to stop using advertising equivalents <hes> and it's still used quite frankly in the profession but it's because it's it's it is a real serious? It's a serious number but so A._B._C.'s and and online impressions are still two numbers that are used in the profession but the the message out of boss out of Barcelona is stop using issues and ah I think the communications profession still having a difficult time <hes> with that <hes> and I don't I don't have a silver bullet answer for that one <hes> but I I will because a lot of what communications and P._R.. Professionals do is the value of it is qualitative not quantitative <hes> it is and I'll heart you know reference again the the <hes> The C._E._o.. Profile. File a major business publication or <hes> a company profile in either trade magazine or a <hes> <hes> local regional publication. I did some work <hes> recently a for a consumer Tech Company <hes> probably not a maiden not not apple Microsoft not at that level but probably a company that people would recognize a company that has reimagined itself a few times and changed its <hes> <hes> AH products at a company that had a C._e._o.. Crisis of financial management crisis a couple of years ago and really restructured the organization brought in some new leadership and the story that that we were able to place was a story about that that process and how the company has emerged and <hes> and the new product lines it was involved in and that sort of thing and that was extremely valuable. The people that it was extremely valuable for in this case was the board of directors and some of the institutional shareholders right right. It was a very important that now that's a very well defined audience and it is a very limited audience <hes> so <hes> you know I'm not sure how you apply a metric to that another client <hes> and I'm trying to bring these real world experiences to to what I do and I teach the course I told the students and of course I come here as a practitioner not as a little. I have some academic training on not an academic right. We actually I did want to ask you. We have just under a minute here and I just wanted to ask you that one that one final question <hes> that I teased coming coming out of the break <hes> who looking forward in your crystal ball who's going to prevail in that C. Suite the CEO's The C._M._O.'s. That's a that's a good question. I I did a recent survey on Lincoln. There are roughly sixty thousand people on leaked and who have C._M._o.. In current or past title and our about five thousand only five thousand who have C._O.. In their current or pass title so that tells you who's winning that yeah sure but I think we would have looked five years ago than that. Five thousand would have been even smaller <hes> so I think that but the more important point is Rather C._e._o.. Or C._M._O.. The things they do you are going to look and feel the same that same set of responsibilities. <hes> is going to fall under that title. Excuse me and it's going to be important for that person to live in the C. Suite <hes> and to and to who report to the C._E._o.. and to be an equal with C._F._O.. And The C._E._O.. And all the other C._F._O.'s that that companies have so whichever title prevails the skill set the skill set that Communications A._p._R.. Professionals bring and learn and deliver is going to be a key component of what that person does great advice great insights. Thank you Marty and thank you for spending time with us today and thank you for listening listening to W._V._U.. Marketing Communications today from West Virginia University. I hope you found today's episode as informative as I have. Thanks again. You've been listening to W._V._U.. Marketing Communications today Karachi live from West Virginia University for Biweekly Program that sits at the intersection of data.

Barcelona Marketing Communications Executive Communications Corpo Eh prof- profession West Virginia University Harney Micevski Paul trade magazine Marty President Roy A._B._C. CEO apple Lincoln Karachi Microsoft C._M._O. ninety degree
"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

09:35 min | 1 year ago

"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"From this book what was the value to the organization is C._E._O.. Of A small aw Tech Company <hes> not a brain that anyone who's listening would probably recognize but a small tech company that's growing <hes> in the cybersecurity space obviously a space that's exploding more generally and the students in their in their discussion and I haven't <hes> haven't read the writing assignments for the week yet that was just submitted last night but were were torn between to kind of models of value one was there's the traditional are more and more traditional our ally model value than a marketing might bring to this sort of discussion <hes> leads generated sales generated <hes> <hes> that sort of thing can you you measure clicks from an online review of the book people who Click through to the link to the company's website and how they did they navigate through the website to to perhaps a marketing or sales information collection page or something. Something like that <hes> and there's other people in the in the class said Hey. Let's take the C._E._O.. At his word because I was able to do a Q. and A. With the C._E._o.. For the purposes of the class as to why he wrote the book while he hope to gain out out of the book <hes> <hes> what value he signed the book and let's measure it against what the C._E._O.. Said <hes> and if you measure it against that that his definition of value which was some visibility link which was <hes> something he could use for a talk track and conferences he appears that when he talks to media when he talks potential <hes> prospects he even said he used it as a business card <hes> when he would meet somebody nobody he'd give him a copy of his book <hes> cereal but he has business cards anymore. It's a pretty good substitute so <hes> so from that perspective the add value perspective the definition of value has to be <hes> <hes> not the practitioners definition of value I think but the definition of value assigned by the by the owner by the client <hes> if you will so it's a it's a it's an interesting challenge <hes> how oh you Dornam value in a world where you're sort of looking more more like a marketer more and more like an advertiser <hes> but the but the value of P._r.. <hes> the value of a book the value of they cover story for a C._E._o.. In Forbes magazine Fortune Magazine <hes> is you know. How do you put a dollar value but the C._E._O.'s love it? They love it. <hes> so it's it's it's deliver value but understand that the definition of value is not your definition. It should client or your your C._e._O.'s definition. That's that's an important point. I'm GonNa Pause you right there. We're GONNA take a quick break now. We're GONNA come back and talk more about <hes>. We'll talk doc more about measurement some of those necessary tools and who will win out the C._M._o.. Or The C._E._O.. In this new world so stay tuned we'll be right back just a quick break to remind the West Virginia University's online find data marketing communications program is the first graduate program of its kind in the country focusing on strategic thinking critical problem solving an informed decision making the Data Marketing Communications Program at West Virginia University prepares you for your career by learning innovative tactics from award-winning faculty like those were featuring today. You can learn more at DMC dot W. V._U.. Dot E._D._U.. Go there and find out more <music>. Let's pick it back up with our last couple minutes talking about P._R.. And other sorts of topics yes sounds good. Thank you Paul and again. We're talking to Farney Micevski President of ninety degree communications and a leading expert in P._R.. Executive Communications Corporate Affairs and a whole lot more <hes> we're talking about. I paused you there. We were talking about R._O._I.. Just wanted to ask again. You know how can communications medications professionals demonstrate again that that R._O._I.. On the activities that they are <hes> you know that they are executing on Roy well that the short answer is to go to Barcelona and see if you could just suck it up the prof- profession gathered there twice <hes> in <hes> most recently in two thousand fifteen in Barcelona to develop. It's a great city to develop the Barcelona principles which were or an attempt to to answer this fundamental question which is how do you measure R._O._I.. For for communications P._R.. What what sort of resources do you need to do that? What metrics do you need to do that and the the thing I think that came out of that at the single most important thing that came out of that was to stop using advertising equivalents? <hes> and it's still used quite frankly the prevent but it's because it's it's it is a real serious. It's a serious number but. So A._B._C.'s and and online impressions are still two numbers that are used in the profession but the the message out of the out of Barcelona is stop using issues and with. I think the communications profession still having a difficult time <hes> with that <hes> and I don't I don't have a silver bullet answer for that one <hes> but I I will because a lot of what communications and P._R.. Professionals do is the value of it is qualitative not quantitative <hes> it is and how hard you know a reference again the the <hes> The C._E._o.. Profile missile and a major business publication or <hes> a company profile in either a trade magazine or a <hes> <hes> local regional publication. I did some work <hes> recently away for a consumer Tech Company <hes> probably not a maiden not not apple Microsoft not at that level but probably a company that people would recognize a company that has reimagined itself a few times and changed its <hes> <hes> UH products at a company that had a C._e._o.. Crisis of financial management crisis a couple of years ago and really restructured the organization brought in some new leadership and the story that that that we're able to place was a story about that that process and how the company has emerged and <hes> and the new product lines it was involved in and that sort of thing and that was extremely valuable the people that it was extremely valuable for in in this case where the board of directors and some of the institutional shareholders right right it was very important that now that's a very well defined audience and it is a very limited audience <hes> so <hes> you know I'm not sure how you apply a metric to that another client <hes> and I'm trying to bring these real world experiences to to what I do and then when I teach the course I told the students and of course I come here as a practitioner not as a although I have some academic training. I'm not an academic right. We actually I I did want to ask you. We have just under a minute here and I just wanted to ask you that one that one final question <hes> that I teased coming out of the break who looking forward in your crystal wall who's going to prevail in that C. Suite the CEO's The C._M._O.'s. That's a that's a good question I did a recent survey on linked in there are roughly sixty thousand and people on weekdays who have C._M._o.. In current or past title and our about five thousand only five thousand who have C._O.. In their current or past title so that tells you who's winning now sure but I think if he would've looked five years ago that five thousand would have been even smaller yeah <hes> so. I think that but the more important point is whether it's C._E._O.. Or C._M._O.. The things they do are going to look and feel the same that same set of responsibilities. <hes> is going to fall under that title. Excuse me and it's going to be important for that person to live in the C. Suite <hes> and to and to report to the C._E._o.. and to be an equal with C._F._O.. C._O._O. and all the other C._F._O.'s that that companies have so whichever title prevails the skill set the skill set that Communications N._p._R.. Professionals bring and learn and deliver is going to be a key component of what that person does great advice great insights. Thank you Marty and thank you for spending time with us today and thank you for listening to W._V._U.. Marketing Communications today from West Virginia University. I hope you've found today's episode as informative as I have. Thanks again. You've been listening to W._V._U.. Marketing Communications today..

Marketing Communications Barcelona West Virginia University Executive Communications Corpo Fortune Magazine Farney Micevski President C._E._O. Marty Paul Roy A._B._C. CEO apple Microsoft C._M._O. ninety degree five years
"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

10:15 min | 1 year ago

"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"Know anxious. Every time you come in you start reminding me of what I haven't done. You bring me another book. You bring me another idea going going to. I didn't look at the last yeah that's a good thing. Though which I think is what today's topic is the high cost of procrastination. We all think we're saving money. We're saving grief for saying being anxiety. I don't WanNA think about this. I don't want to spend for it and yet. What are we gaining? We know we gotta do it right so it's easier to put it off easier to put up and I always say to people I said he'd before. Maybe I've come up with the answer. I don't deny it. I just delay it or defer. WHOA that's incredible you right? That's exactly what's going on. I don't deny that I have to do these things. I just don't want to do them today and it's not just you. It's ninety five percent of the population that decided to put this thing off and you know why because one I don't understand it and you confuse me lose me. I don't WanNa look dumb. I don't WanNa feel dumb so <hes> I don't have the interest to dive into topics. I don't understand easily. We'll talk about football. I don't don't really understand what I'll talk with you all day long because I think I know football right right so that's part of it. It's not pleasant. There's no instant reward talk about me buying a new car. I don't need a new car. I really they don't but I'll talk to you about it endlessly. I'll go look at a new car because it's it's fun. It's fires the the dopamine in my brain here. I get a I get a jolly jolt out of that. I don't get a jolly or a jolt thinking about closing the wealth gap or <hes> planning for the future and you know let's focus on you. GotTa Ask Yourself. Why is that and the advertisers constantly bombarding you with all this information to buy this car by this product right but think about it makes me feel like I need it? At how Great Feel I love the ads today now immediately comes on and there's a girl riding a horse with their hair flowing in the wind and I- I giggle now I say is that going to be toilet. Paper is going to be a car that deodorant ordering what's going to give me that free feeling you know we we associate buying with making us feel good because I don't. I feel good when I buy this stuff I think about none of this stuff is taught in school. People are taught to do you know go out. Get an education. Get a high paying job right but we'll not thinking about how to manage that income and so a lot of times. You're not getting bombarded with information telling you to get your affairs together. You may get eight bombarded with information about retirement right but that's ten twenty thirty years from now and it's always picturing the fun. I'm going to have in retirement or not going to be sick. I'm not going to be old. I'm not going to be penniless. It's just GonNa be fun. We're GONNA finally half of is my father's view of it after working his ass off his whole life he's finally going to have fun except by the time he got. There wasn't so much fun. My mother had Parkinson's <hes> you know he didn't realize he he didn't have enough money saved right <hes>. Ah those years more the fun years he had hoped for well go looking back in my family. My Dad worked for <hes> wonder bread wonder bread. I love one right and man we lived off one debris and we just there was a stable in our household ah but watching my dad get up every morning he drove. We're talking about maybe an hour to get to work right in our back and traffic and when he wasn't so wonderful working for him but he was he was responsible. Yes exactly so a lot of times you know we wanted to be. I was in a game and I was in high school so we want that to be at our practices or you know at our performances put a lot of time. He couldn't be there right because he had to work you know and he ended up with a great retirement a great you know great pension but you know at what cost yeah right what caused what costs and did he feel like he had any freedom at any point in his life here. No he was four. I'm GONNA say forest but he he was obligated right. He's obligated to do do it again. You know he you know he wouldn't he'd love taking care of his family. He's not going to bitch and Moan like people that generation did but but there's a trade off. There's a cause and effect tradeoff for doing that and all I'm saying this today. Just like you know building wealth out. It's a it's a decision that everybody has to come to and thing is some people do it early in life. Some people do it later in life but they they come to that decision in sometimes they give up. They'll say well. You know what I'm past the point of no. It's too late but let's go back to the key question. We're talking about here. So what gets you off the dog issue. What gets you to make a decision? You know you gotTa do it. You don't WanNa do it. You don't understand how to do it. You think think it'll cost a bunch of money and you don't WanNa put money into something that you don't get an immediate payoff for an immediate to thrill or excitement when I buy a new code or a new car. I feel like I got something for it but I go buy an annuity or go buy insurance her answer. I go buy some retirement plan. I don't instantly feel like I got anything here and yet which you got US peace of mind which he got his freedom. You know I'll tell you Rachi got us. Control Rabbit doesn't author his name is Robert Kiyosaki Asaki. We'll this book called Reading Airport famous and he'll tell you he you know he enjoyed writing that book and he'll tell you that he's not a he's not a best writing author. He's a best selling author. It makes a big difference but he wrote this book because it's real it's career. He talks about real things so he wrote this book called a cashflow quadrant and all it means that there's a quadrant of four I mean that paper and drought one lineup of one time to make four by four boxes and so in that first box you put an e.. The second box down under e- put an S. right next to the e you put an eye and then under the be put under the you put an eye so the east and four employees the stands for self employed right the beast stands for business owner and the is stands for investor and what he was saying is that you have to get to a point and get to the revelation which box do you. What do you want to be in so prior to that rich? Dad Poor Dad broke it down based on a financial statement so this it goes back to how do you get off the dime. You have to find out where you are and were what are you doing. Why are you doing this? Why are you getting up every day? Why are you <hes> what you want? What do you want so that's the first thing you have to figure out what is it that you really really want? My Dad wanted security of having a paycheck and having a company take care of me work for Chrysler for forty years start off in the assembly line ended up as a vice president you know only in America but at the end Chrysler didn't take care of no we thought Christ cutback in the benefits <hes> Chrysler wasn't the all powerful answer to all life's questions as went on and he realized it could've made more money had he been in petty been done things trump when he was consultant at the end after retired took early retirement after forty years took early retirement in his late fifties early sixties he made twice as much money working half as much. Let me say that again we're twice uh-huh twice as much dollars even stumble on twice as much money half as many hours he would only work six months a year. He ended up twice as much money because he really didn't get benefits and get some things but there was a lot more money in the expertise. Houston he had acquired than Chrysler was compensating him for so basically he started his own business doing business because he many other auto executives back in the eighties got laid off and then the companies realized we all the guys with the gray haired girl they we don't what we're doing so we brought a lot of them back as consultants to help us answer these questions we thought it was good because we don't have to pay pinch pensions and benefits and therefore we'll pay them more and he already had the pensions and benefits he just wanted the salary he made more money in those ten years consulting than he did in twenty years of working for the man working for the corporation and thinking about this he came to realization meaning that he had to mind his own business yeah so a lot of times. If you don't have the fortitude to start your own business and you what you have to look at it your assets and your liabilities meaning that your asset column in would get back to financial statements income expense asset and liabilities your asset column is Actually Your Business Right and that's what you're managing and then he ended up so you've got the employees the business owner what was the US won the S.'s self-employed self-employed kind of that he was self employed as small business of one man band being a consultant and at the end he realized he still didn't have enough. My Dad was a top executive for Chrysler in the sixties. I think it is mostly made four thousand dollars a month. I was a lot of money in nineteen sixty but the pension was based on that amount of money any shoot you know most people make more than an awful lot of people make more than three or four thousand dollars. You said the starting in a lowest guy in the totem pole made more than my dad did it is ultimate height so therefore when it came time to his pension adventure was paltry you know he was getting. I don't know thousand dollars a month or something here plus social security because and it was like this isn't enough to live on he thought it was in nineteen sixty but in nineteen ninety wasn't anymore and so yes he makes more money which allowed him to pay off the house and do some other things but income so he had to become a small investor he got pretty good play in the stock market with a little bit like one hundred grand and he'd play it and he'd make about ten percent return on it and that extra ten grand is what kept them alive the all the work he put into becoming executive in the end because if inflation and the cost of living that he couldn't project wasn't enough and he got a pension less than one outta ten of us are GonNa get pensions engines anymore for me. I don't get a pension right so it wasn't enough and he found he.

Chrysler US business owner self employed football consultant Houston dopamine Reading Airport executive Robert Kiyosaki Parkinson Moan Rachi America vice president
"oc" Discussed on WiLD 94.9

WiLD 94.9

02:31 min | 2 years ago

"oc" Discussed on WiLD 94.9

"Oc the yankee famous normally what i gotta get in with my we'll be selling africa hip hop yellow cabs outlet camp how the back act like they forgot how to read how y'all got plus got it made jesus three cars make the facts the game blinding sideline blind with catch the catch with leading gradually become worse the name brown gets involved with just know good girls going back with him mommy got much south everybody ride her just like route hill teases can't say you light starts women shirts came to school graduated four players stop feeling like a champion ami in the world.

africa brown
"oc" Discussed on WiLD 94.9

WiLD 94.9

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"oc" Discussed on WiLD 94.9

"Oc that made the yankee famous in got get valium africa hip hop champ champ back they act like they forgot how to how fitting halfway y'all got a plus i got it made cheesy three for ray recipes the world trade from the banks blanking take a stepfather twix lying with light catcher leading gradually become worst game negative in spell the windsor kids involved with just you know video good girls going back to cities with him mommy.

windsor