35 Burst results for "OC"

Wet Notes 8-30-21

Scuba Shack Radio

07:35 min | 3 months ago

Wet Notes 8-30-21

"This is wet notes here on scuba shack radio for monday august thirtieth two thousand and twenty one. Well we have certainly had our fill of extreme weather lately just last week here. In connecticut we face the challenges of tropical storm on re just barely below hurricane strength and at the last minute it shifted east and we avoided the brunt of the wind rhode island wasn't as fortunate and now we have item a cat for hurricane hit louisiana. Extreme weather is now the norm. The news keeps getting worse. Recently there was a study published by nicholas bars from the potsdam institute for climate impact research and that was that the gulfstream could be varying towards irreversible collapse. Now the gulf stream is part of the atlantic meridional overturning circulation or a. m. Oc this circulation takes warm salty. Water from the tropics moves in north and then takes the cold water south. The study finds that the circulation is at its weakest in one thousand years. So what happens if the gulfstream collapses that will dictate extreme cold for parts of north america and europe. Is the collapse imminent well. That's not an easy question. Answer it could be decades away but as we have seen things are happening a lot faster when it comes to climate change not only will the disruption of the gulfstream resort in colder north american temperatures. It is predicted that there will be a rise in sea level disruption of the monsoon patterns and impacts on the amazon rainforest. An aunt arctic ice sheets. The study concluded that is that this is all a result of human endorse induced climate. Change in may of this year. I talked about a project out on lake. Tahoe called cleanup lake. That project had an ambitious goal of cleaning over seventy two miles of the mountain lake. So i thought i would give it a quick update on how the work is progressing. Now these numbers come from the cleanup delake website. Cleanup delete dot org as earlier this month. Team of divers has removed an amazing eight thousand. One hundred and twenty two pounds of trash were three hundred and three thousand six hundred eighty four kilograms and covered about twenty two miles or thirty four kilometers of coastline. There update indicated that they have completed seventy four dives over twenty seven days of diving. The diver's consumed two hundred and eighty six cylinders of air. Today there have been eighty one volunteers who have delivered two thousand six hundred and eleven volunteer hours. Now i'm not sure if they're on pace to meet their objectives but that's not always the measure success. The amount of continuing effort is what really counts. Keep up the good work guys. The annual boston sea rovers clinic for this year is just one month away. The two thousand twenty clinic happened just a couple of weeks. Before the corona corona virus lockdowns took effect. We really didn't know how serious things were then. Now as we continue to emerge from the pandemic the show may just have the distinction of being the last face to face. Scuba show in the world before the pandemic and the first face-to-face scuba show in the world post pandemic monty. And i were at the last meeting. And everything's proceeding for the october. First and second show the show will follow state and local mandates and as the days pass by. We are all hoping that the show will go off his plan. This year shows moved from the traditional march date to october as a result of the pandemic that you'd be a great time to enjoy some early fall weather in new england. It'd be great to get together and diving is certainly a social sport. Do you miss dive training magazine. I sure do. I think i've re reread all the back issues. We have a good shop at least three times. So what's happening with the publication. Well i reached out to catherine castle garcia the editor to find out the latest catherine informed me that they hope to be publishing again in the fourth quarter of two thousand and twenty one. Now that's some good news. The fourth quarter is not that far away. And i'm certainly looking forward to dive training magazine hitting the streets and finally here on wet notes. I wanted to give you an update on the situation with dutch springs. If you remember last time. I reported that the property owned by stu jill school had been sold to trammell crow texas developer. Who's planning to build a large warehouse facility on the property. The initial word was that dutch would shut down after the season while a lot has happened in the last couple of weeks i there was a petition that garnered over three thousand supporters to keep the place open and as we know petitions can only go so far then there was support from patty professional association of diving instructors patty due to white paper outlining the economic benefits dutch brings provides as a diving venue. Patty estimates that because dutch exists. It helps to generate three point. Four billion annual retail sales in the northeast they tag the economic benefit to bethlehem at thirty four point five million as for tax revenue. The paper indicates that about ninety. Eight point nine million is generated for state and local taxes and northeast and about two point one million for bethlehem in addition to patty support. The lehigh valley planning commission has called the proposal of disaster for the quality of life in the lehigh valley while it seems that there a great deal of opposition to maybe very little that can be done to stop the effort. One positive. I that i did see. Was that trammell. Crow was indiscretions with local officials to offload the fifty off lou to fifty acre quarry for community use. Just how would you get to acquire if they build the warehouses. I don't know while the saga is far from over. I would expect that we won't see. Dutch brings open for the twenty twenty two dive season but his al michaels once said. Do you believe in miracles. Well that's it for this edition of wet notes. Here on scuba shot radio for august thirtieth two thousand and twenty one

Gulf Stream Dutch Springs Clean Up The Lake Dive Training Magazine Boston Sea Rovers Wind Rhode Island Potsdam Institute For Climate Gulfstream Resort Hurricane Cleanup Lake Boston Sea Rovers Clinic Amazon Rainforest Mountain Lake Nicholas Connecticut Catherine Castle Garcia Louisiana Tahoe Arctic North America
2021 College Football Betting Preview

Behind the Bets

04:24 min | 3 months ago

2021 College Football Betting Preview

"Gentleman. I have picked the brain of many times. Jay romano pro. Better here in las vegas good to be with you. Thanks for having me all right well. We finally broke the seal. Got you on the pod. And i think it's a perfect situation. Do college win. Totals because the board has been hit pretty hard. But there's still a lot of opportunities out there and we're we're obviously. The calendars turned to mid august. We are ready to go Football season's right around the corner. So i know there's a lot of plays you like a little bit off the grid but i want to start the marquee ones and it's the one that's my favorite of a mall and i've talked about it a few times on daily wager. I believe i've even mentioned it here on the podcast but i am very very big on auburn under seven now the juices move some shops or six and a half. If you want to go six plus money that's fine. It's just so tough when you get the push at seven so i prefer the seven with the juice and it all comes down to the schedule. Not the only reason but the schedules really really difficult. And you've got bama. You got an got georgia. I don't think there's any chance auburn win those games. I know rivalry game and war eagle and all that stuff with the with the iron bowl but it's just auburn is rebuilding. And they have a new coach bryan. Hartson coming in from boise. State and bonex is just not materialize into the quarterback that everyone thought he would be. Maybe a new oc. Mike bobo will unlock. I'll just kind of have to see it to believe it. So in addition to obama. Georgia am there at lsu. They have all miss at home. You know at arkansas. And then there's there's this tough spots here and it's a team that's going to be lacking on offense defense. They're calling card. So i think i don't see how they go eight and four to lose this play. Well i i would definitely recommend Playing the seven laying the juice in this situation. I almost always gonna lay the juice versus taking maybe plus one ten plus one twenty on the under. It's definitely worth the extra half a game. I'm actually high on auburn this year. However i completely agree with you. The schedule is brutal. There's just no breeders for them. I think bonex. Could you know have an improvement. This year they can play well. It's just there's just not enough wings on the schedule. It really looks like they're ceiling is seven. It's just you know when you like. You said when you go to texas. Am have to play alabama lsu home against georgia. And then at penn state week three. It's just you forgot about the penn state game. I'm glad you mentioned that. Cause at the white out game in happy valley. yeah. And i'm looking headlines there between four and a half and seven and a half point underdogs So they can exceed expectations and still not go over this win total. Yeah no. it's a lot to ask. It's certainly a lot to ask but you're so you're high on wsb. Maybe as a dog and a lot of spots throughout the season. So i know you have some places. Well but notre dame under nine talk about not soft spots on the schedule that that's certainly stands out where you'll get the irish yet. The with them again is scheduled schedule. Schedule you know. I know there are top ten ranked team coming into the season but it is just absolutely unforgiving. Weakened weak outs starting at florida state where they opened about ten and a half eleven point favorites. It's down to seven and a half eight. That's not gonna be an easy task. Going into dough campbell on a standalone game in a national televised audience. Week one with a new quarterback Jet cohn was name started earlier this week. With up and down. Wisconsin played well and times. But we'll we'll have to see how he jumped there Notre dame is starting four new offensive lineman. They returned to starters on offense. It's it's a little early in the season For that type of test. So not only would. I looked afford a states Plus the points week one just a little bonus pick right there but the under nine for the season feels like a pretty safe option

Jay Romano Auburn Hartson Bonex Mike Bobo Alabama Lsu Georgia Las Vegas Boise LSU Football Bryan Arkansas Barack Obama Penn State WSB Texas Jet Cohn
Kamin Samuel: Reinventing Your Life Post COVID

OC Talk Radio

02:57 min | 5 months ago

Kamin Samuel: Reinventing Your Life Post COVID

"Comedian samuel what a treat to have you on the show. Once again i charlie. It's such an honor to be here. Thank you so much for having me. Well i i can't wait camellias such chatting with you as always such a delight and really you are one of my all time favorite guests because you offer a so much. Thank you what we're finding to be here. It is and and I'll tell you right now. It appears that we're about to enter. A bit of everything is going to be post. Covid phase in life in the united states. And so i think a lot of shows are going to be doing post covid type of shows and we are. We're going to do one. And and i was thinking that perhaps now might be a good time to rethink what our personal life might look like in the near as well as longer term future and i'm choosing to call this show reinventing your life post covid. What do you think about that. My i love that topic. I love the titles. Because i i do think it's an opportunity for us now to reinvent ourselves to really look at this last year as a our own individual wakeup call into. Who do we want to be from here. Who will you want to emerge into. What are we learning So that we can do things differently from this point forward. That's a that's a great way to put it a wake up call to reevaluate or or evaluate. Maybe for the first time what our life was like is like and can be like as we discussed a couple days ago A great place to begin might be to assess our life last year from what you called a higher altitude asking ourselves what we might have learned from isolation and quarantine as well as from here and frustration. It really impacted us. didn't it. yeah. I think i impacted us in ways that you know. We're still awakening to work. You know we don't understand all of the impact. We know that there for it. Was you know financial or health or just isolation in general and so. It's an opportunity before we go back into business as usual life as usual to really define that and really take stock of this last year. What went well. What didn't go. well where am i. And then and then really have a have an honest discussion with ourselves about our about who we are what we want.

Samuel Charlie United States
What Happens After Death

WokeNFree

02:20 min | 7 months ago

What Happens After Death

"Number one out the gate. What happens when a person dies. This question is definitely without an answer. Actually nobody really could save for sure. I think that our body turns to dust. But i'm not sold on anything else not buying a okay like that. Dr martin luther king junior won said every man must do two things alone. He must do his own believing his own dying. So essentially how. I interpret that phrase and all of our links and resources will be linked in the episode at woken dot com. And make sure you check that out. I would say. I agree with you in that there is a lot of uncertainty and unknowns when it comes through the process of death but we do know is. It is an actual change in circumstance. Where the people that you knew the people that loved you the people that use. Oc with no longer can interact with you in this human form because your body is no longer functioning. So it's a change in circumstance. It's loss offer those that you leave behind and comes to you. Yes i agree. It's a question. Mark question to the death equal peace not necessarily so according to the university of iowa st family children's hospital again they break it down really very. Interestingly which is why. I wanted to share it. They say you know death happens when the body stops working the heart sub speeding the brain doesn't get or send any messages to the body sight hearing taste touch smell. Don't work anymore and then you know when someone is dead. Their thoughts doesn't have their body doesn't have any thoughts feelings anymore. So when a person dies their bodies can't move or play anymore and after death the body will never be able to do these things again. So does that to that kind of breakdown in the processing sound like peace not to me. Sounds like a finality of this form of existence. But i think the to argue that death equals ultimate piece. Is i think our mandic notion. I think it's something that we see in media but it is not scientifically proven and theoretically is possible sore but it that's gonna be person's specific beliefs specific

Dr Martin Luther King University Of Iowa St Family C Mark
California AG’s Office Asks to Drop Charges in OC ‘Rape Doctor’ Case

Fork Report

00:35 sec | 7 months ago

California AG’s Office Asks to Drop Charges in OC ‘Rape Doctor’ Case

Brooklyn Born Skeery Eats Pizza With a Fork and Knife

The Brooklyn Boys Podcast

01:55 min | 8 months ago

Brooklyn Born Skeery Eats Pizza With a Fork and Knife

"Way pizza. What a fucking knife fucking knife and get dead to me okay. You don't eat pizza fork and a knife i. I'm just as much as you want a straw just because what you does just because you're yelling doesn't make you right. Just because you're louder does not make you write a whisper. Who who do you think you are. What are you what are you. What are you from the great state of wyoming. He'll eat pizza that way okay. See that's a quarterback off. You know what. I was referencing. Yes yes you don't if it's so big if it's such a massive slice you have to cut it in half fine then you pick it up and when your hands pinson out. It wasn't about the size of the slice. Yeah what was it about. Emotion in the oc- bucci nelson. Here's what it was about pain. Boozy strap okay. Now let me let me say this you know that. We've we're both from brooklyn born and bred. We are already going bullshit weight and you know that we do have these rules. And i do you have to do the fold. We talk about this. We have talked about nauseam head. Wait wait so when you pick up your pizza if you don't know what it is by now it's the new york. Fold you pick up a slice usually its triangular or even if the square one you've put a crease in the middle you fold it over and then you hold it donovan moldova's holiday you still pick it up the point handle it handle true story now. Here's the problem with that. This is what you didn't see. You didn't me struggling for thirty seconds prior because my buddy phone out trying to tape that. So he's putting me on his instagram story. Nearly caught the ladder thirty seconds. Which was me using a fork and knife on pizza. Worse when you say it out loud

Bucci Nelson Pinson Wyoming Brooklyn Moldova New York
Brooklyn Born Skeery Eats Pizza With a Fork and Knife

The Brooklyn Boys Podcast

01:55 min | 8 months ago

Brooklyn Born Skeery Eats Pizza With a Fork and Knife

"Way pizza. What a fucking knife fucking knife and get dead to me okay. You don't eat pizza fork and a knife i. I'm just as much as you want a straw just because what you does just because you're yelling doesn't make you right. Just because you're louder does not make you write a whisper. Who who do you think you are. What are you what are you. What are you from the great state of wyoming. He'll eat pizza that way okay. See that's a quarterback off. You know what. I was referencing. Yes yes you don't if it's so big if it's such a massive slice you have to cut it in half fine then you pick it up and when your hands pinson out. It wasn't about the size of the slice. Yeah what was it about. Emotion in the oc- bucci nelson. Here's what it was about pain. Boozy strap okay. Now let me let me say this you know that. We've we're both from brooklyn born and bred. We are already going bullshit weight and you know that we do have these rules. And i do you have to do the fold. We talk about this. We have talked about nauseam head. Wait wait so when you pick up your pizza if you don't know what it is by now it's the new york. Fold you pick up a slice usually its triangular or even if the square one you've put a crease in the middle you fold it over and then you hold it donovan moldova's holiday you still pick it up the point handle it handle true story now. Here's the problem with that. This is what you didn't see. You didn't me struggling for thirty seconds prior because my buddy phone out trying to tape that. So he's putting me on his instagram story. Nearly caught the ladder thirty seconds. Which was me using a fork and knife on pizza. Worse when you say it out loud

Bucci Nelson Pinson Wyoming Brooklyn Moldova New York
OC Fair announces plan to return this summer

Tim Conway Jr.

00:36 sec | 8 months ago

OC Fair announces plan to return this summer

"Rides, games and fried food ready for thousands of cooped up visitors this summer. This year, we're limiting capacity, OC affairs Terry Moore says. Currently, the dates are July 16th through August 15th, depending on covert 19 case rates, fewer number of rides, fewer number of concessionaires that giving everybody a little more elbow room for safety, But we'll see We'll have all of the favorite fair officials are pushing for about 75% capacity again, Maura less depending on Cove in about 45,000 people a day more, says reopening the fair could generate $10 million in proceeds and because of capacity limits. People should buy tickets in advance in Orange County,

Terry Moore Maura Orange County
Los Angeles, Orange Counties Meet Metrics To Move To Orange Tier

L.A. Times Morning Briefing

00:42 sec | 9 months ago

Los Angeles, Orange Counties Meet Metrics To Move To Orange Tier

"Los angeles and orange counties have banked. One week's worth of the coronavirus needed to progress to the orange tier of the state's reopening plan. It's a move that would allow a more widespread unlocking of businesses and other public spaces and the county's moved to a less restrictive. Tear could happen as soon as next week. If their metrics hold steady upon reaching the orange tier counties can allow bars to reopen outdoors with modifications and without needing to serve food also capacity restrictions are lifted in stores houses of worship museums. Zoos and aquariums can raise their capacity from twenty five percent to fifty percent as well and other businesses like restaurants and movie theaters can raise indoor capacity

Orange Counties Los Angeles
The long wait for a true Poco F1 successor is finally over

Daily Tech News Show

00:32 sec | 9 months ago

The long wait for a true Poco F1 successor is finally over

"Smartphone maker poco revealed the f. Three a rebrand of the redmi k forty with a snapdragon eight seventy five g modem six point six seven inch one hundred twenty hertz. Amyloid display and thirty-three watt fast charging lodging march twenty seventh for three hundred forty nine euros. The company also announced the x three pro which features qualcomm's new snapdragon eight sixty s. Oc and lt modem a six point six seven inch one hundred twenty hertz lcd display and a large five thousand one hundred sixty million our battery lodging march twenty fourth for two hundred forty nine euros.

Poco Qualcomm
#183 Jamie Lerner Self-Care: If You Dont, Who Will? - burst 03

OC Talk Radio

15:29 min | 9 months ago

#183 Jamie Lerner Self-Care: If You Dont, Who Will? - burst 03

"We just are and were very well equipped to do it. And it's also interesting about reinvention. Is that we lose a lot of something. That is very important along the way which is south care so women are masterful in reinventing themselves and then they also are masterful in forgetting themselves. How did how did how did he know. We're going to make a transition to self care. I mean seriously on my sheet in front of the next. The next bullet point was self care and you made a wonderful trenches transition to it. So that is what. I'd like to talk about now. And and focus probably the majority of our time is self care and personal responsibility and and especially in this current cova time of chaos and confusion and and one of the things that you told me about when we chatted before the podcast was that you described your passion. Your current passion for helping people find themselves in the moment. Can you tell me what that what that means to you. Find yourself in the moment every moment that we can be present and it is just a moment by moment and establish or reestablish connection with ourselves that that is the ultimate in self care and and i think a lot of that comes from being able to manage our thoughts and then are feeling but first and foremost our thaw and i think it's important cut. We rarely slow everything down and allow ourselves to be in that moment contain. That's why one of the most important things of how we can care for ourselves and then others it's always about foul firth and then others. It's kind of a win win for everybody. Jesus talks about that. When he says you know i it's always quoted love god and love your neighbor but what's always left out is love. Love your neighbor as yourself and to me that assumes self love precedes other love the cacao kangaroo barber care for another if they're not taking care of yourself self love is sort of. it's almost frowned upon that. You are selfish. You are ego centric if you do that and and if you take care of yourself too much and yet and yet if you don't take care of yourself you're you're no good to anyone else you know want when you could on the airplane they tell you to put your mask on on first before assisting other people and there's a reason for that. That is a universal truth. We cannot care for anyone until we care for ourselves without feeling resentment and if we feel is not much then we are not caring for ourselves or another. So you know. I think people don't really understand what it means to wrap third loving arms around themselves and nourish and nurture themselves into connection. That is the most unselfish thing that you can do. And in some ways it sure responsibility if you're then going to assume the care of others whether be children or a teacher or if you're in any role where you're in a leadership role it's just not possible to do it without having spent some time with yourself and nourishing yourself and if they're self some something to give agree with you on that and i was thinking about taking care of ourselves. There's there's just a number of of ways to do that in you know we're going to get into tactics toward the end of the Of the of the of the show. But right. Now i i'd like to disorder. Get a big picture of what do you mean by taking care of yourself. I know account. I have an idea of what i need by but but i'm curious what your interpretation is kind of goes hand in hand with taking personal responsibility to understand that really. It is known responsibility to care for your responsibility to begin to have an understanding of what year in the evening for yourself and then to figure out a way a gentle loving way to kind of implement some of that self care and most people do the opposite. They expect other people to care for them. They don't even know their own news. They expect others around them to know what they need and they expect that they should be given what they need. There's this really Twisted sense of entitlement. just because the very I think the other interesting thing about women reinventing themselves then they get to hide behind all of the roles that they've taken on as they never care for themselves the end up feeling resentful. They ended up feeling overwhelmed. The end up feeling all the things that they should be feeling and yet known even knows what they need. Not even know. They haven't even taken the time to figure out like okay but only know what i need for my. What do i need to do first thing in the morning but the guy can so myself up before we take care of all these other people so to step into that role of personal responsibility for sending the morning and ask yourself now. What are what. I need so myself. That is such a loving and lovely question to ask one and then to answer it with you. Maybe coffee before. I serve an to eat something before i i just some basic things. That really remind us that we're important. How counter cultural that is because we you know we're we're thinking we always have to be givers don't we we. We can't be. we can't be takers. we can't be an it's not even really taking it's it's more of. You're giving love from an empty cup and you've got to fill that love your love cup for yourself because unless you do you end up resenting the very people that you are serving and it doesn't feel good on your and it doesn't feel good on there and either never feels good to be given some things from someone who is representing you in the process so yet to unconditionally give to hand. That is a lovely feeling for the giver and the receiver and the way we get there is by taking care of ourselves so that we can give which hand alternate goal to feel good about the giving and to feel good about the person who is receiving what your kid i have for the last year been very involved on my own in in the in the sort of tradition node as mystic christianity and the mystics and and and i'm reading people of the thirteenth to fourteenth century teresa viola saint john of the cross and and teresa viola sort of my my guru. Now and she was. She was in the fifteenth century. And they talk about spending this time in divine contempt mystical prayer. But she is very strong that you do that in doing that. You are taking care of yourself your relationship with yourself yourself in the divine how how you relate in the divine but that that then becomes the resource for helping others that so you don't you don't just folk off. Yeah you don't just focus on yourself and forget everybody else. You have to focus on yourself but then the result is it results in a self care you. You can't help but want to share that with other people tackle once again. It's a win win for every beautiful idea. Now you want. You talked about personal responsibility in that. And i've even thought about making when i make a title for this show and we'll see what happens after the show. They make the title. But i i'm working on a premise of the me. Look at my own title here. Self care your responsibility to be responsible for yourself. Well is it so you would. You says it's good. I'm glad you agree because you're not title if you said no i don't believe any of that however it's a turn off for people a lot of people do not want to be responsible from south. They feel resentful that they should have to be responsible for themselves. They feel entitled that others should be responsible for their happy. And i think that it just needs to be thought about in a different way because who would know better for you than you know and yet we expect others to know what we need what. We consider south for first and foremost look. We need the great question. People don't ask themselves that question very often. But do you want. Don't ask themselves that either but people will tell you all day long what they want and what they get is more of what they don't want so and it's always someone else's all so you know if that doesn't work very well that way no it doesn't and and how in the world like you said if we haven't even really investigated pin through the thought process of understanding what we want and what we like in life. How in the world is someone else supposed to know that you know great costal one and yet we expect them to set us fai our needs and we've not identified their their needs. I mean our our needs and how they need to respond. You know My listeners heard have heard this before. But my wife. And i for probably. We've been married thirty six years and for at least twenty five of those. If not more. We take every year between christmas and new years now. This happens throughout the year but we take an intentional time of three days away so we can have two nights in one place. You know two full days in place and we ask each other So how was i. What kind of husband was last year. What kind of wife was i. And and what do you want from me. How can i serve you in helping. You find. You know helping you fulfill your needs and so we're forcing ourselves to identify our knees and until the other person. This is what i would like fantastic. I mean that's that's a conscious of our relationship a nice guy. Yeah yeah you know a lot of good writing on that jamie is. Are you familiar with the land baton. Elaine de button depends on how you want to pronounce it. The scarlet life. You know he's rich and really good stuff on that he's ridden maybe the best stuff of love between a man and a woman as anyone is written for you know. He's just barely turned forty now but he just has has exceptional writing on that. You know what i wanna do. I i want to go a bit deeper but before we do. I'd like to take a quick break. And then we will come back. And we're going to pursue a little bit more about this personal responsibility and how the victim mentality may come into play in that. Hi there this is charlie hedges. And you're listening to the next with charlie and my very special guests. Today's jaime lerner A woman who is a therapist adventurer pleasure seeker and a cute devil tae of self care. And that's exactly what we're talking about. And and i think she has so much teaches that i've learned so much from jamie and jimmy. We've talked about a bit about personal responsibility. And that letting other people know not expecting other people to somehow somehow be able to read our minds in our souls and understand what we need. We need to articulate that. What other kinds of personal responsibility you know. We're talking about our own personal responsibility and our self care. How can i take responsibility for myself. Do you have any examples of that for me now. I think that away are rewarded in society. Forbidden since Mainstream media that. They reminded us every moment. That's come we are the victim of everything. We have no control so for me. I always suggest to people to turn off the television and to Find a new source. That is a little more emotionally intelligent. That will allow us to feel good when you're done breathing. You're listening to or watching in fetter feeling paralleling cars. We have to take personal responsibility for what we are chasing to consume and hall. We will fail one way or done firmly cloud video. You know that's brilliant. You know is that we have to take responsibility for what we consume in our media. And and i find pretty much nothing but danger when not not just. Tv in general but for me. It's tv news and tv news. You know their their purpose is to stir up controversy in stirrup.

Self Care Mental Health Oc Talk Radio Ucicove Teresa Viola Saint John Teresa Viola Firth Confusion Elaine De Button Charlie Hedges Jaime Lerner Jamie Charlie Jimmy
Shailene Woodley confirms that she and Aaron Rodgers are engaged

DSC On Demand

01:23 min | 10 months ago

Shailene Woodley confirms that she and Aaron Rodgers are engaged

"Its official green bay packers. Aaron rodgers is engaged to actress. Shailene woodley whom you might recognize from such works as the oc big little lies and perhaps most notably as charades player. Second from the left on hollywood game night. just make that The future mrs. aaron rodgers confessed to jimmy fallon. She knows next to nothing about football. Yes we are. We are engaged but for us. It's not new news. You know so. It's kind of funny. Everybody right now is freaking out over it and really. We've been engaged for while he's a wonderful incredible human being but i never thought i'd be engaged. Somebody threw never girls. When i grow up on to marry someone who who's rose balls a football fan. I yet to gain. And before i met him. I'd never seen one softball game before when we also like i knew he was a football guy but i didn't know like what kind of a football guy he was and i'm still constantly learning. I'm still like wow you know friends. You got to watch his youtube greatest. I was like i don't know about that. I know is like the nerd who wants to host jeopardy jeopardy. I love happens to also be very good at

Aaron Rodgers Shailene Woodley Green Bay Packers Football Jimmy Fallon Hollywood Softball Youtube
Source - Florida Gators OC Brian Johnson to coach Philadelphia Eagles QBs

Papa and Lund

01:04 min | 11 months ago

Source - Florida Gators OC Brian Johnson to coach Philadelphia Eagles QBs

"Hired a quarterback coach today by the name of Brian Johnson. And he was there or get your for the Giants in the Stanford quarterback. Totally different guy guy. Shame. He was a quarterback on the Utah football team in like 2007 or 2000, and they beat Alabama in the Sugar Bowl. He was the quarterback, and he actually called the plays. And they finished number two in the country. So I was working in solid state at the time and running a station and doing a morning show and he graduated, and I offered him a gig as a radio talk show host. And after contemplating and doing a few shows, he decided this isn't for me, and he got into coaching so long story short. He was at Mississippi State. He coached Dak Prescott. He was the offensive coordinator Florida Florida most recently and then he just got out in the NFL. By the Eagles is their quarterback coach. Had he accepted that job that I had offered him in radio all those years ago, he would be starving still in eating Macarena, but he made a tremendous decision. Got into coaching, and now he's the quarterback coach of the Eagles, and he probably wouldn't take my call.

Brian Johnson Stanford Dak Prescott Giants Utah Alabama Football Florida Mississippi Eagles NFL
No Eagles Gig For Josh McDaniels: Philadelphia Reportedly Hires Colts’ OC Nick Sirianni

Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

00:19 sec | 11 months ago

No Eagles Gig For Josh McDaniels: Philadelphia Reportedly Hires Colts’ OC Nick Sirianni

"Eagles have hired Indianapolis Colts offensive coordinator Nick Syriani as their next head coach, replacing Doug Peterson. 39 year old spent the last three years in India under head coach Frank Reich was Eagles offensive coordinator for two years prior to taking over the Colts reports say that the other finalist for the Eagles job was offensive coordinator Josh McDaniels of the Patriots on the

Nick Syriani Doug Peterson Eagles Frank Reich Indianapolis Colts India Colts Josh Mcdaniels Patriots
Steelers part ways with OC Randy Fichtner, two other coaches

Behind the Steel Curtain

00:30 sec | 11 months ago

Steelers part ways with OC Randy Fichtner, two other coaches

"Steelers have not renewed the contracts of the phone coaches and. That's just a nice way of saying you got fired so they have gotten rid of offense coordinator randy feeding her office of line coach. Sean seret and defensive backs coach. Tom bradley on top of that is also being reported. Now those moves those three coaches that was official may by the pittsburgh steelers organization. It's on their website is on our website at behind the steel curtain dot com. The reports are though the keith butler. Defensive coordinator survive these rounds of cuts and he will be back.

Steelers Sean Seret Tom Bradley Randy Keith Butler
How Zoom might stay relevant post-pandemic

OC Talk Radio

05:58 min | 11 months ago

How Zoom might stay relevant post-pandemic

"Back to our listeners. And welcome back to work place perspective. Julie mccoy thank you to recite a happy new year. And thank you for having me back again. Sorry excited. I love that. We've with scientific arthur time. We've had to kick off our new year. I think it's a great way to do it. Twenty twenty one. Can you believe it. thank goodness right. Never so happy to see a year in the rear view mirror ever well. This is a great topic today. We're gonna be talking about lessons from twenty twenty one that we can take forward with us into this new year. What we could use to improve ourselves improve our lines and provide quality of lives and leaving behind everything. That doesn't serve us. So i am so excited to talk about this list. Jump right into it. Well thank you theresa sought. I've done a lot of reflecting on your twenty eight twenty as we leave it in the rear view mirror. Thank goodness but i. I think it's really important for your listeners. To before they russ not normalcy and twenty twenty one whenever that takes place. I think it's really important to reflect upon things that they undoubtedly learned in the what i call the roussel of twenty twenty because it was that or many of us and some of us bar more than others but You know there's a seeing among the coaching community that there's no comfort in the growth zone and no growth in the comfort zone and we've all been terribly uncomfortable to varying degrees where the past year and we now see the light. The end of the tunnel return to our normal are were teens and had dick schedules. And and i think it's really important to tag out or the experience of twenty twenty uncomfortable experience the lessons that we all learned and in a city. Here right now. Sort of your listeners may be dismissing that Because you know it they were mostly more focused on the pain and how to get through it and what was going to happen next year that accompanied all of his nyan certainty of it but invariably we. I am certain that we all learned things. Maybe we learned a new skill for example. I know a lot of people Might i'll take myself as an example. I wasn't really much of a cook. Started this process. Why us man. I ate out a lot. We got to take now snatch And all of a sudden is down than i had. Actually prepare a week's worth of menus. Arkansas and prepare food and i became a much better cook because i had to learn how to do things like substitute ingredients. And before i was just following the recipe rigidly. Because that's all i knew how to do. I had no idea. I'm substitute well. If you can't just run out and store to get one item because that's too dangerous right to your hell. I figure that out. So there's there was real learning around that For me i. I know of other people who had to learn how to be alone. Alana people just really can't stand thought of being alone and on the isolation of this pandemic inspires ties into that You know i would say that as we need this year last year behind us it's important to take a moment to reflect on what we gained on and there were a lot of positives. They came out of twenty twenty on on a broader scale For example the images of the clear skies in los angeles on this beautiful days when there was no pollution the images of the himalayan mountain one which you never see right because it's always obscured and smog the fact that a lot of us learned that our lives were so much more hectic when we were running around in our cars going back and forth to meetings there was so much easier just to sit down at our desk in have a really productive. Absolutely you know. I find that amazing now and that was one of the first things i noticed was how much time i saved by. Not having to and i still get ready. The i get up. I put my hair up close make module around and everything but still. It's so awesome. How much time you save right. And you're saving the environment at time. And you arrive at meetings not so frazzled. Especially in southern california when you're driving in traffic all of the time I you know. I just woke that going forward. Some of us will remember value of hadden's in meetings which they seem very awkward in the beginning and some people tatum so much they just signed off and reviews combat. But were those of us who had to stick it out. There were these we had to accomplish. I think we learned how to work through the awkwardness of winners. It might've speedy and ocean the conduct brisson's talking and once we did that we download it was really productive platform for getting things done and could sit down calmly in our desk with a cup of coffee or glass of water and proceed to our meeting without the rush of. Oh i just got the freeway. I'm laid i gotta find parking place. A russian take an elevator. So i i just hope that some of us will from time to time and undoubtedly in person meetings organic resume as soon as nike And i hope that some of the small may be take her pause in every now and then say you know. This meeting doesn't have to be. We're solidity in the comfort of our own homes or on offices and students via sumer via conference call.

Julie Mccoy Arthur Time Theresa Russ Himalayan Mountain Dick Alana Arkansas Brisson Los Angeles Hadden Tatum California Nike
Texas fires Herman after 4 seasons, hires Tide OC Sarkisian

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 11 months ago

Texas fires Herman after 4 seasons, hires Tide OC Sarkisian

"Steve Sarkisian as the new head football coach at Texas following the dismissal of Tom Herman after just four seasons Herman led four bowl victories for got the team to the big twelve title game just once he leaves with a thirty two and eighteen record at Austin including a warning for marked versus archrival Oklahoma search easy and has been the architect of Alabama's high powered offense that includes Heisman Trophy finalist mac Jones devante Smith he's expected to stay on at Alabama for the CFP championship game January eleventh against Ohio state I'm Dave Ferrie

Tom Herman Steve Sarkisian Herman Football Texas Mac Jones Devante Smith Austin Alabama Oklahoma CFP Ohio Dave Ferrie
Texas Longhorns hire Tide OC Sarkisian to replace Herman

The Fifteenth Club

00:29 sec | 11 months ago

Texas Longhorns hire Tide OC Sarkisian to replace Herman

"Sarkeesian, a zoo new head football coach for the Texas Longhorns. Tom Herman fired this morning, and it didn't take long for the powers that be to name a head coach. He's an assistant coach for the Alabama Crimson Tide. We'll talk about Steve Sarkisian, the new head coach of the Longhorns next hour also get you up to date on the bowl games that went on today, going on. They're not our friend Matt Brown of North Carolina faces the Agnese tonight in a big bowl game in the Orange Bowl game kicks off at seven o'clock, but we've got a fun show for you this

Tom Herman Texas Longhorns Steve Sarkisian Football Longhorns Alabama Matt Brown North Carolina
"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

05:40 min | 1 year ago

"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"Thank you for joining me. Thank you for having Angelo the I'm excited about this. But first of all I want to congratulate you as in digging into your background and in in two thousand nineteen, you're included in the Orange County business. Journal. OC Five, hundred directory of influence for innovation. In February of this year renominated the Orange County Business Journal women in Business, awards and in March of this year I'm not sure I surprised they were still doing business as. At March of this year you were nominated as a woman have been fluence awards in the finalists in the Game Changer Award at. Fantastic. I was humbled by by the nominations or or the recognition what I do with OC. Angel. Investors is really a passion project for me You couldn't stop me because I've been blessed in my life in. This is my give back to women that want to learn about angel investing so That was that was definitely surprised all those three nominations. That's great. I made a fan tastic and and. In the two this year I mean again it. Is early in the year but you know Kovic nonetheless as we get into march in the world changed a little bit but but that's okay. But I, want to ask you a question later on about how covert maybe as influence the kinds of businesses that you look at it and those kinds of things. But before we get started like take a few managed to talk about your investment group. And all the other things that you do to win all these awards frankly. Well I started oc angel investors in January twenty seventeen I realized that there were. Many women just like myself who wanted to learn about angel investing and they wanted to see companies that they would understand and they wanted to be educated on how to be angel investor, and so there's many groups here in southern California that are in the angel investing groups, and then part of most of them they're wonderful but the deal flow that we see in those groups. Is usually focused on the brain trust in that group. So we have very diverse backgrounds with his angel members and I wasn't seeing a group that was really catering to what women what we understand an our background what we could get passionate about because when you invest in a company, you've got to be passionate about the problem it's solving. So I started OC angels to kind of bridge that gap we meet monthly we started with eight members in two thousand seventeen..

Orange County Business Journal OC Orange County Kovic Angelo California
"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

02:00 min | 1 year ago

"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"Angelo Ponzi. I am Angela Ponzi your host here at the Business Growth Cafe and thank you for joining us. So you're thinking about starting a business or maybe you have one. Now when you're looking for investors your enthusiastic after all who wouldn't want to buy your product. And it's a billion dollar market. All you need is just one half of one percent and boom. You sell your on the Beach Drinking Margaritas enjoying life. Having the waves lap against your feet, but the journey from idea to MVP, to launch growth is a very long road in one that's not a straight one. With potentially ashes of cash in your wake I, like that phrase ashes of cash. The road to success is a dangerous one. Recent statistics show that only fifty three percent of startups will make it to year five, ninety percents of startups Phalle in ten percent of those do so in the first year. As they say in the wizard of Oz pay no attention to the man behind the curtain. But today we're going to be talking to the woman behind her actually in front of the curtain Zander lookout ski? Zander is the founder and CEO of OC Angel Investors. It is a membership based woman focused Angel Investment Group. It focuses on and is driven by executives and entrepreneurs with diverse and successful backgrounds to shed some light on the world of investing. But before we begin our conversations, let me take a quick break. My Company. Provides consulting interim and fractional marketing leadership services with a focus on the strategic and analytical side of marketing take a holistic approach to driving business. Consider US, getting architects who use research to gather the necessary insights from your customers, prospects, competition, and the marketplace to develop fact based approaches to building effective and efficient growth plans, and like a general contractor P party with internal teams of carefully selected vetted individuals and..

Angelo Ponzi Angela Ponzi Zander lookout OC Angel Investors founder and CEO Zander Angel Investment Group MVP Oz
"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

07:31 min | 1 year ago

"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"Hey Charlie high ball took pleasure to be back here with you virtually on. Oc Talk Radio for the last couple of weeks. Paul I seen to be focused on a lot of energy on the idea of navigating with no map today I plan to kind of continue with that thought but with an entirely different. Take this time. It's about when to go with your gut. Now I'm a gut guy I believe that. Humans have millions of years of evolution. Updating our knowledge of the role of ventilator intuition decision making it has only been since the industrial revolution that we have begun to use numbers and analysis is fundamental guidelines far significant choices in life although such a move has proven successful or helpful in science. I'm not so sure if it is as much valid in life making life based decisions you see I think each of us possess this powerful internal. Gps I want to say GPS system. But that's redundant that guides our ability to make good decisions which I see are formed based on three primary influences intuition passion and personal character and today I wanNa pray primarily most of our attention to installation intuition but we will get into passion and character in to help in this thought process. My guest is a successful and highly into in highly intuitive individual has made significant life choices that at the end of the day had been based on very informed intuition or Gus. I I have known tai-bo since about nine thousand nine hundred eighty five and had been privileged to witness many of his most important decisions. I I so admire tied. His intelligence his contribution to society in his strong belief in listening to his heart. Let's bring on Thai rose and talk about our internal. Gps and institution. Yo Tie Darlie our you. Well I am. Well thank you yes you will. I am well Paul as well so we will see if the punt kissed ends well. Well I'm on Calcutta not end. Well that's great buddy said eternal. Gps I'm like eighty five. I remember our Tuesday lunches Charlie. I don't remember what we talked about. But that was the foundation of our friendship. From along time ago appear recall. We went to lunch nearly every Tuesday and we woven in and out of life A different occasions since then. So thank you. That was very nice. Introduction I'll try to live up to The platitudes that you give me the mice things you said but It's an honor to be with you once again on today. Show thanks better. You know what I what I I can't I can't believe is to remember the day that we met. I remember you. We used to meet weekly. But I certainly have no recollection of meeting on Tuesdays. But I'm I'm confident that you are correct in that. Well I might have just made that up as we were talking before the show for this conversation. It's going to be Tuesdays okay. Okay Tuesday's tie. Yeah I'm Charlie. Yeah okay so ty. We discussed briefly. We didn't have a long phone chat but just briefly that I've been wrestling in his time of quarantine with the idea of Nag navigating with our no map navigating with no map when our friend. Yours and Mine Terry. Hershey reminded me that we indeed do have maps but those maps are found within our internal. Gps So in fact we do have maps. They just look different than the ones. We're most familiar with what? What are your thoughts on that? Well I think we do have internal maps but what happens? Perhaps is that we. We tend to rely on the printed map. Whatever that may be in life and so maybe we get a little lax with our internal maps And we don't necessarily rely on them as much as we did before we had were in all of this information being thrown at us. You know From so many different places. So I'll definitely I believe there's an internal map and I don't know maybe I trust that. The perhaps better sometimes than I do Maybe an external map if that makes sense but yeah. We're in an era now. We're in the pine that's we. Nobody knows how to navigate this. Exactly we're all you know we're trying to figure it out. Perhaps as we go along but that might be the very reason that we need more intuition at a time like this because there is that internal. Gps that's maybe going to give them guidance. You know a bit of a story I read. I read in my last blog. I had a quote from I believe it's you know. Vile Harari who wrote Sapienza a wonderful book and he said we have become so dependent on on Google maps and ways and it has been a nice `application to help us get somewhere easily. But Willie done is that. We've turned our faith in algorithms and in the process forgotten our way forgotten our ability to find our own way that we start depending on science and we can no longer find our own way because we we are so enamored with science and with this data that we don't look to our internal GPS. I thought there was a quite quite insightful and then talking about maps you know what maps I like Thai. I like the one of the early explorers that there may be monsters here and the end of the earth those and they do them right onto the map. You know Not like they had ever seen them but those all yes those are well. They're works of art. Actually you know oh they are wonderful but I find their truthful. You know they're they're as we're going. There may be monsters here. Do you don't know and and the littoral map doesn't know either now tight. We live what I'm calling for those of us who can remember this far back. But I'm I'm calling. We live in a Jack Jack Webb America. Just the facts Ma'am we glorify data and analysis spreadsheets lists plus and minus columns and so after all the facts.

Charlie Paul Thai rose Jack Jack Webb America Calcutta Gus Hershey Willie Vile Harari Sapienza
"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"Welcome back time again for another episode of OC spotlight showcasing. The most amazing people doing the most incredible things and this one well. This one really caught my imagination. I gotTa Tell You. It's all about sports. Let our guest Scott Kelly Explain it all. Hey Scott how are you? I'm good I understand. You're not so good you calling in from a roadside summer after a flat tire. So we'll hope this isn't a flat interview here. I'll try to do my best but a nice and comfortable car. Okay good well. We're going to be comfortable this week over in Garden Grove. You're doing something I have never seen in all the years. The stations been around. You're doing an e sports event. What would you describe what? What's the name of the event and describe what's going to take place Eastwards Fast Pitch Conference and probably for the best way describing is part via game chairman? Part Shark tanks and part Analytics experts on East Sports. Now for those of YOU FOLKS. That are of my age. I'm a I'm a man of a certain age here. I'm in my mid sixty s sports to me. I still have to scratch my head but we have done so many shows about this in fact we have coming up on a couple of weeks the director of the East sports program at UC Irvine. Which I'm told has one of the bigger east sports programs out there. And I think he's some commissioner for a new high school league across the country hundreds and hundreds of Ice Minium here in southern California that a sporting east sports teams tell me about e sports. What the heck is he sports? Well your sports have been around for quite a long period of time you know basically it's competitive gaming And the reality is all your spot out fifty six.

East Sports Scott Kelly OC Garden Grove Ice Minium chairman UC Irvine commissioner California director
"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

14:02 min | 1 year ago

"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"Welcome back everybody time again for another episode of OC spotlight. The one show. That takes a look at the most incredible people doing the most amazing things and today. Well we've got. We've got a big one for you here today. Somebody who certainly made an impact in southern California across the globe here. I'm GonNa let them introduce himself. Welcome to the show here sir. Hey Paul doing today. I'm Good Friday exciting on your show. Tell us who you earn what you were most recently doing here. All righty well my name. Is Toby Corey and I've got a nice checkered history. And doing crazy my life. I'll say some big ones along the way here so todd tell us about. How did Toby Corey? Come to be the president of Tesla Energy Group. Yeah let's see here why I had a large successful career high tech here in Silicon Valley and I was running a billion dollar network operating system business back in the early nineties and then I've always been a very restless soul and and kindred spirits set out to create started own company and we have the time when the Internet was being born to sing. Call the Web Browser and an html protocol who went on to treat the world's largest web development company so we were one of the pioneering companies on the front of perhaps the greatest innovation and the last one hundred two hundred years of humanity really had a chance to build some amazing websites and go through a public offering and create a company of five thousand people a billion in revenue and That was just an incredible Ri- and then I on this board of directors are Dr Richard Leakey who is a Quite a character in and of themselves. I had the chance to hear him speak to. Uc Irvine A few years ago it was richer. Leakier his son I forgot which one or maybe it was his daughter. Yeah and one of them talking about all the work that they do in. What was it? is it. Uganda or Kenya. Kenya stories ethics so he was famous leakey family. He discovered the the famous lucy fossil remains and he wrote a book in the early nineties called the sixth extinction. And he's chronicle the exact problem that we're having right now which is facing an existential threat with climate change. We're seeing temperatures rising oceans rising polls melting Biodiversity shrinking our oceans becoming more and more acidic and all of the factors around that. And he's been quite a you know savant and I think just very visionary guide and that got me really thinking about you know. Think about what deep responsibility we have to ensure that future generations have a better opportunities than we had. And I'm not sure we're living up to that Our responsibility and I was very moved by that and then have the opportunity to go to solar city. Where you log. Musk was our largest shareholder and chairman of the board and Got To go through my second. Ipo there and That was an unbelievable time. And then Got A call. Go back there We felt the time is right to merge the two which I always thought should have happened earlier just incredible vehicle because that wasn't necessarily the obvious play on Wall Street. You know Sometimes Wall Street. I think have a hard time seeing seeing things I mean. Look at Tesla's stock. Today was out three four months with one hundred seventy dollars. I think it's over eight hundred today right. But so if he is disrupting the entire transportation sector. And you've got your changing the paradigm. They're so you've got these electric vehicles but you're filling with fossil fuel electrical kind of some of the purpose. So we're seeing a resurgence at eight. I almost look at solar technology very much. Like computing computing. Started these big mainframes minis running these big words rooms with air conditioning myself right now and then it moved to a more distributed paradigm where the CPU cycles. Now run on the palm of your hand with your iphone your android and energies moving in the direction of the cost of panels. Coming down the cost of technology coming down the abundance of Sun and now the ability to self generate and then With the Tesla Power Wall and your electric vehicle. It's changing the world. So it's an amazing time to be alive. It really is rare opportunity for me to ask you the question. I hear all the time when they talk about batteries. The basic battery has gotten a little better. But it's still the basic battery that's been around forever. Maybe it's lithium now and maybe it holds a little longer but is that what's holding it back the giant the ability to store this power for longer than just a few hours. You can generate it but it seems to be the battery. That's the limiting factor in the car in its range in In transferring us off of fossil fuels to a permanent renewable platform here. Yeah what's a little bit more complex that you're right on one hand however we're not quite seeing. Moore's law where CPU cycles double everyone. I guess that's what I was getting. It right yeah. Yeah but we are seeing major innovations. The first version of electric vehicles couldn't even go fifty miles and now you're looking at cars. Go four hundred miles. So that's a four x improvement in less than five years. And I think that you know one of the smart things that Eli on Did such visionary Entrepreneur was understand how to put the right strategic pieces in place to have the kind of disruption innovation and he invested very early on in the gigafactory which is now the largest lithium ion batteries factory in the world and He's doing amazing. Rnd work that is going to show leaps and bounds and the ability to store energy biggest pieces and not only is it. Is it going to increase radically over the coming months and years? But more importantly for homeowners that one of the things that make solar challenging. Is that when you're home? You're usually using about forty percent of the electricity or solar system is generating and then we'll get into kind of a gray area where we ate some public policy to help with called net metering so when your system is over generating it's feeding it back into the grid which does get consumed but it's you know it's it's It's complex but now with my battery I can show charge my battery up and use that. So it's really changing the paradigm in dramatic ways. But you're going to see you know. I'm going on my Tenth Year Teaching Entrepreneurship afternoons at University. There's amazing Rnd work being done on solar cells. There Tesla Solar Rousseau. I think you're going to see. Probably one of the greatest. Innovations occur in the storage area in the next five years. Okay because that always seems to be the weakest link in the process here that the battery is still the battery. And it's better. It's coming Paul. It's common okay. I'm hopeful and then the other thing what about pushback you know. I'll give you a perfect example so I have a second home out in the nine heritage in Palm Springs. My parents used to live in and when they passed. I inherited out there and out in the valley. I was going son all the time. I'm going to put solar on the roof here. I won't ever have to worry about it. And yet they took away the tax incentives and then the local utility center. And we're not going to pay that much for the power that you're taken back because it's hurting into our business. We're in the power production business. We don't WANNA be buying it for MOMS and pops all around America with their solar roofs and all of a sudden the kind of solar business dried up. It's it it it. What was red hot? Suddenly cooled off Is that push back I is that a short term pushback or is that a big term problem here. No it's definitely a short term push back and I think when you see paradigms changing and industry he's denying you're you're seeing the last gasp so I think we all know fossil fuels not the greatest thing for our planet. It's emitting massive amounts of co two into our atmosphere and rounding massive sort of climate debt for future generations to call so what the the beauty of it all is not too long ago you know. Solar Systems were Seven dollars a watt an average solar system. The seven kilowatt at seven dollars. That's fifty thousand dollars a day. They're under three dollars. A lot of ways to go but with especially with storage that allows you to unhook from this net metering. So you don't need the regulatory policy issues that you're running into some you know some difficulties with your current utility provider. My you know I just believe in freedom and I believe consumers should have a choice and when you can only buy electronically from one provider. They can escalate their rates. Whatever they want and it's a monopoly. Times are changing quickly. I think it's not going to be long before you're going to be able to purchase a system that will pay for itself and the very short order or enter into a lease or a power purchase agreement that is actually cheaper than what you're getting today without having to shell out any money at that that's around the corner. I'm I'm I'm I can guarantee you that in the next year or two and what do you think about? I hear Our City Irvine apparently has done this. I think the city of Palm Springs is doing it where they're giving you a choice get green energy and they'll say well for the moment maybe charges you a little bit more. Maybe raise your hundred dollar Bill Two hundred and ten dollars. Something nominal like that but at least then. You're telling us we you want it's sourced from. I don't know Solar Wind. Something geothermal something else here that will consumers pay to switch over to that even if it costs a couple of bucks more hope to have well. I have mixed feelings on that. I think it's because one of the things that Ilan treat back in the day when the green move just started most of the products were inferior and they cost more and just had a point of view. Like that's crazy like these products. I'm going to build products. That are better. That are either at parody of existing cost or cheaper right. And that's what he's I mean. Although there's all this hassle Automobile Is One hundred percent green at electric. Like he's redefined the driving experience Is such an amazing product. He's disrupting the one hundred plus year old transportation industry and ways that we couldn't have imagined just three or four years ago so. I think that for those folks that are challenged may be living in an apartment or their roof. Is this not Conducive to sue the right kind of solar production at the right cost level. It's an okay step but I just don't believe you should have to pay more for that right And I think that you're gonNA find that they'll be more distributed networks that will be in in communities that are directly so. I think it's a short term paradigm. I don't think it's the long term and I think that I think the Grizz important It's like technology today you've got these servers that run at Amazon and Internet based servers. You'RE GONNA have more of a distributed system that works in a more in concert and I think he's GonNa drive a much more cleaner better paradigm. So let's talk about. Electric cars will be where you came from the solar city side of the equation here but the electric car is a fascinating development. It seemed inevitable to so many of us and yet it took so long to get here and there were others who fell along the way fisker here in orange. Although they've come back now is a Chinese entity here but you know they're they They were in the race there for a while and couldn't seem to deliver Was it just Alonzo's tenacity? Was it his deep pocket book that let him keep going Even when there was no prophet there or was what what was it. That made Tesla's succeed. Where so many failed. Yeah God that's a really good very deep question. I'll try and I'll try and keep my answer. Shake going going on teaching My Tenth Year of Entrepreneurship at Stanford and having been successful onshore myself. Well high big successes the mediocre successes and failures. I've always looked at you know entrepreneurship something that can be learned or is DNA exact. And I've come to the conclusion that I believe. Although you can't anything get better at something because you have the natural ability And the natural programming of your brain. Or you don't and there's I brought I've hired executives out of Fedex that have failed miserably and entrepreneurial endeavors and Ilan is truly a force of nature like predecessors and it's time Nikola Tesla J. P. Morgan Rockefeller and now. There's also many folks people talk about them in terms. I've never obviously had a chance to meet the man here. He's one of those unattainable giants that you and a few others have met here. But he's somebody that intrigues us. All and we all wonder how why what. What's the secret sauce here? Well I think it boils down to Some really kind of simple thing. So first and foremost is most folks do not use all of the ability empower that that they have been bestowed US less than ten percent of our brains and that's been proven In both neuroscientists he has such an extraordinarily big thinker. For starters and number two he puts Create the culture at a pattern of extraordinary challenges and one of the things that I remember at Tesla was a a mantra that he always used which was excellent is just a passing grade so the expectations are so high. If the rise to such a level there and keep focuses on big hairy problems and that's where most people fail. He wants to go to Mars and he acts like he's really GonNa do it. Yeah well he is going to do that for sure. I here's a clamp of you won't believe this concept of costs first principles which is breaking things down wasn't sure he's an incredible marketer. He has a he's he's he's the indescribable. But when he was starting spacex he was initiative by rockets from Russia rocket sizes food or Russia and it turns out. The rockets were like sixty million dollars..

Tesla Irvine Toby Corey Ilan Dr Richard Leakey Kenya Russia Tesla Energy Group OC California Paul todd Solar Wind president US Uganda
"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

02:52 min | 1 year ago

"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"You don't sign like we're free service actually from for buyer's agent But they always retain because I think I am able to kind of offer that to them and for whatever reason they have stuck with me on their second turn now seven plus years later from again. That's great though. That's just a testament to how you do business and the relationships you develop so good for you good for you One of my favorite things to do towards the end of the show is to ask my guests. Their final final thought question. And that is what is your ultimate lesson learned in your career as a real estate professional. Just be authentically me There are in. I've worked teams and groups and at the end of the day. When you're shooting yourself. Might my dad would always say be yourself and you can't lose so. I'll leave with that be yourself and you can't lose and I don't have the nerves I don't have the I'm not pretending to be someone. I'm not if we click. It's great if not. That's okay too if I fit and fit. It's a beautiful thing so just be you and be authentic answer. Authenticity big this generation. Don't be a hater. Pixel I can tell all right so my next favorite question is what you're guilty. Pleasure Bachelor really. Oh my goodness how. We finally met Somebody. Who ADMITS THEY WATCH? I mean millions of people doing nobody ever admits show. So if you knew how excited I was right now but I'm not going to comment and say anything through this great image Monday night. We are going to be watching the Bachelorette one point one of those old fuddy who says who watches this fairytale nonsense. We're going to put twenty people the room and they all magically follow love. Every time I mean it just that's it. It's ridiculous is the show ethnic elegance at all. I just cut. That's part of it. Ruined Bartolo family actually promote and help saying I'm Super Fan out all right Who got hot in here? We went to place. I didn't think we'd ever visit here. Careful what we ask so anyway Christina. Thank you so much for being on the show. Thank you for sharing. Thank you for Sharon To how you do your business and trends and I think it's going to be a great value so thank you so much for coming in. It's my pleasure and I wanNA thank everyone who was tuned in and we look forward to being back in studio next week.

Christina Sharon Bartolo
"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

11:05 min | 1 year ago

"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"I like that you're laughing. But she she lived in Palm Springs. Look at those going to say that long term thrown away laughing at it now. It's the hottest thing go to call any and go to some areas in palm springs and that is quite entre. I actually love the color so and I think it looks beautiful with them. A White Oak and good clean line century saw Paul hanging there long enough. It all comes back. You would have thunk. Somebody tweeted into question. How selling real estate change are we all just GonNa go to I'm I shouldn't even mentioned but you know we know the sites. Were all the frayed of your that Now have the listings. And we're just GONNA go on Zillow and all these places here you know. I get asset question a lot and I think it's a it's a great question because on paper it sounds like a one percents Transaction charge is with the way to go but really when you come in to cash the financial repercussions of your biggest investment And just the service aspect but also I can tell you. Numerous occasions in areas like Credit Omar where listing agents unfortunately will not choose that offer When they are represented by red fin or Zillow and that is because it really is a mechanical transaction. And at the face of it. It seems like that's the case but truly it's an emotional process. It's so much more thorough from a legal perspective and financial perspectives. So there are I. I've seen it so many times in it's such a disservice. I I noticed On on both sides really Because there's so much fault in it and I could talk for days about it. There's a lack of concierge to absolutely because it's something you only do once a couple times you know. Bart buys and sells them like candy here. Probably but I've only owned what I think. Two houses in forty years or something digs transaction. And it's so true and what you notice from a negotiation perspective that we save you From knowing just a relationship with other agents especially area like this To like we said all the other factors that can kind of come into play From concierge level your savings so much more money and you have no idea where you're getting into especially in an older home if you don't have the right due-diligence after I leave here I'll be going to a property where you know. There's a we will have a lengthy termite inspection a physical inspection and the things people that I use and have been in the area for over twenty five years. They find things you wouldn't imagine which would save you I mean countless dollars. So that's not something a red vendors Egypt would be able to do trans- actually so Are you doing real estate as a quote unquote investment like second or third properties for people as well it you see a lot of that In addition to obviously primary residences I do at depends of course on the tenure of The client right now. I'm just immersed in the market that is first and second time homebuyers Of course their first home tends to be a million dollars. Takkula great on them but But it it does seem to be that You know I have a divorce. Say currently in San Juan Capistrano. That's looking For her you know fifth and sixth investment opportunities so it's kind of across the board but by and large I would say I'm a first and second time homebuyer. Space currently elder millennial yeah the older millennial ripped. Here's another one that we hear all the time here. Are we in danger? In Orange County of becoming one. Big Leisure World as millennials. Choose to move elsewhere or cannot afford to live here. Our own kids can't afford to live here which is going to be one big senior. Kimmy because the fastest. I look at the statistics. I don't remember exactly there but the fastest of seniors by by population is in places like Orange County and you look at Newport beach. It's like twenty five or thirty five percent of people over fifty five sixty years of age. I mean logically. There's some sense of that right because the older you get when you're like Paul and you're sitting on millions four that's right. You could afford more expensive house versus the millennial. Older older millennial leaders are trying to save up for even a down payment. Though some logic to that and I remember there was some presentation Laguna and there was a proposal for some some Multifamily living in the concern was that they. The only people that are going to be able to afford that are going to be the elderly. It's an interesting question. I but I overall like I mean just speaking of Laguna where we happen to both live and even Orange County. I don't I don't see that it's amazing. Laguna such a. Its own micro-climate But Newport you consider just on the on the other side of Dana Point you can get into a condominium four hundred and fifty thousand dollars and you can probably get an Fha loan so As much as I think people are staying in their property longer as the As a baby boomer generation stays there. Still you know I even in San Juan Capistrano. There were some phenomenal new constructions for under a million so So yeah I think employments going so great here in the area P people are coming here especially with with tech and I can definitely speak from. My you know went to college here and and most of my friends are either from here. Usc and they all want to come back here and raise their families and might not be the twenty something. But I think the thirty something that you know ran to La to begin their career. Like my husband. And I did They WANNA come back here and raise their family and go to the great schools. We don't always have to put our children in private. Schools can save there. There's a lot of great things about Orange County so in my experience You know it's definitely Broadening for that thirty something crowd for sure of you guys aren't worried about the Grain Orange. Canny how about the high rising the high rise of Orange County enough. There's such fights about where else to go up. And Are we going to become San Francisco? We're GONNA become Manhattan or we're going to end up like that you're not gonNa have a backyard and emerge but you're gonNA a starbucks at the base of your building here. Is that where we're going? We have seen a lot of that. Or WE'RE GONNA GAL. I'm I know we're talking to local areas right now but it would be one of the cities that would just fight that hunting. There's no way that's ever GonNa Happen Right. But as long if they're selling that kind of answer that's the opposite to the green because those are going to be more probably affordable right you may. That's how the millennials are going to have their first home ownership And maybe I mean is it A. Is it a trend? It's here Stan. Anaheim by the stadium. It's a big thing. Santan Point Dana Dana Point. They're putting lots of density downtown in a relatively. Yeah right right around the whatever that checked yeah exactly commercial but could be somebody Have you do run across those? You sell them. Do you buy them. I do run across them. Taylor Morrison Some of the new constructions that have kind of by Hoke hospital And I think that's a great star. Property sold one at like seven hundred thousand. And they're you know stone's throw from the ocean so I could see that Paul that that's definitely where that younger millennials going and as you know. They value experiences over things so the fact that they're in the area And close to things to do like the Lantern District that you mentioned They want to take the trolley to the crap house and have a good time. I'm just I'm sure there's people listening right. Now that are outside of California like you said seven hundred thousand dollar this Condo Newport. Yeah they probably have a five thousand square foot five Acre House somewhere in the Midwest for real. It seems like somehow living in Orange County is going to change. And I'm not sure we really planning for. It's just sort of happening because there is no place else to grow Afford Abilities Continue to be an issue in yet tons of people want to still come here and I just wonder what it's going to look like twenty thirty forty years from now we're GONNA have to hang around long enough policy. I plan on Paulo but on the show. I'm going to be the elder baby boom. Hey Christina What is your why o. Bart well I mean my wife has always been. She's nobody's barred sound good. It's funny always connection. I I feel like when I'm going through this process with my clients. I'm literally PART OF THEIR FAMILY. And there's just nothing. I love more than that I live it breathe it. I don't know if that's something healthy or not healthy but it is how it is. I truly am twenty four seven for them but I always wanted something that could kind of collectively be who I was and even You know as you're on my blog I my intention is truly to serve. And so this gives me that freedom to do so And and it's it's been such a beautiful process. I've gotten closer to people I it's like you live their lives when you're buying or selling real estate with them. I could be showing their house every single day. I live and breathe their home. I live and breathe family. Live and breathe nap schedule. Their job promotion there sometimes. I'm a therapist between a husband and a wife. I mean where a lot of hats But that connection is is really the why behind IT I. It doesn't feel like work. I don't drink Monday or weekend Because of that I just have to ask you one of the credit. 'cause you talk about connections you talk about repeat customers and yet you say. Wait ten years. That's a long cycle for that. Repeat to happen here. How do you stay connected to them over ten years or seven or whatever you recommended holding a house for a great question Paul? And it's so neat because I'm actually at that place where I am buying their second home. So it's fun because I watched them six seven years ago. Bring their first child home and they're now on their third. So it's so organic for me Paul. I I've never done a lick of marketing until this year. And it's it's just I really am part of their family and part of their lives And they are part of mine I don't know I guess it's just the way been since I was a little girl. It doesn't feel like it takes much effort. It's a trust. They hear you hear these terms from agents that buyers are always committed..

Orange County Paul Zillow Laguna San Juan Capistrano Bart Palm Springs Dana Point Dana Dana Point San Francisco Midwest La Egypt Anaheim Kimmy Fha starbucks California Usc
"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"Six weeks renovations happen truly very quickly It took me a while to found. Find those teams but I love to share those resources Because yes it's that's that gray white clean. Modern more contemporary style And then just kind of depending on the area they add a little bit more of that Boho touch or the colorful pop And it's it's so fun surfaces just change the world instead of the style of it but if they can keep the house clean in terms of open sight lines in living areas I think that's ideal deal okay. I'm play devil's advocate here. For a second so is there a risk for someone and maybe I'm probably answer my question but if it's okay I'm GonNa. I'm going to sell my house. I'm going to remodel. Let's say the kitchen and the bathroom but what if the style isn't what a buyer is going to have a style that they're looking for right so that there is a potential that Ramal and the like. That's that's great but I wanted you know X. Style and said why style. It's so but I I would think that the answer is just keep it as clean generic as as possible with good products and then try to appeal to the masses. Exactly I think a fresh coat of paint goes a long ways sometimes even just aesthetically and the fresh smell like those things in a white surface. You can't go wrong with And just try to keep it as up to date as you can. In the last ten years trends again. Financial Trends are also style trends if we can kind of stay on trend for that sail and Just some of those things. People walk in the door. It typically those surfaces the The paint that the ceilings the flooring that can really set the lifespan of a design is at about ten years about ten years. That tempo But then of course we see these amazing mid-century moderns Incredible and I'm sure everything. Now you know in ten years we'll want like the Mahogany Cherry floors again avocado green and orange. That Paul has in his house..

Ramal Paul
"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

11:04 min | 1 year ago

"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"Estate agent extraordinary. Welcome to the show Christina. Someone having me part of course and Paul were glad to have you. Today's well okay. I just flipped in there. We Have Christina and Paul Chris. That's right so Christina. Let's start with that study on a little bit more about you. How what you do who you serve. And then we'll get more into like on the fundamentals of real estate. So how did you get to be this amazing real estate agent that your today? Well part I guess you could say real estate is kind of in my DNA I've been showing properties since I was maybe five years old by My father was A broker in the palm springs area in the eighty S. And it's kind of all I knew most of my life so some of the things that stuck out since I was a wee girl was those long term relationships that my father would have for thirty five plus years and that was very attractive to me. I think it was just a holistic type of relationship on sometimes their biggest asset but also the place in which they lived and built the reality so a lot of that was always attractive to me And I just always saw myself in that role. Okay did you have you? Have you done? It obviously weren't selling real estate at age five but did you have any other career as an adult or right into real estate you know right after graduating from UC. I did work for the Irvine Company so initially I was there Bought our first place at twenty four but in the meantime I was a pharmaceutical sales. Rep I was a biotech sales rep and Kinda graduated to surgical sales kind of the the summit there for about ten years So so yeah. That was actually started in real estate. But I felt like unless I had bought my own property and Was in the position to really remodel and renovate like I I eventually did. I wasn't completely ready to make it my entire world so I chose the sales and connecting which was medical sales For a large portion of my twenties in Los Angeles and soon as I had the opportunity to come to flip a home in Orange County. Thought this is a kind of market. I could see myself in in the long term. That's great began. Connect your question before you dive into deep here because she says she's an elder millennial she's the elder of that tribe here. Why do so? Many millennials not value or homeownership are not seem interested in. It is just because they're delaying family. Is it because they saw the crash and they're scared is because the prices or is it just lifestyle and they're just never going to be that excited about the picket fence in the backyard? Well you know the the interesting portion is the elder millennial Say The thirties Has a little different mentality. I think they are seeing homeownership as something They strive for you know. It's it's the age old down payment. Honestly they get in a position where they've spent so much on higher education their master's degree or whatnot. So it really is that the can preclude them but as they have kind of grown in their career I find it to be a huge value asset for them Perhaps the the younger millennial You know I think the mentality is a little bit different there. Sometimes you know. They're starting their own businesses in starting in the tech world and unfortunately with Or fortunately maybe for big banks. They're looking at a very clear financial statement over the last few years and so I do think they strive for it. Surprisingly Paul it just depends on their viability financially. And you know maybe it is better that they do rent for a while honestly because as I see real estate it's a long term investment. And if you can't sit in it for at least seven to ten years maybe it's not the time. So perhaps they are. They've got a decent head on their shoulders in that regard because we've had so many shows and people have come in expressing. Worry are they ever GonNa get the fever or you know. We all wanted to own our own homes. And they're my kids and other people are linked. Maybe I think I think deep down. It's really that internal struggle of of candy they'd like to but can they hold onto it and do they have that longevity and that's part of real estate and I think you hit a a great point because you and I've done a show before your show in that the topic was what's the what's the right minimum amount of time to to own a house and I think from a planning perspective that seven to ten years because when you don't know the volatility to as we know there's cost to get in and cost to get out so that I think is a good rule of thumb. Yeah so criteria say that who do you serve so I like to say I'm the anecdote for the busy professional They tend to be honest. It's usually the female that reaches out to me They tend to be either the CO breadwinner or the breadwinner of the couple. Just happens to be my demographic that replicates itself over the last six years but they're extremely busy they have children at home and lives there juggling and I step in and I think the reason I can be that anecdote is meet them at their office for an hour and we go over properties I you know kind of hand hold them as they work through a potential renovation and get some contractors in there you know so they are not You know wasting time truly so. I think that tenure and just that practice of me and my own experience and now multiple multiple clients that have gone through something similar can kind of Save Time and And really handle some those worries. I think that female professional want someone that they can trust I'm not the type. This isn't something for my financial gain. It's really For that connection long-term and this is just a nice thing. I can kind of provide a bunch of different of my attributes for them but I I think that those. That's my person. He's my people that sounds like a very similar to our practice and we'll offering concierge type service and it sounds like that's what you are doing this show. We're providing the bite-size knowledge. Just they need it for that. You're busy so Paul just as a Salvador through member but Letitia when she tells her story. Who's my my business partner? She started investing when she was in kindergarten. So much like you were a five hole. In the real estate she started investing as a kindergartener and has stuck with it. Ever since. So I love those those things. What are you in the way of trends right now? Well I think Gosh I'm extremely busy right now and I think that's probably because the interest rate is remarkably low I have a good pool of buyers between like one point five and two point five and they are looking for a forever home. Their families expanding their on their second and third child So there's that mix I think there's some fence sitters. Of course that are worried about a potential change after the election so You know waiting to see if there's any volatility there But I think by and large they are looking for a forever home. It's not necessarily an investment. Of course it is. It always is but They're finding the right fit for their family long-term and Whether or not it's they're smaller home they're growing out of Or something they see their family and it it is just. It's very busy right now as a season for me for buyers for sure. Yeah I think there's a there's an interesting overlap. In in our businesses and our our respective specialty jurors being real estate in mind being just the market in general and I think something common theme would be. It's time not timing so I mean I have people that I meet to like. Oh I can't invest now there's election interest rates are high or there's issues with China and historically if we look at time not that you picked like the best day it was at a market low right But if you use that seven time your time horizon it's barely moves the needle that maybe you brought at a market peak it happens. And then you know they're gonNa there could potentially some sort of adjustment but then given the amount of time it's GonNa come back and usually comes back higher than before. I think that's very consistent in just just overall investments rather be real estate or otherwise absolutely I think at our coastal market specialized from Costa Mesa Saint Clemmie and. That's always been a huge point for them is that these are the places with our our phenomenal school district and that big blue. That are those continuum that if you can't afford to be here and invest it really is more that time you don't WanNa lose it. What would you so someone's getting ready to sell out because you represent sellers as well so do you go in and like I know we have a good design. I go you look and say okay I mean you go as far as let's take out a wall and make this more of a great room experience or what what. What is that process like for you? You know it. Just it really depends on this feller and their style. Yes we've done that absolutely And it just. It depends on timing again my clientele. They've got these young children at home. So sometimes that's not doable. So quote unquote convenience tax or convenience concession if you will And they kind of expect that in a request repairs or that clientele that I'm looking at it could be more invested vestment minded person coming into Laguna beach per for example and might want to create their own style and it was already built in. Nineteen seventy three's so where do we begin? I think there is that aesthetic that that clean clean lines modern fresh style That is what everyone's kind of looking for like you said that open concept living area. So if there's any way we can declutter or paint some walls flooring does so much It's less expensive than you think And can happen in a week so there are times that I have absolutely done that. It just depends on their time and how they're looking capitalize on that investment. But I think it goes away. As if they're able to sometimes spending a little bit will help make a lot one hundred percent and then just generally speaking what are people looking for? And what is the the the style? If you will either interior exterior we talked about the openness. But is that is that a thing? It's the thing that open concept and kitchen. Kitchens and bathrooms still sell You know a good portion of buyers. Just don't have the time to renovate so If you are a seller looking to do that they love. The courts countertops which ironically is cheaper than granite cheaper than marble and You know you can really resurfacing fairly quickly In my time in the industry I've watched Kitchens be remodeled and four to.

Paul Chris Christina Irvine Company Los Angeles Orange County fever UC partner Laguna beach Costa Mesa Saint Clemmie feller China Letitia Salvador
"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

14:35 min | 2 years ago

"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"On either side of the field and in the process you try and ride off your opponent or you might hook them to stop them from paying the ball. It's also played right handed so I'm left handed but I had to learn how to play right handed because that way we avoid as much as possible people Clyde ing head on oh I see I see because there's a right of way of the ball so as soon as the balls hit it creates this imaginary line and you want follow that line in order to not Follow your opponent. Keeps the the play moving in the right direction. Is there goalposts. There's goals on either side On the grass. Yes there's two posts and in the arena at the the goals are built into the arena and There's not a goalie per se. No no there's is you cannot gold tent in Polo but you do have offensive and defensive positions and you can get very strategic you know in terms of positioning on the field and and get as complicated as you want in his Ratty Jeanne truce I see people falling or getting hit. It seems like a very like talk about that so I was GONNA ask. This is This is my attempt at humor as hockey where they can take him to start being on each right. Well we know but We saw all of the rules are intended to keep the horses safe and the player safe. We don't want to see anybody getting hurt and one of the great things about arena polo is that it is played. It's softer it's played at a slower pace It is a much safer endeavor than The grass Polo can be horses. In general are always you know you have to be aware at all times what you're doing and and never take it for granted that they're going to just stand there just because they were standing there for an hour before if something spooks them they're going to move But our whole job and our goal it. OC POLO is to keep people safe. We do everything we can to keep the horses in good shape we you know. Keep the equipment in good shape. The Rina's everything we do is because nobody don't WanNa get hurt. We don't WANNA horses to get hurt. So yes any horse activity is definitely a little bit more on the risky side than walking to school. But or the the You provide the horses for players at at your read. We provide the horses for lessons. And then as you progress into club chuckers you need to buy Your own horse and then we provide all the care for the horse so we do everything from make. Sure it's fed to the vet to everything everything that needs to be done but it really Changes the club The way people play when they own their own horse. If you don't own your own horse worse and you come from you know sort of a motorcycle background in anything. Oh this I'm just going to get on and ride it like a motorcycle. Well I don't want you doing that to my a horse so When Union your own horse you start to understand the importance of maybe swing you know at a particular play because if you do hurt your horse then you don't have a horse to play for the next six months or so? It really creates an investment in your sport and improve approve lot faster in these teams is the Final Cup as their what happened. Yeah so we just root for teams. Do I have to play. Can I just come you. You can't so not only So from from an arena polo. We have We have an arena league that we play with Clubs up and down southern California. Yeah that's really fun to get to play against other clubs will make up teams For usually you make up a team for a particular tournament And we do have events that are open to the public and the other thing that we do. That's really a fun. Thing is that we put on private private events so we're sort of providing unique polo experiences for people to whether they wanna come and have a team building event and and bring all of their customers or their. You know hiring employees and we'll get them all on a horse we'll walk him through. All the steps will teach him about how to swinging Mollet Horse Care and then they can come and have lunch and watch a Polo match or we can put on. You know a fancy dinner party and An I'm an exhibition match. So that your guests you know can can see polo up close and we can make the team so that you know there brandon then. Everybody's rooting for one team or the other. Are we donate you know. Raise some money and donate it to charity. So there's a lot of different things we can do because we can put on Polo at anytime and we can cater it to to what people are looking for super creative. So let's say our friend Paul here so I wanna I wanNA start playing poll. I want to start playing Polo. All right So what What do you do with Paul? So Hall Calls Heather who runs our Polo Club and she's a US certified instructor so she's been teaching people for twenty plus years how to play Polo. You set up a polo lesson. And she'll you know first time it'd be one on one and she'll assess where you're at and But I I got to ride a horse because I don't think I've ever been on horse. Bush is GonNa put you on a horse and we'll get you. All you need is a pair of jeans and preferably a pair of boots but if you don't have boots just any closed toed shoes will do we've got the helmet okay. And she will walk you through the basic step so that you can get on a horse and start swinging a mallet and but in an hour and then from there you can kind of you know assess for some people they say. Oh well well that was great. Thanks and other people most of them say that was you know hooked books I where do I sign up. When can I come back? And and and they they come back you know and eventually become Polo Club members But we can. It just depends on how you know. Obviously the more athletic you are the easier easier it is to to pick it up but if I just wanted to watch our events I can just come waddling my grandson and just watch him. We were not open to the public on a daily basis. But what we do is just you contact heather or text Texas on the Social media channels. And we'll let you know when we do have an event going that's open to the public We do put on a lot of different things is just with weather and all of the things that can come on. Come up and change the time. We don't want to post something ahead of time and have the public could come out. Jeff watchers. You feed come out a ticket. Prices depends on the event and what the which particular occasion as some of the Tommy. Give you a little Interesting anecdote they always say in the show. I know a little bit about everything here. I live in Ladera and at the corner of Ortega Highway and Antonio is that there's like a writing area there. I think I'm told. Its Own Bhai Vines Smith she fights to keep that open because every other corner has been developed and she somehow keeps that what I know. It's not Po. What do they do there? That's the jump core. I also because that was originally a polo field. I don't believe that they've ever consistently played poll there but we have put on Polo exhibitions. There now it is used for Grand Prix showjumping right. So that's what you'll see there. But they will tell you my grandson. I know nothing about horses. And we've just grown down to sit and watch and it's amazing watching horse and rider. There's nothing like it. It's just majestic and One of the things we do kind of at halftime as we'll bring the horses up to the crowd and let people pay them and talk to them and try and explain whatever we can And introduce the kids to lower says. It's it's really fun. We talked about training the people training the Paul's but Do are are the horses trained Info Polo or is it kind of an absolutely yes. Yes they are I mean some of them come by naturally are naturally better polo horses. His but They really just. It's enough lettuces them. It's a mind Mindset and a good Polo Pony will turn you know to the ball before you do and We used to have one Polo Pony. Who taught I don't know probably three hundred people how to play Polo and he would kick the ball into the goal for them? That's kind of you calling pony so I'm assuming that I actually know that. The Mongols when they wrote a horde award across Asia road smaller ponies faster and they would run longer. Yes and so- ponies have a connotation being smaller horse as opposed as opposed to racing ignores right. Yeah so we call him ponies and But their horses and ponies Really it refers to the Height so from certain height. It's a miniature horse. And then the next level is a pony and then the next level is a horse I don't know why we've always been called Polo ponies. I should look that up but Some of our horses are small and close to pony size and others are giant thoroughbreds thoroughbreds Off The racetrack. So some of the best Polo ponies come from Argentina. And they're they're called an Argentinian thoroughbred. But they're really a mixture of of the local creole horse thoroughbred They can stop and turn very quickly and they can run fast We use a lot of thoroughbreds thoroughbreds off the racetrack They are fast and they've got. They can run for a long time but they tend to be a little bit more high strung. Sometimes we find great quarter horses who have really good minds and are lot more quiet and they are perfectly suited for playing bipolar Marina Most of the horses that we have have you know they start. That's their first sport but We have converted a lot of horses this along the over the years from other sports to Polo ponies. So what's your what's your expectations or your goals for the future of the Polo Club. Well I think that You know we've spent the last year just trying to get a handle on operating something like this. It's very complicated to have To own the stables of the grounds and then have the Polo Club and then really sort of started this event. Business on top of it So my goal is really to now that we're getting a handle on all that is to be able to enjoy it and to build the The club membership so that we you know the more people we can bring in to enjoy it the the more fun for the rest of us and then I think it's you know with the events. It's really fun because you can introduce you know a hundred people at wants to something. They've never they've never seen it before you know everybody's heard of it but most those people have never seen it. So that's really We've been in Orange County for thirty years and I don't know how many people know that there's been a Polo Kalev around and it's just in their backyard. You know not many so I think now's the time for them to learn that it's in a beautiful location. You feel like you're right you know about that. What what what would it even look like when we walk? It's will the It's just straight up Silverado Canyon which is at the end of Jamboree and You get off the road and all of a sudden you're on this winding country road. You feel like you're out in the middle of nowhere There's a winery out there. There is winery out there. There's a lot of other Other equestrian properties there You just you. You're you just take a deep breath and you can smell the trees and and it's You can't believe that you just got off the to sixty one and so you you kind of wind your way up the canyon a little bit a- and pull off the road and there's the Polo club and it's four acres. Were right on a creek. And there's were right next to Black Star Canyon so it's completely open area next to us And we're able to trail ride from our property out onto Black Star Canyon On on on on trail rides with Irvine UC parks And then the property itself is brand new but it looks like something out out of the Nineteen Thirties California. Yeah it's it's By design you design. Yes it's it's very unique. It's very modern in feel that it's that classic you know. Clean Line It's a the barns are all old wood and and then the buildings are white STUCCO With beams you know exposed beams on the inside and We've spent a lot of time really focusing on every detail because how often do you get to build a Polo Club with all everything. Yeah everything you want My you know we've got horse shoe in bed it in concrete we've we've got Brass inlay signed with the logo and a bar. The best part is good. We've got our own boss. Did she say bar. Polls the Paul got far. They're far so how often does it open. Give us the address and website and all that stuff so Orange County Polo Club love got COM or OC POLO DOT COM and We're the best way to contact us for hours is really to Contact Heather Via the website or if.

Polo Club Paul Orange County Polo Club Polo Pony Mollet Horse Care California hockey Heather Jeanne Rina Black Star Canyon Ladera Argentina Orange County brandon Bhai Vines Smith Brass inlay Bush Jeff watchers
"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

12:50 min | 2 years ago

"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"How do you do it Wilbert? Thank you for having me today. can do show. I'm not really sure I just keep going and going and going until I drop but it's It's all so so much fun that it doesn't really feel like work so I think that's why I never say no. That's actually the key to key to success. I think is doing what you I love to do. It doesn't feel like a job. Let's start with something that's maybe The more obvious is is. How does one come from Training meaning to be an attorney and then only businesses and then developing Polo Club. So tell us about that. Well I have always jumped from one one thing to another and I think this is my fifth or sixth career so My father has was an attorney and I was always doing real estate. Investments on the side and and Always looking for other ways to find income and sort of had an entrepreneurial spirit But use the law firm to really pay the bills and along the way I think I was in high school when he had purchased a self storage George Property and he My my mom was looking for something to do and she said well I'll be the property manager and so she jumped in and learned The self storage business and eventually became The Queen of self storage and has we kind of went on to sort of build a a little mini empire here in southern California self storage properties In the meantime I went off to college I went to film school and Really loved it kind of that world and to do some fun things in film and but all along I realized you know what a loft legal education could do for me and Think I felt like I deserved to be at the table having the conversation but I didn't really have the education yet to do so. I went to law school and in the process Really learned to kind of get excited about the law so after law school a Worked in at a law firm for a couple years but I also knew that There was a family business at home. Sort of calling my name and Started looking at some other entrepreneurials businesses that might be kind of fun and I would bring the spreadsheets home to my dad. Didn't show up to him and he'd compare it to the self storage business and point to call him the Roi and and It didn't take me that long to figure out that maybe I should jump into the self storage business and They had already you know really put the foundation in place and had built this incredible business. But it was before branding was even really a concept so for me. It was really easy to come from New York City where I saw sort of things happening at a faster pace and maybe a little further ahead head of what one might consider the storage industry And apply those things to our business and so it was just fun because it it was right at that time. We were still using yellow pages so I got to really help bring our business to the you know to the twenty first century and along the way Got Back to playing Polo which I had done growing up and We had always been sort of the Supporters of Polo Club and We've moved a few times because there's always new development kind of ready to take over where their stables were and When that happened at our last place might adn I looked at each other and said you know? I think it might be time to find a permanent permanent home So that's where we are now. Okay all right so you're still active with the storage. Yes okay And those are across the country or no we're just in southern California are Game plan was to be able to drive to any location on any given moment to check on business. Okay so we we were lucky to kind of get into some very key locations early on and have just focused on managing them as as as well as we can in providing a really high level of service. Since this is a business show. I will tell you that. In our asset allocations we and the real estate world we love self storage George as a portion so may not be sexy but it is that makes money sexy integrate business. We love it so let's talk about Polo. You grew up playing Polo in New York no in Newport Beach I'm actually from Newport beach. fourth generation Californian so oh I grew up. Doing Hunter Jumpers which is an English exploitation. kind of writing and My Dad would kind of he loved horses as well so he would come with me and he would start writing my show jumper and he put on the bridges and velvet hat and would go to horror shows with me and my mom found a sign for Polo lessons and attack shop. And she thought well that'd be really fund thing to give denny for his birthday so she got him pull a lesson. Where was that Anaheim? Okay yes the first club That eventually became the orange. County poll club. What was called a Winston poll club? It was right by Angel Stadium and it was just a little rundown stables. That happened happen to have a an arena where we they played polo and he came home to. That's the most fun I've ever had. He sold his Porsche. And that's a big move. I always had it was a passionate porsche owner and But to Polo ponies. And that was it for him. He never looked back. I kept doing eight hundred jumpers for a while but I would always go to the barn with him and just the the sheer thrill of being able to ride. You know at an F. Fast Pace on a team with my dad you know was so much fun that I quickly switched over. One Hundred Jumpers Polo. And we've never looked back so we were talking earlier in until I've met you I've only one other person that plays Polo and it's mutual friend. Shane Bom who's been on the show bit about Polo then but Not Enough so so. Let's talk a little bit more about that Paul and I were joking earlier. to say that well we we thought it was just for like the rich and famous and We we know being referenced in that that that Very addictive show called Crown so what is happening with Polo as a as a sport or or as a horn industry. Maybe right well. I think that it's obviously you know we do. All we all picture the big grassy field and the beautiful hats and dresses in royalty playing again. And they're absolutely is that history I mean but the history also goes back to the Mongols and it's Berry Polo as one of the oldest sports in history and it has been played by the military in order to keep the you know officers and the horses in shape And it has always been played you know played on the grass but we also have a game called Arena Polo and that is the played in a much smaller field with three players instead of four. And it doesn't require as many horses it doesn't require as much money and doesn't require as much land and therefore for we're able to sort of bring Polo to people who wouldn't necessarily be able to play Who can't afford to to kind of fly after Florida for four months wants with their string of ponies and couple of Argentine pros as much as? We'd love to do that. Some of US have to go to work every day and to be able to drive you know. Twenty he minutes from the beach to Silverado Canyon just up Jamboree and play Polo with your friends and your family. It's it's it is for everybody is are there other courses. Arenas what do you call them. Well F- Polo clubs other clubs here in southern California. So there's there's no other So there's a couple of grass pull clubs Out in the desert and Santa Barbara which everybody's seen pictures yeah and there are a couple of arena clubs in Los Angeles and we've always been the only arena club in Orange County It's it's hard as you know in Orange County to have any kind of open land that doesn't get developed so and horses in general. Yeah it's difficult to find a place to that's big enough to to have an operation. It's certainly not a moneymaking concept so What we've done is really trying to figure out a way to be a turn key solution for people so that they can live here with their families? Go to work every day A.. And come out you know after work and play Polo Horses Ready. It's tacked up. It's been groomed. It's well taken care of and they can just go out and have fun and on the weekends. They can bring their family. Yeah we have lots of multigenerational families playing and So it really people will go from having never ridden a horse before to playing. You know in Club chuckers any year. Okay we kind of talked about that earlier so when we were talking about. Hey Boys COMPLA- like well. I don't even know how to ride a horse so we love people who've never learned how to never ridden a horse before 'cause we can teach you how to ride while also learning you how to play Polo and when you are focusing on hitting a ball. You're a little less worried about whether you're doing things. Perfect on the worst which allows you to progress a little more quickly And because you're constantly turning to chase the ball you your you know you you you get a seat. What we call a seat very quickly okay and And it's just a lot more fun than riding around in a circle hoping to get your you know post just right. Yeah What the Saddles considered a western saddle and English in English it's It's like an English shuttle. It's just a little bit larger than an English. Saddle really looks like English. Writing but Just sort of a sporty version. Because were a little looser in the saddle trying to reach that ball or you're okay right often opponent so you've said multigenerational you said you play with your dad. You started as a child. What are the age range of players who it might otter is eight years old and she's starting to swing the mallet and we'll probably be playing in chuckers As soon as she possibly can she's chomping at the bit My father's seventy seven years old and he does not show any signs of hanging up the mallet so it really. I mean it really is something that you can play your whole life which is so much fun because what else can you do. You know with men and women kids and adults horses and as a team and so it's I I mean maybe be. Sailing is the closest equivalent to it. right maybe maybe golf but it's different. Yes yeah well that's really. Somebody tweeted and Hausa game played real quickly. I was GonNa ask you that House the game yes well with the ball yeah so soft the arena bowl is a is like a mini soccer ball. So it's like a leather ball that's about the size of a grapefruit free and that's so that it can bounce in the on the dirt arena and then we The difference between grasp Polo and Arena Polo is a lot like indoor soccer versus outdoor soccer. Arena Polo. Looks a little bit like hockey. The ball never goes out of bounds unless you hit it out of bounds. And then you've got to throw it back in so we play three on three so you the three players on each team and two empires and the ball is bowled in and then you are trying to score goal On either side of the field and in the process you try and ride off your opponent or you might hook them to stop them from paying the ball..

Polo Club California attorney Porsche soccer Wilbert Orange County New York City Angel Stadium Anaheim US golf hockey Silverado Canyon denny Shane Bom Santa Barbara
"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

19:14 min | 2 years ago

"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"You knew you had one shot at this and you were ready for it yet the end and then came to the ears which were you know tremendous growth years for me classify that as kind of clever kind of almost say Muzak or something to the carpenters the the carpenters they prayed a time I think a studios right and I I asked part Karen Karen I'm gene Elliott just got signed PNM's Oh good to meet you and I said can I ask you a question that's weren't but I mean the last the eagles come out in their suddenly this country rock you know or or you've got all sorts of very it seemed like it started in the late sixties and into the early seventy as you head everything from James Taylor to Chicago and brass bands you know it seemed like everything was open at that time we had such fusion was in Paris in the eighteen nineties when he's interested as renoirs you know to chagall's that we're actually combining classical art with modernism and and and same thing with music reveal themselves and debussy expression impressionism was really a combination of folk music with what later would become jazz with classical music with with music was actually a real music Princeton rebel would would employer out of a Basque music I don't know idea that okay now you're educating me here all right so with with music in the seventies uh we would try our best to imply all these different nuance Genres to mainstream music for me it was yes of course Ban some folks always lyrically based a little bit of Jazz Combo stuff a little bit rock stuff a little bit of our NBC love you know and some stuff that I couldn't really you know Categorize at all so it was always a combination of many music I liked big band but I refuse to use ordinary big band sound okay a horn section I wanted to do with synthesizers and I wanted to Caricature is the big band sound and that's what we had and powerful people and dumb it's on just to the Gemini and very powerful layered stuff almost in a minute he's a strange comparison maybe I'm reaching for something but almost kind of like filled with Phil Spector with his wall of sound in in Simpler Times he tried to make them seem lush and and deeper rather than just you know three chords and Bass Drum and guitar here well you know my tensions for Harmonic d easy it's always made it more difficult you know to arrange orchestrate In those days there were no such thing as polyphonic synthesizer it's no it was monoplane that means you have to pay one or the time so if you did a horn section or violence section with six to ten those whatever it is we have to play once a one note at a time and then and then doubled it you know perks go back and do it again exactly yeah right and then lay on another track here right yeah it wasn't that easy but gave us out you know and it was it was something unique confessional it was time for for not only you know William time for a burgeoning time for music and it was lovely and the eighties with again was different music was tightening up but music up I wanted to open myself up to new influences and I thought were no more influences you know in music that I thought especially mainstream music could really influenced me in the way that I wanted so I went off into poetry land and I went off into literature and went back to the college and and I I went into the humanity in theology got well subsequently really affect the way I recorded yonder tree subsequent album so during that period of exploration I'm sorry to train rush the story but we got about five or seven minutes left here during that period of time you can dropped out of public view the church changed we had new wave music and and punk and it's almost like they wanted to go back to super simple again here they didn't want our castrations they didn't want lush they wanted stripped down sounds again here did did that change your flavor your quest or you're just on your own as you said mission quest here to find your own voice your own stories well I I played a little bit that game you know with black cars and hurts to be in love and wild horses and we had reasonable success with it and But I just by by the time the late eighties came I was not interested and in in mainstream music anymore I just was not it wasn't interesting to me more people were just trying to hit the bottom line or the lowest common denominator to attract an audience and that we tried to manufacture it hit rather than make music that really came from the artist right that's exactly so so in in in late eighties nineties that went off into my own thing and and worked with big orchestras you know and even record a full on orchestral concerts we oriented album like condo and so I and then I lived for two or three years and the melons and worked with touchy dishes and according to Nelson call a good thing so I for people who follow what I do you know the cardinal rule was stay interested as you stay interested you might be interesting there you go all right so I gotTa tell you what interested me when I went to your website talk about your interest in singing and other languages that seems far afield from anything else I could have imagined and I've looked at this piece I don't know when it was recorded this Canto and yeah it's spectacular. I Dunno where it would play today I don't know what station would run it except on the Internet there are no stations like us you know it's it's anything in everything and I I'm not trying to just blow smoke at your but your voice is never been better your interpretation I mean it just move me to listen to this piece and I have wow that's something this guy has still you know so often we think well the artist is coming back to just recreate their hits and and we're going to relive those days again here you've in directions nobody could have followed her imagine and you're hitting it well you know I I love doing that I just recently did a from the new Wilderness Road L. CO wrote Redemption. I did that in Spanish with a friend of mine from Argentina I'll a hundred learner and it's called El Camino de don't and it was really fun you know it's on my facebook I it's really a I really enjoyed singing in Spanish it's not that easy if you don't thing in Spanish that he do just phonetically learn the phrases like like how I read about pop stars try and record in Japanese or something just because wanted to a foreign language version of their song and they would they had no idea what they were saying but they would have to learn it phonetically I the method actor way I e I became an I studied what what the translation was all about really internalize it and of course Alejandro help with pronunciation but I knew exactly what I was thinking when I was saying then that really was the impetus for for my thing so why sing in foreign languages it's hard enough to say that can do certain things in those languages that I can't do an English like what what would you say the language has a different sound has different meanings it has another certain different phrases that don't translate English and well a certain sound for instance in Italian the vowels are bigger longer wider and Spanish there are more intricate consonance a for instance they're like the song a Roach redemption the English version is so long road to redemption John that's what it is in English and Spanish sickest lot of glass Giannino Day I don't know why but that sounds more mandic and lyrical to me just just I have no idea what you're saying which is the sound of it in Spanish or Italian like they have to really time your continent and then on a challenge I love you know but I like to sing things that are meaningful and I think that's why people still come Syr concerts because I'm not just running through the hit although we do that right advantage that's the starting point not the ending point you're starting with here's where we were and here's where I've gone yeah I mean when we it's fun to do night Walker it's fun to brother brother in Appalachia and all that but it's also you know fun for me to pick up the guitar and do something beautiful from from wilderness road you know and I I just you know look I mean music is just more than sound it's what lies behind the sound that is the impetus for the sound is the intention behind the sound that that really still gets to me on deep level well I'll tell you what I heard your music which I had not heard the stuff if you're talking about here in some foreign languages like the can't is it a canto the piece that up on your site there you playing with unofficial brother playing on piano or somebody Don Wow it's just below video go check it out everybody your website is a g I N V dot Com Link Valley facebook you know we have a bunch of videos on there I love doing in fact we're shooting another video on Monday at a local pool hall and a Video and we'll end the piece here for many years you would know this I went from being a DJ to being an entertainment publicist I handled Johnny Mathis and Anthony Quinn a whole bunch of people and then i to produce the world nine ball championship mental these guys from the old Steve Ms Rex up to the modern era how I fell into and so we're chatting with emerging and halfway through the callers Paul it turned out that they were blind and I said incredulously you like pool somebody would start breaking the balls in crowd would gather we wouldn't do anything just the sound of that's an attractive sound so I challenge you to think about how you can incorporate some of that in to your music because I think you'll find amazing I'm GONNA use a lot of the breaking the of the balls to to accentuate some of the you know the the open evaluated by the F._D._a. this product is not intended to diagnose treat cure or prevent any disease..

Argentina seven minutes three years
"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

13:45 min | 2 years ago

"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"Roll acts and everything in between I mean there was a rich environment it seems like well they had I mean a lot of ars that I really really admired including Ken Stevens Joe Cocker Right Carpenters and in Quincy Jones and George Harrison made a deal with them and oh king made a deal with them and so I mean they they they were really the the most famous and the best independent label you know in the world at that time and it was really an honor and privilege to be they found artists was not the carpenter viewpoint I I confess I was a big carpenters fan too and and era when that was kind of could be seen as UN cool this kind of I mean she sang so magnificently but this kind of lush almost like The throwback to the forties and fifties kind of music orchestral kinds of songs to Joe Cocker. I mean you know there's there's a wide range between those audiences in those south but they seem to be able to find artists in niches and develop that in a way that others wouldn't or couldn't they weren't just bound to afford formula I remember the first week that I just went to the ATM studios and of course her was producing crazy himself and Karen Carpenter's coming in and she was rolling her drums in and You know I was star struck with all the great artists going in and out of A and studios right and I and I I asked part Karen Hi Karen I'm gene Elliott just got signed PNM's Oh good to meet you and I said can I ask you a question that's weren't why are you rolling your own drum and she's never stopped being Rhody I love it I love it all right so you're in this rich environment and you flourish and and described the music I don't WanNa put my own classification on it but it's not the it it was a very lush to me a very orchestral kind of sound to this it wasn't just your typical top forty pop music and yet it played on the pop charts how how would you how would you classify where does it fit I may I know artists hate to do that. but for those who may be younger and they're trying to understand what that time was like what what was your music about well you have to you know give the audience a backdrop and the backdrop was in the seventies music was the thing in people's lives and the music was exploding in the sense that music was fusing into all these new ones dial yeah combining styles calling fusion but I mean the eagles come out in their suddenly this country rock you know or or you've got all sorts of very it seemed like it started in the late sixties and into the early seventy if you had everything from James Taylor to Chicago and brass bands you know it seemed like everything was open at that time we had such fusion would in Paris in the eighteen nineties when you enter the Nays renoirs you know to chagall's that we're actually combining classical art with Modernism and and and same thing with music reveal themselves and Debussy French impressionism was really a combination of folk music with what later would become jazz with classical music with with music that was actually a real music Princeton rebel would employer out of a Basque music I had no idea that okay now you're educating me here all right so with with music in the seventies so we would try our best to imply all these different nuance Genres to mainstream music for me it was yes of course van some folks always lyrically based a little bit of Jazz Combo stuff a little bit rock stuff a little bit of our NBC you know and some stuff that I couldn't really you know categorize at all so it was always a combination of many music I liked big band but I refuse to use ordinary big Bam town okay a horn section I wanted to do with synthesizers and I wanted to caricature is the big band sound and that's what we had and powerful people and it's been just as Gemini and very powerful layered stuff almost in a weird Jesus a strange comparison maybe I'm reaching for something but almost kind of like filled with Phil Spector did with his wall of sound in in Simpler Times he tried to make them seem lush and and deeper rather than just you know three chords and Bass Drum and guitar here well you know my tensions for Harmonic D easy it's always made it more difficult you know to arrange orchestrate In those days there were no such thing as polyphonic synthesizer it's no it was monoplane that means you have to play one or the time so if you did a horns section or violence section with six to ten those whatever it is we have to play one a one note at the time and then and then doubled it back and do it again exactly yeah right and then lay on another track here right yeah it wasn't that easy but gave it sound you know and it was it was something unique confessional it was time for for not only you know it was time for a burgeoning time for music and it was lovely and the eighties with again was different music was tightening up but music tightening I wanted to open myself up to new influences and I thought were no more influences you know in music that I thought in especially mainstream music could really influenced me in the way that I wanted so I went off into poetry land and I went off into literature and went back to the college and and I I went off into the humanity in theology got well subsequently really affect the way I recorded yonder tree and subsequent album so during that period of exploration I'm sorry to train rush the story but we got about five or seven minutes left during that period of time you dropped out of public view the church changed we had new wave music and punk and it's almost like they wanted to go back to super simple again here they didn't want our considerations they didn't want lush they wanted stripped down sounds again here did did that change your flavor your quest or you're just on your own as you said mission quest here to find your own voice your own stories well I I played a little bit that game you know was black cars and hurts to be in love and wild horses then we had reasonable success with it and But I just by by the time the late eighties came I just was not interested and in in mainstream music anymore it just was not it wasn't interesting to me any more people were just trying to hit the bottom line or the lowest common denominator rice to attract an audience and that we talked to manufacture it hit rather than make music that really came from the artist right that's exactly so so in late eighties nineties I went off into my own thing and I ended up worked with big orchestras you know and even record a full on orchestral concerts we oriented album like condo and so I and then I lived for two or three years in the Netherlands and worked with such musicians and according to Nelson call a good thing so I for people who follow what I do you know the cardinal rule was stay interested as you stay interested you might be interesting there you go all right so I gotTa tell you what interested me when I went to your website talk about your interest in singing and other languages that seems far afield from anything else I could have imagined and I've looked at this piece I don't know when it was recorded this Canto and yeah it's spectacular I dunno where it would play today I don't know what station would run it except on the Internet there are no stations like us you know it's it's anything and everything and I I'm not trying to just blow smoke at your but your voice is never been better your interpretation I mean it just move me to listen to this piece and I thought wow that's something this guy has still you know so often we think well the artist is coming back to just recreate their hits and and we're going to relive those days again here you've gone in directions nobody could have followed her imagine and you're hitting it well you know I I love doing that I just recently did a from the new Wilderness Road L. Call Road to redemption I did that in Spanish with a friend of mine from Argentina I'll a hundred learner and it's called El Camino de don't and it was really fun you know it's on my facebook I it's really a I really enjoyed singing in Spanish it's not that easy if you don't wanted to a foreign language version of the song and they would they had no idea what they were saying but they would have to learn at service and I did the method actor way either I became an I studied what what the translation was all about really internalized and of course Alejandro helped me with pronunciation but I knew exactly what I was thinking when I was singing and that really was the impetus for for my singing so why sing in foreign languages it's hard enough to say that can do certain things in those languages that I can't do an English like what what would you say the language has a different sound it has different meanings it has I know there are certain different phrases that don't translate into consonance a for instance they're like the song a Roach redemption the English version is so long road to redemption John that's what it is in English and Spanish sickest lot of glass Giannino Day I don't know why but that sounds more although we do that right advantage that's the starting point not the ending point you're starting with here's where we were and here's where I've gone yeah I mean when we if you're talking about here in some foreign languages like the can't is it a canto the piece that up on your site there you playing with unofficial brother playing on piano or somebody on wow it's just below video go check it out everybody your website is a g I N v DOT COM Link Valley great apple sharks in the video we're going to end with another common theme here the sounds to work into stuff I I'm going to tell you a quick story here that we'll end the piece here for many years you would know this I went from being a DJ to being an entertainment publicist I handled Johnny Mathis and Anthony Quinn a whole bunch of people and then somehow stumbled into the world of billiards and I produced in one thousand nine hundred seven one of the biggest billiard tournaments ever put on it was here in Los Angeles at the Biltmore and when to produce the world nine ball championship all these great guys from the old Steve Ms Rex up to the modern era how I fell into that's a long story but we were doing a Romo Piece in Louisville Kentucky and we're on the radio talking about an tournament that's coming up and somebody called and said I love pool you're blind I said I just loved the sound of the balls clashing together so I hope you'll will work some of those sound it is a magic.

Joe Cocker Karen Carpenter Ken Stevens Quincy Jones UN George Harrison seven minutes three years
"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

14:19 min | 2 years ago

"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"It's cutting into your exercise time it stabbing you in the back nine and it's attacking your peace of mind it's pain and it's getting in between you If you want to live CD medic target your pain at its source it's fast acting relief with active OTC ingredients plus the added benefits of THC free hemp oil. Welcome back everybody another episode of OC spotlight the one show that talks about the most incredible people doing the most amazing things right here in your own backyard and this I'm well a personal favourite of my we have somebody with us that long enjoyed his music and he's decided to come back into our backyard here in Orange Johnny he's going to be doing some concerts in San Diego and in up in Beverly Hills soon welcome if you will the one and only gene of Anneli welcome Sir good to be with you Paul Gina the Nellie take us on the ride of the last twenty or thirty years of as we were talking offline I was distracted young young disc jockey in Ann Arbor and then eventually in Virginia and loved your music all the the ounce of that era the seventies into the eighties and the music business changed dramatically I got outta radio and lost track of so many artists as times changed as tastes changed Take us through that journey what I wanNA start with you as a young boy in candidate here with a Dream Your father is a cabaret singer as I understand looking at your bio here and you get inspired by jazz drummers and cabaret singers and classical music how does that spark turn into the The big superstar that you became in the seventies and eighties here as as a child I was introduced to a lot of great music am you know I'll give this example A lot of people would say that a Steinway D. was a great sounding piano okay well when you listen to a Stein way D- whether it'd be erroll Garner playing in Oscar Peterson talking my language because I was a big jazz fan so creep going here for for me at by the time I was ten years old it's not that a dime away d sound good it's just the way channel should sound everything else was less than less than piano sound right so for me you know the the big bands the great drummers of the great singers that's the way you're supposed to think and that's the way you're supposed to play my standard was were standards were Pretty High I was lucky to have been a drummer to release them in a place called the cavs Aloma at eleven years old in Montreal oh my goodness yeah I got to meet Gene Krupa Buddy rich and Stan Kenton live and and see Duke Ellington Ella Fitzgerald Tony Bennett real up close you know and really took a good good close look at their technique how they breathe intonation pitcher eleven most kids are uh-huh playing baseball I'm watching Batman or whatever I had my share that too but but you know for me it was all it was really the the the pension for Frist Petix was just so there When I was in sixth grade seventh grade I was the only kids who got who took the free tickets to go see the Montreal symphony every Thursday I good for for any elementary school kids the the first time that I went they played Rebels Daphne employed and I said to myself I said well I don't know what it is I don't I can't I can't sure the tonics I can't hear the fundamentals and it's sounds like it's somewhere in the spheres and so it intrigued me so much rebels way right and then with Ravel's Bolero but I don't I don't remember all of his other compositions the one that they use be ten so famously yeah right yeah all all is counter compositions are just amazing but when another incident was when the first time I was introduced to Sunday mass was when I was six or seven years old and my parents wanted me to go and I was born rate Catholic Child Catholic school France schools and all we're connecting on another level I'm still a good Irish Catholic and the Church has obviously rich tradition of music going way back when I didn't want to go and when I walked in to the church in one hundred piece squires started thinking Patterson jelic the I I mean I got shivers all over my body and I get God really lives here Ya down all the harmonies Rian Chance Oriental impounded it was something you know acoustics something really visceral you know something tax how about music that really kind of this touched you in a way that most six seven eight ten eleven year olds didn't some of them just wanted to pick up a guitar and be Elvis Presley her you had a real deep connection with the music itself did and and I I I love the drums and when I was by the time I was ten or eleven I father bought me a kiss and Ludwig Kit I was lucky kid my time I was twelve I started taking piano lessons and then took guitar lessons when I was forty eighteen and and that really giddy having basic knowledge of all the rhythmic or the rhythm section instruments really started my my arranging a really helped my ranging abilities now you I was GonNa say somewhere in there you picked up a a record contract in Canada did you get a Juno award there quivalent of sort of the grammys or whatever that came later by by by the time I got out of high school I got signed to ours Victor one of the big record companies and had sort of mild hit in Canada gave me a good taste of the business and then I asked for my release and I moved to New York that was not quite eighteen I dropped out of college while I figured I'd take up my education along the way and so I read phonetically and I continued my muse to carry lessons you know with with private m where your parents supportive of this or were you following the dream that your dad had to for himself at maybe one point time or were they saying no don't go there this'll break your heart here my mother was terrified my father had his fingers crossed I like that all right so now the story that I got I'm sure you've told us a million times it's in your bio it's in your wikipedia article yes he has a great wikipedia page here folks go check it out I never had heard this story but I'm GonNa ask you to retell quickly one more time here you come to Hollywood according to what it says you're down to your last five bucks brother and you decide to take a bold move and stand outside the gates of A. and M. Records over there of sunset and Try and meet a great famous herb Alpert talk about that well you know I have to you know precluded or at least we see did you know with with this feeling that I always felt like music was more than just a career or a job I felt like it was something that was inside and made it had to be brought out yeah sounds like Oh yeah I always you know look at it a little bit like a mission quit and after being an ally month and having all the doors slam shut my face we had to leave the next day and I I didn't want to leave so I got up early that morning and I walked on okay boulevard and I as a song says I did stop it to a church and I I rested in the pews and fell asleep this like the Mamas Papas California dreaming here right yeah and I woke up with exactly knowing what I have to do and I went back to the at that time was called the Orange Motel five bucks a day and I got up and took my guitar and I just waited in front of the gate The Charlie Chaplin Studios Wearing records was yes and of course that was worn by the guard and all that kind of stuff and finally three or four hours later I saw her come out of his office and walk across the parking lot and I said this is exactly what I thought this is the moment yep so I dropped my guitar ran through the gate was changed and a constant herb and while I was being dragged away by the guard I think that a little mercy in his heart and ask the guard let me go in and asked me what I wanted just let me sing you a couple of songs come back in thirty minutes Oh my goodness I hang him I saw him let's see Mama Koko lady people gotta move crazy she likes to songs like that yeah and all those became big hits for yeah right well at least well-known yeah you know he just turned mink what welcome to the family and I started recording Three weeks later I went back to Montreal it was Christmas Day isn't this the story that keeps everybody coming the the possible dream the down to your last buck and you literally get in front of the man and you have five minutes less than thirty seconds to make an impression and you did yep yeah and but I had worked towards it for five years Sir because you see I started really early and by by the time with eighteen I mean I was well not quite five years I've got twenty one but every breathing moment you know every waking moment I thought about it and I tried to improve myself and by the time I did perform for for her but I guess I was ready to make an impression how well you were you were prepared for that one moment from crazy left to power for people to storm at sunup and just the Jim Knight then ending up you know would brother brother you know that that six year period was tremendous growth and let's go back and look at the roster in and this is like what the late seventies somewhere in that period time here my first record was ninety seven me too and then broach that was nineteen seventy eight so if I remember correctly from my disc jockey days m was a was not what record companies are today they had a very wide sound from T- from herbs original Tijuana Brass Whatever you want to and then then Gina's Vanilla and rock and roll acts and everything in between I mean there there was a rich environment seems like well they had I mean a lot of ars that I really really admired including Cat Stevens and Joe Cocker and right carpenter and in Quincy Jones and George Harrison made a deal with them and oh king made a deal with them and so I mean they they they were really the the most famous and the best independent label you know in the world at that time and it was really an honor and privilege to be they found artists with the carpenter viewpoint I I confess I was a big carpenters fan too and and Arab when that was kind of could be seen as uncalled this kind of I mean she sang so magnificently but this kind of lush almost like throwback to the forties and fifties kind of music orchestral kinds of songs to Joe Cocker? I mean you know there's there's a wide range between those audiences in those south but they seem to be able to find artists in niches and develop that in a way that others wouldn't or couldn't they weren't just bound to offend Formula I remember the first week that I just went to the ATM studios and of course her was producing crazy? himself and Karen Carpenter's coming in and she was rolling her drums and You know I was star struck with all the great artists going in and out of you know why are you rolling your own trump and she's never stopped being Rhody I love it I love it all right so you're in this rich environment and you flourish and and described the music I don't WanNa put my own classification on it but it's not the it it was a very lush to me a very orchestral kind of sound to this it wasn't just your typical top forty pop music and yet it played on the pop charts How how would you how would you classify where does it fit I may I know artists hate to do that but for those who may be younger and they're trying to understand what that time was like what what was your music about well you have to you know give the audience the backdrop and the backdrop was in the seventies music was fee thing in people's lives and ah was exploding in the sense that music was fusing into all these new ones dial yeah combining styles calling fusion.

Karen Carpenter five years six seven eight ten eleven yea thirty minutes thirty seconds eleven years five minutes thirty years Three weeks seven years four hours ten years six year
"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

11:32 min | 2 years ago

"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"It's cutting into your exercise time it stabbing you in the back nine and it's attacking your peace of mind it's pain and it's getting in between you If you want to live CD medic target your pain at its source it's fast acting relief with active OTC ingredients plus the added benefits of THC free hemp oil. welcome back everybody another episode of OC spotlight the one show that talks about the most incredible people doing the most amazing things right here in our own backyard in this I'm well a personal favourite of my we have somebody with us that long enjoyed his music and he's decided to come back into our backyard here in Orange Johnny he's going to be doing some concerts in San Diego and in up in Beverly Hills soon welcome if you will the one and only gene of Anneli welcome Sir good to be with you gene of the Nellie take us on the ride of the last twenty or thirty years of as talking offline I was distracted young young disc jockey in Ann Arbor and then eventually in Virginia and loved your music all the the sounds of that era the seventies into the eighties And then the music business changed dramatically I got OUTTA radio and lost track of so many artists as times changed as tastes changed Take us through that journey what am I wanNA start with you as a young boy in candidate here with a Dream Your father is a cabaret singer as I understand looking at your bio here and you get inspired by jazz drummers and cabaret singers in classical music how does that spark turn into the The big superstar that you became in the seventies and eighties here as as a child I was introduced to a lot of great music am I'll I'll give you this example a a lot of people would say that a Steinway D. was a great sounding piano okay well when you listen to a Stein way D- whether it'd be erroll Garner playing and Oscar Peterson talking my language because I was a big jazz fan so creep going here for for me at by the time I was ten years old it's not that a dime away d sound good it's just the way channel should sound everything else was less than less than piano sound right so for me you know the great a big bands the great drummers of the great singers that's the way you're supposed to think and that's the way you're supposed to play my standard was were standards were pretty high I was lucky to have been a drummer released Bam in a place called the cavs Aloma at eleven years old in Montreal oh my goodness yeah I got to meet Gene Krupa Buddy rich and see Stan Kenton live and and see Duke Ellington Ella Fitzgerald Tony Bennett real up close you know and not really took a good good close look at their technique how they breathe intonation pitcher eleven most kids are uh-huh playing baseball I'm watching Batman or whatever I had my share that too but but you know for me it was all it was really the the the pension for for aesthetics was just so there When I was in sixth grade seventh grade I was the only kids who got who took the free tickets to go see the Montreal symphony every Thursday my good for for any elementary school kids the the first time I I went they played Reveal Daphne and chloe and I said to myself I said well I don't know what it is I don't I can't I can't sure the tonics I can't hear the fundamentals but it sounds like it's somewhere in the spheres and so it intrigued me so much rebels way right and then familiar with Ravel's Bolero but I don't I don't remember all of his other compositions here the one that they used in the movie ten so famously yeah right yeah all all all is counter compositions are just amazing but when another incident was when the first time I was introduced to Sunday mass was when I was six or seven years old and my parents wanted me to go and I was born Great Catholic Child Catholic School France schools and all we're connecting another level I'm still a good Irish Catholic and the Church has obviously rich tradition of music going way back when I didn't want to go and when I walked in to the church in one hundred piece choirs started thinking Patterson Jelic the I I mean I got shivers all over my body and I get God really lives here yeah down all the harmonies the enchants now the orient confounded it was something you know acoustics something really visceral you know something tact how about music that really kind of this touched you in a way that most six seven eight ten eleven year olds didn't some of them just wanted to pick up a guitar and be Elvis Presley her you had a real deep connection with the music itself did and and I I I love the drums and when I was by the time I was ten or eleven a father bought me a kiss and Ludwig Kit I was lucky kid my time I was twelve I started taking piano lessons and then took guitar lessons when I was fourteen eighteen and and that really the hunting basic knowledge of all the rhythmic the rhythm section instruments really started my My arranging a really helped my ranging abilities now you I was GonNa say somewhere in there you picked up a a record contract in Canada right didn't you get a Juno award their their equivalent of the grammys or whatever well that came later by by by the time I got out of high school I got signed to ours victor one of the bigger record companies and had sort of mild hit in Canada gave me a good taste of the business and then I ask for my release and I I moved to New York I was not quite eighteen I dropped out of college while I figured I'd take up my education along the way and so I read phonetically and I continued my Erie lessons you know with with private m where your parents supportive of this or were you following the dream that your dad had to for himself at maybe one point time or were a saying no don't go there this'll break your heart here my mother was terrified my father had his fingers crossed I like that all right so now the story that I got I'm sure you've told us a million times it's in your bio it's in your wikipedia article yes he has a great wikipedia page here folks go check it out I never had heard this story but I'm GonNa ask you to tell quickly one more time here you come to Hollywood according to what it says you're down to your last five bucks your with your brother and you decide to take a bold move and stand outside the gates of a. and M. Records over there off of sunset and try and meet the a great famous herb Alpert talk about that well you know I have to you know precluded or at least we see did you know with the feeling that I always felt like music was more than just a career or a job I felt like it was something that was inside and made it had to be brought out yeah sounds like Oh yeah I always you know look at it a little bit like a mission quit and after being an ally month and having all the doors you know slam shut my face we had to leave the next day and I I didn't want to leave so I got up early that morning and I walked on okay boulevard and I as a song says I did stop it to a church and I I rested in the pews and fell asleep like the mamas Papas California dreaming here right yeah and I woke up with exactly knowing what I have to do and I went back to the at that time was called the Orange Motel five bucks a day and I got up and took my guitar and I just waited in front of the gate the Charlie Chaplin Studios wearing records was yeah and of course that was worn by the guard and all that kind of stuff and finally three four hours later I saw her come out of his office and walk across the parking lot and I think this is exactly what I thought this is the moment yep so I dropped my guitar ran through the gate was changed and a constant herb and While I was being dragged away by the guard I think that a little mercy in his heart and asked the guards let me go in and asked me what I wanted just let me sing you a couple of songs come back in thirty minutes Oh my goodness thank him I saw him let's see Mama Koko lady people gotta move crazy do you like if you she songs like that yeah and all those became big hits for yeah right well at least well-known yeah he just turned Meanwhile welcome to the family and I started recording Three weeks later I went back to Montreal it was Christmas Day isn't this the story that keeps everybody coming the possible dream the down to your last buck and you literally get in front of the man and you have five minutes less than thirty seconds to make an impression and you did yep yeah and but I had worked towards it for five years Sir because you see I started really early and by by the time with eighteen I mean I was well not quite five years I've got when I was twenty one but every breathing moment you know every waking moment I thought about it and I tried to improve myself and by the time I did perform for for her I guess I was ready to make an impression yeah well you were you were prepared for that one moment so you knew you had one shot at this and you're ready for it yet the end and then came two years the years which were you know tremendous growth years for me from crazy left to power for people to storm at sunup and just the Jim Knight and ending up you know would brother brother you know that that six year period there's tremendous growth and just let's go back and look at the roster in and this is what the late seventies somewhere in that period time here my first record was nineteen hundred you too and then brought to you by that was nineteen seventy eight so if I remember correctly from my disc jockey days m was a is not what record companies are today they had a very wide sound from T- from herbs original Tijuana Brass whatever you want to classify that as kind of clever kind of almost say Muzak or something here at to the carpenters the the carpenters that period of time I think that and then then Gina's Vanilla and rock and.

five years six seven eight ten eleven yea three four hours thirty minutes thirty seconds eleven years five minutes thirty years Three weeks seven years ten years two years six year
"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

11:40 min | 2 years ago

"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"Showcase while strategies and investment wisdom. That's essential for our evolving world. I'm your host Zandbergen in studio today. As user. We have Paul Hall. Are you doing today. I'm doing good. You have a long time returning. It's funny how there's a cycle you know those who were here in the early days find their way back eventually yeah and I'm glad that was able to to rope him. He's a busy guy a good friend of mine entrepreneur extraordinaire armone as`Die Armand and welcome to the show. Thanks for having me Barts really get to be here yeah of course of course I don't know where to start with you or some Shit you've done. I'm GonNa have you talked a lot about your background but just to get people kind of a heads up. I know you're a published author keynote speaker her <hes>. I Call You a serial entrepreneur. <hes> you author of the Business Bible C._E._O.. Of Six companies business coach Motivational Speaker Speaker and of course you're a great dad and husband <hes> workout fanatic like myself so <hes> <hes> sometimes. I know how you do it <hes> so let's give her one kind of a heads up. I know you've got a real early. Start in your kind of your entrepreneur world <hes> so let let people know how you did that. He absolutely well. Thank you so much for having me on the show. It's an honor to be here on spend time with you and I think you know how I get it all done because I see you in the gym at four o'clock in the morning. That's that's the part of it <hes> so you know my <hes>. My background is is is kind of unique. I fell in love with business when I was a kid. <hes> you know eleven twelve years old I started selling baseball cards and just love the concept of creating a business and so by the <hes> tunnel was about fifteen or sixteen years old. I decided to drop out of high school and <hes> I wanted started my own in business. It was in the early nineties so the <hes> you know tech boom was happening and I happen to kind of be techy can and so I did really well for myself for few years. <hes> moved out of my parent's House got a nice apartment drove a nice car did all this stuff and then at one point <hes> decided that <hes> I still wanted that education and so I gave it all up and went back to school and <hes> and did some different things studied neurobiology <hes> got my degree from Berkeley and then attended Harvard Medical School but the <hes> you know the business thing inside of me was always burning and so <hes> I needed to get back to business as quickly as I could and I I did and now it's been about <hes> <hes> about twenty years that I've been back in business and applying everything that I know from from <hes> the sciences <hes> really to businesses in different sectors yeah so you you run businesses and we'll elect till about maybe at least a few those businesses and then I know you spend a considerable amount of time now coaching <hes> mm CEO's and business owners to be more effective and better better entrepreneur so I wanna make sure we talk about that sure absolutely well. My my biggest company that I've had for the longest time is actually based out of Orange County California on our corporate offices here here and then we have several facilities across the country. It's a recycling company. <hes> we recycle electronics and I've been doing that for about twelve or thirteen years. <hes> and I say I've been doing it. <hes> really for the last three years. I've almost completely exited the business so so while I still own most of the business <hes> I'm not running day to day <hes> and I've started <hes> multiple other companies and and most of them have nothing to do with each other different so you know I I own a digital marketing company. <hes> I have something to do with data security and then I have a <hes> <hes> a web development and <hes> an APP development business <hes> we have a photography and videography studio in Orange County and I've been in <hes> the the restaurant business. I'm not in it now but having restaurant chains and all sorts of different things than at business in the medical sector but for me it's that love of business and at one point I you called me a serial entrepreneur. <hes> I am but at one point I realized that it even that wasn't enough to keep the juices going so I realized that Gosh what I really love is I love solving problems and I love solving problems in the business world and so <hes> I decided what I wanted to do is advise other CEOS because there are some brilliant. Alien C._E._O.'s out there <hes> in all kinds of businesses and some of them are having issues in their business that they <hes> they can overcome on their own and they really have no one to go to and I became that guy and <hes> it. It's just turned out to be such a joy for me because on any given day I get to play with two or three or four different companies. <hes> and you know I'm working with brilliant people who can actually follow through with the guidance I give them and <hes> based on the fact that I've started so many of my own companies over over a dozen I have a lot of knowledge that can pass on so we talked about this the other day <hes> and do the companies that you work with companies that you own and still run although so different there's still a lot of similarities right. You were talking to me about my business and <hes> presumably it was the first time you really heard in-depth about this type of business. You came back with all these you know really good solid ideas and strategies and my assumption is hey. It probably has worked in other businesses as well. You not as unique as you think yours at. Is that a fair statement. It's very true. Yeah I mean you businesses business. <hes> and what you find is that the the issues that most CEOS are are dealing with <hes> whether their doctor who has the medical practice or they're an attorney or they're in the I._T.. World or they haven't manufacturing company or an online business. The really are very much the same sorts of obstacles that you run into on a day-to-day basis and a lot of it has to do with <hes> <hes> <hes> you know employees and I work with people who have teams right. That's where I really. I'm able to make a huge difference is company that has ten twenty thirty forty one hundred two hundred employees. It's is really Lee when <hes> when my impact is felt the most and when you look at those businesses the the basics are the same eighty ninety percent of it is the same once you get past the <hes> you know the <hes> sort of what's on the surface <hes> so what a doctor does us to run a medical practice with let's say ten doctors and nurses and all this stuff and what an attorney does in legal practice in what in accounting you do an accounting practice and manufacturing plant believe it or not are not that different yeah. That's what I was I gather when when we last met what are some common challenges including you know companies that have employees. That's probably the biggest challenges but what are some of the biggest challenges you see that your CEOS are are facing. You know it's interesting. I tell you the number one thing that I see <hes> and I have clients ranging from <hes> companies that are small as two or three million dollar companies to <hes> the one hundred million dollar companies an higher and a couple of public ones and it's amazing to see how few C._e._O.'s actually take the time to understand their financials. <hes> I mean it's the ultimate scorecard for your business. You know it's like asking Lebron James. What's the score in the game right now? You know it's the fourth quarter with five minutes to go and having him look at you and say well. I've never really read the scoreboard before or is that the number of points or rebounds or is that it which which side of the thing which side of the screen is art the thing on or you know where's the twenty four second clock violation. I thought it was twenty. Seven seconds right I mean and I see people I'm like you're running a twenty million dollar fifty million one hundred million dollar a year company and <hes> and and to me. That's that's always a surprise but then it's not because at one point my recycling company at one hundred fifty employees and I didn't know how to really read my financial. It's not supposedly I I kinda did right but I wasn't able to look at my financials and get real guidance on what I should be doing and my businesses as C._E._o.. And that's what's important right as you know what to look at it and seeing it like a treasure map and saying okay. This is a treasure them. Where do I need to go dig to find the treasure right and that's what your financial should be? They should give you <hes> that vision. It's kind of like the the the rear view camera. You might have on your car right when you put it into reverse it shows you what's behind your car and the point. Is You need to trust that video. Now someone comes and says oh well sorry that videos from eight minutes ago but that doesn't work right the equivalent of some of these companies a C. I'll talk to the C._E._O.. On the twentieth of the month and I say so how'd you do last month and they start telling me and I'm like what the real numbers knuckle will. The financials aren't done yet unlike so your accounting people failed at doing the one thing that they're supposed supposed to do which is to give you accurate financials in my world by the tenth of the month the latest by the fifteenth so I'd say that's the one thing that that sort of surprises me the most interesting other than on the job training world. Did you get you're. You're you went to school. He went to Harvard and I mean I think most that was medical all right yes so other than your own <hes> <hes> on the job any authors that you like or mentors or how'd you do that yeah I mean I'm a I'm a serial student wouldn't as well as being a serial entrepreneur so <hes> you know I I read nonstop. I listen to audio books and podcast nonstop on I call my car <hes> Mobile University which <hes> I picked up many years ago from Jim Rohn and and so when I'm driving. Around there's no music in my car. You know I'm not a not goofing off. I'm listening to audio books. <hes> I <hes> I love taking courses so anytime. I have a chance to take a seminar so I'd say you know I've been I've learned business from <hes> some of the best greatest business business minds and the other thing that I do is I follow the stock market very closely <hes>. It's really the only kind of news I like to watch so I don't. I'm not one for watching the different you know C._N._N.. Fox stuff like that instead I'm focused on companies and how their stock performs in what they're doing as the stock does what it does right so these days. I'm a huge fan of TUSLA. I'm watching Tesla very closely and seeing what is he lawn must doing right and wrong and how is that playing into the to the stock price. I think you can actually learn a a lot of business lessons from that <hes> and whether you run a bakery with eight employees or <hes> tasks Tusla the rules believe it or not are are the same and so <hes> so I watch a lot of that and that's that's that's part of where I get my awesome but most of it honestly has been from making a lot of really bad mistakes on my own and failing multiple times and <hes> and learning along the way and having my you know my businesses <hes> multiple times <hes> get get to the point where you know I was forty eight hours away from having chains put on my doors and having a close up the business in and somehow we pulled it out and each time I learned a different lesson and <hes> I think those are the lessons honestly that <hes> for me have been more valuable than all the classrooms that I've been into and all of that <hes> usually is can we can you elaborate on that can we. I mean I I don't we don't have to everyone of you. Can you pick a mistake that that that that the listeners would get a great lesson from yeah you know at one point <hes> I think <hes> one of my big mistakes was I started to <hes> my company was my recycling company was growing very quickly and I was at about twenty employees and we were just chugging along and there was more money coming in you could imagine opportunities everywhere and I was working my butt off you know had a great team of people everything was just on track and so you know everything we touched would turn into gold so I wanted.

TUSLA attorney Paul Hall Orange County Armand Motivational Speaker Speaker Harvard Medical School Lebron James Orange County California Harvard Tesla Fox Berkeley Jim Rohn Lee CEO Mobile University fifty million one hundred mill one hundred million dollar
"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

09:35 min | 3 years ago

"oc" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"From this book what was the value to the organization is C._E._O.. Of A small aw Tech Company <hes> not a brain that anyone who's listening would probably recognize but a small tech company that's growing <hes> in the cybersecurity space obviously a space that's exploding more generally and the students in their in their discussion and I haven't <hes> haven't read the writing assignments for the week yet that was just submitted last night but were were torn between to kind of models of value one was there's the traditional are more and more traditional our ally model value than a marketing might bring to this sort of discussion <hes> leads generated sales generated <hes> <hes> that sort of thing can you you measure clicks from an online review of the book people who Click through to the link to the company's website and how they did they navigate through the website to to perhaps a marketing or sales information collection page or something. Something like that <hes> and there's other people in the in the class said Hey. Let's take the C._E._O.. At his word because I was able to do a Q. and A. With the C._E._o.. For the purposes of the class as to why he wrote the book while he hope to gain out out of the book <hes> <hes> what value he signed the book and let's measure it against what the C._E._O.. Said <hes> and if you measure it against that that his definition of value which was some visibility link which was <hes> something he could use for a talk track and conferences he appears that when he talks to media when he talks potential <hes> prospects he even said he used it as a business card <hes> when he would meet somebody nobody he'd give him a copy of his book <hes> cereal but he has business cards anymore. It's a pretty good substitute so <hes> so from that perspective the add value perspective the definition of value has to be <hes> <hes> not the practitioners definition of value I think but the definition of value assigned by the by the owner by the client <hes> if you will so it's a it's a it's an interesting challenge <hes> how oh you Dornam value in a world where you're sort of looking more more like a marketer more and more like an advertiser <hes> but the but the value of P._r.. <hes> the value of a book the value of they cover story for a C._E._o.. In Forbes magazine Fortune Magazine <hes> is you know. How do you put a dollar value but the C._E._O.'s love it? They love it. <hes> so it's it's it's deliver value but understand that the definition of value is not your definition. It should client or your your C._e._O.'s definition. That's that's an important point. I'm GonNa Pause you right there. We're GONNA take a quick break now. We're GONNA come back and talk more about <hes>. We'll talk doc more about measurement some of those necessary tools and who will win out the C._M._o.. Or The C._E._O.. In this new world so stay tuned we'll be right back just a quick break to remind the West Virginia University's online find data marketing communications program is the first graduate program of its kind in the country focusing on strategic thinking critical problem solving an informed decision making the Data Marketing Communications Program at West Virginia University prepares you for your career by learning innovative tactics from award-winning faculty like those were featuring today. You can learn more at DMC dot W. V._U.. Dot E._D._U.. Go there and find out more <music>. Let's pick it back up with our last couple minutes talking about P._R.. And other sorts of topics yes sounds good. Thank you Paul and again. We're talking to Farney Micevski President of ninety degree communications and a leading expert in P._R.. Executive Communications Corporate Affairs and a whole lot more <hes> we're talking about. I paused you there. We were talking about R._O._I.. Just wanted to ask again. You know how can communications medications professionals demonstrate again that that R._O._I.. On the activities that they are <hes> you know that they are executing on Roy well that the short answer is to go to Barcelona and see if you could just suck it up the prof- profession gathered there twice <hes> in <hes> most recently in two thousand fifteen in Barcelona to develop. It's a great city to develop the Barcelona principles which were or an attempt to to answer this fundamental question which is how do you measure R._O._I.. For for communications P._R.. What what sort of resources do you need to do that? What metrics do you need to do that and the the thing I think that came out of that at the single most important thing that came out of that was to stop using advertising equivalents? <hes> and it's still used quite frankly the prevent but it's because it's it's it is a real serious. It's a serious number but. So A._B._C.'s and and online impressions are still two numbers that are used in the profession but the the message out of the out of Barcelona is stop using issues and with. I think the communications profession still having a difficult time <hes> with that <hes> and I don't I don't have a silver bullet answer for that one <hes> but I I will because a lot of what communications and P._R.. Professionals do is the value of it is qualitative not quantitative <hes> it is and how hard you know a reference again the the <hes> The C._E._o.. Profile missile and a major business publication or <hes> a company profile in either a trade magazine or a <hes> <hes> local regional publication. I did some work <hes> recently away for a consumer Tech Company <hes> probably not a maiden not not apple Microsoft not at that level but probably a company that people would recognize a company that has reimagined itself a few times and changed its <hes> <hes> UH products at a company that had a C._e._o.. Crisis of financial management crisis a couple of years ago and really restructured the organization brought in some new leadership and the story that that that we're able to place was a story about that that process and how the company has emerged and <hes> and the new product lines it was involved in and that sort of thing and that was extremely valuable the people that it was extremely valuable for in in this case where the board of directors and some of the institutional shareholders right right it was very important that now that's a very well defined audience and it is a very limited audience <hes> so <hes> you know I'm not sure how you apply a metric to that another client <hes> and I'm trying to bring these real world experiences to to what I do and then when I teach the course I told the students and of course I come here as a practitioner not as a although I have some academic training. I'm not an academic right. We actually I I did want to ask you. We have just under a minute here and I just wanted to ask you that one that one final question <hes> that I teased coming out of the break who looking forward in your crystal wall who's going to prevail in that C. Suite the CEO's The C._M._O.'s. That's a that's a good question I did a recent survey on linked in there are roughly sixty thousand and people on weekdays who have C._M._o.. In current or past title and our about five thousand only five thousand who have C._O.. In their current or past title so that tells you who's winning now sure but I think if he would've looked five years ago that five thousand would have been even smaller yeah <hes> so. I think that but the more important point is whether it's C._E._O.. Or C._M._O.. The things they do are going to look and feel the same that same set of responsibilities. <hes> is going to fall under that title. Excuse me and it's going to be important for that person to live in the C. Suite <hes> and to and to report to the C._E._o.. and to be an equal with C._F._O.. C._O._O. and all the other C._F._O.'s that that companies have so whichever title prevails the skill set the skill set that Communications N._p._R.. Professionals bring and learn and deliver is going to be a key component of what that person does great advice great insights. Thank you Marty and thank you for spending time with us today and thank you for listening to W._V._U.. Marketing Communications today from West Virginia University. I hope you've found today's episode as informative as I have. Thanks again. You've been listening to W._V._U.. Marketing Communications today..

Marketing Communications Barcelona West Virginia University Executive Communications Corpo Fortune Magazine Farney Micevski President C._E._O. Marty Paul Roy A._B._C. CEO apple Microsoft C._M._O. ninety degree five years