17 Burst results for "O.'Hurley"

"o.hurley" Discussed on Mac Power Users

Mac Power Users

05:25 min | 3 months ago

"o.hurley" Discussed on Mac Power Users

"My different responsibilities, which ones do I stop? Which ones do I move to somebody else? Which ones do I change? What do I have to continue? And keeping that front of mind all the time and then as I move throughout the year, maybe it's like the half year or three quarters of the way through the year, make my decisions on what will not be around for me in 2023. And then also along with the structure stuff is these things that I've been talking about separating out my machines more, separating out my apps more, and honestly trying to find some order in my life. 2021 was just like wild for me from I just lost all control of my working life and was working way too many hours for me. Way more than I necessarily needed to on some projects that just other people could do or I just didn't need to be doing anymore. And I feel like I kind of burnt out a little bit. And so I have made some immediate changes, put some better plans in place, making myself take vacation. And then spending the rest of this, you know, maybe 9 more months kind of working out what the next few years look like for me. It's a kind of like a foundational year for me, really. This is me setting up for maybe the next 5, mix ten, something like that. I think there's a lot of wisdom in saying. I'm going to take time to make these decisions. When I did the law firm shut down, I made the decision very rapidly. And I took three months to shut it down, which really wasn't much time. And when I heard you were going to take a year to kind of look at everything, I thought, that's actually really smart. And I think it's something everybody could benefit from, like, a bit of the brainwave. I think it's just because I have done the other thing a few times of very quickly making some changes. And I'm not saying that it is wrong. At all, and it worked for me multiple times, but my problem really stand from, I didn't know what to change. I just know I wanted to change something. Yeah. I wanted the outcome, but I didn't know what would get me there. And I felt like if I just started making quick decisions, I might not be in a better position. And so I needed to keep that front of mind for a period of time. And it would allow me to kind of get to the end space. And you're also facing from my perception, the additional challenge of the fact is most of the stuff you do, you really enjoy. So it's not like you've got stuff like an anchor around your neck. You're actually looking to maybe get rid of something you actually enjoy, but you just don't have time for. I'm blessed to walk on a large variety of projects, all of my favorite people, how do you stop those? This is my problem. And so that's why I like quick decisions just weren't going to work and it was going to need a lot of time and soul searching, I think somewhere. Yeah, I think it makes a lot of sense to spend time in those decisions. You know, mine were at the end of the year, which is not the best time just due to logistics, the way that the podcasting calendar works. But I do think it is useful to look at what you're doing and sometimes the reasons for starting something aren't there anymore. Or things have changed, and it's not the right thing to continue. So I totally get that. I did want to talk to you a little bit in this section about the idea of seasonal themes. This is the first year that I have, I've kind of decided, you know, maybe it's poor theme choice over the last few years, but I have found it hard to find or to define something even that feels like it's irrelevant. It's relevant for a year. And so I've kind of broken down at least this first part of the year into a season, which I think will probably continue for the next quarter as well. But do you have any thoughts on I like the idea of I'm going to do a season and then in December? Yeah, no, that was my yearly theme. I just didn't know that. Yeah, but I feel like it gives me a way out. If you have more flexibility, some people find it daunting. What I'll say is if people do not know what we're talking about here, I really recommend we have a website called theme system dot com. It explains what a theme is. It's got a great video that gray made. It is selling a product as well that we have, but there's a lot of information there and you can take it and do whatever you want with it. You don't have to buy our journal to do the theme stuff. Me and grey were doing theme stuff way before we had a product. That was to help people with them. And something gray has pushed a lot of times is the idea of seasonal themes, so instead of doing a theme for an entire year, do a theme for three months. I've done this in the past. I've had themes that ran for 6 months, one of mine, my favorite one was the year of positivity, was like a theme that ran for it was for 6 months because I felt like everyone in the Apple community was just too sad and too mad. And I decided I didn't want to be anymore. I was like 20 17 or something, like all the computers were bad and no one liked the software and I was just like, I'm just going to change it up because I was getting bummed out doing.

Apple
"o.hurley" Discussed on Mac Power Users

Mac Power Users

02:07 min | 3 months ago

"o.hurley" Discussed on Mac Power Users

"I don't want to pull a Stephen and say something that I'm later going to regret. Because I'd end up doing the thing. If Apple released their own displays, I'm not going to replace the style display with one of those, just for the sake of replacing it. Mark the record right there. Unless those displays like $200 a piece, which I won't pay, right? They're going to be expensive. I mean, I would never buy a pro display XDR. Not tell me about it about it for three months. It doesn't sound like me. I just want to set my restraint, you know? 'cause I deal with just the worst situation with my I have an LG monitor. It's from their ergo line. It's the ultra fine ergo. And one of the reasons I really like this is that I use in my MacBook Pro. Is it's like 30 inches. It looks really nice. The screen is good. And it's got a really great arm that clamps to the desk, and it's got lots of adjustability in all angles. I really love the monitor for its adjustability. And I have it plugged into a cow digit dock, which is where I have all of my peripherals plugged in and stuff like that. And it's what I have been with one cable. I can plug into my MacBook Pro, right? Live in the dream. Okay. Every day, I plug my laptop in, I have to open the laptop. I have to unplug the USB-C cable from the back of the monitor and plug it back in again for the monitor to come on. I do this every day. This is how I start my day when I get to the studio. If I don't do that, it won't work. And if I leave the machine for Alexa, I've come record for like three or four hours. I have to go back and I have to do it again. So I feel like, and then all my Friends, with their big pro display XDRs, they're like, oh, come on, just get one. And I ever strained. It's like I'm dealing with this terrible amount set up every single day, and I have not gone down the pro display XDR route because that monitor is too expensive. It is. So I think I deserve congratulations. This episode of the Mac, power users is brought.

Stephen LG Apple Mark Alexa
"o.hurley" Discussed on Mac Power Users

Mac Power Users

05:39 min | 3 months ago

"o.hurley" Discussed on Mac Power Users

"Doesn't really come to bite me on this machine so much, but I was using the original M1 MacBook Pro for a while. And that 60 gigabytes of memory on that machine because I was doing a lot on it. That would really get upset sometimes. I would get those pop ups and it was like, hey, you do not have enough memory anymore, and you need to close some applications. So that was one of the reasons why I went so high with the ram on the MacBook Pro that replaced it because I just didn't want to keep running into that anymore. And I haven't had this issue once at all on the 14 inch MacBook Pro. Yeah, I have this theory that these Apple silicon Macs are going to be very stable and last a long time, and apple's been making iPads that last forever for a decade, and these are almost like souped up version of iPad chips. In some cases, they're the same chips. So I can't help but feel like these things are going to last a while. So I do think getting more storage or memory when you buy it might serve you well because I suspect your computer is not going to feel slow for a long time. I mean, I guess while we're recording this, we're on the eve of an Apple event. And I do wonder if there's going to be anything with the M two, which is with that in mind, like the M1 is just like get this out the door, and maybe the M two brings some quality of life improvements that would allow for more storage more ram. That's what I would like to see from that base level. I think it needs to increase over time. All right. So you've got what color did you get? I don't remember what color did you end up getting for your iMac? It's yellow. Nice. Thanks. I was lucky enough to get sent a review unit of this machine. And the one that they sent me was yellow, and so then I kind of fell in love with the yellow. I don't think yellow is the one I would have chose. I probably would have bought the orange one. And the orange is gonna really come to love the yellow. And then Stephen, we do a campaign, which might probably use as listeners will know. We do our podcast on every year. And we challenge each other to do things. Now, my desk is completely covered in stickers as Steven's face, which, because of his beautiful blond hair, her almost yellow kind of in their hue. So it really does fit in now honestly with the whole movie. I'm building over here. Can we put a picture of that mission notes? Because I think it's truly disturbing. It's something. That's for sure. I don't know. I really like Steven Hackett, but that's too much Steven Hackett. At this point, I barely notice it. It's just like, this is just what my desk looks like. Well, it almost becomes a texture when you get that mini stickers, right? That's a lot. Okay. So switching over to the iPad, what are you using these days? iPad mini. That's all. What? Just the iPad mini. I thought you had a protein. I'll give an asterisk. So I have an iPad Pro. I have a 12 inch iPad Pro. It is the 2020 version. The one that they added LIDAR for. I think that was the 2021. Yeah, the big upgrade here, I have air quotes. Again, this is one of those things where new iPad Pro dropped and I was like, all right, quick, let me buy it. And then I'm the soccer because nothing changed, but I got that. I got later. Put an asterisk on that. I have a use for that for you in a minute. What are you doing with it currently? That iPad Pro, it has two uses now. It's main place now as it is mounted to a rowing machine that I have in my studio. Okay, all right. So that's pretty good for fitness plus. And then also part of my work now is product design. I run a company called cortex brand who make notebooks and other things coming. And I like to use the Apple pencil on the larger screen to draw out and sketch some stuff. That's it. Other than that, that I've had pro doesn't do anything for me anymore. My main iPad usage is all on the iPad mini. Yeah, and honestly, I continue using that for another 6 years because it's going to be fine. That also may be the next time they update it. It's so good. The form factor of the mini has always been interesting because it's always been the small one. But for a long time now, it's just kind of sat at the bottom of the line in terms of importance, but not in terms of price. It's been more expensive than the base one. But with this new design, the iPad air design scaled down so nicely, I mean, I'm right with you. I haven't touched my iPad Pro everyone from 2018 and it's just been on a shelf because the mini does everything I want it to do in this really great size and lightweight form factor. It's really crazy because the iPad mini has been around a while, but it's the new design and like the new Apple pencil integration, like it's like suddenly everybody's like, what? Everybody's really into the iPad mini now. As well. I have one. We took our vacation last month. I brought that in a $30 keyboard off Amazon that folds and fits in my pocket and that was awesome. Yeah, like I said this at the time and it's kind of going with some of the stuff that you said. I really like what you put in for Jason's scorecard, the 6 color score kind of like I'm kind of just now accepting what the iPad is for and doing what the iPad wants me to do. And I do feel like the iPad.

Steven Hackett Apple Steven Stephen rowing soccer Amazon Jason
"o.hurley" Discussed on This Week in Photo

This Week in Photo

02:45 min | 5 months ago

"o.hurley" Discussed on This Week in Photo

"Always you're banging and doing all that stuff. So you're in Tampa right now, hanging out. What's next for Peter Hurley in 2022? Well, I mean, I'm here for a couple of reasons. What I've tried to do is I've been very fortunate that I was talking about this to my head shot for I do on Mondays at 10 a.m. I do a thing called all business. And it's a 45 minute zoom where I just want to fire everybody up for the week. And I said, it's really important. There's two things that I'm really concentrating on are trying to concentrate. And one is health. I think health is a huge thing. I don't think you're gonna pick up your camera and have good energy with your subject. If you're not a healthy individual, obviously, we want to get our immune systems, you know, as strongly as possible with everything that's running around these days. And also one of the things that I think is important is having a hobby that gets you active and out there. So when I look at things that I want to do, they are almost pretty much structured around the sport of sailing. I train for two Olympics in sailing when I was younger. I still sail. So and multiple source of income. So while basically a hobby that keeps you healthy, obviously your diet and the amount of sleep you get and it's very important. And then it's gonna give me the ability to shoot when I'm shooting, but I'm also working on other sources of income. So while I'm down here, I'm actually shooting head shots for a there's a startup convention, so I'm shooting at the convention, I'm also meeting with my cofounder of Shea bangers, Vadim, and I had a regatta this weekend that I just sailed two days and I won. So I kind of structured my life with these things that really appealed to me and I figured if I'm the only one whose construction my life so we can do it the way that I want to do it and I've been fortunate enough to do that. That's right. That's good man. You're always an inspiration. At some point within the next year, hopefully if the chains come off the world, it will be able to hook up in New York and have a drink or something. So we'll see. Sure. Yeah. Absolutely. No. Please do. If you're anywhere in Northern California, whatever. Just let me know when you're out here. All right, Peter, we'll leave it. We'll leave it right there. Have a great rest of your week and folks that are listening and or watching to watching this make sure you head over to headshot crew dot com and bangers, SHA, BA, NG, RS, no E dot com. I'll put the links in the show notes and all that stuff so we can get to it easily. Peter Hurley, thank you, man. Thanks for coming on. Always a pleasure. This is Twitter..

Peter Hurley Tampa Olympics sailing Vadim Shea Northern California New York Peter Twitter
"o.hurley" Discussed on This Week in Photo

This Week in Photo

06:29 min | 5 months ago

"o.hurley" Discussed on This Week in Photo

"Selling them in they're out there. And we're building a metaverse around them. And I just got off, I have a conference call tomorrow with a huge sponsor. Photo industry people are jumping on board and behind me in this thing, which has been amazing. We're building shebang arts, though, which is a metaverse based on shipping. Your entry into bangers villas with a shebang here. To get, you'll get a plot of land in there along with a spear. I mean, it's crazy. So it's all a community driven. It's based off the collectible. The collectibles have utility. So, for instance, oh, I have to work on that today. That reminds me. One of the NFTs like somebody got a flex kit. The my new studio kit from westcott is a $5500 item. We attached it randomly to one of the ship bangers. Somebody bought it, bought that ship banger. It was in who was in the Ukraine. And was a non photographer, actually. And then sold it on open sea. If this is all different information for you, you can go check this stuff out later. Open season marketplace for NFTs that you should check out. You should also check out the foundation, which is one that's for artists and photographers like us. But sold it on open sea with the utility attached to somebody in Vancouver and now I am shipping a studio flex kit to the photographer in Vancouver who's utilizing the utility that was attached to the banger. We've also attached my workshops, some people have got a lifetime membership on the head shot crew, people get somebody's got a whole day with me. We're all fly to them and hang out with them for a day and coach them. There's all this stuff going on. It's really interesting. And with the metaverse coming, we're building our own. We've got a token that is going to be the currency within banger's bill called of course, a shabak. And all of it's happening. I love it. So this is elbow now, right? Dot com. Yes, your bangers are selling on open sea if you go to open sea dot com. I think or is it IO? It is open sea, you have the link here. It is open sea IO, yes, open-source. And then search for a few bangers. Now, be careful. There's a lot of impostors out there. Make sure it looks like this. There's 1.3 thousand items, which is what we have 625 owners, and there's the floor price .0 8th of an eth right now and you can go in and purchase one with Ethereum and that's where we're selling them right now. We do have 2500 of them that we've made, but we're keeping the 1200 on the sidelines for now for when we reopen, bangers dot com. We're trying to build out the metaverse. We're working on sponsorships. We have big announcements in terms of sponsors and what we're doing over there very soon. And since we're building our own metaverse in our own token, it takes a little bit of time. So we're thinking in the next couple months, we'll be seeing this coming out. We'll be making announcements so you can the best way to find out about everything is to go to bangers dot com and search our Discord or go to Peter Hurley on Instagram and you can check my link tree my link in my bio has everything that's going on with me. So that's probably the best place to go. Love it. Love it. So just real quick, when you say you're building a metaverse. What does that mean? You're building a community that people will be able to interact with in virtual reality or there's some kind of community plus to define metaverse as you see it. Absolutely. Well, it's interesting that coincide with Facebook changing their name to meta. So right now, everybody's looking. I mean, gamers are used to it and people have used an Oculus before and been in virtual reality scenarios, understand it. I've gotten to one virtual reality gaming place in New York City with my kids for their birthday. And that's it. I've never done this. So and now I'm creating a metaverse. So a metaverse is basically we're going to start with probably a browser based. I mean, the goal is for me to let's say I'm a banger owner, which I am. I bought one of my own actually. And I walk into the I go into this metaverse and my avatar is my shebang. And I'm communicating with other photographers that are standing in front of me in their shebang with their camera. And it's going to be like a mall type structure where you walk into well, we were joking before that we'll have a bar. I was like, can you get lit up at the bar and have a banger like kind of woozy? Like, somebody passed out on the floor, you know, can you sell drinks in there? I don't know. But basically, we're going to have little storefronts for photo industry related things. And people are actually going to go into these stores and be able to peruse items from that manufacturer or you know. I've approached B and H B and H is one of my sponsors. I want them to come into my manner verse, and I want somebody to walk into the B and a store and be able to buy a product in the metaverse while they're in the store in their and have that item shipped and show up in the physical world at their home. So these types of things is what we're working on. Not to mention that there'll be a virtual classroom where I can teach my workshops from. Or anybody for that matter. If I have a classroom in the metaverse in she bangers, Bill, we would be able to schedule classes there for different speakers that could come in that I could be teaching a full on class to the metaverse or the citizens of in front of me right now from my computer from a WeWork or wherever I am. Wherever. Yeah. That's crazy, man. Congratulations. You're always crushing it..

Vancouver westcott Peter Hurley Ukraine New York City Facebook Bill
"o.hurley" Discussed on This Week in Photo

This Week in Photo

05:14 min | 5 months ago

"o.hurley" Discussed on This Week in Photo

"I think there's a disconnect between me and the subject when that happens. I also like the pupils. I like real estate in the eye to be the iris, not the pupil, so when you shoot a strobe, a lot of times you get what I consider big pupil syndrome, and I feel like somebody with vibrant blue eyes, you need to show as much as possible and you need as much real estate as possible. So I hit them bombard them with constant light to get the pupil down. And then there's no disconnect between the strobe going off. So plus I have more control because I could see what I'm doing. I'm self taught. So I'm not that sharp when it comes to setting up a strobe and then seeing where all the light goes. I like to see where the light goes as I'm creating. I still use strokes. I do shoot strobe, but for certain situations, like if I need to do full body head to toe or if I have a shooting somebody and they're moving around a lot, I'll freeze it with strobe or I want a particular look. I'll use strobe, but 90% of the time I'm using my flex kit in the studio. Love it. Love it. All right, I want to wrap this up with you always forward looking right and this NFT thing that people are either loving, hating or on the sidelines or in the game with is kind of on fires on fire last year year before. And it doesn't seem to be stopping now. You're jumping in to the NFT space. What are you doing there? This is amazing. I mean, I started to hear this NFT. I think the first time I heard of it, I was like, I was like everybody else, what the heck is that? And why is GaryVee just squawking about it so much? And I was like, so I was like, I'm going to listen to a guy. I like listening to Gary. So I wanted to listen to him. And then another guy listened to Tom Bill you actually one of my friends, I guess I would say in clients I kind of went in and I wanted to get him in front of my camera so I ended up photographing him and I just started following him and listening to what he said and he was so into the they were so into the NFT thing that I was really starting to take a look but not understanding it at all. I had recently not too long ago got into crypto and was investing a little bit here and there. So I was trying to learn more and more about absorbent as much as I can. And probably like many people out there, they're like NFT, what non fungible what and it wasn't long before one of my photographers, the deem who's in Tampa, where I am right now, came to me and said, hey, we got to do a project. Right now is the time. We've got to do an NFT project. We got to bring it to the photo community. And start this thing. And unlike most photographers that are looking at NFTs for an extra source of income for their work, which is incredible, which we need to anybody watching this that has an archive needs to start to research NFTs and getting their work up in the blockchain and starting to sell because we've never before had the chance for a royalty on sales over the course of a lifetime like attaching your work and creating NFT will do, which you can do now, which is an insane way to create residual income for yourself. So I think it's a powerful thing for the photo community. But I look at my work and I'm like, I photograph all people, and I didn't get model releases for quite some time. And I wouldn't want to sell an NFT to somebody of somebody's face like to somebody else unless that person was okay with it and maybe somebody would buy if they were celebrity. So now I'm just thinking about future work on what I could produce as an NFT. But a lot of you probably have a landscape that looks awesome that you like a fine art piece that's insane that you really like that you think it could be worth a lot. Maybe you shot something on film way back when and you can dig that sucker up and somebody's gonna like to own that piece of art. And I think NFTs are a huge thing for us that we don't even realize what it is yet. But for me at the time, Vadim came to me, he said, let's do the first collectible for the photo industry. He's like, I'll get an artist. So he got an artist, and he said, I'm going to get an artist to give me some samples and show him to you. And he showed me this little guy with a camera in his head on his head for a head. And I was like, that thing is the coolest. So I think the artwork itself was so cool and the artist is amazing. So then we were like, well, okay, we've got the artist. We've got something cool, it's hot that people will resonate with in terms of a collectible. What are we going to call it? And I was like, I don't know. If you look at all these names of these NFT things, they're all crazy and strange and interesting and whatever. And I was like, well, I mean, I yell shebang all the time. Let's just call him shit bangers. And I was like, come out of the E, because it's shorter and cooler without the east. Soban is without the E at the end. And we did the drop in October, I believe now..

Tom Bill Gary Tampa Vadim Soban
"o.hurley" Discussed on This Week in Photo

This Week in Photo

05:57 min | 5 months ago

"o.hurley" Discussed on This Week in Photo

"I needed somebody in Chicago. I needed somebody where else were we? San Francisco, obviously New York, companies, wherever they're based. And we shot it all. Head shot crew style. And we matched across the board. So I think it's a recipe that works if it could be done better. I'd be doing it. If somebody can show me how to do it better, I will change to that. Right now this is the best. And then for people if they want to go check that out, they should just headshot crew dot com, if they want to jump into that program. Yeah, let me show that on the screen. That's the site right here. Very cool. Very cool. All right, I want to switch gears. I know you're working on a bunch of projects. So you mentioned, what? 6 companies that you're working with right now. You got a lot going on. The one thing that you're really interested to hear from you about is the NFT project that you're working on. So I'm going to transition to that in just a second. Before we do that, I know I'd be remiss if I didn't ask you about squinting. You talk about shebang, right? And that's kind of the emerald whatever, okay, I got the shot. I love it. Right? So yeah, but squinting. For the folks, folks that are listening to this are Peter Hurley fans, they already know the story, but for folks that aren't, talk about squinting and where that came from. So when I remember when I modeled I was, I was modeling and I would talk to other models about how do you look better in front of a camera and we would like we never really pinpointed it and it would be like gaze off into the distance and think about something cool and their faithful. I was like, I don't understand that. I don't know how to look cool. I just did it. I guess I learned as I go. I got more comfortable in front of the camera. And then I looked cooler. So when I picked up a camera, I went, well, I remember those photographers that didn't coach me Dan for gave me anything and how do I what do I tell my subjects? So then I was like, I don't like when you put up a camera in front of people, most people open their eyes. And I don't like wide eyed shots because they look scared. Like the people look scared. So when I started headshot, it's already and started photographing models and stuff in New York City. I would like, I was like telling them to squint. I was like, can you squint a little bit? And then I opened up the all the ads for headshot photographers and all the actors were wide eyed. And then I looked at actors like in Vanity Fair they were shot by like Bruce Weber and nanny Lee Woods and Steven meisel and her Brits and stuff. And they all look cool. And I was like, why do these people look cool? And the actors that need that shots look so out to lunch. I was like, I'm gonna stop that. So I made everybody squint. I didn't know, I didn't know it was not squinting that I wanted. I just wanted the eyes wider from when they opened them at first from being uncertain. You know, deer in the headlights when they open their eyes. So years later, I actually have a video of myself in 2012 and I haven't come up with the word squint yet 'cause I talk about squinting and I do this stuff with my face. And one day my daughter said squint and I was like, oh, that's good. And then I was like, wait, I have to define this. What is this? And I was like, squinting is narrowing the distance between your pupil and your lower eyelid. So it's lower eyelids up. It's not going sweating its protection in the eye. So that's like if you're in a snowstorm and you're closing your eyes for protection. That's not what you want to do with the squint. The squinch is a lower lid up thing. And people do it naturally as we speak when we're confident. We just do it. You know, when we get in front of in front of cameras, we're not confident and we're unsure, so our eyes widen because we're thinking about our face and that triggers the eyes opening because we're uncertain. So all I was trying to do was rectify that by giving them something to do, which I coined the squint. And then I trademarked it. And then I put out a video on it and they put me on Good Morning America and they came to my studio on command and morning America and we did it. And it was awesome. And now, I don't even like a lot of my photographers send that video out to their people before they come in and shoot. And I don't want to do anything like that. I want the person to walk in my studio as their natural selves. And I'm watching them before they get in front of the camera. And if they get in front of the camera and their eyes don't wide and I don't even tell them to squint. I don't need them. I need them to look confident. Whatever that is. And I went from being a photographer, photographing faces to becoming a facial conveyance strategist, where I am strategizing on what their face needs to say that's best for their personal brand and getting my subject there. So if it requires a squint, they're gonna squint. If it doesn't, they're not going to. It doesn't matter to me. But 9 times out of ten, somebody will get in front of your camera and they'll just give you one of these. And it's like, it's like, why are you doing that? Stop doing. Don't look scared. And you've got to reverse what somehow. So squinting is the way. And they're only aiming a lot of it is people trying not to blink, because I'm a blinker. My brain somehow knows when that strobe is going to fire a millisecond before it fires and my eyes are closed 90% of the time. So a lot of me doing that is just like, okay, I gotta try not to blink, don't blame you like a glaucoma test or something. Those are too wide. Yeah. Yeah, so you start looking like a deer in the headlights. Do you shoot strobe? Are you shooting continuous lighting? 'cause I'm a, you know, continuous lighting would solve that for me. Well, I designed the Peter Hurley cineflex kit from westcott is my is my weapon of choice when I'm shooting headshot. So it's continuous light. It's LED panels. It was the thing that I needed, I don't like strokes going off in my subjects faces for a number of reasons..

Peter Hurley Lee Woods Steven meisel Bruce Weber San Francisco Chicago New York Dan New York City America glaucoma westcott
"o.hurley" Discussed on This Week in Photo

This Week in Photo

05:37 min | 5 months ago

"o.hurley" Discussed on This Week in Photo

"Obviously it's going to vary by region in all that somewhat but generally speaking. How many people do I have to shoot in order to get to a hundred K? It depends on your sales method. So we do a training called the TNT method for sales. It was developed by one of my photographers. His name is Tony taif. And I started using it and my and my, I'm transparent in my, in my fees and my structure in my everything. If you go to Peter Hurley dot com, forward slash rates, you can see how I do it. But I charge $1500 to step in front of my camera and you don't get an image. It's $300 in images of this recording. I do tweak my pricing all the time and who knows where it's gonna go. But generally, if somebody's spending 1500 to come in my door, they're gonna buy I'd say I average probably like 8 images maybe during a session 5 to ten somewhere in there. Sometimes I just sold 14 the other day. So let's say that's three, let's just say for the sake of this, they buy 5. That's a $3000 session for me. And I only do one a day these days. I used to do three a day, which was crazy back in the day. Now I only do one a day. So everybody's different. Everybody's markets different, but to make a hundred K, if I'm doing three, you know, obviously I'm at the top of the game. So most of my photographers charge we're doing a model where we say create a session fee. It's about, let's say, just say any market in the U.S. can pretty much handle this, I think, where it's I mean, you have to be good and you have to have a portfolio, but $200 walk in your door. And $200 in image. So for 400 bucks you walk in the door, you get one a head shot. I think that's a decent starting ground. So if they sell 5 images, they made $1200. And I think a lot of my photographers on the head shot crew are doing it. Some are doing it less summer doing a $100 to walk in and a $100 an image, which what I'm trying to do is create a baseline for associates in the crew around $200. If they've gone through my training, they've gotten this accolade for me then they could probably charge more. But even if you do a hundred and a hundred, it's a $100 to walk in, you sell 5 images. You just made $600 off of it. And that's pretty damn good. I think that's pretty cool. No, that is. And then, you know, the other side of that is some people that are listening or watching this or thinking, yeah, that's great, but he's saying I'm going to charge X dollars to walk in the door. What if I don't have a door? You know, what if I'm living in a studio apartment in New York City, but I want to be a headshot photographer, am I doomed? Do I have to rent a studio and have that overhead? Can I just do it outside? I know you started your living room with window light. I started natural light in a studio apartment in New York City. So I have no, you know, anybody who says that, I'm just like, I have no sympathy, if you don't think you can do it. Plus, headshot crew members can rent my studio for it's a $100 an hour with a 200 minute. So for 200 bucks, you get my lights. You walk in my studio and you shoot up a storm, you get you just book a bunch of people in two hours or whatever and you make it a ton of money. So and I do that in my Burbank studio as well. So it's not it's not really an excuse. A lot of people have excused that they're in like a small town and there's plenty of people in that town. I'm sure that need headshots. And if you're talented, how far is the next big town from you? Like do you have to drive an hour? And then maybe you run a space there. I mean, how much would it be to talk to other photographers in that town and say, hey, can I rent your space for a couple hours to do headshots? I mean, I'm sure I'm sure that wouldn't be difficult or you find a right now I'm in a I'm in a kind of work sharing space I was in the conference room. It's like a WeWork, but it's in Tampa, but it's not WeWork. It's another it's totally different thing. But I was in the conference room today and it was perfect. I'm actually shooting in here on Wednesday and there's a white wall that I'm setting up against and it's perfect. So all of those excuses are to me, are excuses. And if you really want this, if you love photography, I just think headshots, anybody photographs people. If you consider yourself a portrait photographer and you don't have a headshot component to your work, it's just silly. This day and age. And I can teach you how, which is even sillier. Just I'll show you. I'll give you an entire recipe plop it in front of you. I have a 24/7 zoom room that's running right now that runs all the time where the head track crew, there's 1500 members where there's always members in there supporting each other, coaching each other, answering questions, setting up lighting and shooting while coaching through the process for the people that need the help to get the recipe that I've created done for them. And then people say, well, why do you want to copy Peter early? You want to copy me because well, first of all, how many photographers out there go around, hey, I want to be copied. Like, I want to be copied, because I have a company called headshot Booker, and we have global companies, and we're doing jobs in I need shooters. I did a job recently for a company where I needed somebody in Moscow..

Tony taif Peter Hurley New York City U.S. Tampa headshot Booker Peter Moscow
"o.hurley" Discussed on This Week in Photo

This Week in Photo

06:59 min | 5 months ago

"o.hurley" Discussed on This Week in Photo

"Your subject. And it's going to get it's going to get to him. And they're going to change. And they're going to be in the palm of your hands. A lot of things, I look over the course of my career and I see how things change now. I can get people a good headshot in I actually don't shoot the I don't press the shutter anymore until I see something I really love. And I wait. And the first shot I take of people, I would say 9 times out of ten is the best picture they've best hedgehog they've ever had in their life. Because I wait until I see what I want. I coached them until I see what I want. And if I don't see what I want, we're gonna be there. It's gonna be a really long shoot. 'cause I don't press the button. So it's not that flow. It's not that flow, again, back to that stereotypical photographer, you know, it's not that flow of yeah, that's it. Yeah, okay, look to the left a little bit. Okay, yeah, yeah, yeah. Okay, oh yeah, and I'll purse your lips. Okay, now squint, click, click, click, click, hundred frames a second, whatever. You're not doing that. Are you doing more of a medium format large format kind of flow where it's like everything is perfect? Okay, we're ready, look at the birdie, click, you know, which where do you fall in that of both? It's a hodgepodge of both. It really is dependent upon the subject, what they're giving me. I do shoot fast when the person's hit ratio is high. So by hitting issue I mean, they've got a good look. The angles of their face are phenomenal. They already appear confident. I don't have to have them. Anything like asking them to squint or get their jawline out, the things that I do holding the sub like the techniques I use are posing. And posing is inauthentic. I hate the word pose. I like to say loose positioning. So I want to get to the point where I don't have to tell them that stuff. And we're flying and stuff's coming at me. So when stuff comes at me naturally from them, I'm shooting faster. If there's nothing there, I'm not shooting at all. Photographers have one or one tree, a lot of photographers are one trick ponies. And they use positive reinforcement as there only means a direction. So it's that turn this way, turn that way, click beautiful, amazing. That was perfect. That way, click. Yes, that was great. Do that again. It's just positive. They don't really give them any juice or anything to respond to. And if the person is flat and doesn't respond, it's going to be a long shoot, and it's going to be a lot of shots that have that deadpan look that doesn't fly when you're trying to pull and elicit expression out of people. Yeah, this is like the discussion is an example of like we talk about at the top. There's a lot more to a headshot than put somebody in shade and open up your aperture and start clicking, right? There's a lot more to it. You built a business around this called Peter Hurley's headshot crew, talk about that a little bit. What is that model? How does that operate? So years ago, my web designer to design Peter early dot com. I started shooting at blinders on. I never looked at it. I never knew what was going on around me. I just wanted to create. And I was looking at the competition in New York City and I wanted to I created a really clean simple recipe for my work. And it worked out really well. And then the F stoppers reached out to me. And they said, we want to interview you. They interviewed me. They're like, look, nobody did the, nobody's done tutorial and headshots that has your experience. Let's do it. And I did their first tutorial. And simultaneously with that, I talked to my developer and he's like, why don't we make a website with like a form where like a community where photographers can talk and I was like, that'd be really cool. And I said, so I was like, let's do it. So he created it. We launched it in 2011, so it's now ten years old. It was ten years old in December, is when we launched it December 2011, so we're just ten years old. And it's grown to 20,000 photographers. There's about 19,000, I think, on the site. There's 1500 in my coaching group. I launched it simultaneously. As I was launching the headshot intensive, which is my signature workshop, so people go through the workshop and then they go into the headshot crew and then the head trackers are referral engine for photographers to get work. So if you see there, you can hit find a photographer, and it's going to search for photographers in my network. There's 18,975 from a 137 countries. Look at that. So type in any city anywhere and then see who comes up and we'll have a group. Look at this, he's going San Francisco. So you got camera Dennis and Tony, and then you've got other photographers that are in my coaching program, which would be like Ida, who I overview to Stephanie's taking the headshot intensity. I took the hedgehog intensive. Daniel St. Louis Allen Ortiz David Sachs Stan Stan's been a headshot mania with me. Diane Morton does a lot of my workshops and stuff like that and Nina's working with me as well. Deans also working with me. So then this becomes a directory then. So once you go through the training, you end up in this directory and people ordinary people can come here and search for you and book you. Is that fair? Yeah, and if you there's also a portion of it that of people that don't get trained, that still are in the search that that's a lower level called silver, but golden up is the training and they the gold members show up above the silver members. But yeah, it's just awesome because I teach the recipe. We also teach business and how to get the business started and how to make money. And I actually have what I call my hundred K club, which my goal is my goal when I started hedgehog photography was to get myself to a $100,000 a year. And I was really excited about that when I hit that number. And for me, to be able to I started from scratch, I'm self taught. I had the same thing most people have when they want to become an artist from parental from a parental standpoint parents saying, no, no, no. You got to go get a real job. And so for me to be successful at this, the hundred K mark was like something that I really, really valued. So last year in 2021, we have more photographers on the head shot crew jump over the $100,000 mark due to my coaching than ever before, which means the world to me. So and I'm trying to name Peter. What does that mean? What does that mean in terms of the number or the number of headshots that a person needs to shoot during a year in order to get to the hundred K mark?.

Peter Hurley Daniel St. Louis Allen Ortiz David Sachs Stan Stan Diane Morton New York City Ida Deans Dennis Stephanie Nina Tony San Francisco Peter
"o.hurley" Discussed on This Week in Photo

This Week in Photo

05:37 min | 5 months ago

"o.hurley" Discussed on This Week in Photo

"What do I do now? And I had to figure out a wider reinvent my former direction and then I found this thing that I do called misdirection, which was phenomenal. And that changed everything. But now, what I found was I call it I coined at the chameleon approach. Basically, you have to be a chameleon for the individual that comes in. So if I want the best out of my subject now, I want to get something special for them. I it sounds a little hocus pocus, but I read energy and kind of profile them and figure out what they're doing before they get anywhere near my camera. And then my brain kicks in in a way for me to get exactly what I need out of them through the words I use the mannerisms I use how I direct them. It's all geared on what they need. So a good example of somebody comes in petrified and they're really freaked out. My whole energy goes down. And I just talk slow and I just start going, hey, we're going to do great and come on and hang up your clothes. Let's get going, I got you. I got you. Because they're not going to be able to handle big Peter. And then if somebody comes in and they're all fired up, I heard you the best we're going to get this. And I'm going to be like, yay, yeah, we're going to get this. Get your ass in front of my camera. Let's go. You know, and I change, and then I read how the human see everything, it's almost like everything comes to our face. You see the concern for their well-being on their face. I say to them, you know, stop looking concern for your well-being because that's what I'm picking up. The coolest thing that I've learned since I've been shooting that I tell my clients is the brain will try to tell you what your face looks like, but it doesn't know. Our brain tries to tell our ourselves what our face everybody listens to this right now. If you're looking at anything, I doubt you're looking at yourself. I kind of am because I see myself in front of the camera. But so that's the only time I might know what my face looks like. But I'm looking at my eyes, I see it like a little outline in my nose and my cheeks and that's about it. We don't know what our face looks like. So our brain tells us what our face looks like, and it's wrong. It's super wrong. Because otherwise nobody would ever look in the camera the way they do. So the photographer has to become the coach. In order and it's all based on levels of persuasion. You're trying to persuade the person to do what you feel is correct for them and their personal brand while they're fighting against you to do it because they don't know that you know better than their own brain. So it's a very this dichotomy between the two things that's just crazy to think about. When I'm just trying to get the best out of them and if they listen to me, they'll do it like with the quenching and the jawline and all this crazy stuff that they won't do unless I convince them and persuade them to do it. So it's all levels of everything that I coach and that I teach and that I do is levels of persuasion and then you have to cater it to the personality that's in front of you. And to do that, honestly, it takes time. I think I probably have maybe 40,000 faces in front. I'm guessing, but I know I'm I gotta be over 30 or four. I don't know where I am. But persuasion piece of it, would you agree the persuasion is. I don't use percentages, but that's part of the equation the other half is that persuasion has to lead to trust from the subject. Because if you're subject to arguably, if your subject, if you're Peter Hurley and your subject's coming in and you're like, oh, I'm being shot by Peter Hurley. Of course, I trust him 40,000, 30,000 shots in, you better know what he's doing. But if it's a regular no name person off the street and maybe they see your portfolio, maybe they haven't, it's harder for them to elicit that, okay, this guy knows what they're doing. They're not gonna make me look like an idiot, you know, they know better than I do about my facial expressions. How does that unknown person or lesser known person get to that level of trust quickly, you know? In the hour or 30 minutes you have with your subject. You wouldn't believe how many people didn't get the memo when they come in my studio and they didn't hear. I was the best at this on the planet. I'm like, what the heck? They're not listening to me, no. I mean, it's unbelievable. I'm like, do you realize the amount of there was there's something about Picasso where Picasso, somebody asked somebody he asked me to do a drawing and he drew it and he handed it to him and he said that's 30,000 bucks or whatever a 103 100,000 bucks or whatever he was. And then you go that took you like three minutes. And he goes, yeah, you know, I took a lifetime to be able to do that in three minutes. It's like, you know, it's like that. It's like I've been working at this for so long and when people come in my studio and they don't give me the respect that I believe I deserve, it's becomes a whole build of gaining that trust in them through being an expert. So you have to be an expert. I coached photographers on how to be an expert. I tell photographers, look, I'm going to coach all the stuff I know. You claim it is your own. I'm coaching you so that you can use these techniques to gain that trust because the more confident you are behind the camera, the more that trust is going to happen sooner from your subject and you're going to get better pictures. Confidence is contagious. So if a photographer's confidence behind the line, if you're even if you're quiet and reserved and an introvert, but confident, it oozes.

Peter Hurley Peter Picasso
"o.hurley" Discussed on Living the Law of Action Show

Living the Law of Action Show

03:03 min | 1 year ago

"o.hurley" Discussed on Living the Law of Action Show

"It's <Speech_Female> really <Silence> brings me a lot <SpeakerChange> of joy <Speech_Female> and bringing <Speech_Female> people together. <Speech_Female> I've always <Speech_Female> been that person <Speech_Female> who loves <SpeakerChange> bringing people <Silence> together <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> all those things <Speech_Female> bring me joy and <Speech_Female> making new friends being <Silence> part of <SpeakerChange> networks <Speech_Male> Samara. <Speech_Male> You are a <Speech_Male> truly beautiful soul <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> a woman who is <Speech_Male> living a <Speech_Male> life of inspired <Speech_Male> action. <Speech_Male> How does someone get <Speech_Male> in touch with them if they <Speech_Male> want to support the camp <Speech_Male> project or they <Speech_Male> just want to just <Speech_Male> be around that incredible <Speech_Male> energy here <Speech_Male> on clubhouse <Speech_Male> or in <Silence> business? <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> Right. <Speech_Female> Now if you <Speech_Female> DM me through <Speech_Female> Instagram <Speech_Female> action <Speech_Female> is still alive <Speech_Music_Female> and that's <Speech_Music_Female> action action <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> a live <Speech_Female> live. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> You can also <Speech_Female> go to my website <Speech_Female> actually used to live., <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> and definitely <Speech_Female> check out <Speech_Female> at <Speech_Female> risk it with <Speech_Female> Flava <Speech_Female> w h <Speech_Female> i s k <Speech_Female> i t <Speech_Female> with with <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Flava is Flava. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> She is also <Speech_Female> on Instagram <Speech_Female> Facebook <Speech_Female> and YouTube <Speech_Female> and the cam <Speech_Female> project is being developed <Speech_Female> on social media. <Speech_Female> The <Speech_Female> the website <Speech_Female> is the cam <Speech_Female> project.org <Speech_Female> and that will <Speech_Female> be coming soon. <Speech_Female> Everything is in the works. <Speech_Female> The can cast <Speech_Female> is our <Speech_Female> way past that will be <Speech_Female> launching <Speech_Female> live soon <Speech_Female> as well. So we're <Speech_Female> very excited to get all <Speech_Female> these things moving <Speech_Female> and we have <Speech_Female> people that are already <Speech_Female> ready to jump <Silence> on board <Speech_Female> and be part <Speech_Female> of this program. <Silence> As <Speech_Female> our kids need <Speech_Female> us they are our future <Speech_Female> Whitney Houston <Speech_Female> had it right <Speech_Female> kids <Silence> are our future. <Speech_Female> So we <Speech_Female> need to be there to support <Speech_Female> each and every <Speech_Female> one of them, even if <Speech_Female> they're not our own kid. <Speech_Female> I always <Speech_Female> wanted to adopt siblings <Speech_Female> now. I feel like <Speech_Music_Female> I'm adopting all <Silence> kids everywhere. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Samara thank <Speech_Male> you so much for being here <Silence> today. <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Thank you. Rob for having <Speech_Female> me. I really appreciate <Speech_Female> it and our friendship <Speech_Female> means the world to <Speech_Female> me. I am so <Speech_Female> blessed that <Speech_Female> I met you <Speech_Female> and I don't believe in coincidences. <Speech_Female> I don't believe <Speech_Female> that you're mr. Action <Speech_Female> and I missed <Speech_Female> auctioneers alive <Speech_Female> and people think <Speech_Female> we're married when we coma <Speech_Female> which is hilarious. <Speech_Female> But I am <Speech_Female> so blessed <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> everything happens for a reason <Speech_Female> and you <Speech_Female> and I connecting <Speech_Music_Female> his <Silence> you <Speech_Male> got that right? <Speech_Male> This is just the beginning <Silence> bate Bate. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Woohoo Pate. <Silence> <Speech_Male> This <Speech_Male> is the living the law of <Speech_Male> action show. <Speech_Male> I am so <Speech_Male> thrilled to <Speech_Male> be able to share stories <Speech_Male> of incredible <Speech_Male> people that <Speech_Male> crossed my path <Speech_Male> off of a daily basis <Speech_Male> Samara Hurley <Speech_Male> another <Speech_Male> example of someone <Speech_Male> who lives a life <Speech_Male> of inspired <Speech_Male> action. <Speech_Male> Be sure to check <Speech_Male> her out. All right, <Speech_Male> two things <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> three <SpeakerChange> things <Silence> for things <Speech_Male> do take time to <Silence> breathe. <Speech_Male> Don't let fear <Speech_Male> stop you <Speech_Male> and live <Speech_Male> a life of inspired <Silence> action <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> until <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> next time. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Thank you for listening <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to The Living Room Los <Speech_Music_Female> you show <Speech_Music_Female> with mr. <Speech_Music_Female> Action raw Baptist <Speech_Music_Female> these <Speech_Music_Female> rate review And subscribe.

Whitney Houston Samara Hurley Facebook YouTube Rob Instagram today project.org two one Speech_Female each Flava Samara Baptist
"o.hurley" Discussed on Living the Law of Action Show

Living the Law of Action Show

04:56 min | 1 year ago

"o.hurley" Discussed on Living the Law of Action Show

"In raising our kids. And so the best thing I can do is try to improve myself. I am the last person to tell you that I'm perfect cuz I'm not which is interesting cuz I've been an event planner for twenty-four years and when I started Celebrations by Samara over twelve years ago in Houston, we were trying to come up with names and ages of people like, oh how about perfect parties and all that there is no perfect party. If your party is perfect. There's something serious to wrong. It's for me. I used to tell my staff before we would go into em up for an event that I might have been planning for two years. The paperwork is very type-a. OCD minute-by-minute. Aisha can tell you that should see my schedules before it's a play-by-play, but I need job. By the end of that night that entire document should be completely like crossed out moved over. It's never supposed to be perfect. What's the point of hiring event planner thoughts the page for me? I tell my staff. Okay girls that guy whoever let's see what we're going to fix today or let's see what we can make great today or what we can change or what's going to make this special because it's those impromptu moments. It's those things that happen that you don't expect that can make your event the greatest most memorable event of the year and sometimes that's how it goes down and is a great thing. Yeah. I was a wedding DJ and a corporate DJ for really giant events for many years. I've done thousands of events. And the one thing that was really fun for me to watch was the boss type a event coordinators and they would hand me their their schedule of exactly how everything was going to go down by the second and then I would watch because We're dealing with humans here. Like, you know one person cannot control is like herding cats and it was just amazing because ninety-nine percent of the time there was always changes. Nothing went on time. Everything was this and you had to be able to bounce and adapt which I found really helpful in the way that I live. My life now is the ability to adapt and I just found it really caught on to be at these events because they never went as they were and now I'm a wedding officiants and I married people and the first thing I tell the bride and groom is I feel this is my gift to you. I'm telling you that you are now on a neat Sig tried strapping and hold on tight anything and everything can happen and it's just perfect and its imperfection like just know anything can happen. But the the the best part is off at the end of it. I'm going to marry you and you're going to be husband and wife or wife and wife or husband and husband, but that's always what I tell them and it really takes a lot of pressure on because people in events they put so much pressure on their life. And and you one thing I've noticed about you is that you put a lot of pressure on yourself and I think the way that you maneuver through that is very philanthropic oil..

Houston ninety-nine percent Aisha two years today twenty-four years twelve years ago second first thing thousands of events Samara one thing one person
"o.hurley" Discussed on Living the Law of Action Show

Living the Law of Action Show

05:53 min | 1 year ago

"o.hurley" Discussed on Living the Law of Action Show

"Well, it's just about being flexible and making it happen no matter what what you're doing and who you're with and where you are. Yeah. Well, not only that so Samaras an action taker her daughter Ava song. An action taker she has a company now. She's eleven years old is called Wizkid with flavor and tell us a little bit about that. That's right. So Ava started with get with Flava Flav I get it when she was nine years old. She likes to say back when I was nine and she's only eleven she just turned eleven. She started with scuba Flava in Vancouver. There was a lot of drama going on in second grade on the girls. And so she came home crying a lot. And so she was obsessed with watching the baking baking Channel competitions and not one day. She brought home this cookbook from the school library and it was making emoji cakes and it's using fondant and all that jazz. So my kids used to want me put me on the show nailed it the Netflix show because I was the worst Baker I used to burn everything. So Ava wanted to bake cakes. And so the last day she came home crying. I was done. I said go get the cookbook dead. And we started to bake and my goodness the kid has got skilled. Thank goodness, because I'm the worst Baker but she's incredible. And then before you knew it people were ordering cakes from my nine year old that's down there. You have it so we did here awesome Okay, so Yeah, like, you know have enough in your life. So you have an eleven-year-old daughter. You also have a seventeen-year-old son. That's right. So my son Gavin he just turned Seventeen and when he was thirteen months old, he was diagnosed with autism and we had Early Intervention when we were in the Navy and a mega the Navy and moved to Houston, Texas and Gavin has been through a lot but we actually didn't tell him he had autism and it till about a month and half ago. So that's a whole long stores in itself. But we I have taken every part of my life story and my journey and I have learned from everything. There are no fails. There are absolutely no fails just have to learn from them and move forward and that is what I do. That's amazing and you have another project like you don't have enough stuff going on and that is the cam project. So share a little bit about that. That's right. So the can project is actually in memory of my son Cameron Cameron had a very unusual genetic defect. It's called Giant on policy is liver intestines and stomach or in a membrane outside of his body and he had a hole in his heart and a 10% lung capacity and unfortunately Cameron did not make it and a year later. She had this miracle preemie baby. We call Ava and so we believe his soul is definitely in a vast body and she just could not wait to get out. So she was super early and she came out with a Vengeance. So with Ava's whiskey with Flava as a kid preneur and my action used to live and my event production Celebrations by Samara Dave and I decided to create a nonprofit and we're calling it the cam project cam which is going to be Kam stands for kid action makers and this is where we influence Inspire them..

Samara Dave Vancouver Gavin Ava 10% Seventeen nine Flava nine year Cameron Netflix Flava Flav eleven Cameron Cameron seventeen-year-old second grade a year later Houston, Texas nine years old eleven-year-old
"o.hurley" Discussed on Living the Law of Action Show

Living the Law of Action Show

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"o.hurley" Discussed on Living the Law of Action Show

"On clubhouse. That's right. That's what we're doing a baby or recording live in front of a studio audience. We're gonna have some questions and off. I am so excited about my guest today. She is someone who I met right here on Club House in like a week or two ago. We become fast friends and gave me just tell you a little bit better. All right. She's the founder and CEO of action. He still alive. She is an axe Tanisha by 8 nature and acts Tanisha is someone or action-packed is someone who is about Edge on the go and confident in their ability to handle people or situations and she is a true action Taker and she lives a life inspired action Samara. How are you? I am fabulous Rob. Thank you so much for having us here today. I feel like I have to say hi. It's Samara Harley and then if Samara Hurley, I'm done speaking with you can say that, but you're not done speaking cuz I have you for the next few minutes. So let's rock this thing out. So first of all, happy birthday to you, happy birthday to you. Happy birthday, dear Samara. Happy birthday to Paige tomorrow is big birthday. That's right. Tomorrow is my 45th birthday. I'm one of the few people I think that loves aging and I'm all about birthdays. So thank you for joining my birthday. You're welcome. Happy Birthday. I mean, so today's Monday tomorrow is the day the show will be released. So that would be today if you're listening right now if you're not live and it's Samaras birthday, so happy birthday tomorrow. Thank you. This is the best birthday present. You could give me Rob. Well, there you go. All right, you're cold a firecracker because of your energy passion and ability to talk to anyone and you are all about creating a village and you have so many stories to tell just give us the Reader's Digest version of Samara. Okay, that was long enough like a found was a muted if I just like her phone was unmuted. She be laughing right now. She probably laughing said there there is no short version of Samara Hurley Rob. You've made a few weeks. You should know that by now. I know so just give us the short version of someone hurling. Highlight I am all about taking action and creating a village. I create a village for myself and for my kids and for my family because we have moved so frequently due to my husband's career. So it's all about building relationships and maintain those relationships. But one of the things I love about you is you have a background in very thanks so much background in meetings public relations marketing event production destination management public speaking sales fundraising networking social media training blah blah blah blah you list goes on and on and on Iraq and you know, you have really reinvented yourself because as a high level event planner you kind of got really thrown for a loop because of the this pandemic so you had to reinvent yourself. So why don't you share a little bit what you've done since you had to like pivot and turn left or right or go straight or words way overweight you went. That's absolutely right. So we actually have lived in eleven States and we moved to Vancouver British Columbia where we lived for about four and half years. And then in December 2019. I moved the family from Vancouver to Scottsdale, Arizona to live near my parents. So it was all about getting ourselves situated. I was working as a event coordinator for a non-profit organization here in Scottsdale, and I pretty much coordinated the last event of the city and that was on March 6th. My birthday is March 9th and then quarantine hit and we were in an apartment and my husband moved here from Canada at that point and then we just tried to get settled as much as we could with most of our life in a storage pod..

Vancouver Samara Hurley December 2019 Scottsdale March 9th Rob Canada Samara Harley Samaras March 6th Samara Vancouver British Columbia tomorrow Tomorrow today Paige Reader's Digest Tanisha two ago Scottsdale, Arizona
"o.hurley" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Scribes

Sci-Fi Talk Scribes

12:11 min | 2 years ago

"o.hurley" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk Scribes

"I take one of it and I don't. I Plead Pippen and loads of rings. And you're listening. Sci-fi top revolve prosper back on Fi. Talk With Cameron Hurley. I'm Tony Tomato of course and I got to talk to you about The feminist revolution. And before we get into it I wanNA give you kind of my perspective. I'm an older guy you know so I remember Phantom years back when the just slightly really got heavy into it right after when the start when Star Trek was being shown on in Syndication. That great thing where they showed it every night and it was like it. rekindled interest in it and frankly phantom was pretty much a boys club and there weren't many women that were in that were involved and to my delight especially. I would say in the last ten fifteen years that is sure. Change not only women but families People of all genders and sexual orientations have become involved in it. And it's just been absolutely amazing and at times I feel like I was born to but But but I'm happy that it's the way it is because that's the way it should be. So yeah talk about Your Asset Your award-winning Essay collection and your perspective on that. So people can idea how you approach that sure. I have a lot of perspectives on Phantom Just because I was I ended up having David Hartwell who is a long term. He's a huge editor. At tour he actually added to Heinlein and he was one of my teachers at Clarion the writing workshop which I went to when I was like twenty years old and he had said you know You should read the classics. You should get involved you know in conventions and all that stuff you know what I did. I found it at the time that it wasn't it wasn't the most inclusive in place just because it felt very her and there was something that somebody pointed out. We were actually talking about this Confusion I was a guest of honor at a thing in Detroit in Detroit and they said you know it. It's not just about you know inviting people into space. 'cause they're because women have always been you know fans of star trek all the slash fiction for Star Trek Fan fiction. Women like so much it would go to go but when you start talking about the faces and women and people of color coming into the space is what they would find is that they were not exactly welcomed. I think there was a great article that come out came out about how you know. Asma would go around pinching women's bucks right a convention and that's not exactly welcoming thing. Yeah I'll never forget grabbed. Connie Wilson's Boob at a Hugo ceremony of all things so when we see that right when people would see those things in here those things that message you get back is this space is not for me And I think the reason we're seeing more people in the space as opposed to like writing you know online and their private groups and having their own. Private Phantom is because we've made those more inclusive spaces We've said Hey. Grabbing people is not okay. Go there and we police those things we talk about them and it is. It's been a hardship to some people but we've also had to say you know people who you know act in a specific way are really not welcome in these spaces because what we've done is think about. I always think of all the writers that could have been right all of the amazing people that we could have had banned him. You know in those days. It's not that they weren't interested that they were not welcome like they were getting these signals. That is not for you. It drives me crazy. I think one of the reasons we're seeing such a huge golden ages. Thanks fiction right now. I can't keep up there so many books I wanna read and the reason I feel is just because we have made it a little bit more welcoming for many different people and so yeah so I kind of took that on Talking about that and he feminist revolution of how that that shift and how faces are changing. Some of the pushback that happened of. Oh this isn't my science fiction Blah Blah Blah think. Well that's fine. Go have your own your if you WanNa have a convention with just you and your friends. That's fine but don't call it a world fantasy convention or a World Science Fiction Convention. Let's let's decide what we're GONNA do so. I talked a lot about those. Those thoughts knows issues and and stuff in feminist in online spaces the FAA. You know we have always thought we actually just came out came out With getting some press again because somebody said the witcher that Oh this woman could never be in a sword fight with this guy and was like Oh my God this is so I wrote this. This talk about how women have always been part of fighting for I and that was literally what I did my master's work on. I'm a historian by training. Women have always made up especially in revolutionary movements at least twenty percent of the forces fighting forces and support forces literally. You can't do it without sports but yeah there's always happens. It's like not Jewish people her ten that because now you're seeing it more and actually portrayed the way it was sometimes even as it was historically sometimes we get to the twenty percents People Freak out because they're not used to seeing it But just because you're not used to seeing it doesn't mean that what you were seeing was true that s a has been a really great one for people arguing online about it that they can just link to it and say you go. That's that solve that issue and move on so yeah well what's interesting is going back and I occasionally will look back at movies or television. Shows was a kid and looking at him now. And it's like Oh my God. The attitudes are are oval. It's like I was an impressionable kid. Thank God turned out alright but look at the junk. I was being fed here so I you know I was. I was just looking at Steph. Even like from the nineties or even the early yeah that I that. I'm like WHOA. What were we thinking? And that's just because we're more aware and we've been made more aware once people have platforms to actually say. Hey you know. This isn't cool and this is why and you go. Oh Yeah that's why I felt so weird about that or whatever I always. I've been saying this a lot lately. Folks the good old days weren't so good people if you're saying that if you're saying I missed the good old days it's like no you don't. It's better sal. My grandma loves to tell me that she said you know. The nineteen fifties were not the nineteen fifties right. That were portrayed in the media. She's like it was not like that But people do. We have these these nostalgic views of what the Password I look at my own past. I was born in the eighties and the eighties is was not a great time. This new jer- movies it was you know make than wars in Central Asia. And you know all this The Revolution in Africa like it was it was the AIDS crisis. So there's a lot going on but we have ideas that there was some mystical. Yeah Golden Age Where life was not hard and things were great for everyone and yeah. It didn't exist for sure honestly. I don't think we've reached a golden age. It I think as a humanity is is still in like a adolescence. And keep tripping over feet you know. I want my star Trek Future. I'm ready garage now. There's and that's the beauty of Star Trek. I in in one thousand nine sixty seven I lived in Newark and and we had riots and it was. It was tough then. There was national guard on the WAY TO CHURCH. And stuff like that so. I'm watching Star Trek episode and it's a very subtle thing of course attendant. Who are is there? But it really struck me the scene where an African American gentlemen walks towards the camera and Captain Kirk is right behind him and he goes to his station and Kirk goes to see spark. Wow It's no big deal you know. And it's like it really it made. It made an impact that yes people can work together of all faiths and religions and races and thank God even with the New Star Trek and now with with sexual different sexual orientations. And they're doing it but it's it's it really helped me to give me the hope that I needed at the time. It was a tough time and it was the Vietnam War was going on and we're having dinner and they're literally giving you the the body count as you're having dinner every night. It was like it was tough but And then the assassinations Dr King. Bobby Kennedy. It seemed like they all happen back to back to back and it was. It was just. You don't know what how things were going to turn out and I'm I'M SURPRISED. We survived it. You know it goes to the fact of the good old days weren't so great and but yeah I mean things as bad as things are we still got a long way to go but they are better and at least I'm starting to reflect that the media has already caught onto it. There's Commercials have mix race couples. Same Sex couples and nobody even says a word about it. They're they're just showing it and it's like this is. This is what America really is. And there's always a few. Don't believe that but it's like no. This is America. This is what we are. And you can't ignore it and you can't stop it so you might as well accept it as long as nobody's harming anybody. What's the big deal? I got to get off my soapbox. Yeah a lot of people don't know like Don't like thinking about change. Not Thinking about things know that might be different than what they were taught they were but you know again that and music also the benefit of it's like your you're star. Trek examples a great example. It's showing people how things can be different right at that. That is why I got into this I think it was a quote from Joanna. Arrests where she had said she start writing science fiction because it was the one place that one genre where she could actually explore the way things could be super different and that. Oh Yeah me too it for sure. That's the power of science fiction where those two little words. What if and they're so powerful and it's like what if we figured it out you know or or in the case of planet of the apes forty if we don't figure it out You you can. You can hold both arguments and say they're your choices. What are you gonNA do about it? So that's the beauty of it and it makes you think about it and fantasy to fantasy is a great way to to dream a little bit. Yeah of course some of it is impossible but that's the beauty of it. It's yeah it's like reading dream. You know that kind of absolutely. What is what is next for you. Well I am. Currently working on a sci-fi thriller called Losing Gravity I call it. It's like killing eve. Meat die hard and space. So I'm very over that one. Yeah right it's my first thriller And so it's a little bit of a learning curve for me..

Detroit Captain Kirk America Cameron Hurley Pippen Tony Tomato David Hartwell Connie Wilson FAA editor Asma Heinlein Bobby Kennedy Africa Dr King jer Newark Central Asia Joanna
"o.hurley" Discussed on The Worldshapers

The Worldshapers

12:35 min | 3 years ago

"o.hurley" Discussed on The Worldshapers

"I was still in high school. I was taking college class cuny college classes as part of my high school school curriculum but anyway he was amazing history teacher because he tell it like a story and all these wild things right that people have done in the past and and what motivates them and all of that and as someone writing fiction and sort of struggling with character motivation and where to ideas come from and what are some twists and that was really awesome for me to take those notes and be like okay. How can i work this doing and i realize realize that you know it's probably going to serve me better to go straight to the source of where all the stories come from right which is our in history and so that was that sort of leaning more and more there was another teacher again at the same community college. She was exceptional. I think it was a it was a feminist history course first of some kind and it was it was amazing learning about it was wild so we had a really great time with that one too and and it just yeah just spark majors and my parents were. We'll zone you if you don't go to college so i had to go to college but i chose to do something and study something that i found really interesting and it has. It's really changing transform. You know my writing because i'm going straight to the source stuff as i've you said people have said oh your your stories are so weird and stuff happens. It's so creepy and whatever and i'm like you don't understand the sanitized taste east from actual events. I there's stuff like i researched. <hes> i spent two years living in south africa where i got my master's degree in history and i researched which all of these archives from something called the truth and reconciliation committee which is what they did after the end of apartheid in that country where people could come forward and actually we tell stories of the horrors that had happened under the state and they would be they'd be given a political immunity. Oh my gosh like the stuff you read is just i'd have to stop and take a break like just the things that people do to each other but to me. That was a much much better way of spending my time like researching the real world and what has happened then then just reading books which i was going to do anyway so it's interesting. You're my twenty nine author. I think that i've interviewed so far and <hes> there's certain i don't remember i don't wanna say names because i'll forget somebody but you're about the third or or fourth who actually has a history background and does seem to feed into into that writing and clearly it feeds into yours as well for sure so how did you did you break into writing see i sold. I sold them nonfiction piece. I think when i was sixteen sixteen like a local newspaper which was a nice little jolt of like oh wow so when you pay like twenty bucks or something for it doesn't wow like twenty bucks and you my mom the cut it out of the paper so exciting <hes> and then i think i sold my first. John started submitting when i was fifteen genre magazines mary jo and bradley science fiction fantasy magazine and i think it intergalactic medicine show was around then so entail bones and i i think my first professional i sold them know seventeenth like an online magazine for like five dollars. I think i professional story was tail bones and that was when i was twenty i think <hes> and so that was that was the first one where i actually felt like a real writer. Like a a publication. I've heard of is she. Mice and it was great because i met i forget his name but i met the editor of that publication like ten years later. Some just published comes to put my first book and any said he said oh i love to talk about you is like you know a high first published cameron early. He's like but honestly like honestly. The reason that you're in you were in that particular issue was because i had a spot of exactly three thousand work and i had a pilot stories that were on the maybe pile at your story happened to be three thousand words. I thank god bless you. Sometimes that's all it is right. It's so funny having been a newspaper editor early in my career. I know exactly what it's like to have a specific specifics fish that you need to fill magazine simpson and yeah so now. That one's a good story but i can't use five thousand words. This one point is good but just in my i mentioned selling newspaper and i was laughing about bit. My i got paid for was to cat fancy magazine. It used to have something called the young writer's corner when i was thirteen i saw them this terrible pun about santa claus looking for or replacement and he found a guy who wouldn't weed his garden and he knew that he could never work out because he wouldn't jojo for that pat. You know you take what you can get what you can get exactly a sale is a sale so you you carried on from. They're largely short fiction for for quite a while before. You tried something i i had i actually was trying longer her stuff. I feel like i'm a natural novelist so i i was writing very long stuff and i think it was actually encountering other writers and at the time you the punt of popular wisdom of the john was you need to publish short fiction so that you get known and then you publish the longer stuff. Is your stuff little stand out on the pile or whatever her i hated that bit of common with tom and i hated it and <hes> so i did so. I tried to write short fiction especially again. When i went to again the period writing workshop they specifically are like we would prefer you won a short story complete arc every week and into that gave me a lot of a lot of experience doing that and again i think i was twenty when i went to that one as well and and yeah it just i don't know i i did a lot of short fiction. I sent a lot of stuff out and at the same time i i was working on longer work novels. I think i finally i sent out a partial sent out a novel to several publishers without unadjusted just to the slush piles when i was twenty two or twenty two i think and of course was rejected across the board as i go well well and then i sent out another manuscript again when i was twenty three twenty four looking for an agent and all of those were rejected does well whatever and again it's not a ton of luck which the short fiction i have just strange horizons again. I had the tailbone sale. I had some stuff to some smaller magazines. I did get into a year's best s._f. At some point which was really cool for one of my story transient stories but it just wasn't and i could tell you know i could make sure it story but it wasn't doesn't anything special like i look at some of the short story writers who are writing today elissa wong bobo lender like they put stuff out and everybody's like oh they go. The crowd goes wild. I was not like that. It was just like well. That was a store again. It fits the three hundred thing so. I'm like there's clearly something i missing a short fiction that i was not just just wasn't gelling and wasn't coming together whereas i think when i finally wrote my first novel goal was actually published her first novel again like the tenth one hundred and when i grow gods were just like let's just put everything since i can't can i have the space centre bug magic and world's at war and a desert planets like mad max apocalypse. I'm going to do all this stuff and cutting off heads and i did and ended up sending it out to think three agents in one came back and said yeah yeah i'd like to represent this and i was like oh cool and you know we sent it out and got tons of rejections and here's here's the irony okay and this is why i tell people that that how how i broke in is not how you break in today. It's all very different certainly like skulls e. That's how it's done is very different but i so i said to the agents around. We got rejections across the board. Nobody wanted it and then she gets an email from somebody at a an editor at a house that she'd already sent it to but she'd sent it to a different editor at the publishing house. Will this editor said hey. I heard cameron. Hurley is shopping canaveral heard it online somewhere and i read a short story i liked. Could you send me this novel. I think it's weird. You haven't incentive to me and she was like oh. I sent to this other editor. She didn't want it so she sent it to this editor who redshirt story that she liked and and yet twenty four hours later we had a three book deal and that one eventually there's a whole thing with that that didn't go through and there's a bunch of messed up stuff because the editor was fired two thousand and eight. It was a disaster but it was eventually published. You know somewhere else but that was my first experience was and then me thinking how short story thing really does them so yeah. Everybody's everybody's story is different than i do the same thing when i talk about when i got in with don books which here's my major publisher it was it was almost here's a three thousand word story that fits because they had a. They had a hole in their publishing schedule. The night had a book published through <hes> murdy greenberg bert. I was called five star and they said well send over some of your stuff in we'll see if there's anything that fits and they picked mine and so that's how i got into toss it was they had a whole and i felt it was that was what they needed. Yeah that was like ten bucks later so i'm still on so well i also wanted to mention in <hes> going back to <hes> clarion. Where did that fall in there. Because one thing i often ask writers is about their formal writing training and i get hit or miss. You did mention david <unk> syriac right maverick yeah. Thanks <hes> was a teacher. He must've taken some formal writing classes in university at some point but i get a lot of hit or miss with authors as to whether formal writing training it was helpful or not. It sounds like for you. It was for me. It was a and it really would depend i think i i started going to like local local workshops and stuff from the time i was about fourteen. That's actually when i started reading writers. Digest thinking okay if i if i really again i was twelve. I said wow i could be a writer. How cool is is that simply. Get really mad where i think you know how many years i spent studying writing how long it's taken rate to to get to wear 'em but i also go to the point where for some people i feel story and structure and all of that stuff comes a lot. More naturally and others of us really really gives me. Gotta work it but i did. I had to work at it and a lot of that was plotting structure. Actually current agent has been really great with helping structure yeah but i i struggled quite a bit when i i was starting out because i could write sentences and there were characters and people did things but it wasn't a story. If if that makes any sense it it wasn't you didn't get that feeling of catharsis or emotion at the end of it. It was just like okay. So what which is what demon knight would kind of right at the end of some of these story that he's just take off so what and i had to learn what the reason i'm writing the story so yeah i i started out near doing some of those creative writing classes in college and what i found that with a lot of them i felt it was a.

editor writer cameron south africa bradley science simpson John tom knight Hurley publisher twenty four hours five dollars ten years two years
"o.hurley" Discussed on The Worldshapers

The Worldshapers

04:04 min | 3 years ago

"o.hurley" Discussed on The Worldshapers

"Welcome to the world shapers conversations with science fiction fantasy authors about the committee made a process. I'm your host every and this episode's guest cameron hurling relief <music> welcome to another episode of the world shapers. I am as i just said a minute ago over the music. I'm your host edward bullet and i write science fiction and fantasy and i've always enjoyed talking to other authors of science fiction fantasy about their creative process. That's what this podcast is all about it. It takes its name from the world shapers series which is my latest series of models from books book. One world shaker just came out on august the the sixth in mass market paperback already out in trade paperback audiobook and a yearbook and the second book master of the world will be out on september timber tenth which is a couple of weeks away as this episode goes live and it will come out to simultaneously and e book and audiobook and trade paperback with the mass market computer back to <hes> follow later. <hes> one reason that this podcast takes its name from the world shapers is that the whole premise of the world shapers is that there are a potentially the infinite number of shaped worlds which are worlds that <hes> have been shaped by individuals who now live within them so it's a bit like authors <hes> giving inside the books that they've created the main character's name is shana keys. She's in a world that she thinks is the only world she thinks it's <hes> our world basically although there are are some differences that readers from our world will pick up on <hes> but then suddenly something happens that <hes> shosha that something weird going on. There's an attack in her. Best friend is killed and she. She can't believe any of this is happening and just like that. It isn't happening because she actually has the power to shape this world mysterious stranger named carl yasser shows up and explains to her that she is the shape paper this world and that is just one of many many shaped worlds and elaborate shaped worlds. He also tells her that <hes> the adversary who is the one who attacked her is trying takeover her world and already has the knowledge how to do that. She can't stop it. All she can do is try to escape her own world and he says if she can travel from world adds to rolled through the labyrinth and retrieve the knowledge of the shaping of each of those worlds she can take that knowledge to agree or the mysterious woman at the center of the labyrinth and onc- ziegler has that knowledge she can protect labyrinth from the adversary who's trying to take over and eventually destroy all of these shaped worlds so the the first book takes place in the world is very much like ours book to master the world which comes out september tenth from books takes place in a world inspired by jules verne so i had a lot of fun doing the steam punk thing in that book it has you know submarines and flying machines and mysterious islands and all that great stuff you'd expect from a jules verne inspired world book three which doesn't have an actual title yet but my working title is where wolves vampires peasants so my. I don't think they're gonna let me keep that one. I'm working on that now and as you can probably tell from that it will indeed have werewolves and vampires and presents so that's going to be a lot of fun and it will be out about about this time next year. I would imagine the other thing. I wanted to mention before we get into the episode. Proper is that <hes> this podcast is up for an aurora era award this year. The aurora awards are the fan voted awards for best canadian science fiction and fantasy and if you sort of like the hugo's only limited to canada. If you are a canadian resident or citizen you are eligible to vote for the aurora awards. All you have to do is buy a membership in the canadian science fiction and fattest association for a whopping ten dollars. Most of us can afford that and you can do that by going to the website pri aurora awards dot c._a..

jules verne carl yasser canadian science ziegler cameron edward bullet canada ten dollars