18 Burst results for "O'reilly"

"oreilly" Discussed on Newt's World

Newt's World

02:40 min | 3 weeks ago

"oreilly" Discussed on Newt's World

"People from Fox with me. So I had a very good core of journalists to set us up for a daily broadcast called the no spin news which we do every night. And then the radio syndicator came at me and I always love Paul Harvey, and so I- resurrected the Paul Harvey fifteen minute newscasts every day, and we do that on more than three hundred radio stations every day. So, the combination of radio and television built or audience, I think were the most profitable news internet. Organization in the world. Right now? We, have an enormous amount of people who follow us and pay a fee a small I keep. Very very reasonable. So everybody can come on in. And we have grown grown since January the pandemic started. My company Mr Speaker has gone from five Million Dollar Company to a twenty five million. Dollar Company. In well, what nine months? And it's because. Unlike most television news organizations, we don't have an agenda. You know I'm a traditional Guy Eileen conservative in some issues but I don't have an agenda. I, wrote a book on Donald Trump the United States trump. That is the fairest book on Donald. Trump. I think that's ever been written. And I am not in business to promote any politician or do anything people know that. I had twenty plus years at Fox they were him. So we have been very very successful, but the best thing is that I don't have to work for corporations. So I can do pretty much what I want to do, and that meant a lot to me in my lifestyle. I think that's tremendous. Achieved Because I watch you and we chatted as you were leaving Fox and I watched. You have evolved and it's really very, very impressive. You'RE A. Unique figure in the number of people who would meyer you pay attention to you and their willingness to follow you. That's in a sense. What a remarkable success of your books told us you and I have something in common and I think your listeners should know this. So I've known as speaker. Now for twenty five years, we bleed for our country. I mean Newt Gingrich and Bill o'riley. This is what we have in common we believe. For our country. You may disagree with me you may disagree with Newt Gingrich and that's fine. That's fine. I am so. Emotional. About America and so everything that I do isn't money.

Fox Donald Trump Newt Gingrich Paul Harvey Mr Speaker Dollar Company America meyer Bill o'riley
"oreilly" Discussed on Newt's World

Newt's World

03:51 min | 3 weeks ago

"oreilly" Discussed on Newt's World

"oreilly" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:03 min | 9 months ago

"oreilly" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"The today show is brought to you by Hiroko which has been my most most frequently used cloud provider since I started as a software engineer Hiroko allows me to build and deploy my apps quickly without friction. Her ROKA's focus has always been on the developer. Experience and working with data on the platform brings that same great experience. Hiroko knows that you need fast. Access to data data and insights. So you can bring the most compelling and relevant APPs to market Harajuku fully managed post grass reddish and Kafka data services. Help you get started faster and be more productive whether you're working with post grass or patchy cough or redness and that means you can focus Chris on building data driven apps not data infrastructure visit software engineering daily dot com slash. Harajuku data to learn about Hiroko managed managed data services. We build our own site software daily Dot Com on her roku and as we scale we will eventually need access to data services ervices. I'm looking forward to taking advantage of. Harare coups managed data services. Because I'm confident that they will be as easy to use as Hiroko core deployment deployment and application management systems visit software engineering daily Dot Com slash Harajuku data to find out more and thanks to her Oku for being a sponsor of software engineering daily. Yeah Talk Yeah.

"oreilly" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

16:17 min | 9 months ago

"oreilly" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"L. Y.. Thank you to seen by indeed the question that's somewhat tangential to that coming back to the idea Of Your nonfinancial company. It is hard to compete for top talent. If you are not one of these financial companies because a lot of the best talent can go to a place black AIRBNB or stripe and get not only great cash positions but can get a lottery tickets that can mean so much money in a financial last company and as you have shifted to becoming coming more and more of a technology platform in some ways your growth is going to be bottlenecked. By how many good strong engineers you can get Oregon's the strategic leadership leadership so. How do you reconcile that competition for talent with the financial companies well? I think that I won't deny deny the serious challenge competing with companies that have effectively have a currency that is valuable super money. Yes I've called super money. First first off idealism goes a long way there are people who are sick and tired of working for companies that they don't feel good about but also I think there's it's also a bit of fatigue at the lottery nature of this thing. Yes there are companies. There are definitely companies where you can get a guaranteed return Amazon. We'll pay are you in stock and keeping off the other hand if you're kind of going to a startup that's becoming less and less because the big guys are in fact doing it wrong long exactly in the way that I'm saying they're taking too much of the value. Think about some of the companies have invested in where it was sort of like. Oh Yeah Amazon. Says that's a really nice idea. Sell to us or we'll do it. I think there are a lot of people have felt like they've been they've been screwed over by the venture capital model we in which which they're basically cannon fodder chips in bedding in a in a casino mindset. So that's part of it. The other thing I think really helps us. We have distributed Work Environment so we can hire people in who are not here in Silicon Valley where everything's so expensive and they're they're good engineers all over and we work a lot remotely and we've kind of developed A. Yeah so I think it's the combination of values of the combination of being distributed company. I mean there's no question that would we like to be able to get people more easily absolutely files say my wife. Jan Pocket runs a nonprofit offer code for America where trying to get people where there's absolutely no prospect of an exit or outcome and you still find good people you know when she was at the White House in recruiting people for the United States digital service. People say well I can make Larry and Sergei a a little bit richer or I can. I can make it possible for people to get healthcare anything about the healthcare dot Gov rescue team. That came out of Google where they're like. Oh Yeah and they thought it was just going to be a temporary thing and then it was sort of like whoa you know. We're really impacting people's lives here and at Google. We're not doing no not anymore. I think that's people want to have a positive impact and people want to make a difference. Yeah AH since. We're Kinda near the end of our time. I want to go into some further-flung questions because you do right. A lot of editorials not a lot but you read enough editorials to make me curious and follow your twitter. The concept of publisher versus platform. We've explored this a little bit but more in the context of O'Reilly which is Pretty Tame relative to the questions faced by some of the other publisher slash platform question marks people have have vastly divergent views on how sympathetic they are towards twitter and facebook for the kinds of content moderation and censorship issues news that they have. Do you have any concise perspective for what these companies should be doing differently. Do even have enough experience. Experience with this domain to legislate from the outside or do we have to just give credence to facebook and youtube a tube in twitter and just assume they're doing their best. What can we actually say confidently about what they should or should not be doing? Well I guess I would say a couple of things there first off the way we talk about the issue is really badly broken. This is not about free. Speech ever is not about free speech because if you think about how social media works anyone can speak right but what the the question is not about censorship. It's not about stopping somebody from saying something it's about. How much St you amplify choose to amplify what they have said? And Chris Cox. who was the chief product officer facebook? I felt put it pretty. Well he says I think car issue is anybody can speak. But we don't have a responsibility to give them a AB can get on their soapbox on facebook but we are not responsible for gathering their audience. And we shouldn't be you know. So what's the the way I think about facebook and twitter and Google to the extent they do this a youtube. They are absolutely responsible for their curation. They're absolutely just like if New York Times chooses to put fake news on its front page you go eight curated that stuff up to the front and yet that is what facebook. He's doing all the time this stuff. Yes they're individual front pages but to the front and they. They should be held accountable for that. That that being said I think they are working very hard on it and were really good examples of this. Recently those a new study came out and somebody said everyone talks about how youtube radicalize people what we just did this new scientific study and we found that in fact youtube is is actually making people more more moderate when they reach out to renee arrest of who'd been one of the early people who was raising the flag on this and she said Yeah because they've changed what they do in response to all of the red flags that were going up so that they have made off where these people getting the data that they're talking about for doing in these gigantic studies like it seems so questionable to me that you could actually get enough data to really say this with you know. This is a very good book by Yokoi. Bank learned earned team at Harvard called network propaganda where they were just using. You know you can get public twitter data for example they were studying and that was another thing. What percentage there's bots like you don't know what the denominator is so I mean the point is if whether there's bots or humans you can kind of look at what what happens to it on the network? Does it matter to you if it's about that got on your front page. If that's what they're trying to measure they're just trying to say how does it propagating the BOT if they're measuring whether B- bought got radicalized like if they're saying oh this this was the before radicalization this was after radicalization. It whether or not it's about matters Adar's well sure but I mean I think I'm not sure you would even consider that a bought would be radicalized because the has a purpose now but that's the point is how would you identify the data set for a study like this. If you're trying to identify how humans anyway I am deep into the. I do think that we are Holding these guys feet to the fire is important but recognizing how much progress they have made and how much effort they've put in towards it is important because if you contrast them with you know mainstream traditional media there are companies. Fox's are notable example actually has a business mall right around actually canonizing misinformation back. Yoke is book network propaganda. They literally looked the spread of fake news. And they said look it actually starts equally on the left and the right on the left. Mainstream media tends to tamp down rumors you know they they start they start to spread and then at some point they mainstream media so ten doesn't kind of raise them to the top on the right it gets up to the top stop and Fox as real news and that's the big difference and so here's a company that whose business model is to spread misinformation information and I guess that's always been true. You know you think back William Randolph hearst and the Spanish American war you WANNA war. I'll give you a war but we are in an era of yellow journalism and I think that there is a mainstream media conspiracy to blame tech. I agree and Dan that we need to basically not by that because the tech companies are doing more than any of the mainstream media companies to actually fight this and the mainstream media companies are still like they're like man they're eager for their clicks so they'll do click bait headlines. Even the best made need now that being said there. Is this issue that the you know this fundamental Achilles heel of the social media engagement model that tends to reward sensationalism so little bit. There is a problem that you know. Companies like facebook are trying the moderate content that they are also incentivizing. And that's a serious problem completely agreed. Love Your Summers Station. There there was the case of cloudflare making a decision to shut down a white supremacy site that was hosted on cloudflare's servers do you think hosting companies should be forced to be treated as content moderation platforms should they be total open blank platforms. How should they answer this question? I think again this goes back to. I think a lot of people don't really understand the concept of censorship ship. Censorship is something that a government can do. Censorship is something that someone empowered us. If somebody says look I don't want your business because I don't appreciate your values. I think that's perfectly reasonable consumer decision. It's no different than somebody saying again. It's tough because there are. There are cases where government intervenes says. For example. These are protected classes. You can't discriminate on the basis of race. You can't discriminate on the basis of sexual orientation. You can't discriminate. You know that's but again that's that's the government which is something that expresses our collective will making that determination termination and that's why mark was saying. Hey we really liked the government to give us more guidance on some of these things but in the absence of that guidance there's no reason why facebook for example. You know my personal advice to mark. Look you gotTa stop pretending that this is some kind of vast democracy where users get to decide this free speech your king. Your job is to be a good king and the best thing A. I didn't didn't go anywhere but I think if if he had values around like no. This is a bunch of stuff that I really don't believe yes. Hey if Rupert Murdoch can say I don't believe in climate change and I'm going to basically not cover any of it and I'm GonNa. Nobody talks about that as like. Oh my God how is it. That Fox's censoring any news about climate change or deny an amplifying climate denial and they're not having on their feet to the fire. That's there because every while that's their right as a media company you know so why would it be any different. FACEBOOK said No. Actually we're taking a stand on some issues and I think that they're a little bit lily-livered hiding behind the free speech idea and I love it when somebody says no we're not going to host a white supremacist site. We're not gonNA host hateful content. We are going to actually take action. I think we need more of that. Not less of it and then of course if there are you know where so you get into. Issues is when companies are in a position of great power when somebody has a monopoly but I I actually think many of the most most of the a lot of Maui of social media companies by the right wing saying you are censoring. When in fact the evidence is the opposite? They're actually in fact. I just read Steve Levy's forthcoming book about facebook and there's a lot of evidence from inside facebook that they were basically like in the two thousand sixteen election. They Hillary was going to win so they spent a lot of time trying to appease the rightwing wipe them off. It's not gonNA matter so they actually Samat opinion. There were opinions of people on the inside. Who Thought Yeah? We are basically appeasing the right way. It wasn't whereas the right way saying that you're censoring us. No they're actually amplifying and I think that the idea. We will get better at all this. I do think that is true but I do think it is a it is a because it has become the subject of a kind of kind of cyber warfare. that's going to be hard and we have a lot a long way to go before it gets better and in fact it may never forget better. I don't know if you've read Neil Stevenson's fall but it opens with so great kind of like little section where they're really talking about people who you know. This is massive disinformation campaign on facebook and people. Just don't WanNa know the truth or not. facebook on the equivalent of social media. Sounds like reality literally where this fake nuclear explosion. People won't go to the town like to see that it's still actually still there and eh the willing desire of certain parties to believe certain things and have nonconsensual real you know like hey whatever. That is something that is problematic. I do have to say if you have the perspective of history you do realize these things things can get so seriously out of control they end you end up with the fall of civilization. Yeah this is a wonderful book called the swerve which is really about the rediscovery of science in the renaissance but it starts with kind of like the beautiful picture of the devotional literacy literacy and knowledge in the Roman Empire and is sort of turning point. Where is a female Egyptian mathematician I- PATIE- stoned to death for being smart? You know and that's kind of in some ways in the telling of green blast book that is the turning point of that leads to the Dark Ages. Yeah and you know. We're basically there was a turning away from knowledge and I think we have big parts of our society look at something like climate climate change where people are saying. Yeah we don't want to believe the scientists we WANNA believe and there are people who have their political or commercial interests pushing that narrative errative and then there's people who who swallow it and and then we've been you know we see this sort of turning against expertise and there's a lot of people playing with fire and and this huge issues at stake not just the politics but look at the environment and you look at where the future goes. Helping people able to navigate. This new landscape is really important to.

facebook twitter Fox Google youtube Oregon AIRBNB Amazon New York Times Silicon Valley William Randolph hearst cloudflare United States O'Reilly Harvard
"oreilly" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

10:45 min | 9 months ago

"oreilly" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"It's not just at the level of well you need. They have your developers learn about tends to flow or Pie. Torch is also that you actually have to understand whereas data going to be who collects exit. Who curates it? How do we clean it? What kind of people do we need to build a data pipeline into these processes and that stuff that's more easily digested in in conference format? In many cases I think the organizational touchy feely side of things. It is but but again you have to have the big picture in order to to know. How do you give people context this great quote from this Guy Edward Schlossberg that? I've always loved and tried to live by. He said the skill of writing thing is to provide a context in which people can think and so often people go astray. Because they don't they don't take the time time to get the big picture and that's one of the things that we've always tried to do in Riley books it. which is you know to have an introduction my working theory when I first so a lot of our formats was that this really two kinds of knowledge in those books one? Is this big picture. How does this thing work? How do all the pieces fit together? And then there's very specific knowledge wishes. Well what function do I call. Or what command do I issue and that you wanted to give people enough context pretty quickly because many of our users are in a hurry that they could then dropping been anywhere later and they would know enough to be able to be oriented. So it's kind of like a little bit like when you go to a new city you know you. How do you get a big picture? Sure of this is the area where this great restaurants. This is where the shopping is. This is where this museum is amazing. Or whatever it might be that you're interested in this is how you get out and there's a great park so you have that level of orientation and then you kind of like. Well how do I get there. What do I do WanNa get there one of the opening hours? So there's all these analogies there that you can start to say well. How do those play out in the way people learn and do things online? Your your company started as a media company. I mean well not really. We start as a documentation. Come we rename. The company around the media was originally O'Reilly Alien Associates. Because we were literally band of Consultants Alameda documentations kind. Whatever yeah media when people think media they often they advertising is your yeah we? We've always been that eventually evolved into a technology company. Yeah yeah tell me about crossing chasm from being a publisher of content to that plus more of a platform. That's been a big challenge challenge for us and I think that it we were held back for a number of years by the fact that it was a joint venture are online platform we had we started in two thousand one and we invited our biggest competitor time Pearson Technology Group in as a partner and so it was set up a service separate company and we didn't take full control of it back till two thousand fourteen. We really should have done it much sooner. Because you know any any vet. You're always what was it originally called it was called safari books online safari books online. Okay so that was with you in Pearson. Oh Gosh that would have been really hard unwind. Yeah it was and you know if we could have done it a few years earlier it would have been much better better but it was just meant that we was harder to be hands on with the platform because we have these people who were pouring into both companies they were. It was a separate company once once we took control of it again we kind of had to really get in there and start seeing what was going on and and went through a couple of false starts but then we see I think we we. We really started to hit our stride. The thing that you know this is the other side of what I'm spending a lotta time on apart from things like really trying to understand how we build around the future of learning but the other is what does it mean to be a platform and if you look at a lot of things. I've been writing publicly like in the piece written in courts they're really about what's wrong with the idea that seems to be the Silicon Valley playbook today which is winner takes all because if you really want to have a platform it's got to be good for the people who use it and there was this great line which Abend tops who writes this great newsletter as local strength equerry calls the Bill Gates Line. He has a wonderful post. It's a conversation between Bill Gates and Pala helped who was head of so-called recalled facebook platform and bill apparently said that's not a platform a platform is win the people who use it. Get more out everything you do now. It's funny you have bill. Be The one saying that but I with them. Because of course Microsoft that was true originally Microsoft's our take take too much out of the platform and and that led the lots of problems. But that is in fact the key idea and I've been writing about the way it looks to me. You know by looking at the. The financial goals financials and so on that they're taking more and more of the value out of the web and is becoming less vibrant as a platform and They've been there. Was this sweet spot where they were really allocating value very fairly to lots and lots of people and now they're allocating more and more of the value to themselves just like Microsoft did on the PC and apple's doing the same thing in the in the APP store. And I've really been working very hard to understand how we don't do that at a Riley. You know it's very easy to give yourself privileged access very easy to say a while we introduce this new feature while we're taking more of the PIE is great right. This different kinds of of again. Dif- different terminology here. Ben would disagree with me on on showroom maybe ABM thinking about mixing up whether anyways maybe somebody else bay idea platforms standing for every dot com platforms versus Agri every eight hours and so on but you know there are people who are pure enablers. You think about something like stripe. They don't control anything they don't you know they've just provided some infrastructure. Lavar twilly William whatever you know whereas like Google or facebook or Amazon whether you called Niagara Gate or platform. They're really in the position to decide who who gets. What and why? which is they control the economy of their platform? And there's a real temptation to cheat. Microsoft accepted it on the PC. You know they gave themselves privileged. API's they also were there saying well. Great wow this is great applications. We'll we'll do those two and then they privileged their own applications. Now you see the same thing with Google. There's various kinds of of content that really are commodities. You know where you kind of go okay. Everybody's building Liane weather data provided by the government. Well Google or Stock Day there. Whatever it is public the public data? And that's fair but then there are things like you know say tripadvisor which spent fifteen years building up the database of customer comments and then Google says well we. We've got to do that. We're going to actually. We think we don't WanNa pay these guys this way we can. It was use our platform position to put our content. I are reviews. I I kind of think. That's very much. The Microsoft play so I went back to Riley. We do have a privileged position. Because we're both the platform for online learning platform and we're a participant so a still makes me smile the time it was must have been two and a half years ago. Whenever we introduced our live online training Laura Baldwin our president who really runs the company day to day calls an emergency urgency meeting of our team? We have a real problem. We we introduced live online training. And it's been so successful that Pearson's revenue is GonNa fall by half in the next month. This is a problem. Yeah it wasn't like wow we just took we introduce this new feature first of all we entered when we introduce. We socialize it to all our to our partners. But sorry this was win Pearson was still a part of it Nope Pearson. They're just they're not an owner now. Oh but they're still still on the platform as our hundreds of other publisher's content but we introduced this new feature but we went all in on it. We we introduced one hundred live online trainings and Pearson introduced ten. You know and so it was such a successful new feature that the revenue is allocated among publishers in proportion of usage and we were just as actually usage spices a somewhat complicated algorithm for. But boy it was. We sucked huge amount of value out of the platform. And what we ended up doing was radically reducing the price of our online trainings until the other people on the platform. Quick catch up because our goal wasn't to like take the value it was to keep them producing value. And I've been thinking a lot about this this. Id of two sided markets. Maybe some of this. Actually I started thinking about this a lot with Uber and lift some of these online matching marketplaces. Where you go track drivers offers you gotTA drive passengers? And that was the first piece I wrote for court Sue Critique of Split scale it because there was so much capital they were able to say. Oh we're just going to optimize for the passenger side and we're gonNA screw drivers and they treated the drivers as sort of fungible resource in fact if if of capital had been less scarce. We might have got a different balance of who gets what and why it was just that fundamental question of economics and you go okay. Well we'RE GONNA have to pay this much to the drivers GonNa have to pay this much of the passengers and and in a way. I think we've forgotten that a platform thrives lives when it suppliers thrive so at a Riley. We're spending a lot of time so when we introduce a new feature like cat go to how do we get other people on board. How can they use it? How do we teach them to create content in areas? That we're not GONNA do it. I think you know most of the platforms. I see out there. They're like they. Maybe they start by a bootstrapping some content from outside providers. And then they're like well. Actually you know this is a really lucrative area. We should do this ourselves. I think are fundamental commitment to this assess a platform play. He gives something very distinctive. If you don't.

Microsoft Google Riley publisher facebook partner Pearson Edward Schlossberg Pearson Technology Group Torch Bill Gates Bill Gates Line Consultants Alameda Alien Associates Abend apple
"oreilly" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

13:35 min | 9 months ago

"oreilly" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"So one thing I like about talking to you is most of what you talk about. Is this high level abstract imagine of computing the almost religious aspect of what is so cool about computing but together with that collection of words. That comes out of your mouth. That is very high level abstract you have a history of making incredibly smart tactical decisions in how you have built the business and I think there are people who make very good tactical decisions in building their businesses but may not have a big high level abstract view of the majestic nick nature of computing and there are people who have very pile of use of the majestic nature of competing. Who may not be so good at making tactical decisions? You seem to have done a good job of finding marriage marriage there and in particular in the the nuanced financial and just tactical business disciplined. You've taken to your business. We talked about this. It's a lot in the last episode. Where you just said that O'Reilly is not a financial is company in the sense that your products included in that set of products is not a stock ticker symbol? It is not a price of stock and with that in mind. I'd like to know a little bit more about how you think about the mechanics annex and the selection of an acquisition like this because the vision that you just laid out. It's very beautiful. It's it's also very broad. There's a lot of companies you could choose from in in selecting something to acquire that might fit as a puzzle piece snugly into the portfolio of a Riley. So can you just give me a little bit more light on the lower level aspects of why you made this particular acquisition well first off. There aren't a lot of companies that a lot of technologies that do do. What category does this? Jupiter notebooks in this catacomb in our opinion and both we support both in the platform we've been fascinated with Jupiter for years as we actually ran a Jupiter Conference for a couple of years and so when we encounter caddock Ota what we found fascinating about. It was just how easy it is to integrate Jupiter. It's still a little you know like if you look at the Jupiter Integration or platform you know. There are Jupiter notebooks associated with with with some of the books where the code is all excusable suitable. But you go into this different environment and catacomb has got a lot in common with this thing that I've been in love with since the early days of the web. which is this so so easy back and forth between code and explanation of the code and it? I think it's an environment that and it also in in addition it it makes it easy to do things like shell programming to do. A lot of the things that are in sort of administer sort of system administration network administration security area and not just you know data science and data heavy Jupiter Excels. Although you can do that as well so it just really increased our interactive capabilities. And I think the thing that we're we're doing that we are doing a lot. That is in just the learning space. But I think we're really also seeing it as a way of exploring. How do we turn the platform into something that just helps? People do their work. Because that's always been our goal to be kind of a knowledge utility. You know you use Google everyday use. Get up every day And how how US o'reilly every day and we think that there's a lot of things that we do where you go okay. I'm going to set aside some time for learning a new skill but actually if we look at the usage patterns that we already have of the way people consume our content on the platform a lot of looking for an answer to a problem. You know they got what they're quoting environment in one window and they've got a riley another win there because they're looking for answers to for the what are they gonNA type on the next line. They're not looking and you know they're not sitting there go. I'm trying to learn how to program they're saying I'm actually trying to build this machine learning model and I'm not quite sure how to set that next parameter or I'm not quite sure what you know how to optimize this or what is my data pipeline. Look like they're trying to get very specific answers so the other thing. I guess that we do. We obviously have this environment where we've built a marketplace in. I mean that's the other thing that's really critical about the the online platform. We don't produce all the content and so we're always looking for core capabilities that we can open up to our marketplace partners because that allows allows us to get useful content in areas. That we don't really do. We're not we'd never been a certification company but Pearson's mccarter partners and guess what they do all the certifications so can we give them better tooling to build better content this more useful for our users so so we did that. When we introduced live online training we said okay? We put together this package of tools so lousy to actually have live synchronous training. We opened it up to partner. Sound the platform arm so we would have training in areas that we ourselves didn't want to do and now is we're looking at these tools for more interactive not just say interactive active learning but interactive doing supported doing. We're basically we wanted to have it be part of the capabilities so the platform so that we can say to our partners. This is is something you can use to to build to build on and I said you know. Our roots is a documentation company. Really on some ways coming full circle because that was the thing that I think distinguished o'reilly books from the very beginning was that we were documentation company whereas other people were like. Hey we're writing a book about. I mean again if people writing books about about software programs and they were sort of documenting this is how Microsoft Excel works six or whatever and and we were like you WanNa get on the Internet. Here's how you do. It was focused on the thing you want to do so it was doing I and you want to put up a web page. Here's how you do. Oh wait you have to think back on when we did that. First Book on the Internet the whole Internet user's Guide and Catalog in one nineteen ninety two and then everybody was doing books on the Internet. And what do we do we book about. Well how do you set up a web server. How do you set up your dns you know? How do you know it was like it was so driven by the fact that well if you want to have a website well here are the things that you have to know about? You have to be able to set up a database. You have to be able to set up to driven by a sense of what people were trying to accomplish when not a change subject to dramatically but you started the company I I believe thirty seven years ago at this is how you count. I started my in partnership with another guy we started a documentation company would have been in nineteen seventy eight and then the company we were in partnership for for five five years. We broke up that partial eighty three and that's when Riley media proper it was founded. So you can. You can either say support. Anyway when you started o'reilly or how long going to take you to start to have a vision for how the company would grow into other markets or. Did you always have that from the beginning. Winded shift from being kind of the mere idea of documentation company to something where you saw the opportunity for something bigger. I guess it was the first piece I wrote that both my first piece of advocacy out there on was called documentation and the future of UNIX six hundred eighty four so thirty five years ago yes and it was basically Something I think I've always been good. I wish it was just a piece of pattern recognition mission. which was that? I recognized that something was changing about the software industry that UNIX eventually Lennox and the Internet. We're changing the rules are before that point again. This is ancient history for many of your listeners. Every company made their own computer with his own operating system stuff and was a bit of a revolution in that there was a standard architecture and a single dominant but when I started that wasn't even really hap- so it was like it was digital equipment corporation and prime computer an HP. And and what I saw with the early adoption of UNIX was like wow all these people are they still have have different hardware. Had Son and I was working for coming called mass comp and the prime and data general whatever and they were all starting to have well and we're going to compete on the basis of our hardware. But we're all GONNA use UNIX or at least it'll be an option on our platforms and I said Oh and one of the things I recognize. There was breath. Well if it was only one version of the software then there would be this sort of idea for reusable documentation so I was sort of making the case. Well we could. We could just take first of all a lot of this stuff. It come out of a research environment so there really wasn't much documentation imitation and I still think of early books like said knock. The only documentation said knock was a research paper out of bell. Labs you know. It was like like six or seven pages where they were kind of saying. Hey We wrote the school program but it really wasn't anything you would and then it was a man page whatever. Wow we can really improve on that you know when the x window system came out in nineteen eighty it was like wow. This is a demonstration project that they want people to build on documentation degree. We can make it better and what what I recognize is was that all of these companies were in parallel trying to do the same thing. which was well we have to improve this crappy documentation and for this free software? Were adopting and we basically said well. You could do it yourself or you could just get it from us. And we actually had a breakthrough breakthrough I think when it was sort of some version of the X window system. I don't remember which one it was. An EX consortium meeting and it was Mitt had started some called the MIT. The X Consortium and Bob Shifu was the director some meeting. Somebody said well what are we. What are we gonNA do about documentation and shy said? Don't worry about it or Riley will do and we literally put all the documentation departments out of business because we realized that once all the companies are using the same software we could produce commercial books that would fill the void and the thing that sort of interesting if you look at the long arc of of the last thirty years. There was this the golden age for commodity software where a lot of publishers producing books documentation for an an and. The vendors didn't have have to do that much then. Of course the you know the way the publishing market evolved consolidation and various other things that became less true and you know companies have ended up having to do much more of their documentation again. Part of what we've understood is in particular as people are working with more and more fragmented admitted environments that you know the industry is really changed. I saw this around. Javascript frameworks because there were so many of those. This just this jungle of love of possibilities and you might be at one company and you're using Django you're another company using react areas so the challenges of having a single path through that jungle became much greater and so every company was having a role again and I think our marketplace approach has really helped because it makes it possible to have much more documentation we allow our corporate customers can even upload their documentation into the platform perform these various ways that we have tried to deal with that. But I think that there's still a long way to go anyway. The point I you know in response to your question and is I think the thing that we've always been pretty good at is we look at these big patterns in the history of the computer industry and we ask ourselves we try to sit back and say this going. You know what I wrote about this in my book. Jeff how do you do pattern recognition on the president in order to predict the future. And it's not really that you're predicting the future. It's that you're identifying. Vectors are adding up to take you somewhere and then you're looking for signs signs that one vector or another is being reinforced. So that when I wrote that first piece on documentation and the future of Unix it was the beginning of noticing something thing and then noticing that Lennox was taking off and you know free software of all kinds was taking often you know. See you start. Seeing these vector start to add add up. And you start going okay. We're GONNA pile onto that and right now. We're in this transformation that surround machine learning becoming everyday we day technology and how that changes the software development life cycle the software development process. Pure gave a great talk about this at our first day. I conference which is when people ask me what should I look at. We have that talking our platform and it's just like. Hey how does this change programming and companies that are trying to adopt opt machine learning. They have to develop a whole new set of skills again and those are skills that are really organizational skills..

O'Reilly partner US Google Microsoft Riley media Pearson MIT Riley Son Lennox Mitt
"oreilly" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

08:58 min | 9 months ago

"oreilly" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"So you asked about Kakada. The reason why we can't a CODA is because it really fits squarely into this vision because one of the things that is unique about Canada CODA is it's not just. Es you can build these. He's learning paths and learning environments. Where you're able to say? Hey you WanNa do this thing. You know we're gonNA teach you about how to do this thing with coober Nazis and so so go through this This scenario you know the first of all that that idea that category of what they call scenarios is very much like what we did in our. You know cookbooks. Years ago in fact when we rolled out category on the platform we actually converted. A bunch of of material from some are cookbooks. And just put it into Calcutta explain. What category is very similar in many ways to Jupiter notebooks but it has a broader scope of things that you can do it? and Ah the environment's more integrators basically effectively a description of a process with embedded code that you can execute and here's the thing that got me super excited about I think about myself as I don't even monthly basis anymore code occasionally way you know and if forget things so I think about when I got married in two thousand fifteen. I built a wedding up site. I E how. Oh I do that I go okay. Let me look this much. Get help right so I downloaded. Oh they're using Jenkins you know and I kind of have to figure out a bunch of things about a never used Jenkins against before but it's pretty straightforward and you know there's some documentation and the and the site and I can sort of code that I can look at and I can modify and I go. Yeah just take out their image and put it in my image and take out their words and put it in my words and stuff but there were a bunch of things that I went back month later and I wanted to change something and I'd forgotten it all I had to go back and look at the documentation again so when catacomb came along I thought about. Wow this this whole world of occasional tasks for example when you think about our corporate customers are online platform us a lot by by corporate customers customers and you think about something like you know saying well. We use this particular set of libraries. They got their on boarding New People. You know we use this particular. Coding Environment Yeah here's our policies and procedures and now you imagine building that in an environment where you can actually execute it you know because that integration of documentation execute code is super interesting. And I've actually been interested in this idea for decades literally. I think one of the things that's most interesting in software is this in some sense. The moving and shifting of the boundaries. Between what the computer does and what the human does and back I guess it was nineteen ninety eight okay. So That's you know twenty one years ago. I wrote at this Serb writing and actually it was nine thousand nine hundred and up to about two thousand three. I think actually the peace. I'm thinking of two thousand three. It was called hardware software after an info were and it was really around this idea that in the earliest days of computing the human machine interface was very close to the metal. You know there were guys back in the early days literally programmed by flicking flipping switches on the front of a machine. Right you know. It's like literally. They were setting bits and then when I started my very first manual ever wrote was an assembly language program annual. You know. It's like move this data into this register. And then you know you still have more and more high level languages and then you get all the way up and the time I wrote this piece. It was it was really spent much time in the late nineties in early thinking about why scripting languages were starting to take off these these things with late binding perl python some others. That are no longer really around. That much like tickle and a lot and there was this great line from this guy. House on Schroeder who was son's first webmaster said Pearl is the duct tape of the Internet. And I thought about that. You know this occasional programming. You know so it's like you go to a conference and they use duct tape to put the wire to hold the wires ars down because guess what they're not going to be there tomorrow. You know knows this idea that this is. The interface has become much more dynamic and there was this other aspect about it. I thought that was really interesting. which was thinking about? HTML as a real breakthrough. I did this contrast between say Microsoft word which was sort of state of the art you know. OPEC software at the time and this new thing the web which was really starting to take off and they said look in an application like Microsoft word. You have little bits of human speech embedded in software code. You know there's menus there's prompts and basically somebody has has sort to put in the human speech into a program now look how. HTML reverses the paradigm you actually with with CGI wishes the original way that you had dynamic content in a webpage. What we're doing is we're actually embedding programs and programmed actions into a human document webpage? You Click on that link and it fires up a program you know we've inverted the paradigm and I think if you look at the way that we're continuing and to evolve software. We are increasingly bringing it closer and closer to where people are effectively going to be program well again. They're not even programming. They're basically but they are calling stored procedures and if you can see the continuity between a programmer saying load this library and then execute this function you go this really. We're we're basically at higher and higher level loading more and more code and then you kind of think about the end user who says okay Google Point is I think we will get to a point. Where we we have the speech interfaces? That really worked pretty well in fact they already do work. Pretty Darn well for a lot of things things that you you know you used to have to the entered commands and now you can just talk so I guess what I'm saying is that you know the guiding idea that we're playing with it a rally or one of the guy the hi. This is this idea of the continuum of the human machine interface and the ability to help people to understand how to use the computer to help them with a task or to accomplish your task all along that continuum and I think a lot of the guiding metaphor that many people use when they think about online training is a little bit like we're going to accelerate the London Black Cabbie in getting the the knowledge when what we're trying to do is say no no we're going to build better and better interfaces where people can actually actually do things and have to say less. Do less explain less. Learn less in order to get the computer to jump through hoops. And the reason why you want to do that is the more you can make easy the more you can reserve your actual. You're we are learning and hard brainpower for things that are now hard. I was loved the one of the Pearl sayings back in the ninety s that I was loved was the the aim of Pearl is to make easy things easy and hard things possible. And that's a lot of what we try to do. We try to make things easy and hard things possible so outta that far cutting edge you know you really may have to learn a radically new skills you know when when people get a book like really get on a wonderful book on tests flow learn. He's got this incredible pedagogy for explaining how you direct your head around deep learning because hey this is new hard stuff but there's a lot of things where you just kind of go now actually. I don't I don't actually need to understand pure particular type type of program or you may just be only knows. which function do I call? Today's episode is sponsored by Data Dog a cloud scale monitoring service that provides comprehensive visibility into cloud hybrid grid and Multi Cloud Environments with over two hundred fifty integrations. Data unifies your metrics your logs and your distributed request traces in one platform form so that you can investigate.

Pearl Jenkins Kakada Canada OPEC Calcutta programmer Schroeder Google
"oreilly" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

12:33 min | 9 months ago

"oreilly" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Software California daily. Glad to be here. The last time we spoke you were thinking about how to capture the opportunity of upskilling and this was in the context of love. upskilling both low skilled workers and high-skilled workers people who are already in technology for example and there are many ways to be upskilled guild. There's books and videos and mentorship conferences. Is there a single best way. Is there an ideal curriculum. Through which an individual can it'd be upskilled. I don't really think about it necessarily through the Lens of curriculum in other ways what we really have to a start to do is to think about what technology makes possible in learning. How do we learn things today? Or how do we gain skills skills. How does technology up skills? I was invited recently to keynote at a conference called Ed crunch in Moscow so I spent some time thinking about how how I would introduce this story and I started with this wonderful New York Times magazine article about the knowledge of the streets and monuments. That's of London which is generally considered difficult exams in the world. People study three years. You'll literally you must become human. GPS in order to pass the exam. The Exam Cam is a half day where they throw your this corner and you have to go to this place recite turn by turn directions that you would use to get there at this. The time of day and people are really spend years on motorcycles on foot on bicycles walking the streets of London memorizing rising every every turn and so I asked this audience. I said you know if you wanted to accelerate the process of people both learning to get around in London. Is The answer better training for how to master the knowledge and the note. Today we actually have a device that we outsource that knowledge to and I use the example. I just arrived in Moscow for the first time I of Very quickly able to Orient Myself get anywhere and the critical point is that even though I originally used used the. GPS TO GET AROUND PRETTY quickly. I could find my way back to all these places that I wanted to go and so it is a kind of actually something was originally class system and learning Latin or Greek us. Something that's called. The Trot Trot is actually a parallel parallel parallel translation of this classical texts in fact this lobe classics out of Oxford. University is on one side is Greek on and the other pages the facing pages English and you can basically refer back and go okay. How does all this work eventually? You kind of learn to do without that aid. A A lot of people think that the GPS trains people to not learn that way around. And you can do that. You can become can ignore things or or become less skilled but I think if you use it correctly it can be a great aid for helping you be upskilled so the question. I posed using that analogy of Google Google maps. So what is the analysis. Technology for software developers and the state of the art in what software engineer has had access to to have that on boarding or education tool or guidance tool that coincidentally also gives you education over time. That's gone from a book to perhaps a website right to maybe a conference a variety of tools. The state of the art. Today you could. Argue is a a guided learning process that to some extent synthesizes the previous pieces of technology we have and to some extent is completely new so For example there is an online learning platform that you acquired recently called Cata Coda. Can you explain the value of Cata Coda and how it compares to this. GPS analogy drawn. Well let me actually back up a little bit. Because I don't actually think that Cata Coda per se is analysis analysis to GPS for software engineer. What's analysis to Google? MAPS is most likely get hub. If you think about Outta you know when you say I WanNa do this thing. which is the equivalent of I want to get from point? A. To Point B. The critical knowledge is actually encoded. Did by somebody into a software library perhaps or some reusable piece of code and that's the equivalent of just follow the directions actions. You know it's like I WanNa do this mathematical functions. Oh load non pie and you don't actually have to know the algorithm anymore. More you just have to know which function call said. I spent some time thinking about this analogy and then so then I said well. What role do we play Atarot Riley because what we used to do is a little bit like teaching people the knowledge as You said a book a conference video so pursuing this analogy astir thinking a little bit about comment that was made to me by of all people incarcerated person at San Quentin? He was in a coding program called the last mile and He was about to get out and he said you know I wanNA do. A startup based last mile is teaches incarcerated people code. I came into give talk to them and he said you know this all. I used to work in. Fisherman's WARF when these people. They can go anywhere in this people who can take them anywhere they want to go. But they don't know where to go and a lot of ways that's the analogy to what we do at our Riley today. It's much more helping people understand again. We still actually. There's a lot of complexities in this analogy. And I'm still trying to think it through but let me just give you a great example. Many times the the question is how do I get to a particular place. It's I want to get to a kind of place so again using this. GPS analogy. I just came back from a holiday at a wonderful resort and the south coast of Mexico called Playa Viva and and I would never have known to say you know. How do I get to play? Aviva what my wife did was. She said we want to have a you know she. Actually he posted it on facebook. She said I want to know. We're trying to put together an event for about thirty people. Were looking for a small place that we can take over. You know she kind of put out some general ideas and did this so social search and somebody's at point of this thing and then we go to tripadvisor and tripadvisor. We'll discuss them like forty five hundred reviews and forty four hundred of them are five star of you never seen anything like it and go well. That's clearly our place and I reach Chaff Guy and we ended up having a marvelous time. But there's a lot of things where you go. I WanNa do something like this and so this is big range of of ways that you have to think about this problem of. I WanNa do this thing. How do I do it? And what we're trying to build eld at a Riley is a range of answers to that question because sometimes you know exactly what you WanNa do you know. You don't know how outed how to do it. In which case we're really doing a lot more work on the search function in our online platform. So that we can just get to answers for example you know so you you say I WanNa do this task again. We've done this in books before we had this cookbooks series. The pro are the python cookbook that. PHP whatever yeah where. It's like. I WanNa do this task. How do I do it? And it's a one or two page quick explanation. We had our hacks books which were slightly bigger more complicated needed tasks way back in Nineteen ninety-two. I wrote a book power tools. That was your. How do I do this thing? And they're so small answers and now we're algorithm mickley starting to surfaced that stuff so you can ask specific questions you know so anyway. The things that I'm thinking about okay. So this set of questions which ranged from the very general where you want in a you. You may want advice and so that hey we have a case study in our online platform where somebody says I. I want to introduce agile into government. Has anybody else ever done this. You know and you go. Yeah we point them to Somebody from from the United States digital service or somewhere else or saying. Hey Yeah. We did Agile in government. Here's how you know. So that's a high level request a little bit like I wanna find aligned to resort. That's kind of like this and then other times. It's all the way down to write this particular regular expression. or how would I do you know what's hyper parameter in out of them. You know this very specific questions. And there's very general questions Russians and and I think what we've tried to do which I think very different from many other online learning platforms is. We haven't basically said that are fundamental job is to take you on this sort of guided tour of some. We're GONNA TAKE FROM A to C or the era. We're going to basically do some of that. We do have courses. We do have live online trainings. That say hey you WanNa do this thing thing you know steps. Here's the step-by-step stuff. Worked along with me but we also have this playground that's is a lot more like GPS or the web. Where so you're basically able to ask general questions get answers and dig deeper and so it's really much more self directed so we're trying to put our users in the position Of the user of Google maps. Rather than saying. We're GONNA teach you to be a London Black Cabbie so if I understand you correctly directly. You're saying that there already exists. A embarrassment of riches when it comes to ways as to learn to do something to learn to do something particular but not just ways to learn to do something ways to do something you know and I think that's an important distinction because in many ways you learn by doing and that's something that we've always been and been very much. The heart of who we are as a company you know back in the early days we were a documentation consulting company then we were a book publisher that we were a conference company online company. But all of what we were trying to do is say. Hey there's people who know how to do something and you want to do it too. So we're I'M GONNA show you how to do it and that sort of a slightly different emphasis when you come from documenting task ask than it is from when you're saying well you don't know anything about this so we're going to teach you to be a software developer and are you. Are you saying that the vision is now so you want to help people to understand how to explore the landscape and how to consider new things absolutely. That's always been part of it but you know if you think back ACTA. The early days of O'Reilly it. Was You know there were a few people with this new technology and very few people knew how to do it. Yeah we would serve learn it and we'd write it down and other people were kind of following along and it's still a lot that way but we built this mental model of what online learning is about which I think is has really been shaped too much by things like coding boot camps and people who don't want to don't know how to Code and we're GONNA teach them you know from from Ground Zero whereas an awful lot of the cutting edge of our industry is people who already know enough to get there. They know how to drive. You know they just. I don't know where they want to see how to get to a particular place that they want to go to..

London Google Moscow Cata Coda software engineer upskilled guild New York Times Atarot Riley California facebook San Quentin Oxford United States software developer publisher
"oreilly" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:03 min | 9 months ago

"oreilly" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"The today show is brought to you by Hiroko which has been my most most frequently used cloud provider since I started as a software engineer Hiroko allows me to build and deploy my apps quickly without friction. Her ROKA's focus has always been on the developer. Experience and working with data on the platform brings that same great experience. Hiroko knows that you need fast. Access to data data and insights. So you can bring the most compelling and relevant APPs to market Harajuku fully managed post grass reddish and Kafka data services. Help you get started faster and be more productive whether you're working with post grass or patchy cough or redness and that means you can focus Chris on building data driven APPs not data infrastructure visit software engineering daily Dot Com slash. Harajuku data to learn about Hiroko managed managed data services. We build our own site software daily Dot Com on her roku and as we scale we will eventually need access to data services ervices. I'm looking forward to taking advantage of. Harare coups managed data services. Because I'm confident that they will be as easy to use as Hiroko core deployment deployment and application management systems visit software engineering daily Dot Com slash Harajuku data to find out more and thanks to her Oku for being a sponsor of software engineering daily Talk Yeah.

"oreilly" Discussed on Bill O'Reilly's Free Podcast

Bill O'Reilly's Free Podcast

03:15 min | 1 year ago

"oreilly" Discussed on Bill O'Reilly's Free Podcast

"There's a true alternative to aarp the liberal retirement group that lobbies in favor of progressive policies for less than twenty dollars a year ear and AMAC membership gives you members only pricing on car insurance roadside assistance discounts on hotels and travel cellphone plans discount dental plans and on and on and on and on so please join more than one million fellow Americans right right now at Amac dot us. That's AMAC DOT US and yes. I am a member visit AMAC DOT US <music> AMAC DOT US so it's due to mail a Susan heard Longview Texas. Thank you for your debate tweets bill. You're welcome Susan it. They kept me informed kept my mental health intact and we try to use you little Humira. Navajo people dialed in to the tweet fest last night. <hes> <hes> James sidell Arlington Texas anyone in the debate shock you with how well they did not. I don't think anybody was particularly charismatic or impressive. It will politicians James CONCIERGE member. Thank you James. They keep praising Obama Obama care here. I thought obamacare was a disaster now. Even from a conservative point of view just in general do horrible no I mean obamacare ear took care of people who couldn't afford health insurance. He gave it to them free or heavily subsidized and that's still employ. The federal mandate has been knocked out where you have to buy healthcare in America. You don't have to anymore but prices of healthcare rose rose under obamacare so a lot of people thought it was a disaster Brad. Dorman Millville New York bill tickets for the paramount show on December number fifteenth is Dennis Miller with you know now it's show called understanding trump to paramount theatre in Huntington as Brad when it out December fifteenth tickets are selling very brisk wait so if you're running the island and New York City whatever come on out. It's going to be a blast. I and Brad is taking his mother's going to be eighty years old so we'll have a good time model type K. Hey Michael Gentry Tyler Texas. I'm sometimes twitter warrior fighting for my freedom. Casually it would like to post excerpts from your message of the day on twitter. You can't just give me credit. I don't mind doing that. Dorothy Corbett South Nyack New York bill when will trump books be shipped to US premium and CONCIERGE members. We're starting shipping early next week. The United States trump comes on twenty four September. You guys will get it. I early next week. We'll start now the quick break and I'll be back with final Jovan. You have been hearing about gold all over the news prices. Keep going up experts warning a recession. Russian is here as time to prepare recent analysts. This week says he sees going up hundreds

Amac dot AMAC Texas obamacare Susan Brad US New York City Obama Jovan Dennis Miller twitter James Arlington America Dorothy Corbett Michael Gentry Huntington
"oreilly" Discussed on KMJ NOW

KMJ NOW

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"oreilly" Discussed on KMJ NOW

"Said this is the real deal. The increase the focus that creativity of the role mindful performance of actions of it. A little bit scary to be honest. I felt like a different person I didn't notice any side effects either. I need to order a box of this stuff before they're released into the stores, then they're gone. Now. This where you can get a little cynical. Okay. Is you're to be Hawkin. This stuff isn't going to be paid to you know, about this stuff. At least with me when I do an endorsement, and I paid for it. I don't get a nickel per any of it do it because it's good stuff. And we don't know. No. I just say that to be cynical. We don't know if that's going to be the case with Oreilly or not. All right. I don't want to put that in your hand. And let you think that's gospel. But there is a full market release of this supplement scheduled for later this year. And this product is bound to make a lot of noise. Experts say the government intervention, though is very likely. Yeah. Government intervention will apparently limit the release of the supplement due to the potent effects, which have all been positive. So what does that mean? This is where Trump got into it and said, no he wants everybody if this is proven safe, and apparently, it has been having access to this particular product. And apparently, you don't need a doctor's prescription because it's all natural. So that's basically where this whole story is at and again, you know, Trump is battling the FDA over this this discovery. And he's saying this will not be banned. The American people will have a right to access this..

Trump Oreilly Hawkin FDA
Should Islanders trade for Capitals' goalie Grubauer?

The Instigators with Andrew Peters and Craig Rivet

02:22 min | 2 years ago

Should Islanders trade for Capitals' goalie Grubauer?

"New york and is philip group our go into the new york islanders remember last night the rumor last night was that berry trots was potentially going to take mitch korn with him to new york the same way that mitch corn is the goalie guru the goalie coach that was with the buffalo sabres when dom was here went to the nashville predators and worked for detroit's for all these years as soon as very trust went to washington mitch korn followed to washington help putting brayden hobie on the map help working with with group our would allow the goaltenders so now he'd be going over there his thirteen were not thinking about that could be interested in ryan oreilly i mean what philadelphia's picking what what's philadelphia have this year philadelphia i'm not sure so does twenty get you ryan reilly from philadelphia philadelphia's truly in on them i mean good twenty minutes to sweeten the deal but again i don't see philadelphia as an aggressive is at nineteen i'm looking at there and they also have not eighteen and they have nineteen mean you're not going to get both of those for ryan reilly how we looking to trade rhino riley away for for pathetically the nineteenth overall pick in the nhl draft i mean rhino riley is a bona fide number one slash to center in the national hockey league he's put up twenty four goals in sixty plus points he's a sixty point guy but i think on a better team i think he could be a seventy point player he has all the qualities that you want in a great centerman i mean nine thousand nine hundred fourteenth overall pick not not nearly enough to get a bona fide nhl hockey player that's gonna make your team better right now okay so they would have to give you more than so are they going to throw a prospect i mean does does connect the interest you in something like that like how much is too much i hate i hate playing you know pretend general manager on the air but i just i'm wondering what kind of value or are you talking could you years as buffalo been our kinda rebuild at one point do we stop taking on first round draft picks and start to get players that are going to make our team better now.

New York Philip Group Mitch Corn DOM Detroit Mitch Korn Philadelphia General Manager Buffalo Sabres Nashville Washington Brayden Ryan Reilly NHL Hockey Twenty Minutes
"oreilly" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

1410 WDOV

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"oreilly" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

"Maltese team have gone too far do with she beat so that's where apu who owns a convenience store changes the markings on some ham and thinks that well you know maybe this is too much no one's going to buy old ham and homer comes in of course he's very excited to eat it now i who is not a character that is he's not ridiculed on the show he actually has lots of scenes where he's inciteful and he he is a part of the comedic ecosystem of the show you are not laughing at apu you're not punching down at i think it's supposed to be funny he's a family guy running a small business he's actually got some really interesting insights over the course of the show but the social justice worries have decided that he's it's a stereotype they don't like the accent and even more to the point i suppose a white guy is the one doing the accent told you euro as a white guy now you're only allowed to do white guy accents and i guess some generic female accents but you're not allowed to do anything else you're not allowed to do anything that is considered from a non white country or associated with a with non white people in any way shape or form you get in big trouble so hankers areas now in the middle of this firestorm i told you about this they did the whole lisa simpson lisa simpson came out and she's like maybe we won't actually address a novel address it later and and now colbert last night because he's not funny he's not smart enough to be a political analyst and not funding to be a comedian he was good play he's maybe a good actor he was good playing an oreilly spinoff somewhat but he's not a funny comedian and he's not a good political analyst but so that what he does is he has people on and he pushed ajaria hanke sorry the white guy who is the voice of a poo on the simpsons about where this is all going as some things are will be dealt with at a later date and lisa says if at all right now a lot of.

lisa simpson political analyst colbert oreilly ajaria
"oreilly" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"oreilly" Discussed on WJR 760

"Like an oreilly autoparts store and purchase a additive that will take and it says r helps free up sticky lifters before you even condemn this now sadly enough we have cooler weather rear located at makes it a little bit tougher on this too because of the idea that the viscosity the oil and it's they can whatever but let's be conservative before you get into the change because again god the chain tension irs wants third loose that chain slap all the time it's not intermittent larry keep in mind to keep that in mind i very good david one eight hundred eight five nine zero nine five seven the carshow if you can hear is anywhere in the united states and beyond you can call us we were talking earlier in indian our whole show here is based on keeping good care of your vehicle and we want to take a moment now to talk to rich white and rich is obviously with a sponsor you are very familiar with that being the carcar council and you can find them obviously easily on the web but i think rich one of the things were already deep into winter i guess people are saying as it is a too late to win arise my vehicle or it's never too late what what do you think about that rich well good morning again and absolutely it's never too late especially if you'd like to cut the car uh get in the car and actually had at work in the morning that would be a very important i agree yeah i uh harsh winter weather it's it's certainly not uh you know uh just for december and and christmas holidays but.

people time irs united states little christmas oreilly autoparts council
"oreilly" Discussed on KKAT

KKAT

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"oreilly" Discussed on KKAT

"The wouldbe bows she goes with and i want the entire thing film for a documentary please and then give it to me for christmas all finance the entire thing um so us some oreilly stuff coming up i feel like the shows a little rapi twice in maybe tomorrow on the euro is yeah i don't know i don't i don't know yeah probably i've got some good fake racism in the news but mentioned this to you i think the best way to do this having listened to most of this videotape is just a play it than pause it and and comment on it cory feldman who was he was a young he was a child and then a teen star in the 80s slash 90s he was in one of my favorite movies all time stand by me yeah and an israeli he's a nice guy we've actually talk to him on the phone off the record and he told the stuff that he made a swear we wouldn't revealed publicly for reasons that i think are going to become kind of clear here and we don't have any independent knowledge of some of these things either but he was molested alive as a kid in hollywood and his best friend corey heym was raped repeatedly as a little boy by by a pedophile men and according him ended up killing himself a so corey feldman in the wake of all this harvey steam thing apparently thinks now is the time and i think he's right i agree to name names but his year from the videotape he has some issues on both personal and and practical dealing with this so we'll we'll play it and positive area is cory feldman hi since grief them incoming needs aren't you about woods on everybody's mind i told everybody a few days ago a plan to drain hopefully bring too late what is happening in world energy is far as peru's and pedophile was all the topics what we've been discussing ever since they even discussed the fact that i have this plan my latest trimmed in urging us you could tell me this on the my voice it's pretty rooftop because the devastation of what a into the past few days i.

christmas cory feldman hollywood corey heym woods peru oreilly
"oreilly" Discussed on Pod Save America

Pod Save America

20:47 min | 3 years ago

"oreilly" Discussed on Pod Save America

"Turn on Fox News and they've spent the last month saying saying will ever acknowledge the fact that there is one governing party in this country and that I liked it there are a lot of people listening to this who are like what the fuck is Bowl Simpson we're not GonNa win the schools are private hell and in two thousand ten and twenty seven deal official Washington Doug Jones Doug Jones pods America is brought to you by lift lift knows their drivers are what keep them moving so they do anything they can to make sure their drivers are happy on every trip it's a simple formula happy drivers mean happy passengers that's the formula maybe that's why nine out of ten lift rides a perfect five star rating you can earn hundreds of dollars a week plus tips WanNa earn more money drive more it's never been easier to give yourself a raise lift was the first rideshare platforms tipping built right into the APP because getting tip shouldn't depend on your passenger having a crumpled bill in their pocket you keep a hundred percent of the tips and they add up fast drivers have been paid over two hundred million dollars percents the feature was first introduced an express pay let you get paid almost instantly instead of waiting for weeks lift is even taking the guesswork out of pickups the new amp device uses color heading to help passengers find their drivers so join the ridesharing company that believes in treating people better go to lift dot com slash crooked today and you can get a five hundred dollar new driver bonus that's lift dot com slash crooked live dot com slash crooked love.

"oreilly" Discussed on Pod Save America

Pod Save America

19:46 min | 3 years ago

"oreilly" Discussed on Pod Save America

"I clearly just a massive cultural problem there with Gretchen Carlson has talked about and then so you deal with that and then you wappler while cutting taxes for the investment income of those at the very top young and ditching the estate tax yet is pretty so which which should our message be here which is a long time since that show keeping up with the Paris there you go Harris's burning there's a couple of things you've got rock confusion now so obviously Tommy it's interesting you say that tax cuts from like five hundred to nine hundred ninety nine thousand and then of course there's the pass through tax cuts right there's the estate tax cuts all that kind of stuff like this is not what we paid for that's true yeah right they paid they did the coke brothers paid for all the research that led to the Ryan plans all the polling all the fucking focus groups all the think tanks that they funded propped up for decades to get us to this moment sorry I've been reading too much of Jane Mayer's fantastic job at penguin press doing well like people need to understand that these this policy is bought and paid for by the people that would benefit the two hundred billion dollars worth of money will go back to the rich just Americans if they repeal the estate tax this is what they want sorry John I was GonNa say Grover Norquist are friendly tax expert he's already upset about this he's like I think this is one of the top twenty stupidest ideas I've ever heard so he's not they're not going to be able to get this through easy and also but we should just know that if you hear big report that Oh now republicans are saying no tax cuts for millionaires you know it's not correct it's they're trying they might be true if they put in a provision for your individual tax rate but what they're going to do with the estate tax ax what they're gonNa do with corporate pass tax it's a it's a win most of the large large large majority of this tax cut is for people we're making you know at least five hundred thousand dollars or more it's which is not most Americans this is not just a Republican problem either reforming the tax code is something we should do it's really hard to do because all the ways in which the tax code is larded up with deductions and breaks and benefits. They're really popular like the economists we'll tell you that the mortgage deduction doesn't make a lot of sense but it's really really popular you know there's lots of things that we would want to not have so so Republicans have walked themselves into this corner because only are there the inherent problems of reforming the tax code even if you were going to be revenue neutral right even if you're just going to move money around and not increase the deficit but on top of that they have all this pressure from their donors and from the far right of their base to not just reform the tax code not simplify the tax code but use the tax code as a means to starve the beast and get money out of the government so they're sort of blocked in from both sides yeah so we should keep pushing this message and we should keep pushing it through all the other crap that trump tweets about no cuts care to pay for tax cuts to billionaires pretty pretty simple guys it's just it's so funny the way deficits only count for Republicans spending the Tax Policy Center that will reduce federal revenue by two point four trillion over ten years and three point two trillion over the next ten after that this is it's an insane amount of money and I don't care I remember started Obama was a profligate spender and the deficit was going up and no one cares and that wasn't just a tea party thing that was all of centrist wash in town all the pundits and thinkers and Oh and they all prayed to the altar of Bull Simpson and the reduction uh-huh care about the deficit and if if the people come together social security and look out for the peds written they won't they bend the cost curve in the out years John don't they know don't they know that unless we do a tiny fix so security will run out of money in twenty ninety seven maybe true that the Republican Party is being taken over by a bunch of racists and white nationalist but at their core there are people like Paul Ryan who just care about the deficit they care about these things six th okay absolutely you're right I'll see you next Sunday at the roundtable enjoy your fucking op ed no none of the Louis more a stone cold authoritarian lunatic is their nominee and there's still the none of those people the Bowl Simpson people that we just need to come together people came around to a consensus that was very dumb not the first time and not the last time what happened but it was a consensus around with the American people are really clamoring for are cut the social security and a balanced budget in twenty forty seven consensus that prioritized cutting the deficit over managing nine percent unemployment what is makes no sense and the one thing that Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton agreed on in two thousand sixteen was not to run on that so there you have it here it is a good idea okay when we come back we will have the candidate for the Alabama Senate Race Democratic campaign the Alabama Senate Race.

"oreilly" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"oreilly" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"People involved in this and i i i sent this person a note this weekend but you know and i know of who is a conservative ever religious figure republican that the treatment would have been very different so why the difference why is it why is it that lisa blow was working or harvey weinstein up until this weekend that make no sense to me at all and then you look at you know what did it what's the double standard why is there a double standard hillary clinton once that every survivor sexual assault deserves to be heard and believed in supported all i have the list the donations to hillary you know it's over sixty thousand dollars from harvey weinstein between the paxton and every other donation he gave let's see it's a like a who's who the democratic national committee tens of thousands of dollars that a democratic senatorial committee tens of thousands the dollars democratic congressional campaign committee thousands of dollars cory booker tens of thousands chuck schumer tens of thousands andrew cuomo tens of thousands elizabeth warren kerstin jilib ranau franken john kerry pat lay he former congressman patrick kennedy and it goes on and on and on it's like a who's who of democrats oh i wonder if it was a republican or if he donated to republicans what the media narrative would be today anyway joining us now from the hill is joe contro to discuss this and much more hurry you i don't think you have to wonder what the media narrative would be we saw that movie sean with rodger ales them with oreilly that's exactly what it would be it would we looked up before cnn did a over fifty stories more than fifty stories in april alone on a riley and how many advertisers do you think they're contacting now of wind speed movies and products probably non so that's how it works himself elective outrage that whenever you see people up in their moral soapbox is sean you know with all bs because it all depends on the the party of the person that's being queues now you ask before lethal blow wire she advising wine theme up all the money she wrote a book and up.

lisa blow harvey weinstein hillary clinton assault paxton john kerry pat congressman patrick kennedy sean cnn democratic national committee cory booker chuck schumer elizabeth warren kerstin jilib joe contro oreilly sixty thousand dollars