19 Burst results for "O'neill"

"oneill" Discussed on Scoops with Danny Mac

Scoops with Danny Mac

04:35 min | 3 weeks ago

"oneill" Discussed on Scoops with Danny Mac

"You know a culture in baseball riding in in the way it's covered. Where there's this new wave of statistical Information and ways of looking at the game and what players did you know with war munch angles and all those things until I've seen. Lists. On the Internet that you can find stories that say that are about you know who who are the players who might not belong in the hall of fame you're on the bubble or the least impressive. Things and usually bronx on that list and. It's amazing to me because you know I sorta judge you can. You can sort of judge players and whether they belong in the hall of fame to a certain extent on how they impacted the game. I'll give you an example, use a different sport. There's always an argument I mean, who's the greatest hockey player in the history of the game? And often. Wayne Gretzky is is talked about I mean he's the great one. He was greatest player ever. I've always felt Bob your the greatest player ever saw because he changed the way the game was great. That's what brock did. And he got to the cardinals and took off and remember the other thing interesting about Lou Brock was he only played one season of class a ball before he was called to the big leagues. So that had a lot to do with him struggling those first couple preseason. and then finally finding himself in a different situation here in Saint. Louis. But he the way the game was played in the National League. You know when he stole I'll give you another example when who stole and nineteen seventy four. when he stole hundred eighteen basis that was more basis than seventeen of the twenty, four Major League teams through. So you know when I think about Lou. Brock, I mean besides the fact that he had three thousand hits. The fact that he still nine hundred, thirty, eight basis and still holds the national record with a one hundred eighteen steals in one season. He was a unique player that changed the way. The game was played in the National League for the next you know ten fifteen years and I and I. Love, that the end is what he did in the World Series 'cause those teams didn't know how to deal with Lou, brock coming and nights and sixty four the New York Yankees never seen anything like. Our wrap it up with this in Danneal is my guest what what is your lasting impression if you had to Kinda seminar what what in somebody asks you by Lou Brock Wha what's going to and it could be off the field on the field all of it what do you think about when you think of Lou? Brock. Well usually think. Bronco. Broiler And he probably would too. Because you'd want to sell you. That's Okay I always wanted to see him take the field with. No just sort of a personal you know I I have a lot of I have several encounters blue and like I said, they're all good. But one I remember was late in my career at the post dispatch I was working on a story. I went over to the Ballpark village during one of the hall of fame ceremonies. There's an opportunity to catch some of those hall of famers and talk to them. And And they have as you know, you're part of it. They have a little private party beforehand upstairs the restaurant. And I went up and I tried to talk to a couple of them and and they were like, I'm not doing that. Not Right now. but I went went up and I caught Lou before he walked into this private party he said sure come on in. So he takes me inside and we sit down and this is a party with his peers guys. He hasn't seen in years maybe. You know fun time and it's a private time. It's not supposed to be a press conference or anything. But he brought me in sat me down on sat there at the table spend twenty, twenty, five minutes with me until I was done and and and then said, okay, you know thank you very much I mean that's the kind of person he was and there weren't a lot of people that I dealt with and my years of sports writing. that were anything like Brooke US Amazing Hey Dan, thanks so much for your time and your recollections of. The Great Lou Brock in always appreciate your work and your books and all your years at the post-dispatch. Thanks so much. Thank Stan always great to be with you buddy. That Stan. O'Neal.

Lou Brock National League New York Yankees Wayne Gretzky hockey Major League Stan Louis Bob cardinals O'Neal Danneal Saint Brooke Dan
"oneill" Discussed on Scoops with Danny Mac

Scoops with Danny Mac

08:01 min | 3 weeks ago

"oneill" Discussed on Scoops with Danny Mac

"One of the great writers in. Saint Louis for many many years longtime at the Saint Louis Post dispatch and a guy that had many articles on Lou Brock and wrote one of the articles very recently and I say recently within the last few years and it's why I wanted to get him on is Dan. O'Neill. Dan. It's always great to hear Your Voice I know you've got a bunch of books out on the Blues in the cardinals and we could talk about that. But I WANNA get you on to talk about the late. Great. Lou Brock it's always good to hear your voice. How are you? I'm Gert Dan always good to visit with you my old radio parker absolutely. When when you think Lou Brock what comes to mind for you? Well, you know I, of course, I think a lot of people is. Think of the world series. When you think Lou Brock I mean he was just so incredible. In Three World Series Three, seven game world series had. Just amazing numbers of you know especially in sixty eight, twenty, four, sixty, four, and set a record record with thirteen. Kids in the world series I don't think I've ever seen A more dynamic player everyday player that is not pitcher per se but but in the lineup everyday player. as Lou Brock, and that was especially highlighted in the world series when he helped the cardinals to a significantly chips and lose a heartbreaker and sixty eight and game seven. But you know the most amazing thing about his world series stuff is he did all that in the series. Two teams that won world series and yet because of the presence of Bob, Gibson was never a world series. MVP So. It's pretty amazing when you think about it, here's another amazing thing. I was kind of looking at the stats and. You know when he's still a hundred eighteen basis in nineteen, seventy four. He was He turned thirty five years old that summer. and as it turns out that he stole, he stole nine hundred, Thirty, eight basis in this greer five, hundred and seventy eight of those steals came after his thirtieth birthday incredible and two in two hundred, sixty, two after his thirty fifth birthday, right so that's pretty amazing. stat and. just shows he was a very unique player I i. There's not too many players you can compare them to. He was also dynamic in the fact of what he did in the community and beloved in Saint Louis. You know Gibson is kind of this You know just a hard line. Kinda. Guy Ozzy is a different, Guy? Stan was a different guy in in in different ways not bad good at you know just different Louis beloved and it's just a different way to with all these guys were so in personality, how would you define Lou Brock when you think about him and the community here in Saint Louis in his relationship with the fans? Yeah No, you're. You're absolutely right and I mean I know all those guys you mentioned and they're all good guys. But we were talking as we've talked before but Lou Brock was unconditionally a good guy. It didn't matter what the situation was didn't matter who you were where you were. He was a good guy. You know you take Bob Gibson who I know as a as A. Nice. person good character down deep. But he's a little more cranky and you got to catch them at the right time scandal. alleged. A little edge. Yeah Louis Stand the man I think those to compare really well, they were always good I'll give you a little story about Lou a good friend of mine bumped into Lou Brock one time at the airport. And he was missing granddaughter's birthday. Because he was travelling and they happen to be getting their shoes shined at the airport. So they're sitting right there next to them or next to each other, and he made some conversation with Lou net came up that he was missing his. Granddaughter's birthday. So he had bought him a book are bought his grand granddaughter. I'm sorry a book my friend. and lucid. Well, let me see that book and he said, do you mind if I I wish your granddaughter Happy Birthday. So he opened up the book and the wrote Happy Birthday to my friend's granddaughter by me and signed it Lou Brock. So that's the kind of stuff Lou Brock did you know on a daily basis south mix community? He was a special man when you think about the greatest trades in in baseball history and I, know you love the game of baseball it'll go down as the greatest trading cardinals history. But when you look at it league wide, where, where do you think this one ranks in terms of baseball history? Well it it might be the most famous Dan I mean. There's been another really lopsided traits. and that trade in particular. A Blue Brock coming here for Ernie Braulio. Was An interesting one because almost to a man, the cardinal players in nineteen, sixty four were against that trait. They couldn't believe the cardinals were making that trade. I mean Braulio at one eighteen games, the previous season, and he'd won twenty one games for the cardinals. And he was very popular guy in the clubhouse and and. A leader on that team, and that trade really shocked the cardinal clubhouse and of course, Broccoli and Chicago. Hadn't hadn't really found himself yet. You're still struggling a bit. He was playing center field and right field for the cubs. Hadn't hit over about two fifty eight or you know right around there for two or three seasons. I hadn't really established himself as as the kind of player he would when he came here. And then he comes here and just completely changed. It really changed the baseball and the National League for the next several years I. Mean they're just there wasn't a player like brock on the scene at that time who was a combination of both power and speed I mean you had more wills with the dodgers who had stolen one hundred, four basis. couple of seasons earlier but wheels was pretty much a singles hitter on Bass Bass. Brockett double figure home runs seven times in his career So he was a different different cat you know he could hit the ball out of the park or you to get on base and steal second and He was just a a unique player to completely change the culture for the cardinals. He fit right into you know it was different. Because the cardinals. Had Black players. They had Bob Gibson and Kirk blood, and they were he was a perfect fit here and and they became very close team and took off. Of course, I'm sixty four and you know as we've talked before you name, you can name to three guys who keys to the cardinals success in the sixties and Brock was circling right up there at the top of the list I think you have to go back to. That timeframe to and when he got hit number three thousand and all the steals and then mix in the championships and take a look at the time frame of when he went into the hall of fame in Nineteen eighty-five, he has to be considered at least in my opinion one of the most underrated hall of famers in the history of the game d do you think that's a fair statement? Yeah. Yeah I do because I've seen. You know especially I think the end unless I don't know ten fifteen years. When you had sort of this new wave of statistical.

Lou Brock cardinals Bob Gibson baseball Gert Dan Saint Louis Lou net Lou Saint Louis Post Guy Ozzy O'Neill Ernie Braulio MVP greer Stan Chicago Broccoli cubs
"oneill" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

KYW Newsradio 1060

03:00 min | 3 months ago

"oneill" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

"James oneill would like to hear it directly if you want to come to my house and talk to me like an equal then I will hear what you have to say and I will consider an apology police reform bills are being discussed on Capitol Hill a report by CBS is Nicole Killian one of the challenges that we have in the split second decisions is the need for more training South Carolina senator Tim Scott is leading Republican efforts and will introduce a bill this week to address police misconduct and use of force but he cautioned reducing immunity for officers could be a poison pill last week house Democrats unveiled a package that calls for a nationwide ban on choke holds your governor Andrew Cuomo's telling those who violate covert nineteen restrictions to watch out we are not kidding around with this you're talking about jeopardizing people's lives and he's talking primarily to bar owners who allowing too many people inside with schools closed New York City has nearly eight hundred thousand dollars worth of food going nowhere here's CBS's Marcia Kramer council education sure mark trigger suggested food be donated to help homebound seniors who have complained about the quality of the food they received it would be an outrageous outrageous waste of money and resources and food especially in the fiscal crisis special unit would go to charity crisis the department of education is trying to work out a plan to ensure the unused food in cafeteria freezers doesn't go to waste the rest is in distributors warehouses he is the son of a country music icon Hank will Ms now word that the daughter of Hank Williams junior has died in an SUV accident this is CBS news you can listen to CBS news radio twenty four hours a day seven days a week on radio dot com or the radio dot com app downloaded today at two oh three here's a look at your traffic update it's gonna be a fairly quiet commute on the majors at least around the Philly area itself the blower for seventy six on time between ninety five the mid county tolls the seventy six this Google express way that looks great great moving through glad went all the way down past thirty street down towards pass young you're gonna find no delays on ninety five either on the east side of the city not be taken for twenty two west just as you get past worst Ford you've got some overnight construction in place that is keeping things a little under the limit just through the length of the project not very long it'll take you a few moments to get through it governor berry bridge heading eastbound into New Jersey that has an overnight lead reduction that is keeping things a little slow right up to about mid span of the bridge it eases up as you get down towards the downside now ninety five north in Delaware from route one to four ninety five to ninety five that's got million paving taking up the two right lanes six a day less than ten minutes a twenty four hour traffic center Americans receiving government financial assistance because of covert nineteen are likely to see that extended through the end of the year but how much will they get that's an area where Democrats.

James oneill
"oneill" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

01:42 min | 3 months ago

"oneill" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

"James oneill would like to hear it directly if you want to come to my house and talk to me like an equal then I will hear what you have to say and I will consider an apology police reform bills are being discussed on Capitol Hill a report by CBS is Nicole Killian one of the challenges that we have in the split second decisions is the need for more training South Carolina senator Tim Scott is leading Republican efforts and will introduce a bill this week to address police misconduct and use of force but he cautioned reducing immunity for officers could be a poison pill last week house Democrats unveiled a package that calls for a nationwide ban on choke holds your governor Andrew Cuomo's telling those who violate covert nineteen restrictions to watch out we are not kidding around with this you're talking about jeopardizing people's lives and he's talking primarily to bar owners who allowing too many people inside with schools closed New York City has nearly eight hundred thousand dollars worth of food going nowhere here's CBS's Marcia Kramer council education sure mark trigger suggested food be donated to help homebound seniors who have complained about the quality of the food they received it would be an outrageous outrageous waste of money and resources and food especially in the fiscal crisis special food security crisis the department of education is trying to work out a plan to ensure the unused food in cafeteria freezers doesn't go to waste the rest is in distributors warehouses he is the son of a country music icon Hank Williams so now word that the daughter of Hank Williams junior has died in an SUV accident this is CBS news you can listen to CBS news.

James oneill CBS Nicole Killian senator Tim Scott Andrew Cuomo New York City Hank Williams South Carolina Marcia Kramer department of education
"oneill" Discussed on Marni on the Move

Marni on the Move

09:02 min | 5 months ago

"oneill" Discussed on Marni on the Move

"The code. Marnie on the move now onto the episode. Who Tell me a little bit about your company and where it began. Did you just did you just launch like a couple years ago or this year we either fit collective just opened in January? It is something have been something that I wanted to do. Most of my career to be honest but it really put it into the works early laughter and then we opened our doors Technically the opened the doors are physical space opened in February. But I've been treating under the collective since January. We're right in downtown. Dc just like two blocks from the White House and essentially what the concept is. It's it's a was a Cepeda and sports practice of physical practice but it's basically a co working space for physical therapists and clinicians every physical therapist. Who works out of the space is their own thing and works for themselves but we all work together so that we can still have time freedom in our lives. You are a sought after renown amongst many top fitness founders studios instructors as well as professional recreational and collegiate athletes. Where does your interest for healing and physical therapy begin? I would say that it started in undergraduate and I kind of fell into it. If I'm totally honest like a lot of people you kind of go to college and have no idea what you're going to be right and you just start taking some classes to mentor friends and parents and anyone. You can speak to you and I at one point to a direct University of Virginia and at one point I met with on the advisors for Kinesiology Department at UB. A few classes to take to see if I beat. Sit in it. I started taking those classes and I just loved. It was the first time I think honestly maybe as an adult even as a kid that I really was excited to go to a class to learn just learning how our bodies doesn't work and why they can do the amazing things that they can do. I'd always been athlete growing up played volleyball and I was in high school. So the two kind of merged really nicely together at UVA's with actually when you studied kinesiology and let me go. This is normal for a lot of colleges but they make you do a certain number of physically practical hours in a setting that relates to the field so far can you go to essentially observe are helping us as well therapy face. You could work in the athletic trainers offense for physician. Whatever you want to do because you basically had to go to Grad school when you finished the major and they wanted to make sure you knew what you do and I personally just enjoy being in the physical therapist office more than anything that I experienced interesting and so now you mentioned that you had just opened in January. How are you managing in the current economic climate and health climate? Yeah units really tough unfortunate an just like a lot of businesses and certainly with this climate right now right. Now we're scaling up and sober really bummed to lose this time of like scaling up. Everyone's position so he's have to take it for what it is so what we're really shifting to try to do is more telehealth with working with patients who were super high level. I always try to foster only there for them and also always trying to foster independence so this is actually a really great time to have to work with patients to pay. What can I do to take care of my body? That's yawned like Ashley's hands and Actually Grind Gulf if that makes sense it's like one of the core things that goes with. Being physical therapist is trying to not have people rely on your hands but getting them to be able to do exercises on their own as well exactly exactly and so this are actually being forced into you know patients who maybe world relying on my hands and or be afraid to jump from an estimate that jump from the nest right so. I'm doing a lot of programming for patients over email. Doing a lot of phone calls virtual visits it gets challenging a lot of physical therapists who work significantly an outpatient to prove that we are lot more than just our hands to everyone. Yeah and so you are. So you're doing telehealth. Yeah I am right now. That's what you're deter. Not every patient I would say is right now. Everyone like everyone's just really stressed right. So I think a lot of aches and pains right now are kind of on the back burner. I think we'll see a really thick and functions. We get to the other side of this but everyone doing new chains home running or doing weightlifting at home or whatever that be but I am doing telehealth right now for fit. Were doing it as we're doing a complimentary just for the time being because everyone just kind of stuck in this position. Yeah and now I mean you with everybody. Exercising at home not in a studio with instructor even if they are following structures on zoom or whatever platform people are using to teach digital workouts. Are you feeling like people need to learn more of an awareness how to move their body because they're not really being supervised in person and are there? Is there anything that you might advise like listeners? Who are doing workouts at home to think about as they're doing all these taking all these classes them time practicing distancing it being inappropriate faith. I actually just did an couple with solid core about like coming back to the foundation of Manson's since a lot of clients are no longer in front of their instructors dislike. How good planning things like that so I think it's really interesting. I think on one in one sense because p people and patients can kind of come back and take their own speed when they're doing anything or watching You know instagram live like you said the other side of it is that like. There's no one watson that giving them like immediate feedback it's challenging and also because things are news even if you're a favorite instructor from whatever fitness you'll have to go to teaching classics probably a slightly different than what you're used to doing. Face off of the principles of the studio at work in if that makes sense. Yeah no completely and so you know the biggest thing that I write out for. People are just making sure that we're still being really smart about it in the sense of like not forgetting all of the principles and values that you put into your training your workouts when we are under quarantine. So things like okay. I've never gonNA jump two hundred percent in a week right related. GonNa take arrestee. I think those are the things that get quickly forgotten. When we're in these unusual circumstances that I found myself constantly reminding patients out there like Oh running remodeling hurts my time out like oh. I don't know and I'm like right like suddenly starting to run. I actually had to stop myself the other day because I was training for actually a marathon in April and I was supposed to run my eighteen mile long distance and it was right before everything was officially. Shut down but a lot of things were shut down and I was. I knew that my race was going to be cancelled but it wasn't canceled yet. It was the New Jersey Marathon and I was like you know. I probably should not do this because I don't have to. And it's a lot of miles so you know maybe I'll just do ten. Maybe that I'll just be my long distance for the next few weeks. 'cause my race is going to be cancelled and there's no need to put that kind of tax on your body. That was one thought that happened. And then the other thing that happened though the other direction was I started to get nervous. I'm never going to be able to run outside again. And so then I was running every day. See all in some form of having happened in our head space. Right of like okay. Let me have this very rational thought of like. What am I training for in this moment right now let me just go out and exercise today? We're also like wait. What am I can never do this again. I need to soak it all in right now. Right and that's how people get injured and one of those people i. I have to make sure that I am bringing awareness to what I'm doing and not overtraining or doing some exercise dance class where I'm GONNA to like trip and Bang into furniture and it's funny talk about half of my job is out of the reminding of these commonsense things are kind of playing out in a way that meets it common sense to them right. They're like really hurting better. We can find buses week it was daylight hundred stats prayed or for Kansas hearts out steps like had gone that far before than you offer took full cycle..

instructor Marnie White House Dc Grad school UVA Kansas University of Virginia Ashley UB Manson watson
"oneill" Discussed on Apocalypse...Now?

Apocalypse...Now?

08:55 min | 5 months ago

"oneill" Discussed on Apocalypse...Now?

"Like now instead of having cars we all have boats and you have to think about like being able to move in the water and be waterproof so feel scuba like scuba culture with totally culture like a lot of bathing suits and scuba culture and like lightweight fabrics things that are easily movable. That are not going to be clingy. Or what about those people that were thins like their mermen and Mermaids do you think would have like Mermaid Mermaid Group summer made tribes? I mean maybe but also like from talking to anybody that's actually swam with one of those prosthetic mermaid things on you have to be like a near Olympia swimmer. So it would be like. Yeah and it's heavy. You don't have the same ability you can't frog kick you. Can doggy paddle any of that stuff? Nomer mates well. Maybe you would but I think that would be like another classiest thing like that Super Thomas Medic athletes would be like we're the MERMAIDS and like the Super Hot like ripped people would probably so I do have flood on here. Yeah waterworld yeah it would be boats and people living like everybody be living on boats or like one thing to think about what that is and I think about this in the summer when you're on water in the summer the sun is reflecting off of the water too. So you've got to protect your skin. You've gotTA protect your eyes. Yes a lot of protective eyewear a lot. You would probably avoid the color black. Because black absorbs sunlight. It'd be a lot of light colors and linen and things that we protect your skin. That would be light but wouldn't bogged down necessarily and girls could wear bikinis. Obviously yeah if anyone can marry Bikini. I personally like personally for me no matter what. Your gender identity is. If you really WanNa wear bikini just wear a Bikini Bikini on where Bikini if it makes anybody happy where swimsuits. I wish I could go topless to beaches. But that's another. I think no you can't even some of them. You New York. If you go to Jacob Rees which is like a queer friendly beach all the way out near the rockaways it's definitely a topless beach and it's like you know it's queer friendly anybody regardless of your gender identity you can be topless female nipples will be as you know quote unquote illegal. As they are. Now in a water world's society I think nipples will be nipples. Yeah I think in terms of your living in such close quarters with people that like okay. Humans are humans and like you know we all have varying scale of sexuality like I'm trying to not single out like our ace folks out here listening but like you know you. Guess what I bring Alexa on. She helps keep me in check. Yeah like I think there would be a certain acceptance more of nudity. Because I mean if you've ever taken like a figure drawing class it's just a naked body. It's all the context that you put it in so if we just have nudity as a whole accepted in this warlord World Society then I don't think of it as being a sexualize thing because like sexuality only matters in the context that you're putting the naked that makes living in a water World Society. I would be worried about pirates which what would pirates where? Oh goodness you just got really excited. I love this. Modern LIKE FUTURISTIC POST APOCALYPTIC PIRATES? I mean it's it's what what can you loot. What are you seeing from the different sits ship so I would think less of like your ship is probably and your. Maybe your ship has like a legion of other ships like that. We have countries like we think of the more is like floating islands ships. I think that's something we could definitely picture in one of these like world building scenarios. So what if they're they're smaller groups so there wouldn't be as many of them but they're highly mobile whatever they can take from other people. I'm seeing like jetskis that are like with like machine. Guns and stuff yeah. I'm seeing jet skis. I'm seeing like you know. Maybe they can at times be a little bit more impractical to show off that. Like hey like we're not here to be fucked with like pirates are always showy with her gold in their hats and their giant feathers. I think we would not adopt those same things but give some flair to what we're doing. Yeah maybe I obviously would be a pirate you would be in this world scenario. I mean they probably like to me. I just picture like really really. High fashionable sportswear. Maybe you know maybe you went to like this amazing like Floating Islands Society. And they're all like it's like the rugby island or whatever and then you guys like some of you look things from there and you're wearing like some people are wearing rugby jerseys but with like cool flashy gold jewellery that they stole from like the gold floating eye on because I mean in the Society of like floating islands and like waterworld. I would think there'd be like a good amount of commerce between all these different countries I also think it's important for pirates to have an animal companion so I would obviously deck out my Chula. Oh my God trixie pirate gear higher. Trixie I don't like when you say pirates now I think if like modern pirates which are just like. They're literally just taking whatever they can get. Yeah so it's just there more gritty but like if we were to bring pirates back in a big way I think we need some swashbuckling aspects of some like you want some some like I just read where okay way to do that without robbing people of their goods. But it's more fun to do that. I know I guess. I don't think I think we'd be opposing forces. In this waterworld society you'd be on like the nude islands whereas I'd be going from place to place me like I'm just going to steal a bunch of shit whereas I am. I'm a costume designer. And I love clothes but like my ideal vision of myself is just like I'm sprinting. Through the field and I've got nothing but like daisies over my nipples and like a leaf over my policies like running through the fields like trauma like a little Elf. Spirit like I am. Meanwhile my Chihuahua is chasing you. I I'm trying to get your the league because it's the last possession that you own right. This movie leased it to other scenarios and earthquake. You need to be mobile mobile mobile and maybe this is when we bring pole vaulting back. Because you're going to really go with the cracks. Yeah just like being able to long form jump. How would you carry pole with you around though collapsible think of it like you know those collapsible like no the collapsible nightsticks? You know what I'm talking. Your Mail your self-defense. Like a one. You literally would telescope out. Maybe it's like a tripod were telescopes out and you can attach to your back. Yeah wear it on your back and just pull it out when you need it. Pulled out and vote over the earth. Is it splits into big. I would just see a big uptick of Meryl's and solomon-like hiking shoes like everybody would dress like they work at Rei in this world to me like everybody just hiking gear mobility would be entirely the thing you got to be able to jump in this world. Yeah everybody would be earthquakes pretty scary. Yeah they are really scary or do you know how to pull. I know. I have jumped off of men's shoulders hardcore punk shows. And that's about as close as I'll ever get is people that are going to survive earthquake or police. People that are really physically fit. And and that's not even saying anything regarding like you know you can be. I'm not saying like everybody's GonNa be lean skinny people like you. Can you can be a look like a fat person and be physically fit in surviving the society but I think everybody would think about mobility. I think society would decrease because you don't know what you're doing you're grabbing your coffee at Gregory's over on Eighth Avenue and then just the world's splits opening you fall to your doubts society would decrease massively. Yeah absolutely Volcanoes volcano ever screw during a volcano. Yeah that's the same deal. Everything erupts like you're gonNA get burned to death and if you're not you need to be able to withstand heat so maybe it would probably be a mixture of like light clothing and protective clothing. So like things like flame proof suit and important Heavy duty boots that are like fireproofing lava proof or very important their masks from the Ash and role that come up that you need is like protective breathing. Apparatus goals hats all stuff like that. I think that would be where we would honestly. Everybody would probably be wearing a flame proof jumpsuit. Because there's no way to be served wedding profusely everybody. It'd be sweaty. It's just GonNa be like flame proof jumpsuits and land like.

Bikini Mermaid Mermaid Group Floating Islands Society rugby water World Society World Society Alexa New York Jacob Rees Gregory Meryl Rei
"oneill" Discussed on Apocalypse...Now?

Apocalypse...Now?

01:55 min | 5 months ago

"oneill" Discussed on Apocalypse...Now?

"Scarves goggles. Probably GONNA be Windy. Ski Boots Yeah. It would definitely be windy. Yeah and you need to protect yourself from frostbite. Facemasks would be another thing. You would probably see a lot of like ski mask Balaclava Those things are co that. Go over your face. Yeah Yeah I like them. Yeah like maybe we can do a cool for or wool. Ski Mask because you need to protect your nose will is like one of the first things get frost bit in when you're in the scenario so you need to cover your your nose so it doesn't fall off so that'd be something interesting to help. Cover your nose. It doesn't fall off during your ice age back to natural disasters. There's four that I have broken down. We'll go one by one a hurricane hurricane ooh like dorks store during or after the hurricane. Let's say both I'd say I during and then after okay hurricane so you're going to want to stay in like any kind of a sturdy above ground building like gyms and things like that but if you're outside I mean we're talking gale force winds so a lot of windbreakers Lotte raincoats. Raincoats Flood Pants Ski Pants. Then you probably would not help you in hurricane. Yeah no no. It wouldn't help you. It would hurt you because you're like you're giving yourself like something to pull you away. You'd Mary poppins yourself. Maybe yeah you'd fly off into the sky And then also thinking about like having deal with a world that's flooded after the effects of hurricane or any of these natural disasters I don't know if this is further on the list but like I'm just looking back to like Hurricane Katrina and any of the hurricanes in the south like we're talking like flooding up to your roof so that also like now instead of having cars we all have boats and you have to think about like being able to move in the water and be waterproof so feel scuba like scuba culture with totally.

hurricane Ski Hurricane Katrina Facemasks Mary
"oneill" Discussed on Night Call

Night Call

04:19 min | 11 months ago

"oneill" Discussed on Night Call

"Down another rabbit. I was gonNA say so now. Now that this book is out and then you're talking about kind of how to adopt it and what's next in that. Do you have any desire to look into a new mystery. Yeah well I mean I left substantial reporting about the RFK assassination hand and obviously if people have read the bug and see there are parallels and not only that it was literally a year and like two months before the Tate Labianca murders same city same. Da's same cops And I found out a lot of really important information and at one point was going to be part of the book and then we finally decided so that book I think is five hundred and some pages little brown. The contract only wanted less than three hundred. Because it's hard to sell. I don't think they knew they were dealing with. They were great. I mean when when we got to I think about four fifty or something or for sixty. I was so pleased then I had to do the notes and they said we'll give you about ten pages and I don't know no one hundred and they're so you crazy. We gave an extra one hundred and fifty so I ended up getting being funny pages. We got it to sixty event notes at the back. And that's the most important part of the book to me because it shows all my sourcing and you know the depth of it but the case her hands stuff that could be a book in and of itself. And there's other stuff that I did find out connected to at the same scene in Hollywood sixty nine that ended up not having any relevance or connection but I found out some amazing singular like standalone store. Answer the most interesting part of the signing driving around. La and skirts very cinematic. And it's like the book is cinematic because it's framed that way like now I gotta drive to the valley drive to Dan. Hannukah rooftop. Yeah it's very like a Raymond Chandler novel I like that. That's a nice comparison guy who's doing the adaptation for the movie spent about a week with me about a month ago and I said Oh my God you're gonNa have a nervous average breakdown to and he said I just. I don't this we're not supposed to say is I wanted it to be a limited series. We sold it to Amazon and they wanted to be a feature film and this guy is a big deal. He's like but I don't know how to you know compress the story twenty ears and to two hours. So that's my life didn't do it in a book and now you're trying to figure it out. I wanted it to be like a limited series. His and I actually think he's at the end of the week. He had a good angle on it. But now I have to wait and see the first draft and I'm a little nervous about that Zodiacal. The accolade to is like a lot of people say that I guess his obsession that was. I can't remember enough. It was a cop and the journalist analyst journalist but also the same thing where like it drives everybody to Mattis. Let's contagious because once you start to realize that this is true then all of a sudden got it Tom. Tom What do you do to decompress. What are you watching your off time when you were doing this? They had like really bad. You know bad part anything. That could really be dramatic enough to let me I. Oh I think about it. I What do I watch on in movies and TV I kind of liked detective dramas stuff I mostly the only watch streaming now? Because I need to see stuff that seems as re I finally started watching succession so I'm actually got like I'm I'm going to death valley tomorrow. I've never been to the Barker ranch where they were captured. And the COP if you get near the end of the book. Paul Dusty was a cadaver dog cop who thinks he has sites in the around the two ranches. He's been trying to get me to go there for ten years and I finally agreed to go tomorrow. So I'M GONNA go for two or three days but I'm supposed to go out tonight and I'm like I'm not gonna I'm not GonNa Finish accession..

COP Paul Dusty Tom Tate Labianca Raymond Chandler death valley Barker ranch Hollywood Amazon Dan Mattis
"oneill" Discussed on Night Call

Night Call

13:40 min | 11 months ago

"oneill" Discussed on Night Call

"Da Guy who signs the attorneys. I interviewed him and and he said it was the biggest mistake in my career. Assign that case that created that monster. Yeah I mean I think what you do find new angle about the case ace. Is You really address. The sort of police corruption and sort of the sort of the general incompetency of the LAPD PD is one of the. That's what I was always trying to balance. Is it incompetence or is it deliberate and I had this one retired. Da Liuhua neck. Oh told me this us and it was so important at that stage of my reporting he said you know I'm looking at this is shown man's federal parole file where he kept getting arrested released arrested released and I go to a lot of freedom of Information Act request to told me like two years to get it all I brought it to him and he was literally dying trying to remember what the disease was but it was not a respirator and he's wheezing and he's like chicken shit. This is all chicken shit. What you mean Mr? What goes we know? This can sometimes be explain splaying Bhai incompetence but this was intentional. They were releasing him when they should've not only violated his parole convicted him then sent him back with the Newton. New Year's added on to make that connection of like well like the. LAPD would probably be stoked if people were doing crimes in the name of white supremacy because that's also part about the setup of the you know you really frame it in this great way. Because I think think the sixties it's like the cool people are always very over represented and the idea that everybody was like you know with it and progressive. It's like a lot of people were Super Square and they wanted to crush. Whatever else was happening? I guess Tarintino kind of God that in his movie because Leo DiCaprio Brad Pitt's character old. Holly I Arianna Reagan. Inter for this Eve baboots book and she wrote this piece about the Godfather and in it. There's this quote where she's like everybody in L. A.. Once guys who look like Al Al Pacino because in La like guys who look like Brad Pitt or everywhere and they pump your gas. I'd better exactly what with that movie gets right. Yeah I want to read my book. I wonder her for four. She's great. I mean I think for me that was probably the section of the book acquire. I started to go galaxy. Mind the whole section about the sheriff's Office and And all you know repeated Opportunities the people had to put Manson in jail between the parole surveillance they had on the red documents showing that they knew he was coming back from the bay. A area the day that Sharon tate was killed with this runaway girl and all that was correct except that he was really coming back from big Sur which is just a little bit below the bay the area but all that stuff was suppressed not shared with the defense and one thing that always bugged me about the case was I was like how could they squad on this land for so long without out anyone getting mad. 'cause like one thing I know about unoccupied land in Los Angeles is people get fucking furious occupied. And you're not allowed to also I. I mean they had visited so many times and he was on parole and they knew that he had like an Arsenal is just absolutely not underage girls drugs. A machine guns And hadn't when the cops or sheriffs would come onto spun Ranchi threaten their lives and he said when he lost the mission for. I forget what it's called the banana clips for machine-gun Michingan fulop a Dune buggy. He told the cops he wanted it back. He called. He's on federal parole. Nothing made sense. And that's the famous line of Manson's there's there's no sense makes sense. Well yeah like putting it in the context of all these other sort of operations that were going on at the time to discredit the counter culture in student protests and activism and the Black Panthers and all of that it makes you know I would hesitate to say like your thesis. Because I think they're still. I think there are many questions that are are left open at the end of the book but in general the premise. That like it would be very possible if one wanted to at this time to create an example Out of somebody like Manson like figure To you know spook everybody out of the out of the sixties basically And it it. It doesn't feel so far. Fetched When you look at stuff. That's actually on the record that happened on that time you do a great job of building it of being. Here's the thing that like Kinda didn't seem right and I went into it more and like found all these bugs under the rock. So that by the time you get to lake. Here's the JFK. assassination sound as crazy just say. Hey like Go with me here because you're coming at it like you're not a true crime person. That was hardest. Part of the book was trying trying to figure out the structure. And that's where I got gifted with a fantastic collaborator. This young guy. Dan Who now has a bestselling book with prints out he. He wrote with France the beautiful one thing about writing that thing with Prince Prologue for the book I mean he got him damn because Prince died right so you know everything got halted because the family was dealing. I don't WANNA say fighting says don't say fighting but they were fighting over the estate and the book got Fro Stopped. so He'd probably he thought a year or two years. I'm like Dad and it took me twenty five and he was just so kind on a poor self possessed and not in arrogant way. He said we'll figure out how to do it in a year or two and he helped me with. I couldn't have done it without him this because I had lost my. You need someone to come in at a certain point for you and tell me what I mean because I lost perspective on what was most important. What wasn't we we still do? We're talking about possibly doing A second book and I was telling you guys earlier there might be a podcast so I mean there's so much stuff that I do want to get out there into the world that's sitting right now in Georgia but at least I got this much because there was a lot of years that I thought Oh my God. I'm going to get run over by a bus family's not I told them what's important. What's not but there's too much that they're just gonNA crazy brother? Put it adopts to get rid of the paranoid while you were working on it. I never really. I mean people everybody asks me that infect you with the paranoia has the only thing I was really a frightened of I mean in the first couple years of drug is that I was investigating. Who are the big dealers at the time? They were making some pretty serious serious threats but I think one of them. I have seen in the book. I took them to Cocos for lines. And he's you know he's in a wheelchair and I have to lift him. Yeah Trolley Taco. And he's you know he used to be a very big strong man but he was eighty and dying and he's threatening me while I'm putting him from my car to the wheelchair. Sure I will fucking kill you right Charlie. I could just drop you on the drive away. You've reached that point too. You're like I realized that when someone said they were going to kill Hilmi or Sumi that man I had gotten but then scared me I mean some of the stuff I learned that he had done and as I learned I hope it comes out in the book okay. I started realizing I wasn't dealing with somebody who was possibly I. I thought I was dealing with some that. Just wanted to make a lot more money by having a more sensational okay. Then I realized it was something much more sinister than that dark and then I saw what he did to other people who caught him and stuff I mean he went full full on attacked again. Like trump kind of parallels between him and Manson to. They were the same age. Yeah I could never decide who was crazy. They were thirty four thirty two thirty three. I think when the trial starts but there were born the same. Yeah it's such a different version. I know yeah but just that violent male ego the same you kind of have to be a sociopath to be either a cult leader or district attorney. It's true yeah. was there any point at which you just wanted to stop every other day. I won't you describe describe you had one hundred and ninety I think binders in your amendment and a whiteboard with the word Manson in the middle line going out. I thought it was very brave of you to put that like in the a photo section and you know my. Dan went through some of my personal pictures he said. I want a progression of photos from you aging aging through this. Yeah and he said. I want to have a picture of the White Board and I said I've got like I think just the first year so you don't see it with like twenty pages ages a paper up around the white word you know beyond the perimeter and I just said you know what I wanna be. That's what happened. I created a whiteboard. Boorda's part of the story. Yeah we'll put it in so But Yeah I used to. I never once I think seriously considered stopping but I would think what if and then I just thought how can I get out of bed I would have wasted yeah. It wasn't just that I also wanted people be accountable. You know I wanted to report what I found to set. I know. It sounds real presumptuous but to set the record straight chasing people before they die. Yeah yeah that's kind of the thing about the fiftieth anniversary is you're like I got to get these people while they're still alive and then at the end you're like I have all this evidence like doesn't mean anything. Yeah the people that could have been held accountable or Dad. I know a lot of people have accused me. I mean there's a lot of people who were not happy with this book blog people. Oh Oh yeah yeah. The Manson Black People Internet people. But also people who are part of world defenders. But I've had some serious. They've they've come here and threats that I know this person really is a member of the family because I said at one response and I know I'm not supposed to respond but I'm like you have to be manses. This is relative because you're the threats are identical to his. Just as a member of the family I was like which one exactly this story like You know we were friends with Karina. Longworth did the pocket. You must remember Series on Charlie Manson and I think like it attain her series and a lot of stuff that we've read like this is really understood as has been understood historically as like a Hollywood story Hollywood Crime Story and obviously your book goes goes into how it goes a lot further than that I mean. It's maybe it's a California story. Yeah it's definitely a California story but I kind of wonder like having gone through all this reporting and having talked to all these people and gotten such a kind of cross section of all these different places that people were at in the culture in this time period and like since fan. Can you still even think of it as a Hollywood story or is it transcended. I'm in a kind of ruined me for having any kind of perspective on it as something. That just wasn't so sinister in deep even if I couldn't prove it can only present a circumstantial case but it made me lose such faith and stuff that I used I. I was never naive. I've always been kind of raised by lefty parents and But I and I always was a little bit careful about authority but at this point now I feel like I don't trust cops. I don't trust the judicial system. I don't trust the federal okay though I guess it is. Yeah realize I mean you know we're talking about the DA earlier like the current Da. Avella like hasn't prosecuted any cops who've murdered anybody For like a decade or something. It's just like yeah. If you put your trust in those systems to sort of do you really do a good job also talking about the connections between the LAPD the L. A. Times again something I would have soc- wants you know. Yeah that makes sense and there was more there too. I wish uh-huh well the L. A. Times I started looking into like the guy who founded the La Times guy. Otis Schindler. Yeah Citizen Kane. Yeah I was like a hers thiamine. Publish whatever served his interest communist tests and the power structure in Los Angeles in the late sixties was him. I'm at the La Times already. who was a very right wing mayor? Reagan who was the governor and Nixon became president in January. I mean he was elected in the in the fall but he was inaugurated in January sixty nine ever younger the DA. who was in charge of the case events was working for him was an axe sky? which is what the CIA of all out he was a spy and FBI and not that that makes him automatically really suspicious? But when you look at everything else I lay out about what was hidden and all that he had to be part like the center of that will the only person to take an optimistic viewpoint away from this book. Given all the effort they did put into trying to crush leftism and crush counterculture in Los Angeles like to me the fact that it always comes back in some way. You know that you can't crush it Ashley diverse reasonably out from La. So I have a the in defending it against being like well. I was also like it was satisfying to me..

Charlie Manson Los Angeles LAPD La Times Dan Who Arianna Reagan splaying Bhai Al Al Pacino Newton Sharon tate Black Panthers France Leo DiCaprio big Sur Brad Pitt Ranchi CIA thiamine
"oneill" Discussed on Night Call

Night Call

13:18 min | 11 months ago

"oneill" Discussed on Night Call

"Of the sixties with co-authored. Dan Dan pipe and bring bring bring welcome. Tom Thank you thanks for having me. Thanks for having us. Thanks for taking us on this journey. people were suggesting chaos to us before we even picked it as a book club book. They were like you. Just talk about this book on your show because he talked about all the things in it anyway and then we all just crunched it Thank you guys. Crunched eat finished it today. Perhaps we went on a spree. This is our book club. Pick This month Patriot and molly had already read it. She's been on a Manson journey Laurel Canyon journey also so she read the book but then Emily and I had about two weeks weeks so in a way it worked out really well because we to became very obsessive choice. I feel horrible farmers farmers monster. No it was we all I think. Highly recommend yeah. Very nice call book and it's it's super readable But it also leaves you feeling feeling so confused yet tells. Doing just for readers aren't familiar with the book yet. If you just like give us we were saying. This is probably hard but the elevator. Pitch this massive book about conspiracies and you know graphs charts and everything else that you've put together. What did didn't begin as a conspiracy? Book began as a magazine assignment that was supposed to commemorate the then thirtieth anniversary of the crimes ninety nine and I was just looking at different ways to make that story interesting because it had been written to death. Obviously and I didn't even want to do it but I took it. And the Kinda elevator pitches. I went down a rabbit hole and never got out for years twenty years. Twenty yeah exactly interviews. We set a thousand because we decided if I told the truth number. I'd look even more and it's also how do you define the interview you. Is it like a so many people hung up on me or shut doors on my face but I get one sentence from them before but multiple couple thousands of people that I returned to and interviewed again and again Who agreed to talk at almost got into a thousand probably the one hits or some of them? Yeah they weren't the pleasant ones and there's so much that didn't end up in the book but what happened was I found out that the prosecutor Security Vincent Bugliosi who became famous at the trial and with his book helter skelter which to this day as the number one true best selling took crime book of all time. Let's say he cut some corners. That's a polite way but the true way as he suborn perjury during the during the case and hid evidence fabricated evidence manipulator witnesses threaten people etc.. And when I found that out in the beginning like in the first year that's when things started taking a Lotta detours and I started uncovering other stuff connected to other historical events and found out that there was a good possibility that there were darker forces at work than just crazy quote unquote. hippy guy. who was telling his followers what to do for them? That might explain it. Yeah I mean I think one of the things that sets this book apart is how much your voice and your own skepticism about what you're reporting comes through and just you know. Oh by the time you're starting to get into the chaos nation or even in your in the moment you're like Oh God I'm getting into the nation. It just has this thing of a you know. Now you can see you know the next year reporting or more relate ability to for us all. We've all done some interviewing just the idea of getting addicted to interviewing people obsessed with just sort of reporting getting addicted to the reporting especially when you're like freelance journalist doing celebrity interviews. Some of US also may have been trying to do something more important. You're like oh I gotta like that's going to be the thing that's GonNa get me out of this. Yeah exactly well. You also got your haircut three times just to give you a source. Yes One of the stylist to the stars. Little Joe who charged a lot of money but my magazine which doesn't exist anymore. I think I put them out of business. To Premiere was a monthly film magazine. Eggs in there. They were the ones that have signed it. I had an expense account so I told them before. I you know I always would take people for meals and stuff like that but that seemed the lot was one hundred telling tales of like a land far away. None of us have ever magazines give you a budget. And they're like well they didn't they did in this case but it wasn't you hit the wall. It wasn't anomaly that they let me we do that. Because I got the editor in chief as obsessed as I was and as desperate to get out of I think entertainment journalism because he really believed believed in the story. Yeah but the expense account that I got from premier. I ended up having to reimburse them for all those hundred dollar haircuts and everything else in the whole thing thing fell apart in the process of reimburse you. Hey there's no premier anymore that's actually. We'll talk about that with the. What point did you become obsessed enough and have enough information? That was new that you could get your editor in chief to agree agree that this was worth really just a couple months and really I had some big breaks couple months in but then you know stuff what kind of level off and and then something else would happen. It was a magazine story for almost two years. I think eighteen months after I missed the first three month deadline. Jim The editor in chief. Who believe in this and really? I wouldn't be sitting here now if he hadn't he just gave me an open contract. He paid me monthly to keep keep reporting cyber report back to him every month or two you know. We blew the thirtieth anniversary deadline in the beginning. And it wasn't until well. He got fired from the corporate honors. For let's say probably the story that the new guy came in and said we want it in a month or two and at that point I obtained a book agent and I said I. I can't report this stuff now because giving too much away without the answers so give it another couple of years. Give me a book deal. Now will reimburse premier and he said I can get you out of your obligation to them but later we'll have to resolve that there's now so this was originally supposed to be as you said a thirtieth anniversary story and now it's a fiftieth anniversary story. And so you know it being an anniversary year ear of the tate labianca murders and The trial and everything. You know it's been very much in the air. Your book as part of a bunch of stuff that's been came out about the fifth of the move. I have to say that reading your book really put that movie in a new light for me of like it being just such a fairy tale especially with regards to just Sharon and what was going on with her personally. At the time made a lot of sense to me. You know that the maybe a pregnant woman wouldn't WanNa be living like a party house right especially with that kind of violence that I feel like in some of the other books have. We've been reading the family by Ed Sanders as well. Just that you know they sort of gloss over that aspect of it more because Polanski was still sort of playing the the grieving husband husband time. Obviously there's been other things about Polanski that yeah I feel like a lot of. It is a sort of armchair psychology not. Everybody has the Roman Polanski just being this like store narrowly fucked up person who had a lot of fucked up stuff happened to him but also obviously did a lot of fucked up stuff and you know wanting need to understand him as a victim in that in that moment just because it was so horrific obviously so much more complicated moment where it's like. Oh it wasn't the end of if the innocence interesting about the Sheringham Rome and stuff is the UK publishers. which was is Penguin Random House ironically the same company that sued me when I didn't deliver became a book deal? This is all in the book if your listeners I read it About seven years into that deal the same thing happened the publisher pull the plug on. It cancelled the project and that was devastating and then they assuming for a return of the advance which is our but When we sold it in twenty seventeen to little brown penguin someone actually the same publisher who had sued me and that had taken two years to resolve? Were the first ones to make an offer for. It didn't make any sense gasoline uh-huh and they offered exactly as much as little brown did and I said to my agent. I can't even consider this unless they offer more or as a sign of good faith and he said that's reasonable. I said how much more and I said. Don't tell them but I'd be happy with five or ten grand. Just you know something symbolic symbolic. They wouldn't even be that and I told him to go to hell so then they're UK branch the UK rights of this. You you know So they published it there and the only thing they're lawyers had a problem within the book and it was a serious problem with everything about Roman mistreating Sharon and really. Yeah so well I hate to admit this I had I had to give in to the lawyers over there. The libel laws are much stronger and he successfully sued advantage for. I think we've seen also that one of the ways that people keep stories like that out of the press is by being like well it's unprovable. How did Weinstein keep anyone one from reporting on that on his being a rapist for so long? It's because they would go after anyone who intimated anything being with him seems so futile because even as recently as last week there was another rape allegation against Ryan Plants got in touch a woman. Got In touch with me a lot of people that are kinda crazy. Get in touch with me since the book has come out and this woman sounds legit some press. She says she was raped by him in Hollywood they would when she was fifteen. And you know she's been sending me stuff like that but they were so scared of him over there are that I'll tell all of your people if they're in I don't know if you have listeners in the UK tried to get the United States versions if they read Polish Polish even the Poland version. which is you know his home country and we saw that quickly to the Rights they didn't ask for any changes just a UK Socks the UK liable. Laws are hard because I feel like they published crazy things the tabloids but that was the compromise. I had to make so if if your listeners are going to get the book on there in the UK. I don't know how easy it is to buy an American version on Amazon. I mean I imagine it's more shipping vs get that one one. Maybe you can download the American version. Give it away. I'm speaking of lawsuits. How many so I know like bouillaud see threatened right and you know he? He basically said you'll be working for me the rest of your life and to Penguin and who were still my part was still my publisher. Then he said I will own your company every prophet any of your books made in perpetuity. My family will l.. If you publish this book so yeah. He was trying to scare me. I would like to corroborate that he is a crank according according to a friend of mine who worked at the Lumley Pasadena love these store and he said Bugliosi would come in and like throw a fit at the staff and be like. Don't you know who I yeah really. Yeah like all the time and be like read Voltaire. Oh my Lord just mentally ill I truly believe well all all this stuff about you know all everything that came out when he was running for for a and there were two different yeah cases he was involved in and he he was running for office. I mean he was Kinda like trump is now I mean he was just fearful of repercussions and thought he was above the law and the Milkman KS as the mistress case both really were the reasons he didn't he might not have won anyway because everybody in Los Angeles especially in in law enforcement take the. DA's office knew he was crazy he was only there. People don't understand that he was only there like six years left as soon as he finished his case because he wanted to be the more famous Compton who is famous I forget what they called managing..

UK Vincent Bugliosi US Sharon Dan Dan pipe molly Tom Polanski Laurel Canyon Manson Emily Los Angeles Amazon perjury Penguin Hollywood Joe
"oneill" Discussed on Night Call

Night Call

08:39 min | 11 months ago

"oneill" Discussed on Night Call

"Hey everybody walking back tonight call. We're GONNA talk about something we've been talking about wanting to talk about I as long as we've been podcasting. The Sopranos Test. What do you tell our listeners? About your November tradition. Okay ten years ago I started a tradition and I haven't done it every year. I try to but sometimes you know I'm just doing other stuff as one does but I tried to start watching the sopranos right before Thanksgiving sometimes on Thanksgiving from the beginning in previous years I start with the pilot and I worked my way all the way through and usually I can usually get new year's like I'm I'm really committed but but this year I took last year off. I only dabbled. I didn't watch the whole thing but I watched some this year. I decided that I am going to watch it will I I I was like I might just go. Oh with the episodes I remember best and then go through all of the episodes in kind of a random order and see how that feels but now I think having watched two you of my favorite episodes the finale very divisive obviously and Kennedy and Heidi. I think I might watch the finale that I just watched two days ago again and then go backwards through the yeah. I know I'm crazy. I respect this stuff you if you learn anything new from that you should tell us immediately. That feels like listening to a record backward clocks we'll start like finning and review twin peaks. Remix it is. It's it's really interesting when you start from a strange place in the sopranos because it also kind of reminds you i. I saw the Sopranos When I was home I think I may have been in college and I was in Connecticut over winter break with my mom and she was what she had just gotten really into the Sopranos and it was like on? HBO and it was the Tracy. The episode which is also one of my favorite episodes. And I was like what is this and I sat down and we just watched it kind of like even in high school but anyway we were like watching it in silence silence and it was so awkward. 'cause the Tracy episode is like I mean they're all extremely violent but it was very violent and how they tracy has Pantoliano. That's like one of the most horrifying horrifying episode but also that's the soprano. Yeah that's I think that's that might might have been one of the first TV episodes at ever made me cry. Oh Yeah I mean it was so fat like it was incredible and I think she's actually a yoga teacher now. The actress who played trace her for every so often. I'm like what's up with Tracy the she's an amazing actually so phenomenal yeah. I don't think I'd seen her in anything else since then But yeah test your yearly viewing of the Sopranos made me be like. That's a good idea. I'm going to copy you and then I started doing it too. It's a really great holiday thing. Yeah and it's just just like I could watch it all the time and now that we're like so far away from it in the oversaturated TV world but like so few things are or as good as that. Yeah I always says nothing is as good. Nothing is as good. But it's always weird to me to be like the first batch of shows that were prestige shows that I loved. Were all like not famous people and just really character driven and not super high budget and now it feels like it's turned into movies where people are just like whoever spends the most is GonNa win which also so is improving to be true and that's one of the things I'm really stoked about Elena Smith Show Dickinson. Doing so well is that it is a very specific vision by specific person. Person has going for. So you're you guys are going to murder me for saying this but like I did watch. I actually started watching Sopranos a couple of months ago. Oh I think I watched the first season or maybe I didn't get through the entire first season but like one thing that I was struck by 'cause I haven't watched it rewatching nearly as much as you guys But man you don't have to go back too far for this but sopranos is a great example of it. TV shows that are actually shot on film. There is a nice feeling there you can you can. You can taste the difference. I mean it's true also like it makes New Jersey La Click the most beauty. Yeah Yeah World in New Jersey is beautiful and I was always trying to convince my folks to move to New Jersey because I was like. It's so cool because you could just go into New York York and then you get to be in beautiful New Jersey and they just like relentlessly made fun of me because they were like yeah you you just can't even you can't say that. Yeah but it is. It's very very beautiful in New Jersey just across the river but it's one thousand miles. It's true but yeah we. I'm in a forest emily and molly to be watching more Sopranos Panos throughout the next couple of months. But I did want to recommend if you are just wanting to watch a single episode. I'M GONNA make them recommend which ones they love the most. But I'm I'M GONNA stand for Kennedy and Heidi as one of my favorite episodes is the eighty third. I believe episodes from the season. But it's great for a number of reasons. It's a lot happens Jarred my memory because it's been a way long time since I watched a success six isn't it was soprano. Okay spoiler alert. Go Away if you if you don't know anything about the Sopranos go away is comfortably Numb as playing in the car Dr Christopher when Kennedy and Heidi are two teams and they just are in this. It's titled Kennedy and Heidi but they're just like two teenagers on their learner's permit driving at night and you see them for a brief second. They're having a conversation at which point Christopher's driving the car. He swerves to avoid them. The car rolls over and then something else happens that I just can't bring myself to spoil it interesting whenever you to be like watched the climactic point over the series. Well I don't know if you should if you haven't ever seen the Sopranos obviously you have to start from the pilot and work your way through but if you've seen the sopranos and you WanNa like dip dip back in back in I there's also because so Paul you know polly's adopted mother has recently passed away. She's having dueling funeral with another main character. Who has also died died about episodes? There are no bad episodes. But also I think in Kennedy and Heidi the cat who stares at a picture and meows a lot. I think that that or maybe. That's in the finale. But that was like another one of my favorite elements is like the animals are reincarnations of people who have cast. Yes so anyway. We are all going to be watching the sopranos for months and months. And you're invited to join and if you have thoughts about the sopranos give us a call at two four zero four four six night. I think I know which one I'm every watch which one which I think is a good episode. I picked a weird up. I did Mister Rogers neighborhood. Which is the season three opener? which just like about the FBI bugging the house as a framing device? So it's like only intermittently about any of the main characters but it features one of my favorite moments the whole show. which is Tony singing dirty work by steely Dan alone in his car? Just like a ten second one of the best parts of the show and I watched things around the sopranos like the Matrix which co-stars Joe Pantoliano right of course and the movie fallen which co-stars James Gandolfini and Ada Turow as a hot I love Janice the other another really good one is the Janice under the boardwalk thing but will yeah. I'll get into that later. Emily really what were you gonNA which one we're going to start with. I don't know the title of the episode off the top of my head but it's the one where Christopher's GonNa write a movie. Oh yes I just remembered that the closing credits on that are Cake Frank Sinatra and for some reason that like stuck in my head. I thought that it was like the most epic like black. Cut Two credits that I had ever seen very good. They were so that was one of their little flair find song by cake. Oh great I saw. Yeah put it on many mix CD. Yeah before we wrap up the Sopranos segment. We did get a night taxed. I believe I don't know that our third night texter gave a name but they say hey night call just wanted to share that people. Always forget that polly's car horn is the theme from the Godfather. And that's one of my favorite favorite small things on this show Is that that's a and that's a real car horn like that's A. That's a thing you can get a car. That does a song. Yeah Yeah here there's a little Cuckoo Cucaracha when you hear some downs very common out here but I feel like I've heard the godfather one in New York. Yeah well yeah. We'll we're GONNA.

Heidi Kennedy New Jersey Dr Christopher Tracy polly HBO New Jersey La New York York New York Mister Rogers FBI Joe Pantoliano murder Connecticut Frank Sinatra Elena Smith Pantoliano Jarred
"oneill" Discussed on Night Call

Night Call

13:10 min | 11 months ago

"oneill" Discussed on Night Call

"I was just wanted to let go around and do some recommendations just like stuff. We've been consuming I wanted to point everybody real quick to criteria criterion channel. which if you're not subscriber I would highly recommend it and I am not being paid to say this They are doing a little spotlight on season Pitt. Who I feel like is a very nice call? Paul approved animator She did a film. An animated film called ASPARAGUS. That used to screen in front of eraserhead when it was. It's like midnight movie run. She's just a very cool kind of psychedelic Illustrator and animator like doing stuff. That's very kind of leftist center when you think of. You've the history of American animation especially in the time she was working which was like the seventies eighties And Yeah they have a bunch of short films on criterion right now also check it out. I saw her stuff for the first time at a weird bar in Tokyo so it was like very turned on. What are they? I you've convinced me to subscribe to the the criterion channel. But good yet. So what's like what. What is asparagus like? it's very hard to describe it sort of. There's a lot of asparagus. Disparage Phallic asparagus. There's a whole sequence where like a woman basically like relates an asparagus Nice. It's just sort of kind of dreamy and and sort of like free association knee like all these sort of shape sort of melting intrigued other. It's just like you kind of have to watch it understand it but it does have that very kind of groovy seventies kind of ZAP COMEX ask aesthetic and like texture and stuff to it so. I can't give a better the explanation of it than that. Emily what do you think of the Irishman. I'd definitely recommend watching the films of Susan pit because they are short Shorter than the Irishman. I saw the Irishman you are totally immune to the charms of the Irishman would charm. You were confused. I I wasn't confused. You're like what everybody else. I am confused by the general reception to it though. I do feel like the more people that see not to Besmirch my two former fellow critics but I do feel like the more I talk to people who are not critics who've seen it the more I feel a little more You know backed up in my Kinda antipathy towards this movie. It's just so long and it's funny because now it's become such a binary thing of either. You're like Pro Scorsese or you're like pro comic book movies. There's no in between. It's like the in between us. Verner hurts bridge the gap. Well he's now you you know. Part of the Star Wars Universe in the Star Wars Universe never seen any of the star wars movies nor any of John Five rows movies intends to quote. I don't believe him because he always has the same quote anytime people ask them about like pop cultural things that are older. He's like I grew up in a tiny village in Bavaria. And I never saw Nicole true. That's so funny. Like what a good troll say. He's never just doing. I don't know her claims never heard music until he was eighteen. It's like I'm pretty sure. He gave me that exact same story when I interviewed like it's just one of his like in his file things that he says but Anyway he's I believe him that he's never seen star stories. Sure yeah but he also need some quote recently where he was like. We have to pay attention to the Kardashians like we must keep our eyes open to like all the horrors of really Liya. He's not wrong though totally. I mean that's I feel like that's our philosophy in general Yeah No I. It's like I even liked like it's not. That's not even a fan of of late period. Scorsese although I wasn't a fan of Wolf of Wall Street actually saw silence somewhat recently. 'CAUSE I didn't think I was going to like it and I watched it and I was like it's it's great. He's a great filmmaker like and he's not my favorite by any stretch of the imagination. But this just feels like Netflix. Paid him a bunch of money to like. Play all the hits right Well Silent Stan. Emily do not put that on my gravestone plan that is not a defining personality. Betrayed mind but it was disappointing. Because it's not like I'm I don't know I was. I wanted to be good. I WanNa test now about a movie that she hasn't actually seen yet been closely monitoring her opinions on already Noah Baumbach marriage store may guys. How did you know I'd have opinions on this? Did you know of course I. I haven't seen it. I put into the universe that it might be a Blue Valentine. I'm really upset because I issued my very important twitter poll asking if people's Relationships were had been destroyed by blue. Valentine they always lie. I mean it's like I know the truth and I people will email me using anonymous Z.. Mail addresses on. Tell me lay my wife and I went on our first date about a relationship breaking up. I guess what happened next but marriage story. I am concerned. It's going to have the same effect. I'm very concerned that anyone who sees a marriage story with their partner will immediately break up. Obviously don't I don't see marriage story with your but isn't it worse to see it without an away. Also Lucy's movies like that except married couples on dates. Well soon. It's going GonNa be available on Netflix. So you'll just be beaming into your home and ruin your marriage from the inside. Well I think the movie that we all actually want marriage story to be is Greenberg which is ever gotten into Greenberg. Though maybe I was I was coming at it from a place in my life inaccessible Ben. Stiller's away better standing. In and for Noah Baumbach Ben Adam. Driver sure yeah. Well now they both seem too young to be standing for Noah Baumbach right like like Ben Stiller's legitimately has contemporary so makes a little more sense. I love Greenberg so much. WORL- I've I wrote about Greenberg on Tumbler. Back in the the day I was like I am both characters so everybody who loves it. YOU VERBAL LA starting Greenberg. I would say like oh they got Greenberg. D- what does that mean. You'll figure it out when I watched the movie. What is it like an like an older man was annoying? D- oh well talk down to you. That convinced that that's what I say to. Everything always works. Yeah I saw the squid and the whale when I was on a road trip and we were up one for me see. I loved the squid and the whale. I loved it but I saw it. I'm on someone's ancient television in like I don't even remember where we were might have even been in like a motel or something and it was in black and white because the TV was was a black and white TV. And I was like what a fine film beautifully shot in black and white and I realized it was not shot in black talking white literally last week. Wow really. It's so weird when things like that happen. There's information that's so obvious and you've seen this blake. How did I miss it? How did I miss the? Let's incredible I've I've been living in a bubble like mishearing Song Lyric Times. One hundred of all the movies like Human Francis Han Black and white raided Francis PA by the way that's wild y-8. Oh my God I also think I may not really take to Greta. GERWIG apologies apologies. I try I don't know what it is. The cinema of New York intellectuals is over represented that could be anymore woody allen movies. We also don't even. We need the ones we have. Well I I was never into Woody Allen to begin with a pass. I guess it's just like if we understand we're Scorsese's coming from if we stopped paying tribute to these things they will feed out of the cultural memory. Address should probably happen with a lot of them. But it won't if people keep going like We have to make more scorsese movies and fake woody Allen Movies because that is what we think is attorneys early. I have a question. That's not related it to these things but molly had looked at live science our favorite website and found an article asking should we splice human waterbird. DNA for marsh and travel And what would a human water bear hybrid look like water bears look like faceless bears kind of if you really look for Ya Wolfe's sure looked like a slick of flesh colored centipede kid sure we would winning through the star a human and a water bearcroft look Kinda like squidward wait so so life sciences just like posing this question take hey I think what we do what is normally done in science. We you see something interesting. Let's try and mice. I don't know that splicing mice with water. Bears is a good idea either mice because I knew have mice but live forever. I mean it's good for mice. Mice have had it so rough for so long. I think we owe it to my S- I agree to give them immortality not their fault. The spread the plague. Like No. They didn't make the plague side are really. I had a naked and I had to feed it the baby mice and I still feel so bad about that like I know that the snake would've eaten the mice in the wild. But when you have to face it yourself. It's a whole site conundrum and I have. What are we talking about plaything? You think water bears in my family. Let's take a night call about critter of the week and it's technically an email but but there has a new critter that is very cute. Unlike some of the critters that we've covered on this podcast this one is a winner. I actually really like this critter. There have been song. Everyone's like did you see that I'm like I don't you know it's it's not it's my Adam driver like. I don't care but this one I do care about so we have a night. Email from colleen colleen writing this from under the covers as I try to fall back asleep after being jarred awake from a faulty fire alarms scare to fifty five. Am That's another night. Call to be. Had I came across this very exciting scintillating discovery of the Silverback chevro- Taint on camera in Vietnam Aka a mouse deer. They are rabbit sized most animals that despite having mouse lake features are not rodents. They're hooved and most importantly they have fangs and then she includes some links. Thanks last seen alive in nineteen ten. I think this is so cool and I will now be kept awake looking at picks of extinct chevrotain Chevron Chevrotain just wrist tricky his show has there been any discussion on extinct animals and species. You'd wish to encounter colleen. Thank you calling this Chevro- Tan it's Q- It's really cute. It's like a like a more coli version of a deer. It's just so little and but fangs the year with fangs. But where the. I can't see the things in the photos which we willing. So it's very it's very fetching. I like its coloration it but I don't like how it looks like I. I'm not a fan of its stance and I'll I'll let it fly because I like it's ears it kind of is Jack. ELOPE official is host. Jack Elope Yeah cuter. Do you guys have extinct animals that you wish were not extinct anymore. Woolly mammoth that was what I I was GONNA say. Well Fun so fun. Imagine if you're on a road trip you know in in I don't know the Great Plains and you saw willy. Mammoth just like a wild wild willy. Mammoth hanging like that'd be very exciting. I'll tell you what I would like those like really giant versions of things that are now small there. It was like a beaver that was as big as right right giant sloth. It'd be beavers are not very friendly. I would be scared to see a giant beaver where you scared during the full beaver moon. No Oh I charged. I was made fun of actually recently dinner for charging Mike Crystals and my Tarot Card deck under the beaver Moon to get more powers. Rain Rain kept saying beaver Moon. I love that Cardi B. uh-huh yeah at my husband brought it up in front of my parents and I was like God stopped so crazy but I totally I did it and I guess I deserve to be called out my powers are increasing however. And there's a slight chance of rain. We're recording this and there may be rain next week. So thank God for the Beaver Moon. Thank God take bigalow at break when it comes to meet quality makes a huge difference in texture and taste and even though it might be better for you and the environment a.

Greenberg Noah Baumbach Scorsese Noah Baumbach Ben Adam Netflix beaver Moon Emily Woody Allen Pitt colleen colleen Pro Scorsese Ben Stiller Tokyo Paul Jack Elope twitter Blue Valentine Susan pit Besmirch Verner
"oneill" Discussed on Scoops with Danny Mac

Scoops with Danny Mac

14:38 min | 11 months ago

"oneill" Discussed on Scoops with Danny Mac

"A book that is out if you love baseball is celebration. The magic of the cardinals in the nineteen eighties. The author is Dan. O'Neill formerly of the post-dispatch he's written a blues book. And now this cardinals book and joins us on scoops with Danny any MAC dot com is always always and I mean always a pleasure to visit with you. We used to do a radio show together. It was fun when we did that. And now we we have a chance to talk a little baseball again but How are you? I'm good. I'm good in and I I I feel the same way we used to do that. The baseball radio show. It was a lot of fun and I don't get to talk to you or see very much anymore. So it's it's great to visit with you. Miss you down down at the ballpark. But you're still obviously very very connected to sports here in Saint Louis. I I want to start with the book. And then you also have a program coming coming up with some of the guys from those great nineteen eighty teams highlighted and headlined by a Whitey Herzog for an event coming up. But let's talk about this the celebration the magic the cardinals in the nineteen eighties. Why did you want to write this book? Why did you think it would be a good good fit for Karnal fans while you know Dan? I was looking around for another topic. I did the Blues Book A couple of years ago In the book of courses on the history the blues and the Time Line Kinda thing coffee table book so I was just looking for another project and and Bounced a couple ideas around and and I was Kinda surprised to find that there wasn't really a book about the some of the principals have have their individual books. I whitey Herzog's has at least a couple of books out of these Smith as a book that CETERA. But there really wasn't a book the sort of took a look at what I what I think really started the entire Quote Unquote Cardinals Nation. Thing and that was the one thousand nine hundred eighties when the cardinals. Kinda reinvented baseball on Saint Louis and they You know when the decades started they were drawing just over a million fans and by the end of the decade. They were drawing over three night. So is that you know crossroads kind of Decade or point in cardinals history. You know three world series A bunch of colorful characters. Here's and hall of fame players so it was just a natural for me and I love doing those kinds of things. I come cardinals toward the latter part of the decade and Of course I'm a saint. Louis native was always a fan before I became a sportswriter so it was something. I couldn't wait to kind of dive into it really. I'm in total agreement with you. This the start of this really began the cardinal nation and the cardinal way if you will with Whitey coming in cleaning house and just making household changes and introducing this exciting style of baseball and winning and eighty two and eighty five five hundred eighty seven thousand nine hundred eighty two wins the world series. But when you think about the eighty S it's the first name that comes to mind and that's why Herzog yeah without a doubt He was pretty of it. You know it was an interesting transition because the cardinals had had the debt. Great Success Dan in the sixties and then went to back to back world series in the late sixties. Then they want the entire nineteen seventies decade without going through the postseason and even more so the last five seasons of the Seventies. They finished double digit double digit games out of first place. So they they weren't really ever in contention and When the eighties began Ken Boyer was their manager? Manager got off to a tough start in nineteen eighty and and then Got See Bush is still very involved with the team at that point. decided to make the a change And at the same time they were firing. Ken Boyer In between Games of a doubleheader Montreal they were introducing why deserve observe their new manager. Back at grant's farm in nineteen eighty and It took off from there. I mean why that there's never been a more dynamic period in terms of player movement. You know in a year's time from December nineteen eighty summer nineteen eighty one. Why did he move? Thirty one players back and forth and So once the winter of eighty arrive not made a bunch of big trades a lot of new players and really change the change the recipe for the franchise. I mean he took a team. That was the cardinals and a lot of good hitters and in the late seventies season in nineteen eighty they finished that season with six three hundred hitters on their team right and So they had a lot of good. They had talent but but they just didn't have they didn't have it in all the right places. They weren't a good defensive team. They weren't a team that had a lot of speed speed they add Ken reits it their base and teddy sevens behind the plate So they didn't have a lot of speed. Why do you came in not only looked at at Ed Busch Stadium to which was an artificial turf field at the time? Big Big stadium big field but all the steps in pretty much all the stadiums uh-huh and all the fields in the National League at that time were similar kind of ballparks and he He came up with a formula That it was built on speed defense and pitching and by nineteen eighty one. The cardinals were there. I mean you know it's funny. We look back and they. They went to the world series three times in the eighties. They want an eighty two could have been four. Obviously this is where you're going. I'm sure they lie well. They lost game aim seven and eighty five and they lost game seven and eighty seven. And so when you look at it you know they were two games comes from being a team that won three times you know they'd be considered this great dynasty. It had they been able to win two more games but You know that was all based on on a team that was just dramatically different from the kind of baseball they play now. I mean you know. Last year's team two hundred ten home runs. Why did he's team from nineteen eighty one through nineteen ninety getting hit as many as a hundred homerun insight So is different. And you know this Dan because you see you see the game every day The you know back in the eighties the ball was in play. Hey much more than it is now and the cardinals could catch it. Pitch it out. Run it better than any team in baseball at the turn when when you think about when Whitey took hold of also being the GM and and just made all kinds of deals whether it was rollie fingers whether it was walking Andrew Harr Ozzie. Smith Trading Ted Simmons which probably was not a great one when you look back at his tenure but it did work for for both sides you know. What was the turning point when you think about Whitey ball and and getting this thing over the hump and and making it? The excitement that we we saw in terms of the deals that he made well I I mean. I think you'd have to. I point to the deal. I it's funny. You know you mentioned when he did he. He made a ton of deals made a lot of big deals. And really for the most part when you look back at them They weren't great. Deals Appeals But it wasn't it wasn't always about a player for player quality for quality. It was more of. Why do you trying to change the culture culture here because in the late seventies As as that decade came to an end as we talked I mean. The cardinals had some terrific talent. But they just didn't know why did he came in. He wanted him to do two things. Show up on time and work their butts off and the teams in the seventies didn't necessarily necessarily adhere to that formula but he came in and that's that's what he wanted so he changed the culture so he made trades. I I mean you know they weren't. They didn't work out all that great for the cardinals. I mean you look at the trade. He made what Simmons in December nineteen eighty. He sent Ted Simmons Pete Buca Chen Rollie fingers to the brewers and he got back. David Point six Stolis gone on David Greene now. Vuckovich became the sei-hyung award winner for for the brewers in eighty two the American League Cy Young Award winner and fingers was the American exciting young award winner and eighty one and then of course Simmons was there clip hitter for three or four seasons so that was not a trade that wound up being really good for the cardinals but it it was part of a thing thing where he changed. The coulter culture moved a lot of players out and what he moved in where players. Who could run who who who Steal Bases and field and Of course the backbone of all that was Ozzie. Smith when he traded Garry Templeton to the padres as an eighty one and the winner of eighty one and was able to get Ozzie. Smith who comes here once. Thirteen gold gloves seals five hundred. Eighty bases is in an lines up in the hall of fame. So I mean you'd have to say it started with Ozzie. But then when you throw in Trades Bob Sykes to the Yankees for for Young Double A.. outfielder name Willie McGee. Willie McGee comes here. You know becomes a a most valuable player eighty five to time batting champion Had guys like they had so many switch hitters. He calls up timing her as a switch. It or steal deal basis Terry Pendleton which it or steal basis then call Minnesota chitter stole basis. He made the deal for Lonnie Smith who was really either catalyst in eighty two and finished second in the most valuable player voting in the National League another guy who's still basis and disrupt things and they just generated so much they put so much pressure on the other teams defense I that's just something you really don't see happen a lot and today's game. I don't mean that in a way that you know like an old man sitting in sitting in the balcony but it's just the game's changed a lot in the last three years and The cardinals were certainly a different kind of ball club in the eighties. What did what did you learn and doing the book about this decade a baseball? That maybe you didn't know before. Well I think one of the highlights is the book is I did get a hold of a lot of the players and coaches etc.. And what I did was I just ask them to give me. I'm just their own little Vignette or favorite story From the eighties. It didn't necessarily have to be tied to a particular event and that was in the book but but just one of their favorite stories that the one thing I found out the end was just how revered Bob Fourche was on those. Those teams Yeah fourche force was never You know he's never going to be in cooperstown. He wasn't quite on a level with Bob. Gibson or Steve. Carleton or somebody like that. But he was just a consistently good Performer and and just always a a great presence in their clubhouse. I'll give you an example. How he kept guys loose and he and guys just looked up to him? A couple title incidents really You know the story. John Stupor game. I thought maybe he told me a story about nineteen eighty two when he went out pitch game six at push stadium and there were two long rain delays the game there are five hours worth of delays. But he just kept going out out there alarmed up pitching a complete game in the cardinals advanced to game seven. He saved their bullpen but he instead he told me about it. Nineteen eighty-three game. Where or he was gonNA make? He made the start against Fernando Valenzuela in Los Angeles and balanced oil at the time probably the biggest star in the game and it was a national game of the week and Stupor still young pitcher establishing himself and he was all geared up for the game and everything and so He goes out and he can't throw a strike any ends up walking the first four batters without throwing a strike. So why did he's gotTa go out and get them and takes them out of the game. So stupor comes in. The dugout. Goes at the end of the bench as you might imagine just disappointed frustrated madden himself trying to figure out what just happened. And he's not sitting there very long before Bob walks down sits next to him and says you know stupid. I don't know how we can take you out of that game. He had a no hitter going so you know he would do things like that. And and at the same time in nineteen the eighty seven people recall cardinals or an great nationally championship series with the San Francisco giants and the focal point of the series. The first I fee- games with Jeffrey Leonard who hit home runs in each of the first four games and created his one flap down home run trot was just ABS- absolutely infuriated Cardinals fans in Saint Louis and kind of annoyed the heck out of the cardinals as well so they get into game three three in San Francisco. They fall behind Ford and nothing It's the series is one one so it's really a pivotal moment in the series there behind afforded nothing. Why did he goes to the bullpen? He brings in fourche out of the bullpen and before he came in. I was talking to Kim Daily and on the bench and he. I told him if I get a chance. I'M GONNA take care of this..

"oneill" Discussed on The Undercovers

The Undercovers

06:31 min | 1 year ago

"oneill" Discussed on The Undercovers

"Coming Tuesday October eighth the undercovers a global original podcast starring Ed O'Neill he's occupants it's the seller's now is the time when the tension begins to build as the money delayed veteran heroin broker of tie extraction George Montoya Six Foot Sinewy Hispanic and Jose Martinez Andy Sima turn to Martinez he knew what to do this was it the moment when the money comes out cash no deal ever moves forward until the flash it was all their eighty thousand large we good satisfied the seller nodded it would make a small dent in the endless supply chain running to America from the infamous Golden Triangle of Burma Laos and Thailand both traffickers approached the Volvo one remained at the trunk while the other walked up to the passenger side the trafficker leaned in and asked last the park in the middle of the day the set is ready it starts when the buyers arrive in the white remained in the car while the two traffickers approach from the rear the plan is to affect the textbook by bust eighty thousand for two kilos of heroin arc is an ordinary at all a drug deal is about to go down two kilos of Southeast Asian number four heroin right here in the Middle Martinez then closed the trunk and return to the driver's seat with the flash complete now it was the sellers turn to show there's doper drawn together it's what some agents call the flash point and it is the most dangerous sequence of a drug deal because both sides are vulnerable the undercovers the youngest of the three and the bear of the by money all three are armed Montoya Encima have nine millimeters tucked in their belts Martinez has the driver's side pocket and sub knows thirty eight strapped to his ankle but the guns aren't street Roscoe's their government issue because and listened and watched have they been able to look close enough they may have seen with Seema Montoya and Martinez were seeing just and all eyes would be on it including over a dozen da surveillance units who were also fixated on Martinez says he moved to the trunk level park and wait see him yet not yet inside the Volvo three men Paul Sema men are undercover DEA agents and they're not here for a by their hair for a bust your they come a car approaches with two Chinese once the UC's sense the same thing something ain't right back just then all sides seem as passenger doors to the trafficker he looked nervous his eyes darted left and right and beads of sweat were forming on his brow. You'll never have the chance to do it again go Martinez pops the trunk he reaches in pulls out a gym bag in the drug trade this is what is called the flat this is how fast it can go bad one minute you're ready to give the bus signal the next year sellers turned into killers and if you don't react immediately and violently directed to the head George Montoya Lay Dead in the backseat Paul Seema was slumped in the frontal

Martinez Middle Martinez Jose Martinez Andy Sima Seema Montoya George Montoya heroin Montoya Encima Volvo Ed O'Neill DEA Paul Sema Paul Seema Laos America Roscoe Thailand two kilos one minute Six Foot
"oneill" Discussed on Boomer & Gio

Boomer & Gio

03:05 min | 1 year ago

"oneill" Discussed on Boomer & Gio

"It's gotta be bigger than that. <hes> the cops do this job for a reason they become police officers to make a difference than to do good and they understand that and they'll continue to do that and they'll continue to keep the city safe so you know we'll get through. This is is it it my reputation. Take a big hit sure it did but it's not about me. It's about keeping the city. So what do you think the overall morale is of the rank and powell right now. It's <hes> <hes> you know. I i talk to cops. I still talk to cops <hes>. I'm sure that <hes> some of them did not agree with my decision and i'm sure a lot of them. <hes> just wanna come to work. I want to make sure that they're in a good environment that they worked with a good partner and they go out there and do what they get paid to do. What are your community. A community policing programs have worked. There is no question about that. We've seen that the police foundation yes and how many of your offices actually do get involved within the community that they are policing and trying to make different so <hes> that that that program has that it's not just a program away. We have to do business. It's a philosophy. If we're going to push crime down even further we have have to make sure that the the the community all eight point six million new yorkers they trust the n._y._p._d. That if something happens they're going to come forward and help us solve those crimes and they're gonna help us prevent vent crimes to at one message for your rank and file there listening right now the men and women that are walking on the street in regards to <hes> the thoughts aww potential suicide and what we've been through over the last seven to eight months here in new york city losing ten officers who've taken their own lives. What would you say to them. I'm right now. <hes> as you get ready to leave us so what i would say is first of all thank you for what you do each and every day thank you for making the choice to become a new york city police officer a. not everybody but he can do this job and you do it so well. If you yourself are experiencing problems <hes> there there are ways you can come internally through the police department. If you wanna do that you can go through for your own providers. <hes> you can really it it. It's it's important that you take care of yourself and two partners and friends and family members and and sergeants lieutenants in precinct commanders pay attention to your people <hes> and if you see somebody that that might need some help don't ignore it <hes> talk talk about it and if that person needs to get help make sure they get help and this will enable them to to do what they came on this job to do to be healthy <hes> to make a difference and and and this is the best job in the world and you have to be at your best to do it. It was our pleasure having you in here and we hope to be telling more good stories <hes> through our radio station gene and others here at entercom new york and throughout all our stations across the country <hes> with all the great first responder all the great n._y._p._d. Stories that are out there that aren't reported on as much. Thanks for being here commissioner just going to end with yes giants. Go jets. Ask you one question you know the rangers. Who's very much. Are we making the playoffs with the rangers taking the cup man roger. Thank nobody cares about hockey boomer james o'neill on the fan c._b._s. sports network.

rangers new york entercom new york powell partner hockey james o'neill commissioner officer eight months
"oneill" Discussed on Boomer & Gio

Boomer & Gio

03:29 min | 1 year ago

"oneill" Discussed on Boomer & Gio

"If you come forward looking for help and i've i've i've known people that have mental health issues and they tell me that they'd rather have cancer because people understand cancer but people don't understand mental health issues but we have to get past has that <hes> we do so much to take care of everybody in the city. We have to start taking care of ourselves and and when you're in crisis you might not be able to do that so that's why we need partners. We need the friends. We need family members. We need the supervisor's executives to make sure that people get the help they need when they need it because this is this is heartbreaking for everybody in the n._y._p._d. And it's heartbreaking for the people in the city who really do appreciate the men and women and the n._y._p._d. Though i just wanna ask you a tough question here because there have been ten suicides so after the suicide aside happens what does the n._y._p._d. Do do they go in and they look at each individual case to try to figure out why this is happening and what's the background and then you you acquire the data to try to open the eyes of people that maybe leadership looking for different signs or different depression aspects to a person's mental health yeah yeah we take a look but it does take some time because you know you've got to think about the families that are involved in the friends that are involved. There are absolutely devastated and you want to come in there asking really tough questions right away but it is part of our investigation looks at that our medical division looks at that this way we can have a <hes> a suicide autopsy this way we can collect data and see what the issues are listen. It is really difficult to be a police officer anywhere in the united states and i think it's particularly difficult in new york city with all the challenges that we face and all the great work that's being done so we have to make sure that the people come on the job to make a difference in to do good and they do that and we have to make sure that they have <hes> the ability if they are having issues and not let it lead up to crisis whether it's personal issues professional issues <hes> issues family issues issues money issues. We have to give them the resources to deal with that so it doesn't build a crisis is airports they can go. That's anonymous where they can go and get the help without having everybody else a part of this. There's there's there's a number of things that we can do. This is the internally <hes> there's the medical division of the employee assistance unit and if you don't wanna to do that you can go outside the department. We've had a lot of our health providers. Come forward and and make sure that the psychology psychologists counselors are getting money. They deserve if we're sending people going there on their own and we're now working with a major university. Who's going to have <hes> within twenty four hours. You'll be able to make an appointment anonymously at no cost immediately lupi. You'll be able to do that for somebody. At that's a whole nother yeah that's and that's that's another issue that would dealing with. We have to make sure that <hes> ah we get this information out the family members too because who knows best and i i know as a police officer for a long time if i had issues or challenges <hes> during my workday workday. I didn't come home and talk about it but i'm sure <hes> my my spouse or my kids knew something was wrong so we have to give them the ability to to find out what the issues are. We actually put an app on every cop has a smartphone now the employee assistance unit app it gives a rundown of what the signs of depression are and what you can do what the resources says are internally and externally but the boomer geo the big step. Here's to get people to come forward and get help and that's gonna. That's gonna take all of us to make sure that happens yeah. <hes> and that's the biggest part of this as we talked n._y._p._d. Commissioner james o'neill in studio so you mentioned something right in the beginning..

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Cowboys contract rumors: Amari Cooper has shockingly high demands, Dak Prescott likely to join exclusive club

The Dan Patrick Show

00:29 sec | 1 year ago

Cowboys contract rumors: Amari Cooper has shockingly high demands, Dak Prescott likely to join exclusive club

"Dallas Cowboys are reportedly working towards a contract extension with Dak Prescott that would approach thirty million dollars annually Clarence hill. Junior of the Fort Worth star telegram reported. The update Tuesday noted the Cowboys have made more progress towards a new deal with Prescott than wide receiver more. Cooper whose demands have been shockingly high that in quotation marks hill also noted the Cowboys seem to be nonplussed about making Prescott the highest paid player in franchise history.

Dak Prescott Dallas Cowboys Clarence Hill Fort Worth Cooper Thirty Million Dollars
Ellen and Portia Encountered Shark While Paddle Boarding

Ellen on the Go

02:47 min | 1 year ago

Ellen and Portia Encountered Shark While Paddle Boarding

"There are these little tiny baby leopard sharks that are really close to the shore, and you can tell the leopard sharks because they have little skin covered leopard-print and. It's what happens when you cross a shark with a New Jersey housewife what happened. So leopard sharks are dangerous to humans. They eat little fish and things, but but here's a tidbit that I found out when I told someone that we are seeing leopard sharks leopard sharks. Great whites. Yeah. That's why they're there for the great whites. And. They said on the news the other day that this year there are more sharks in the southern California than ever before. Yeah. And there's a scientific reason for that. You see there used to be less? And now, there's more. Last year someone spotted two eight foot great whites out in front of our house. And now they're back and grown, and there are ten foot sharks out near our house. And it's a little scary because Porsche paddle boards every single day out in the ocean. And I keep meaning to tell her about the great white. But apparently great whites won't attack until they're adults as long as they're under twelve feet. That's when they become adults. They're juveniles when their ten feet, but who's out there measuring with the tape measure? Hold on. I don't know. I need to know if you're gonna eat me. You keep biting me. I can't measure you properly. I haven't seen the sharks. But I did. It's amazing living right there on the beach because you see so much wildlife. The other day, I was walking on the beach, and I saw a seal and the so Ashton meal a live on the same beach, and I was walking toward their house. And then there was a little baby seal up on the beach, and it looked hungry. And I was worried about it. And I asked what was wrong, and it it's lips were sealed. So. Anyway, we call the marine wildlife rescue, and some neighbors, we all took turns because are dogs out there, and we were botching it and keeping all the dogs away. And it was trying to throw sand on its back with his little hands. They held little hands and head this door little face little nose and kept looking at me like knew who I was just kept staring at me, and it was talking about working on that seventy show and doing movies with Kristen bell. Now that I think about it that could've been meal Kuna said. It may have been she was tiny like that like meal is anyway, I checked in the morning, and the seal was gone and the cutest thing you want to see a photo. Oh, take one. I wanted to. I knew you'd want to I thought I'd ask anyway. But yeah, should've taken one that would have been a better story to have a photo.

Kristen Bell New Jersey Kuna Porsche California Ashton Two Eight Foot Twelve Feet Ten Feet Ten Foot
"oneill" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"oneill" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"A crash justin side the oneill tunnel southbound as you make way by governments senator ed baxter traffic up a crosses acre bridge backed up already onto ninety three that was backed a spot pause so tough ride for you there the liberte down wrap remains jammed just after you get audit making your way to storrow drive storrow drive eastbound that heavy as well getting into the the bear into the store title so expect some slowdowns there it's open is doing a little better actually it is back down the chelsea side just to the edge of the curve bought the southern williams haven't changed back to the airport in fact the centrebacks out onto route one a northbound on the expressway furnace burt parkway right up to columbia road that's a slight improvement for you route 3 is doing a little better but it's still derby street to union street virtually four northbound hangs up at one thirty nine to 120 895 slow getting over 120 what 28 the cracked by great plant abbas off to the right traffic's heavy getting by there but it really stays heavy beyond it all the way up passed the turnpike and yes indeed the pike is heavy from the state police barracks it's beyond that now it's almost back to route thirty getting to 120 there's a bit of a break in the action and that from route sixteen although it all from bright next update is at nine thirty would wbz's traffic on the 3s burien now to bernard a toyota summary vent and get a 2017 camry se just one forty nine a month or a 2017 route four l e one seventy nine a month for naughty toyota got lisa 424 months twelve thousand miles per year 55 ninety nine due at signing for camry forty forty nine due at signing for raffour excludes tax licensed title witnessed region 169 documentation fees no security deposit options expire thirty seventy abrams now the the fourday wbz accuweather forecast sponsored by amstel axelrod rent for.

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