18 Burst results for "O'meara"

"omeara" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

One Life Radio Podcast

05:31 min | 2 months ago

"omeara" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

"Dot trail had also. I'm in a strange lady. She made me nervous. You doc. you're listening to one life radio. Make sure you check out our podcast and get to know the show at one life. Radio dot com. I'm.

"omeara" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

One Life Radio Podcast

02:32 min | 2 months ago

"omeara" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

"Pushing aging. We had bottom find us on facebook. Hit like and follow us one. My radio right. Oh my gosh. I haven't heard this song by junior. This one is actually This is a newer band payment paula funk sound. Oh yeah this. This reminds me of i. It's.

"omeara" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

One Life Radio Podcast

07:15 min | 2 months ago

"omeara" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

"Iheartmedia as well as in southern california on. Abc news talk. Hey junior happy. Thursday happy thursday and i also got to say happy birthday to my daughter. Ella she turns eleven today so happy. Birthday l. on that's so sweet. I always say happy birthday to him on the radio every year since every year. Ever since i've been born. Yeah so then. I'll pull the clip and i've saved before. I need to start doing that. I never i mean. I have a couple of times. Maybe but i don't know that's a that's a great tradition. It is And your girls are. Are they the apple of your eye. They are they are. I mean i. I always want a boy but i would not trade being a girl dad for nothing like i i love. I love the girl that it's fun. Yeah yeah no it is. And i've most girls love their dads more than anything. Any man on earth and always will Which is which is wonderful so it should be It's such a great day today. We've got a great show coming up. We've got cindy mira with she's from australia. It's four o'clock in the morning there and let me introduce her cyndi. O'meara are you there. good morning. Good morning four. Am and thank you for getting up so early and and educating our listeners. I know it's going to be a great show you guys. She is a wealth of information. A let me introduce her. So cindy is an internationally acclaimed nutritionist author and documentary maker She is the founder of changing habits. Which is an educational health nutritious nutrition business in twenty sixteen. She created the documentary. What's with weight exposing how. Modern agriculture practices of wheat growing has produced a product. That makes people. I would just say sick sick. And more susceptible to disease Cindy authored and self published the book. I've got it here with me Changing habits changing lives as well as her recently released book lab to table. Such a pleasure to have you with us today. Cindy thanks for jumping on with us. Thank you both of you. Yeah and Junior do you wanna tell cindy about the music. Oh yeah. I found music. Today is going to be all Artists from australia. I was able to find an enough of music from from australia. Yeah so we're going to music from different artists from australia today. Since that's where you're calling us from them it'll be fun. I didn't realize how many art is actually came from australia. Like the i was really surprised about. Abc dc. i thought they were british band. I didn't know they were formed in australia. I didn't know that either i watch. Cdc for free in Roslyn parking guard. I does quite easy. Then you've got to see them for free at the beginning. Because i know somebody that like saw not as a kid rock at the beginning stages you know like when he was playing in tiny clubs and that's just really cool to see a a band that got net or worldwide status. And you've got to see them in the tiny intimate settings. That's really cool. yeah so so. What's your favorite. Acdc sign. Do you have one done to shape. It has to be. Oh my gosh. Well we'll we're gonna rock the house today with it with all of them that that juniors picked at city. It's always really a pleasure to have you with us. And as i said i appreciate you getting up so early in the morning it's four. Am and australia. You guys but she is such an incredible woman to have on the show. She knows so much about health and nutrition. So but let's start with this. Let's talk about. Let's let's tell our listeners. Why you started changing habits. Cindy well it. Oh because of my book can have changing lives so People would read my book. I had a book in a cookbook out and people would read my book. Nightside cindy way. Do we get the salt you talk about. Why don't we get the shooting. You talk about you get the. How do you make the braid. And so it just became Something that i needed to do because people kept asking me the questions. And that's where i food line canaan and then we've course ended education. 'cause then i would have people say to me. I wanna know what you know. You books not enough information. So i created the nutrition academy. And now i teach nutrition Who not only professionals but to the light people about how to change what's happening not only in their life and their families lots of the community so they can go into community and do some some good work and so that's how changing haven't started yet. It did but there's a backstory to and it's in your book a lab to table about how you had column in a newspaper and you were writing about food Let's tell that story because that's an incredible story. That's really how it started isn't it. You just became passionate about telling the truth about the food that we eat. Yeah definitely so. I was a mom and i just decided. I didn't want to work out hon. I didn't want to consult. So i went to the local paper. And i asked if they needed a nutritionist for a column and they agreed. I i make forty dollars. Awake was an incredible And i would write a column about how to change their habits like every week. And i did it for two years about halfway through the first In the first part of that year. I wrote a column on my dream. No this is back in the early nineties. It was actually nineteen ninety. And i wrote a column on my rain and saying how bad it was and we should go back to bader and my editor came to me and said look manufacturers association of australia of monitoring No happy with what you've talked about. They've asked you to retract your article and i said no. It's not retracting it. So of course the new type of didn't want to have any Any suing happing. So they said well. What can we do for you a nice at all. You can do not a rejection article. But he was a whole page spread on the benefits of monitoring which they did. The last article i wrote was on official. Sweetness icon account published the same. Because it's I'll get sued by the biggest. You know soft drink manufacture there is and i just said well you know what if you can't come produce the truth. I'm not writing for you anymore. And then after one hundred two. Because i thought there's a book in their second book and that was in nineteen ninety five and then. No publisher wanted it here in australia so i ended up publishing it in ninety. I went to bestseller very very quickly. Because i did the marketing that doesn't needed to make it a best seller and then i was picked up by penguin australia though. That's the story of the book and then the book then went on to to the company training habits. And now we are. You know are multi million dollar company. That helps people become the best. I can possibly become with their health and their lives because the narrative at the moment out there is disgusting as far as the whole a thing that's happening. Nobody's talking. well. I shouldn't say nobody. But i'll governments. I'm not talking about food. Excise shine sleep breath. Work none of this stuff. They're not talking about it. And i don't know if i'm allowed to say this but say whatever you want.

Cindy australia Ella four o'clock forty dollars thursday Thursday two years cindy Today penguin southern california second book early nineties both Roslyn eleven O'meara today ninety
"omeara" Discussed on Breaking the Glass Slipper: Women in science fiction, fantasy, and horror

Breaking the Glass Slipper: Women in science fiction, fantasy, and horror

06:01 min | 4 months ago

"omeara" Discussed on Breaking the Glass Slipper: Women in science fiction, fantasy, and horror

"History is written by the winners by men early editors of science fiction anthologies choice to exclude by women and in doing so made many believe that women did not write science fiction in the genres earliest years. This is just one example. And by no. Means the only one mallory mira self-confessed monster lava and film. Ned discovered a similar story in one of her favourite monsters. Millicent patrick was one of disney's earliest female animators and went on to design one of the greatest film monsters of the creature from the black lagoon but a jealous smell. Coworker ensured that there was no prestigious career. A rating millicent. Mallory decided to set the record straight in her book. The lady from the black lagoon. Hollywood monsters and the lost legacy of millicent. Patrick and reestablish. Millicent of monster design mallory. Thank you for joining us. But before we get stuck into things would you please introduce yourself to our listeners. high Yeah thank you so much for having the ottoman cited to to talk about this with you. Three i m author of lady from the black lagoon an fulltime author. And i'm also fellow podcasters. I host the show reading glasses every week with my friend. brea grant. what did you hope to achieve by. Unearthing the story of million patrick and setting the record straight about her contribution to monster design. Well a few things honestly the impetus behind me working on in in writing from the black lagoon was just i wanted to know. Millicent has been my hero. Since i was a teenager and i wanted to satisfy my own personal curiosity i found out about her when i was seventeen and it just seemed creature from the black lagoon like nobody even knew if she was still alive. She didn't have a website. She didn't have a wikipedia entry. Nothing about her online. So i personally just really really wanted to know at as i started digging into her life and her work and in this book i i also just. I wanted people to know that we've always been here. You know i. I actually started working on this book before the metoo movement happened and while i think it's amazing that there's such a huge push right now to get more women in front of the camera behind the camera writing doing everything women everywhere in cosigned for me but i also think it's really important to have people know that women have always been here. We have a legacy here and millicent. Patrick is proof. That and if i could only unearth her story and bring it to the world than i could could prove it is funny. You say that. Because i remember i was a massive star trek fan still but i remember in high school being completely obsessed with original series star trek and then discovering that d c fontana was a woman and i was like women have been there from the beginning. We right star trek. Yeah so i. I definitely can get on board with excitement. It changes everything. I mean finding out that a woman who designed this incredible monster that i became completely obsessed with it changed my life. It made me realize up until that point all of my heroes in the monster world. Where met you know tom. Savini rick baker. Dick smith jack pierce. It never even occurred to me that women did those things and seeing just one single photo of seeing a woman working on the creature from the black lagoon. It broke my brain open. It was like being struck by lightning. And it you can. You can make a direct line from that moment in time in front of my computer. Seven seventeen to me becoming a filmmaker later on up reading a bit about medicine on. You mentioned that you back. Then she didn't have a wikipedia entry. She does have one now on your on it as well. Yes i mean we're competing is basically all from the bottom up until that point there was no there was really no biographical information about her and the stuff that was out there was largely false Sometimes because of Militants own she liked to fabricate biographical information about which was very fun for me to deal with as biographer But it's now now actually people who she is and she has a wikipedia. Entry people You google tons of stuff comes up. It's really it makes me really really happy. So how did she become raised from history in the first ice so the her boss at the universal studios monster shop and she worked there in the early nineteen fifties was a man named bud west more and he was part of a very very famous big family of makeup artist. The west morris His father actually. George west was the man who invented the idea of a makeup department so they were huge. Deal in hollywood at the time he had a massive amount of power and influence not just at universal but in the film world is a whole unfortunately he was also known for taking people's credit being very jealous of the other artists that worked with him if they were more successful or more talented than he was which wasn't hard to do And she designed creature and they shot the movie and it became very clear that the movie was going to be a huge hit. They the universal studios publicity department wanted to send millicent on a press tour to promote it and up until that point in history know in the fifties. There was no twitter. There was no. Imdb there is no way for people to really look into the details of of credits on films. You know back then. There was no like ten minutes end. Crawl at the end of a movie like we get now. There was only like these cards that gave the heads of department Credit for the things that they did so no matter. What but didn't design at on a movie increase in the credits creature. It says makeup. Bud west more So he never was challenged. People always just assume that he designed everything that came out of his shop

charlotte bond megan mcginley black lagoon seventeen Mallory lady from the black lagoon Dick smith Patrick star trek facebook instagram Savini rick baker Millicent tom twitter one example Millicent patrick wikipedia brea grant mallory
Hollywood Monsters  with Mallory OMeara

Breaking the Glass Slipper: Women in science fiction, fantasy, and horror

06:01 min | 4 months ago

Hollywood Monsters with Mallory OMeara

"History is written by the winners by men early editors of science fiction anthologies choice to exclude by women and in doing so made many believe that women did not write science fiction in the genres earliest years. This is just one example. And by no. Means the only one mallory mira self-confessed monster lava and film. Ned discovered a similar story in one of her favourite monsters. Millicent patrick was one of disney's earliest female animators and went on to design one of the greatest film monsters of the creature from the black lagoon but a jealous smell. Coworker ensured that there was no prestigious career. A rating millicent. Mallory decided to set the record straight in her book. The lady from the black lagoon. Hollywood monsters and the lost legacy of millicent. Patrick and reestablish. Millicent of monster design mallory. Thank you for joining us. But before we get stuck into things would you please introduce yourself to our listeners. high Yeah thank you so much for having the ottoman cited to to talk about this with you. Three i m author of lady from the black lagoon an fulltime author. And i'm also fellow podcasters. I host the show reading glasses every week with my friend. brea grant. what did you hope to achieve by. Unearthing the story of million patrick and setting the record straight about her contribution to monster design. Well a few things honestly the impetus behind me working on in in writing from the black lagoon was just i wanted to know. Millicent has been my hero. Since i was a teenager and i wanted to satisfy my own personal curiosity i found out about her when i was seventeen and it just seemed creature from the black lagoon like nobody even knew if she was still alive. She didn't have a website. She didn't have a wikipedia entry. Nothing about her online. So i personally just really really wanted to know at as i started digging into her life and her work and in this book i i also just. I wanted people to know that we've always been here. You know i. I actually started working on this book before the metoo movement happened and while i think it's amazing that there's such a huge push right now to get more women in front of the camera behind the camera writing doing everything women everywhere in cosigned for me but i also think it's really important to have people know that women have always been here. We have a legacy here and millicent. Patrick is proof. That and if i could only unearth her story and bring it to the world than i could could prove it is funny. You say that. Because i remember i was a massive star trek fan still but i remember in high school being completely obsessed with original series star trek and then discovering that d c fontana was a woman and i was like women have been there from the beginning. We right star trek. Yeah so i. I definitely can get on board with excitement. It changes everything. I mean finding out that a woman who designed this incredible monster that i became completely obsessed with it changed my life. It made me realize up until that point all of my heroes in the monster world. Where met you know tom. Savini rick baker. Dick smith jack pierce. It never even occurred to me that women did those things and seeing just one single photo of seeing a woman working on the creature from the black lagoon. It broke my brain open. It was like being struck by lightning. And it you can. You can make a direct line from that moment in time in front of my computer. Seven seventeen to me becoming a filmmaker later on up reading a bit about medicine on. You mentioned that you back. Then she didn't have a wikipedia entry. She does have one now on your on it as well. Yes i mean we're competing is basically all from the bottom up until that point there was no there was really no biographical information about her and the stuff that was out there was largely false Sometimes because of Militants own she liked to fabricate biographical information about which was very fun for me to deal with as biographer But it's now now actually people who she is and she has a wikipedia. Entry people You google tons of stuff comes up. It's really it makes me really really happy. So how did she become raised from history in the first ice so the her boss at the universal studios monster shop and she worked there in the early nineteen fifties was a man named bud west more and he was part of a very very famous big family of makeup artist. The west morris His father actually. George west was the man who invented the idea of a makeup department so they were huge. Deal in hollywood at the time he had a massive amount of power and influence not just at universal but in the film world is a whole unfortunately he was also known for taking people's credit being very jealous of the other artists that worked with him if they were more successful or more talented than he was which wasn't hard to do And she designed creature and they shot the movie and it became very clear that the movie was going to be a huge hit. They the universal studios publicity department wanted to send millicent on a press tour to promote it and up until that point in history know in the fifties. There was no twitter. There was no. Imdb there is no way for people to really look into the details of of credits on films. You know back then. There was no like ten minutes end. Crawl at the end of a movie like we get now. There was only like these cards that gave the heads of department Credit for the things that they did so no matter. What but didn't design at on a movie increase in the credits creature. It says makeup. Bud west more So he never was challenged. People always just assume that he designed everything that came out of his shop

Millicent Millicent Patrick Brea Grant Patrick Mallory Savini Rick Baker Jack Pierce NED Disney Hollywood Dick Smith Fontana West Morris George West TOM Google
"omeara" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

One Life Radio Podcast

02:26 min | 6 months ago

"omeara" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

"Stay tuned everyone. You're listening to one live. Radio took me term. thanks next.

"omeara" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

One Life Radio Podcast

04:43 min | 6 months ago

"omeara" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

"Know with You know preservatives. And what are some of the things that hidden in that make us. Oh six indy. You might say look. I saw the other day fifty percent less sugar on an apple. Jake and i'll go about doing that. So i flipped it all eva and speaking san apple juice and the rest was water and stabilize them flavors and colors and this is what makes you sick. Just get the apple juice and dilute it down by eighty percent. You know the these are the things that if we if we really think about it and we've done so for the tricks of advertising and marketing and the food companies and bed and prophets today shareholders. Let's face it. They're not to make you healthy but there are some if pickle people that are they so. I'm always looking at stabilizes acidity regulators like citric acid. because that's made with synthetic biology looking gums. So there's guacamole zan from vanson is made with synthetic biology and this is the genetically modified micro-organisms put on genetically modified substrates to mccaffrey attitudes forest. Though they will be hidden ingredients in there that they may not cleaned out. So we don't know what's in those hidden ingredients and it might say natural flavor and that could be forty eight ten hidden chemicals or it could be conveyed biology so win and the other things is chemicals and i talk about that in my commentary. What wade is that. You think you're eating a beautiful salad braid. But giving the they wait from pharma who gives a cape said just before harvest with roundup Which is a broad spectrum. Antibiotic broad spectrum. Herbicide affects the she can make pathway causes neurological issues. So all of a sudden. You've gone dyson missing at christmas And you wondering why you put on white. It's probably inflammation more than anything with a bit of fat bad too bad. Yeah lets you made me think about something. That is is so prevalent in our food. You know a process food and so many people are eating out right now. They really are and some people are eating at home too. But over the weekend i saw a lot of people eating out and i saw a lot of obesity. And i couldn't help but think about high fructose corn syrup and like you said the genetically modified wheat and all these things that that the the big food companies are not telling you that really have caused a an epidemic of disease especially here in usa right. Yes definitely well the truth. Dangerous when you're eating out. Is that fructose corn syrup as well as the vegetable oils. So nice people will be crying in refined vegetable oils at come from genetically modified crops. Ride around up. So on. If i really question restaurants i because i live in and the small community I were questioned the restaurant. And i will say what fat using what should do you. How do you make that. What are the agreements And then i know watching go there. All the time is unhappy with them last night and i haven't i haven't eight nap for weeks. 'cause we do a protocol. This is what we did before christmas. We do have very strict protocols so that we don't indulge in the craziness of christmas so when we go to a christmas party we know where protocol. So why do we wanna eight oldest stuff that comes around And i'll usually drink soda water or uptake. I'll take a cold save. It looks like wine. It's licorice and lemon Lemon modal or casual lime leaves. And i'll make up the sea. It's really sweet. Because of the licorice. And i'll make it called a a Put that in the wind boston. And nobody's in any the difference that you're not doing what they're doing. Is the precious the precious show. You don't wanna drink cindy you know on finally got this one here and they go. Oh i say yeah it's It's it's a bad. I don't wanna do just every year. I don't want to end up january the fist going. Oh what am i gonna do. I feel terrible. You know. I wanna feel good or the christmas took like tiny english. So it's about starting a little bit of discipline and then hitting the christmas period where you can eat the turkey and the vegetables and had a little bit of pie and yeah and some real cream and yeah. That's that's always a good way to do it. I love that mindset. I do and we're going to go to a break. Because i want to talk about all these amazing products when we get back Wherever you're listening to cyndi o'meara of you out there listening and we'll be right back. She is an internationally acclaimed nutritionist author and documentary maker. She's the author of the her new book lab. The table will be right back..

apple Jake pharma dyson wade obesity usa cindy boston
"omeara" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

One Life Radio Podcast

08:19 min | 6 months ago

"omeara" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

"Abc news talk. We have cindy mira with us but before we get to her. We have an announcement to make. We have a winner of the little mercedes right. Oh yeah sorry. i'm on behind. we are actually having. We're having zoom issues with getting cindy dealing with that so. I'm just now seeing this here. Deal with that you deal with that and all announce it okay. So so we have a winner brisa. Monique zakho. i hope i'm pronouncing that correctly at future. Nurse underscore brisa exclamation point. Congratulations to brisa. And congratulations congratulations on becoming a nurse. That's so awesome. And you can keep following my radio on instagram for more holistic information and through this whole december all kinds of giveaways. I'm having a lot of fun with this. So i'm just gonna continue to give away because that's what i do best when will end it but it's been a lot of fun and we do it every year and i think You let me know when you get cindy on the line and until you do. I'll continue to talk. You're gonna love cindy and let me. Just i'll read your bio i because i want you to know who you're going to be speaking with just a minute or listening to cindy is an internationally acclaimed nutritionist. She's an author and documentary maker. She is the founder of changing habits. Which is an educational health and nutrition business in two thousand sixteen. She created the documentary. What's with wheat exposing how modern agriculture practices of week growing has produced a product that makes people more susceptible to disease cindy self published. The book changing habits. It's an amazing book. I've got it right here with me as well as recently released book lab to table another fantastic book. You find her at her websites. What's with wheat. Dot com or changing habits. Usa dot com. She cell's amazing products. We're gonna talk about some of them today and let me know junior. When she's there. One of the things that i was reading in the last couple of days. And i kind put it to the side and put it there and and you know this is this is what i'm about to say is really crazy and i want you to really think about it because Americans are five percent of the world's population and yet they consume roughly seventy percent of the world's pharmaceutical drugs and in the usa is only one of two countries in the world that televises pharmaceutical ads and medications to medicate if you will poor lifestyle choices. That's crazy and i know that's one of the things that cindy is very passionate about when we get around the line. We'll talk about it but you got her. She's on all right. Good morning and i'm like going this a good. I love listening to you. I love that well. Did you hear what i said. I know you're very passionate about a lot of the same things. We are if not everything that we are. And that's one of the reasons. I love having you on the show. And as i said you know cindy is an internationally acclaimed nutritionist author and documentary maker. So let's talk about this ingredients fora healthy holiday and a happy life. I i want to ask you though. What time is it in australia to five in the morning. Oh twenty usual. Time of getting up i get up and i go to the beach Do breathing session and and have coffee with friends. So this is this is just my normal early start to the day. That's easy. I love it i love it i i. I can't get up that early. i've tried. I don't know maybe i need to try harder. I need to try harder. I love my sleep. Like i'm like i'm like a bear when i get into bed. I don't wanna get out Until my my body wakes up naturally but and so do you wake up naturally at that time. Have you train yourself to do that in the summer. Yep and win. The summer i do by the winter at six o'clock. Because i just get the sun so i even queensland's so the sun's just starting to get up now. Oh gotcha. well that'll do it. Yeah that's the circadian rhythm. Something you know a lot about. But can you tell our listeners about why you created your company changing habits. What's at the very root of it. What's the passion. While i wrote a book back in ninety ninety nine ninety eight it was and it was changing habits. Changing lives and i was having fun on the speaking circuit Just selling my book going to authors. You know making all of these things and then one day. My husband had a chiropractor. Said i wanted to chiropractic anymore. I've heard you know that your business might be able to get big. Let's work on it. So we we worked on it and about six months into it. He said What's the biggest issue. Everybody has i said on my soul chapter. They don't have to put the dolts and the together and he said why don't we make it to pay for. Why don't we make it easy. Could people and so we put those together and called changing habits seaweed so and it became a i think he's all four hundred five hundred grand packets to our audience in a matter of A couple of days and that's why we launched from that so we got doing products and then we did programs because we realize that people didn't have the education around food. They've been duped by marketing and advertising that breakfast cereals maija rain low fat pastas and link. Cuisine was the best thing for them And how the company was born. Yeah i i love it. I love a good entrepreneurial story and that's so cool you know again. Necessity is the mother of invention right. You wanted it you you you. You made it. You made it happen. And so everything on. The site uses the forest. Can we talk about that. What it is. And and if there's a way to tell if a company follows the standard you're talking about food companies one It's important that they're looking at regeneration. Not so much sustainability about regeneration number two. I want to know that they have looked at their ingredients. So when i read the ingredient list. I want to say They using synthetic biology or Have they Are they using real food. Have they gone and saw the foods that are the base and also say try to so important in this business. So i don't wanna ni- that i'm buying an ingredient that is from You know child live child slave light or something like that so these things always important. And i'm always looking at you. Know what These companies doing. And lastly what i love to say is that they giving back and they may not just giving back into a charity. They may have created their own charity or they could backing kind so in labor in the community or in speaking in like for me. One of the things i do is i think to the community and i do it for free If a company that's different but if the community may it's more often than not that. I'll go to a community anywhere in australia at the moment the world And and i'll speak for free so it depends on what they do and then you don't know what they're doing behind the scenes so without company trending have it. You know we have a re-genesis tom We treat our animals with kindness and that plants grow in the most enrich so and and we also tonight to to a An old fiji. And i know this sounds cliche but this is because of business coach. We he met somebody on a plane he was having struggled to make an alternate and gander and he went to uganda and so what was happening with which doctors and so we decided to be without business coach and davies. So these are the things that we look for in companies. But i can see. It's right away on the ingredient list. I can see if they think is over not think just by at the ingredients on that food packaging well and so many people they get misled the book that you wrote lab to table your most recent book. Stop being elaborate. Start making better choices for your table. And the holidays are perfect. Excuse to overeat right traditionally unhealthy foods. It's so important to not go too far though. Isn't it and just really try to create healthy holiday meals that that everyone will still love. But they're they're healthy. I actually you know now. I prefer like really healthy food. I don't like things that have a lot of sugar in them. And that heavy with i don't.

cindy cindy mira Monique zakho cindy self Abc news Usa australia queensland fiji uganda davies
"omeara" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

One Life Radio Podcast

01:33 min | 6 months ago

"omeara" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

"Because abby day west good name on the outside all the stockings data waiting fan and with the gift the bathroom assigned the last okay us on facebook. Hit like and follow us. One live radio welcome back. You're listening to online radio..

"omeara" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

One Life Radio Podcast

06:07 min | 6 months ago

"omeara" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

"Self player includes being time management. You know when you're when you when you focus on Making sure that your schedule is set. And you have your priorities lined out. Then that makes your day much less stressful so their components of self care that i think really get widely missed as we focus on things like you know bath salts or whatever it i right or your beard on time management. That's for sure. Gosh kim meeting this morning it was like you know. I just think working from home can be for me. It's been very difficult to make that transition. I'm someone that liked going into the studio like enormously. And i know you feel that way to junior. You are in studio art studios. I'm here in my home studio. And so that has been a huge change for me in the last year and it is. It is very difficult as you say. Stephanie to transition from one to the other you know i just finished scooping cat litter and vacuuming railroad crazy. And they're like. Oh my gosh. I come up and do the show you know and so to get myself in a different mindset. It's like it's very difficult at times. Yeah it's incredibly difficult. And i think that's one of the things that people just don't i mean they're not conscious of it. You know that then then it becomes. You're never done with your work whereas if you go into an office or you go into a workspace there's defined parameters around you because the physicality of being in that location but when learn all melds together it sort of build like the to do list never ends right because you moved seamlessly through your work tasks to your personal past to carrying for people children pets or whatever it is and that That really kinda makes it all just a real messy ball of of things that you have to get done you know. Yeah well and positivity is part of self self care too isn't it. Yeah it really ears and and sometimes they'll can feel daunting and unattainable because because it feels like another to do list. You know i mean like i said. It's one of those buzzwords whereas like well you gotta take care of yourself and so it sort of feels. Well i have to take care of myself and there's one more thing i need to do. So but that's not. The intent is not to create another thing on your to do list or another thing for you to beat yourself up about. So that's why it's important to take the word should out of The conversation and that to me. That's good advice with just anything that you're doing is taking. The words should out of your conversation because it just makes you feel it. Can it can just lead to negative feelings about whatever it is that you're dealing with but it doesn't you know you don't wanna you don't want self care to originate from judgment or be reacted to judgment. You want it to be a way for you to stay connected with what yourself and what your priorities are. And so that goes a little bit back into time management and just taking time even five or ten minutes in the morning to really outline the important things that you want to get done that day. What are your priorities. What are your rock that you're gonna put in your jar and and that is hugely important when it comes to self care but because it helps you identify those priorities and what's gonna make you feel successful at the end of the day. No i love it You know last night. Late last night Rereading the book your body's many cries for water by dr batman's gotham haldi. He's an incredible scientist but drinking a lot of water is so critical to our over. How overall health so many people forget it because that's one of those self care things like taking care of yourself to the level where you're hog nascent of of of how much water you're drinking every day because it is absolutely critical and a huge connection of dehydration is connected to chronic diseases. Yeah yeah totally. And it's funny. I just had a conversation with my kids this morning when we were sitting. Nearly one of my kids said is it important to drink water. And we're like yes. Your body is made of water. You know you know. But they don't think about it as much and i thought to myself. Well i haven't been specifically Telling them to drink water. I put water in front of them. But i personally have a big jug. This is how i get my water. And i have a big judge that helped me like how much water. I'm supposed to be up by eleven. Am where i'm supposed to be out by one. And yup i three. And that is the only way i get all my water in because otherwise i'm running around and i have no concept of how much water i've taken and so i. I love that you mentioned that. Cause that's been a big goal of mine. The past couple of months is to focus on water because it is. It's the life of the body. it's critical. I can't even tell you how connected to even high blood pressure. I was like. Oh gosh because my blood pressure fluctuates some days. It's bad some days. It's good and i and i'm really been trying to figure out like you said self care like really examining my life. Where where do. I need more care. What do i need to be more cognizant of and waters at the top of that list and that is connected to high blood pressure. who would known. Did you know that. I never knew that. Uh yeah. I'm not sure that i knew that. Specifically i mean it's it's just gosh know is one of those most important and he's like the left if it helps you just your body to just fire on all cylinders you know. You don't have that critical component. you're just thick. Yeah facilitates every process in the human body. But you know we're going to go to a quick break. And so. But i want to remind everyone of our awesome social media giveaway today. You've got about fifteen minutes if you want to go to our website or not our website you go to our instagram at one life radio and follow and like us in You read the instructions gotta tag a friend a friend for super easy it is and it's it's a kid's electric drivable car mercedes benz. Amg 'self sixty three And it's super cool so you've got just a couple more minutes and then we've got some other we're giving away so much great stuff and that includes you even donated something That we're gonna be donating. Or i mean giving away next week stephanie. Some some great Beauty counter products right. Yeah yeah super fun to be a part of that. Yeah i love it. It's generosity is as part of my self care it keeps me happy but But we'll go to break real quick when we come back. More coming up with stephanie. Tubes i we're talking about the importance of self care. You guys stay tuned. You're listening to one life radio.

Gosh kim dr batman Stephanie chronic diseases benz stephanie
"omeara" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

One Life Radio Podcast

07:08 min | 6 months ago

"omeara" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

"We are live from dallas texas and iheartmedia as well as km km et in southern california on abc news. Talk junior how you doing. Did you have a good weekend. Oh my gosh. I had such a good weekend. It was so much fun. It was great all around such good mood today. Yeah yeah well. I got into a little bit of bad mood having business discussions. This business doesn't have to be. It should be fun but a lot of times you can get in town but but no and the bills won last night and over the weekend up another w column now and i'm excited about the rest of the football season. It's so different than it used to be. But you know have you thought about what the super bowl will be like I i did. But i don't know i i think just in general the nfl is totally changed and but as of tv viewer do you really notice it though like because they still pump in the crowd noise and stuff you know if if if the bills are in the super bowl. I'm going where. I'm going to miami party out of the back of a truck. I'm definitely going to be within with. I'm going to be in that energy zone. Well the the good thing though miami florida's pretty open kind of texas. So they do allow people in their stadium. There's social distancing and stuff. I actually just got back. He went to a dolphins game and he said you know he was in the stands with a bunch of people. Yeah he said it was a totally different. 'cause they were doing the social distancing and stuff like that so then a completely different field but still fun. I mean it's still football right still football and i'm telling you i had. I had such a great time cheering on the bills last night and as everyone does feel that way about their team and that's one of the reasons i think football is so important. It's a part of our society. It really is. It's a part of our country and if you don't get it. I'm sorry a really anyway. We've got such a great show coming up today. Cyndi o'meara is at the half. She's incredible she's been on the show many many times before. She's an internationally acclaimed nutritionist author and documentary maker. She made she made the documentary with weed. It's incredible and it's all. She's coming in from australia so she two or three in the morning there and so it'll be fun to have around the show over there and it's summer there like football. What are you talking but you know this is going to be a great show for this reason. To one of my favorite people truly one of my favorite people on the planet. Stephanie tubes is with us today. She is a consumer advocate professional particularly focused on safety food and personal care products. She became fascinated with the industry when she was diagnosed with thyroid autoimmune disorder while pregnant with their second child and she has always been fascinated with education and holds both an undergraduate and a master's degree in accounting and finance from texas am university. She's also a certified public accountant and amazing photographer and is owned and operated numerous businesses and the dallas area. You can follow her on instagram. At top tube turvy. That's t. o. U. p. s. y. t. v. y. I'll get it out right so good to have you with us. How you doing stephanie. I'm good so nice to talk to you. It's been so long. I i know i've got a dolly parton mug that i've been carrying around in the back of my subaru for months that i found it a little store aback months ago that i have to get to you. Maybe i'll do grit santa drop off and drop off some some goodies for the kids too. But it's really great to have you on the air and for everyone. That's never heard stephanie. Before you're in for a treat. She's incredible she is and she's also a beauty counter representative and today. We're talking about the importance of self care. And i can't think of anyone better to talk with us about besides you stephanie. So let's let's start with this. How do you define self care now. That's a great question. And i feel like up. Here is one of those buzz. Words that is popular right now and get thrown around a lot but for me it's really Part of it is the relationship and connections itself. So it means you're tuned to when you understand what you need to be your most constructive effective and authentic selves so rather than like defining is just maybe a physical health component which is obviously a really important piece of the equation. We wanna pay attention to a wider set of criteria which includes the mind and the emotions relationships time and resources. So it's really a much broader kind of Open what we generally think about when we talk about self care. Yeah and i think being in tune with your body and your mind is so important. I it's so so important But but also what's really important is to make time for self care every day right. Stephanie yes it really is and so you know one of the things that's important and what people are seeing more and more especially as we've gone through kobe you know how we self-care into into the workplace there into the work day Because things have become sort of nebulous in that you know if you're in a work from home situation or Whatever it is like there's not as much separation between your workday in your personal life and so figuring out a way to work that felker into your work day every single day or into your personal and just kind of making it. A component of what you do. Every single day is is is has become more important as we work through the time period that we're in. Yeah i wanna bring. I wanna bring junior into the mix. Because he's he's a dude. Okay when you think about you are and you know guys when you think of self care usually thinking about women painting their toenails or facial right or going for a walk but men seem to kind of get left out of the mix. Would you agree with that stephanie. And junior well. How do you feel about that. Well i mean for me. Yes i feel like a lot of times You know when you even self care. Products are always focused on women. But you know since. I've grown out my beard. I think i've noticed that more stuff for self care for men. Because i had to start buying products for my beard so then i started seeing things so there are things out there you know but just i just don't think that it gets promoted as much I guess but you know really for me. I guess the only care thing. I actually do is take care of my beard. Yeah you do. You have a big beard. What do you do to your beard. Well into they sell beard products a lot of them. That you know of stephanie. That Like beauty counter example. Do they sell beard products. Yeah i think beard product as the whole facial hair. You know as the as i call it. Like the woodcutter movement has come back. You know those really full gear. My husband's got one right now to Yeah there are a lot more like beard. Oil beard conditioners that are out there Yeah there's a lot more of that now is that has become a is has become popular but you know you guys were touching on something. That's really important that when we think it self care we think specifically of like products about product or something like that but when you talk about it truly.

football iheartmedia km km stephanie super bowl Cyndi o meara thyroid autoimmune disorder miami texas am university dallas texas abc news Stephanie dolphins nfl california florida australia santa
"omeara" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

One Life Radio Podcast

01:40 min | 6 months ago

"omeara" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

"The content of the following program is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice. Diagnosis treatment or cure always consult your physician or a health professional with any questions. You may have regarding a medical condition. One life radio appreciates the support from our sponsors. Make sure you check out. These companies son warrior the pioneers a plant based protein. Go to sonepur your dot com and use the code. Oh l. are for twenty percents off your order. Environmental makers of tariff flora and new immune floor of learn more at enviro medica dot com cancern politics extraordinary pet food that set the new standard of purposeful. Pet food. paleo magazine is now all digital so you can go to pay magazine. Dot com and subscribe also the wellbeing journal combining physical mental emotional spiritual and social aspects of health federal magazine. Sign up and get a free online. Subscription at bedroll mag dot com the international society of sports nutrition the only nonprofit academic society dedicated to sports nutrition and supplementation learn more at sports nutrition society dot org and thorn research redefining. What it means to be well and pushing the limits of human potential go to the sponsor page at one. My radio dot com links and listener discounts. Thank you for listening to one. Life radio Do you wanna go higher baby. That is the question low. Everyone here listening to one life radio. This is bernadette with junior and.

"omeara" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

One Life Radio Podcast

05:08 min | 8 months ago

"omeara" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

"Oh my gosh. But but you know I love this about your vision operation kindness and it is this a world where all cats and dogs have loving responsible forever homes. And I do feel it so important to find loving homes, but a responsible home is just as important to. So how does operation kindness prequalify those that are wanting to adopt? We believe that so many people had the capacity to be responsible pet owners and our role in operation kindness is to educate them and provide the resources that they need to make that possible. There's really been a shift in recent years in animal welfare to try to break down the barriers to adoption so that more animals lives can be saved in shelters. The. Reality of the situation is that if you're GONNA get pets we want you to adopt, and so we wanna make that process. Know an easy within reason as possible. So our adoption counselling process, really conversation based and very welcoming the what we WANNA do is to help you find the best pet that fits your family and your lifestyle and when people Kinda they may not be sure what that looks like. But our team our experts and they're gonNA give you on that path. You know some adopters anything they're bringing home a pet for the very first time and they don't really know what to expect, and so we're here. To prepare them for what that will look like so that they can be successful. You know what if potty training will flake or how do you keep your cats and scratching the couch you know we can help you with all those types of questions, really the animal and the family gets set up for success and how do you stop your cat from scratching everything in the House I would love the answer to that because it's a real problem in my life. I don't know what to do. Well we do have resources on our website for it, but there's a couple of different things you can do and the one that has been really successful with my cat is providing an alternative that's right nearby the couch. So if they are always scratching the same side of the couch, if you put a little scratching like a sicel scratching post, right next to it and encourage them maybe. Russell catnip on that give them a better alternative than they couch and an a positive outlet of will you? Can you still want to scratch right? That's very natural instinct for cats it's just scratched their claws. So giving them, the appropriate place to do it is is pretty important. Well, yeah, and trimming their nails helps for sure but it's hard to stay on schedule with eleven cats. One is hard enough. Yeah. Oh, they're they're little tyrants in the morning when I get up I'm like I. Know You want it they just WanNa. Be Mad. They're not talking to me they're like you know. Just griping until I beat them but I love them all so much I do and as I said at the opening of the show, they add so much to my life. And animals just do you know they can teach us so much about kindness and just loyalty and perseverance so many lessons we can learn from animals right? Absolutely and I think they're especially during this. What is it a really challenging year for all of us? A source of comfort and companionship and I think we're all finding now that we're spending more time with our pets than we ever have before and so really strengthening those bonds and realizing value about relationship. Yeah and what's really important? I. Think. That's what a Cova is taught the world. What's really? and. How can listeners help Natalie I mean in a word, it's it's donate honestly operation kindness exists because of primarily individual people supporting us with whatever they can give. We don't receive government funding or like that. So you know it's really individual people who are like we talked about giving that monthly donation of five dollars There's a lot of economic uncertainty this year, but the animals are still in need you know they have no idea that a pandemic is going on and so we still need to be able to provide their food and their medicine and everything that they. Might need and you can also make donations of goods to the pet food pantry at that something that really speaks to you right now we need mostly canned dog food and canned cat food and it can be any type any amount anything we just that it's unopened and that will go to those families who are in need right now. Wow. Thank you so much for the work that you do in our community. All of you at operation kindness I know I personally appreciate it and I'm there to support you. I will start making a monthly donation to you guys as well. And just. You know we all have to do our part to keep this world. To, keep it straight right. And Entre are absolute pleasure that we have because we love the animals and they you know reward us every day. Absolutely. Absolutely Natalie. Thank you so much. Have a great weekend and I hope you'll come back. Thank you left you. All right everyone. The show is continuing on. We have another amazing woman. Her name is Cindy o'mara and she is an internationally acclaimed nutritious. Cindy is an internationally acclaimed nutritionist author and documentary maker. I might a hula-hoop a little too long last night junior. We're.

Natalie Cindy o'mara WanNa Cova Russell
"omeara" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

One Life Radio Podcast

08:04 min | 8 months ago

"omeara" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

"Of everyone it is for Friday it's going to have some. We're going to have a fabulous show. We already are. We've got Natalie Buxton on with does and she is such a passionate animal welfare advocate with expertise in marketing and development as director of marketing and communications for operation kindness. She develops strategies and storytelling to grow the organizations presence in North Texas and save more lives. We were talking about a lot of things before the break. Natalie. But one of the things that I wanNA know I wanNA hear the story of the great people that started operation kindness. How how did it begin? Absolutely? So operation kindness is Started by a group of volunteers back in the seventies and they really came together because they have been kind of individually working with the local shelters and and rescuing animals on their own, and they knew their hard to be a better way than how animal sheltering was being done back in the seventies. You know too many animals did not have positive outcomes and they were you know maybe getting taken to a shelter and get in Houston is and not having that opportunity to to find a new family. So this group came together and thought what can we do and how can we do it differently and so they started. Just. kind of fostering animals in their own home, and then it grew beyond that and then they got into a veterinary clinic and expanded their and then kept expanding over the years to where we are today and some of that original group they're still involved in the organization as donors and volunteers, but they really built operation kindness to be sustainable and to grow beyond just what they could do themselves. I love stories like this, I? Do you know I've never been able to have like start something like operation kindness I have like my own little mini operation kindness at my home you know, and that's all we can do. You know we all have to do our part you know to help animals they count on us especially domesticated cats and dogs. You know they really count on us to do the right thing and you know we talked about your new and improved adoption center that will. Be Opening soon but I heard that you guys have some sort of state of the art medical wink, and can we talk about some of the innovative treatments offered at the new wing? Absolutely. So this was actually the first phase of our construction projects. It was completed at the end of last year. So we've been able to really kind of get in there and bring in a lot of new patients of it's one of my favorite places because there's always something really inspirational going on. Compared to previous hospital say that we did have at this shelter it's more than triple the size. So just our capacity to care for sick and injured animals on a daily basis has really increased and we designed a lot of things about the new shelter are really revolve around how can we maximize and give them the best quality of life while they are spending their their time with US and fresh Air A. Theme that continues in the hospital too. So each medical room that there is it connects to its own private screened in porch that allows the animals even if they are still recuperating get. To. Doors and sunshine, which really helps improve their spirit and their quality of life. So they're not getting in a cage all day. They're actually able to get out and see the birds and the squirrels running around and really have You know a good experience going to help them feel better. As far as the state of the art features, it has a hustle does have a lab where we run a lot of testing in house we have a pharmacy, a double surgery suite, and that where we do all of our spay and neuters and orthopedic surgeries, amputations, and anything that the animals need. There's isolation rooms for various illnesses that are maybe contagious. Those can be contained in managed and I think the coolest thing that we've recently added is a therapeutic laser and what does that I I'm not a doctor. So I don't know exactly how it works. It seems like Magic to me, but it's cold laser therapy, and this is something that works on humans as well as animals. How animals with hip dysplasia or arthritis or they have maybe some mobility issues or they're recovering from orthopedic surgery or something like that. So this cold laser therapy can just help them feel better and reduce inflammation and swelling and things like that. We've really just recently got it a couple of weeks ago. So we're looking forward to seeing how it can help our patients in the hospital. Wow, that's so cool. I love the technology and the advancement that you guys are putting out there for for all of us to learn from right I've never heard of that for dogs or cats but I I love the idea I do and you guys are full of great. Ideas and here's your next one. Okay. So recycle to support our our to us. Can you tell us about that? We haven't heard during with Michael, support for I think it's more than ten years at this point and it's a really valuable partnership to us and to our supporters to because the way it works is that you know if you're watching any of these home organization shows on Netflix then you're cleaning out your closet and your cleaning out your kitchen, and so you may have household items and clothing that you want to donate, and so you can donate been through recycled to support actually common pick it up off of your porch at your house or various locations. You can drop it off to so very convenient and operation kindness received a donation based on the weight of all of the donations that are picks up. So the more you donate the more we received as a donation from cycle to support, and it's interest about one hundred, thousand dollars a year for the animals just by people cleaning out their closets and you know finding things that are used to them anymore but as a way for it to help the animals instead that's amazing. I'm actually going to call them after the show. ENDED UP, pick up next week maybe I it all the time. I. Love it I absolutely love it. Okay. So how do you all partner with other shelters in the area? Do you do that as well? Oh, absolutely. One of the things I'm most proud of is our partnerships with other shelters and rescues in the area. You Know Pet homelessness is a community problem and it takes a whole community coming together to solve it. So we all have the same goal right and we know that when we are working together and being collaborative that we can achieve more. So we serve as a transfer partner for about forty other shelters. North Texas and even a little bit broader than that our largest shelter partner, Dallas animal services who is doing fabulous things lately and really our role is to help these other shelters when they are low on space when they're running out of room if they had a pregnant animal or maybe they have some orphaned newborn puppies or kittens that they can't stay in a shelter environment, they really need to get into a foster home or sometimes they might have a severe medical case that they don't have the resources to treat but we have room in our hospital also, we can be that. Kinda Bridge to bridge the resource gap and all kinds of come together to figure out. Okay. Well, maybe you can't take this on but we and so one of the ways that we can do that is through the foster program that we have allow us to take those really vulnerable moms and babies you know they can't be bombarded. So a shelters really unsafe for them. So having that and our hospital allows us to take on some pretty significant cases that you know other filters through no fault of their own. They may not have the resources to be able to do that right and fostering is so important I happened to be the weakest foster parent out there. And give them back I fall in. Love. I'm the poster child of the foster. Failure Person. Just can't do it. I'm just really really bad at it. That's why have twenty two. Let.

partner North Texas Natalie Buxton director of marketing Netflix Houston Michael Dallas
"omeara" Discussed on Mission Daily

Mission Daily

09:02 min | 1 year ago

"omeara" Discussed on Mission Daily

"To someone would have been some of the best ways that you've found for recruiting talent. Cats DASH recruiting is very quickly a fulltime job. Because you're always recruiting so when I think about personal references and really having the company spend time thinking about their network says something that we ask of all of our employees and for me. It's also you know when I think about the actual recruiting process know. There's always an asymmetric of information on both the part of the candidate as well as as a hiring manager so for me you know I always force rank. What are the capabilities that I need in this role in order? And then establishing the panel around how can we assess this and then quickly trying to get sick no because I do believe similarly recruiting time kills all deals so really trying to ensure that you have the ability to understand. Does this person have the capabilities? Is it a good fit on both sides and being able to align that panel and quickly? So I don't know if I answered your question directly outside of to say I spend a huge amount of time thinking about how to recruit effectively. And certainly there's the kind of pipeline generation which I think is best done by your employees but then I think there is the execution within the interview process of really being crystal clear on what is must have versus nice to have from capability set and establishing new panel. That can boats get signal determined that and be selling while they're doing it in order to drive to quick decision making now I love that. Yeah that's really really cool. Conceptually delay out there made. What's a question that you wish people would ask about Catholic but no one seems to ask or even node ask especially businesses? Maybe you're thinking about evaluating tools or thinking about Catholic versus another. They think is comparable now one of the things. I reflect on a lot is indisputably were able to save employers money and improve employees experience with healthcare. And we're still very much in that phase of market creation right so when we when an employer chooses not to go with gaslight. It's typically no decision it's sometimes competitive but that's not our most common scenario so I guess when I think about you know what question should you should? People be asking either so many benefits to an employer to have a navigation solution and cast light specifically that I guess the question you know I guess the real question is why. Would you not do this? Because you have an opportunity to directly benefit your employees and help them make that our health decisions and Save Your Organization. Money you know. Health benefits is typically the third-biggest spend item for a company so it's a really powerful value proposition. And so the question. I guess I'm just thinking out loud that I wish people would ask. I think that as I said you know one of the questions that I think that we don't get asked enough is really. What do you do today? Cast light is very much known for trail-blazing transparency and the company has changed dramatically in ten years. But because of its early success and transparency which is a key part of what we do. Today it's not always understood that you know what casts lights doing is ultimately helping people navigate their benefits and healthcare more broadly and has incredibly powerful results Which is not something that we had ten years ago so I think the question that I wish that people would ask and spend time on. Is You know what's changed because quite a bit has changed and I really believe that. There's an opportunity to help people with their health decisions and I'm excited to do that. It's definitely and if we think about you know you're learning routine maybe or whatever you're doing for to kind of recharge outside of work. I love to hear a little bit about you. Know How are you staying? Fit keeping your body and mind sharp and what type of content whether it's bookstore. Podcasts or originals. Are you enjoying? Yea So number one for me. Certainly spending time with family and friends to be active. And it's probably the biggest reason I live in the bay area so you can usually find me running on crissy field or cycling and Barron my treats to myself our weekend ski or Surf Trip so I love to be. I've been active since I was a kid. And it's definitely the way that I preserved my mental health so loved doing that in terms of you know one of the things that I have gotten much more into since stepping into this role is kind of getting back into reading specifically. I've read a lot of military leadership and presidential biographies says over the past couple of months. I read Washington which was just a great story of you know kind of coming against odds in some cases. I've also read American Caesar which is about Douglas McArthur. In the Pacific Theater I recently read. Churchill a life which was great. Yeah so I'm a pretty big reader stories I didn't have an emphasis on health. Care I don't know how did it with something. Well I may need to send you this after. It had a huge impact on. May that yeah. That one in particular is great but yeah. I mean you know I would say that it's friends and family. It's being active and it's reading about real life stories and understanding that you know it's just the exposure to other people's challenges and how they handle than and learned from them that has actually really gotten may thinking about. How do I handle challenge? And how do I develop? Resilience was words so may for anyone listening. Maybe there's someone out there right now. That's getting there be a at the University of Virginia or some type of DSP. That's thinking about you know. What am I going to do for my career? Is there any kind of broad advice or maybe a call to action? You have for younger folks out there. Yeah so you know I guess like my general thoughts. There are kind of number one. I have always felt really fortunate to have the privilege of purpose and so I don't believe that healthcare is the easiest industry working but I have always loved having a mission orientation and so. That's a decision that I made a long time ago. One that I continue to feel really glad that I can be in a business that is trying to do something audacious hard but we're really important to people so it's obviously a personal decision but it's something. I'm really glad I did. The second would be just around the criticality. Technology technology is changing every business. It's not just technology businesses and I see that in so many ways from our customers to our partners and just having that technology skill set and understanding of technology makes you incredibly helpful in it to a very wide variety of organizations so clearly. I'm a little bit biased. Here but I think really having a technology background are working in technology regardless of what fields you WANNA end up in. I think gives you a significant valuable perspective to bring to the table and then my third is really kind of that piece about go to the fire and within technology companies. I've always felt that getting to be a builder. Is You know an opportunity that I'm so grateful I had. I think it makes me a much better leader than what has been if I really didn't understand what it took to build a product and I think everyone has different skill sets but if that is something that you kind of feel a draw to having spent the time you know and not being afraid to kind of go back when I was trying to break into product management out of GSP. It was much harder for me to get a product management role as evidenced by my rejection from gaslight than it was to get a business development role or something more similar to my skills and I really was willing to take whatever role was available at whatever cost so I think also thinking about life. Long people always talk about life being short it's also on and making some of these short-term taking a more junior role all of those things. I think really pay off in the long term about may thank you so much for being generous with your time. This has been awesome interview and we are excited to Continue Watch. Catholic grow and seen you continue to lead a CEO. That's great and thanks for taking the time. Thank you for being such a lovely thank you. Thanks so much. Take care as the founder of a growing media business. There are two things I need less. Worry leads and more confidence. It wasn't until I got confident about outsourcing. Hr to China that has been able to reduce my worry once I reduced my worries about HR compliance. I was able to sleep better literally if you want to get more confident with. Hr Checkout China Today. Your team deserves a leader. Who isn't worried about stuff? They should be outsourcing to the professionals. Now I outsource my. Hr challenges to the professionals at China at couldn't be happier..

gaslight China Douglas McArthur Washington University of Virginia Churchill founder CEO
"omeara" Discussed on Mission Daily

Mission Daily

08:15 min | 1 year ago

"omeara" Discussed on Mission Daily

"When you have gone about building. Culture recruiting trying to retain employees and motivate. Your t of any philosophies really stood out to you. What are some of your biggest lessons learned there? Yes I have one of this now. I think probably the most leaders are this. I wear without team. There's nothing and so the motto at cast late has been one team on a mission. Making things happen so mission. Orientation is definitely a very big part of the culture at cast light and so every year at our holiday party specifically for my teams and now for the company. We've always talked about three questions that people ask Solace at the end of the year that I ask myself at the end of the year which is am. I doing something that's worth doing. So is this a fight worth fighting? Am I doing it with people that I love doing it with people? I respect that I learned from an and finally am I succeeding. And so we've talked about that a lot as a company of how can we make sure that every employee is able to answer yes to those questions? And because cast light has been. It's interesting to kind of talk about it as an older organization but you know it is a decade plus organization now which is older for digital health. And you know one of the things. I've talked a lot about is. How do we actually find joy in the journey? Because changing health care. Is You know a difficult. Non LINEAR PATH. And we have to be able to actually find the joy in the progress that we are making every day So that's something else that you know. We talk a lot about with the team and you know finally I would just say for us one of the words that we always hear oath from existing employs and exit interviews from everyone is is a Catholic is mission and then family. So that's something that we talk a lot about two and it's been interesting this year as we've opened our Salt Lake City office. One of the things. We want to be really intentional about. Is You know having that same culture in Salt Lake City and also ensuring that we've one of our values has always been diversity and inclusion and I think being really intentional to ensure that we have that same culture in Salt Lake City is really important in this year. That's exciting and with all that expansion. Are you able to balance personal life and Work Life Feel like they're just fully integrated at this point. Our you're approaching your mental health and having a personal life while being. Ceo A fast growing company. Yeah well I certainly I mean I guess my first answer would be. It's hard. I think that balancing work life and personal life is always a challenge. And I think I've gotten better as I've gotten older And so the biggest key for me honestly is that I have a deeply supportive husband. Who makes me better at my job and better at my life so. I think he's really been a phenomenal balance to me to ensure that I prioritize the right things that I would be the first to say that this is hard to do government Yeah that's the understatement of the century. So have there been any mentors or investors or partners or really anybody in the space that you feel like you've learned a lot from and if so what if some of those lessons phone absolutely I mean I've been lucky honestly my entire career to have great mentor. Starting at Bain working venture capital and then at castle it so I feel very fortunate that there is. I have a very large set of people that I call upon early and often to support me so some of the people that I would mention you know so our founder Giovanni Kalala has been incredibly impactful. Certainly to me and more broadly to the company he always talked about one of the lessons I took from him was that he wants cast light to be the best professional experience of your career and it certainly has been for me and I always think about. How do we actually do that for all of our employees? And how do we keep that alive at something? People say quite a bit at Catholic. So he's had a tremendous impact on me just in terms of starting the company and helping me think about culture as a defining trait now of the company. Not just something that's exists but something that you work on and is absolutely critical to your growth. I'm very fortunate to have a couple of board members particularly as I've stepped into the CEO role who have picked up every phone call and and deeply supportive and so really in different ways. Certainly helping me with recruiting and understanding how to make difficult decisions quickly and both of them have different skill sets so at park who founded Athena Health and as the CEO of devoted as technical and sales background. So He's been incredibly helpful to me and a lot of the work that I've done and then David Sanger who's been an investor for quite a period of time but really just has perspective on the overall industry so I'm very fortunate to be surrounded by a lot of people who have frankly created a Lotta time to help me. I think what's interesting to kind of focus on there is like if you're getting that type of great help and support from a collection of mentors like it's generally something that is earned over a period of this case a decade or more you know throughout your career. How do you think you went about kind of fostering dot trust and building those relationships so that when you did call people were excited to pick up the phone and keep helping you now? I think that it's probably. I'll speak to the set that I mentioned that I've really been related to cast light that we've been on this mission for so long and it's I sometimes refer to it as the 'cause you know it's just been I think that when people can see when your interest is so I don't WanNa say cure but is you know we've just got such a big problem that we're trying to solve and it's been difficult and there's been ups and downs but we've made a tremendous amount of progress and so you know it's never felt or Ben artificial in any interaction. It's always been genuinely. I have a problem to solve. I think you can help me. So you know. That's really the way that I've developed relationships has been just you know. It's typically with in the case of mentors people who care deeply about the same problem and therefore care deeply about helping you solve that problem so I think that's the core. I definitely have never felt like it's relationship building for the sake of relationship building. It's always you know we've been united in trying to bring our mission to life. Sure and for other CEOS executives news a lot of technical folks that. Listen to this podcast. Is there any advice? You have or folks that maybe want to pursue a similar path of getting into a great role in the company and rising through the ranks into a leadership position. I think that ultimately in terms of kind of expanding the role I think solveen and being willing to fight in the hardest problem so go where it's hard. I don't think it helps your work life balance. Always I think going where the fire is is generally kind of my number one advice and then in terms of as you step into new roles. You know I'll just speak to the experience of stuff into the CEO role. I really helped me. I had one hundred day plan and I really force ranked. What do I need to do and was really pretty obsessive? Frankly about looking and make sure that my time aligned on what most critical priorities were. I think there are so many stations to do things that you WanNa do and are great things to do but just frankly you can't afford to do and so having that hundred day list or one hundred day plan and that rent priority list and then really ensuring that how. You're spending your working hours alliance with that. I think has helped me really. I think demonstrate impact early unrolls which I believe is critical to then setting you up for success in them and then finally I would say you know to me as a manager. You're only as good as your team. People are everything and if you build a great team good things happen so putting in the time there I think similarly good teams don't just happen I mean how you recruit how you retain I certainly spend the majority of my time there so I think really having that understanding that you are. Your team is the thing that actually allowed me when I worked my time at Catholic. I mean that's why I'm where I am anyway. And when it comes to recruiting which your favorite way of getting a cold email or getting an introduction.

CEO Salt Lake City Athena Health Bain David Sanger founder Giovanni Kalala Ben solveen
"omeara" Discussed on Mission Daily

Mission Daily

11:26 min | 1 year ago

"omeara" Discussed on Mission Daily

"Plans to access that data to create that experience for the member so many of us wanted to go directly to the end user but because of the way that healthcare is delivered primarily through employer. It made more sense for us to start there with the idea that that would allow us to have greater access to data and therefore deliver a higher quality experience in when Kessler was getting rolling. How did you go about constructing kind of getting business development rolling and some of those partnerships that are critical to get revenue in the door? Yeah it's interesting him in. We've had certain late kind of starts and stops in that certainly in the early days so for us there was this sat of very innovative employers. Who really believed in what we were doing and so they were really advocated for us to work with them so you know getting buyers on the employer side. I don't WanNa say it wasn't challenging. But I think the value proposition was just so incredibly clear. I mean at that time. Our solution with really focused around transparency and communicating to employers and looking at their data. And saying you know there's a ten to twelve xperience and some of your major markets on you know what people pay as an example for labs or imaging was a really powerful driving force for them to say. We've got to do something about this. It was also at a time when people were moving to full replacement high deductible health plans or just introducing them more generally and said there is a desire in the context of introducing high deductible. Health plans to give their employees better solutions than we really had to partner with the employers to talk to plans about them sharing that data with us to allow us to provide that experience so that was a lot of our focus on business development. And you know for me. Having kind of taken several tours of duty in different roles across the company I did spend time in business development. Really trying to think about. How do we create a shared value proposition for a plan to work with us to deliver shared innovation that will help them establish market leadership in their particular market? So that was a big way that we approached it was to think about. How does it actually benefit not only the employer but the plan to partner with us? Sure in May as I look at the different rules. That you've held at CASS late. You know obviously we're looking back now so we can apply the narrative fallacy. Maybe but it seems like you've been really really strategic with selecting and making sure that you get you know experiences in product management business development but also you know product marketing. Were those all strategically sought or did you just have you always been curious and you know just want to see how every part of the business functions well? I wish that I could say that. I have been deeply strategic. That is definitely not the case for me. What I've tried to guide most of my career. Decisions is really go where the fire is or go where you're needed and joining product was certainly just an incredible opportunity because it was right when we are really standing up the first solution and the first product and I mean. I can't say enough for how much I learned to get to be a direct product manager. It was before we even had a QA team so incredible on the ground learning by experiences moving to business development that was at at a time where we were having challenges forming partnerships to access data and so bringing the product perspective. And how do we create value for each was why I went there? I joined marketing at a time where there was a need to have greater product knowledge in the field as our product was getting more complicated my roles kind of in account management and customer experience. Were at a time when we were bringing together to companies we had acquired jeff which is a wellbeing company and really being able to communicate the shared product vision. So there's definitely never been. I wish that there had been some kind of strategic plan but for me you know it's always been go where you can provide the most value wise words and I think what's interesting too about the acquisition is us those large acquisition hundred thirty five million dollars. How did you go about integrating that? And what type of challenges that it provides you when you were in marketing and then as the chief product officer. How'd you go about integrating? Yeah well I'll speak. Just I a little bit about the thesis which was at the time that we had to add wellbeing to our platform we had really had kind of two product chapters at cast light so we had started with transparency and then we had built out a personalization engine. Which at that time. This is probably twenty. Fifteen was pretty disruptive in terms of leveraging information on people's health to reach out impracticably engage them to connect them to a provider or program and what we were realizing. Was that when people used us. We getting really great results but it was incredibly difficult to stay top of mind and we were thinking a lot about trust of when you're asking people to trust you with their health care decisions. It's hard to do that in your very first interaction with them so there were a number of reasons that we believed that adding wellbeing would allow us to meet people earlier in their health. Journey developed trust develop relationships and then also help us stay more top of mind by providing support for what things along the lines of steps food. Sleep all of the kind of things that can help people maintain and improve their wellbeing on a day-to-day basis. And so that was really the thesis. And when it came to figuring out. What's the right company to do that? The reason that we decided to buy jeff was that we really liked their approach to wellbeing. And that it was ultimately about saying there's always going to be navision and wellbeing. It's about how do you bring best in class? Vendors and really leverage e developments in the digital health ecosystem to the greatest to the most impact and so for that reason ships entire approach was bringing together different point two digital health solutions and not content based approach. One thing. I think a lot about wellbeing. Is there really are no barriers to entry so therefore you want an open platform that allows you to capitalize on whoever's doing a particular area best and so that was the reason that we chose Jeff and absolutely? It was an incredible learning experience. It was incredibly difficult bringing the two companies together to be totally candid. I have yet to meet anybody who's gone through a merger who has told me it's easy. I. I am eager to find that person. I don't know if I trust their judgment though. Yes exactly yeah it was. It was hard I mean bringing together the platforms. They were different. Levels of maturity there was overlap and capabilities. There's the building trust between teams. It taught me a lot and frankly I'm sure I did quite a few things wrong in that process. I'm really proud of where we ended. I do think our solution is stronger for it but you know like many companies. I do think that we definitely underestimated how difficult it would be to bring those two platforms together. And I think what's interesting about that acquisition as well as that well-being you described very accurately there where there's no to entry and so you have a lot of people myspace that almost seems like a great content marketing engine and just a great marketing thesis. In general well-being seems to be the top of the funnel for the space where users are willing to take a recommendation may be or get some more information. How are you thinking about bringing in new businesses and getting the word out to consumers? What's your marketing strategy like? Now arket in Shannon J two new employers and health plans yeah employers and I don't know if you're actively marketing towards consumers as well or if it's just straight to businesses consumer because you actually highlighted effectively a big part of the thesis behind Jeff and how we drive engagement which was we didn't believe in a bland content one-size-fits-all but ultimately when you think about the data that we're sitting on. We do know for our population if you take an customer. We effectively are scoring on a daily basis all of the population in terms of what conditions. They have what they might be at risk or and then it's really about bringing machine learning big data and marketing right like this is ultimately. How do you actually give those Ignatius to people so to your point one of the opportunities that we saw him bringing together. Jeff was cast. It's always end. This incredibly data rich company and we really have an leverage that data in an effective way to leverage while being content in a hyper personalized way to bring in and then connect them either with a provider or digital solution or a deeper piece of content. So that's really a big part of how we attract users and continue to engage users is that hyper personalized content which typically links to some form of recommendation and so in terms of you know. Our valley propped employers. It's also something that's matured quite a bit over time. The original vision of the company was. How do we help? People navigate healthcare very specifically in the area of transparency. So helping people understand both cost and quality information over time. It's been how do you help people navigate on a much broader more personalized basis including a much more holistic look at people's health and so when we're actually talking to employers ultimately very navigation is the word that they use to describe what we do and the way that they're measuring value or thinking about successes. Are you able to engage and delight members? Are you able to drive? A set of behavior changes which is typically increasing utilization of their benefits and programs. Getting people the right care and then getting them to the right provider and then ultimately that generate in a hard medical cost savings are alive so I share that because the value prop and where people are emphasized varies depending on the employer. Some are very focused on providing an easier more convenient delightful experience where others really are looking for hard medical cost savings and so for us over time. We know we in partnership with our existing employers. Stood up this value framework to really demonstrate the ability to move multiple errors. But I think of it as ultimately you know the value proposition being that we can make it easier for employees to navigate healthcare and we can guarantee you medical cost savings and doing that. We're taking time out to thank Trinet for sponsoring independent media like mission daily. If there's one thing I am about an in fact one thing the whole mission team is about it's accelerated. Learning one of the ways I do that is by learning from the best when it comes to learning about. Hr The team and resources. China provides are my go-to source. I started with some of China's free guides at China DOT COM slash guide. You can't do. It's never been easier to get briefed on how to outsourcing. Hr grow and scale effectively. Offer the benefits that matter to your team and win the war for talent start learning from the best and get one of China's free guides dot com slash got. Thanks trying out for sponsoring.

jeff China partner Kessler product manager chief product officer CASS China DOT Trinet Ignatius Shannon J
"omeara" Discussed on Mission Daily

Mission Daily

08:33 min | 1 year ago

"omeara" Discussed on Mission Daily

"Welcome to the show. Thank you for having me. Today am in San Francisco today. Awesome so you are at the offices of Assume and I would love for you to tell listeners about a slight and your chair so calculates a company. That's using technology to help. People better navigate healthcare. The problem that we're trying to solve is just the fact that it's so difficult for people to make good healthcare decisions. We continue to hear how people struggle to figure out whether they're in the right plan. What care they actually need what their plan will cover whether they're going to a good doctor what it will cost so all of these things make it incredibly difficult for people to have comfort and confidence that they're doing the right things for their own health so what we're doing is applying machine learning to empower consumer with deeply personalized timely guidance to make better health decisions ultimately results at lower costs improved outcomes and a better experience. Yeah I think what's interesting is. Difficult is kind of an understatement when we start talking about navigating the healthcare space and as a consumer making the best choice. It always feels like no matter. How hard you try. You're always making a sub optimal choice right. The research has changing like this latest news on this and I think what school is with some of the machine learning and things that gas lights doing. It's a technology is going to be able to help inform you know all the independent research. That folks are always doing themselves. Absolutely I think that your comments nailed exactly we hear from our users which is really hitting upon the fact that so few people would share that they have confidence about seventy percent of as say that they don't understand their benefits and don't believe that they're making good health decisions so ultimately what we're working to do is bring together that data in the context of your personal health content challenges or opportunities but then applying that in the context of the plan design that you have either from Europe or directly from a health plan and one of the things. I was doing some prep for this interview. I think is fascinating and I really love is that you started at cast light as a product manager back in two thousand and ten or so dead at the end. What's awesome is I think so. Often people fall into the trap of thinking like. I have to be a CEO. I have to start a company or found a company in stead of just you know owning one of the most important roles in the early stages which is being a PM. How did you go about landing that Opportunity? And what was it like in the early days of cast light cash? Yes it's it's funny to have been somewhere ten years at this point so for me. You know what really attracted me to cast light was the mission so ultimately you know I just really believed in what the company was trying to do and because it was such a big problem I believe it would be a big market opportunity and then the team at that time the founder Giovanni Cala it was just a phenomenal group of people so when I joined it was about twenty five people and it's actually interesting you mention kind of coming in as a PM. I was very determined to join the company as because ultimately I believed that being a builder and being really close to our end user and to our customers would allow me to really both contribute to the company and grow overall. And so it's kind of an interesting story when I first applied to castle in the product management role. I was summarily rejected. Said didn't even get an interview because of you know not having yet really had a ton of experience in product management so persevered and managed to actually get into company but it is kind of A. I was very excited to work product and be a builder but it was rejected the first time around. I think yeah. That's the hallmark of all great stories right like multiple rejections at first. But it's still too I think. Push past that no drop the Ego and going again and make another ask so. I assume you did. And how did you get your door there as a PM? Eat Out. I think I just got a little bit lucky. In that. At that time the company was still so early stage so there were as I mentioned twenty to thirty people in the company and so there were a lot of changes happening there. And at the time I got connected to a classmate from Stanford who was working at the company who helps me talk to the right people and really explain my case for being a product manager. It's interesting because I've watched a lot of evolution. Just in the field of product management over ten years particularly as technology has become more and more important in every company and I think the role of product management has evolved from one that I was conceived of as Curly Technical. Probably ten to twenty years ago to one that is deeply rooted in strategy today. Couldn't agree more. Are there any favorite examples? You have a product management training programs you know is that the APM program at Google. You know what did you study kind of master that for stroll? Well I think that I just really benefited from some great mentors. There's been a lot of people at Catholic who had many more years of product experience than I did. I've done many of the the workshops and certainly benefited from those. But I don't think there's any real replacement for kind of on the job training and really finding those mentors. I think that you know the things that I think about just from a what did I learn over time in a product manager. You know early on particularly at an early digital health company. I had a hard time understanding. What's the difference between a feature versus a product? I accompany so understanding the scale of the problem. You're trying to solve some an example of that in it was probably around. Twenty fourteen. Two Thousand Fifteen. I was really passionate about behavioral health and it was becoming very clear that behavioral health has a significant impact on people's physical health. And you know. We saw a lot of opportunity to use our data to help people connect with primary care and better leverage three and in the course of that we invested quite a bit and building out a product which were really proud of that product. Bed over the course of the year plus that we were building it just became incredibly clear that this was actually a company and over time more and more companies have entered the space. You know certain late before that but you know as you probably know. It's a very important topic that many people are starting companies and but at that time calibrating on feature verse product. I company was something that I just really didn't have the experience and the second thing I would just comment. That has been interesting for me from a learning curve perspective. Is You know working at cast lights. A BBC to seek company in that we sell to employers or health plans and our ultimate user are people who are consuming healthcare. And it's an incredible challenge to balance the B. and the C. And very often your buyers voice can override the voice of the end user. So assertively been thinking a lot about. How do we always ensure that the voice of the consumer is represented? And I think you know over the years. I've gotten a little better at that. I wasn't great at the beginning and a huge amount of that. Is the data centrality of how you Orient Product Development? That's fascinating so yes speaking from a personal loan servicer. That's our structuring. A media company which is to be easy to see model and I think what's great about those companies is that while really tough to crack. Initially you know getting that balance right over time they become very defensible and you know obviously having a whole bunch of businesses clients is a great strategy. What led you. And the executive team to structure cast light in that beat the B deceit bottle. He had great questions so ten years ago. When we were first started in the company one of the most significant hurdles or challenges that we faced was access to data and we were really open to. We could work with health plans. We work with employers. What we saw is that there was a group of really innovative vanguard employers. Who are in many ways? You know some of the largest payers of health care in the country who really wanted to be able to provide these services to their employees and you know for. Us getting access to data and enough data at scale to be able to apply the machine learning to actually determine what a MRI or lab would cost was critical so there for it was necessary for us to partner either with employers or health.

product manager San Francisco Europe Product Development Google Curly Technical CEO BBC Giovanni Cala founder executive partner Stanford