20 Burst results for "O'day"

"oday" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

20:32 min | 7 months ago

"oday" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"Community in Santana has learned a lot about Alexander in the last ten years. And I think it's because of that persistent unapologetic push for justice that continues against the odds against what seems politically possible. What does a U.S. government officially say about the assassination of Alex O'Day? Well, the U.S. government doesn't say a whole lot. The FBI has been the lead agency in the murder investigation since 1985. And basically what they do year after year every October 11th is reassuring the Arab American community that the investigation is a priority that it is ongoing, and what they don't say is who they believe to be the authors of the crime. They have never publicly named the suspects that there are any that they have. And investigative journalism suggests that they do. I mean, they have a $1 million reward that has been promoted since about 1996 for information leading to a conviction of the crime. But it's just a very peculiar purgatory for the case, and it doesn't seem to break with any new developments over the course of the past few decades. So there is understandably a lot of cynicism within the Arab American community. But some of my most recent journalism suggests that it looks like the FBI has been, at least in the early onset of the investigation, pretty active in terms of trying to prosecute, but there's stymied. And according to my interview with retired lieutenant humi, it wasn't the FBI in 1996 that basically wasn't proactive. It was the State Department official in his recollection that said we need to look at the bigger picture of the U.S. Israeli relations in this case is going nowhere. There's a lot of speculation about oday's killer, but this is speculation that also comes from government statements and actions that sometimes contradict each other in 2016, for instance said, Department of Justice said that the oday family was actually victims of Robert Manning. Who's he? Robert Manning was one of three Jewish defense league members that had been discussed privately according to my reporting and others in connection with the Audi bombing. Never has he been officially named as a suspect we can't even say that. He was extradited in 93 from Israel to the United States in he stood trial for a male contract bombing. He was a hitman in a sense and sent him mail bomb at the behest of the person who paid for the crime, and unfortunately, Patricia wilkerson, a secretary in Manhattan beach, opened up the package and the bomb detonated and it exploded and killed her. So he is serving a life sentence for that crime. A retired FBI agent wanted to question him in the aude case and essentially he denied having been a member of the JD L, which was an extremist Jewish group founded by the late rabbi honey. And essentially, he says, I know nothing I did nothing, so he still in Phoenix Arizona is serving out his prison sentence. So why then does the United States government and Department of Justice say that the uday family is a victim of Robert Manning if they're not saying anything officially that Manning has anything to do with the killing of Alex O'Day? It's just this really peculiar legal predicament. It makes no sense, right? The American Arab anti discrimination committee, which is the group that Alex Audrey belonged to and was the West Coast regional director for, they are also deemed by the DOJ as they told me as victims of Manning's. And how can that be? It clears the way that classification internal classification clears the way for Helena ode to speak at the parole hearing as she did in 2018 in person in Phoenix, and then also in 2020 remotely. And the ADC president is also able to address the parole hearing in those years too as well as a victim of Manning's. But he's never been indicted. He's never been charged. He's never been convicted of that 1985 office bombing. In saint Anna that killed Alex Saudis. So it's a contradiction. It's a paradox. It just doesn't make any sense. What other hints have come out over the years about how much the U.S. government knows about the identity of a day's killers? It's been pretty well reported for the course of 30 plus years. Again, what I was able to do was corroborate a unnamed anonymous source, recounting of the scene in 85 in Santa Ana, where the FBI and LAPD joint terrorism task force members descended on the scene via helicopter and probably pretty dramatically in a little unusual for an Orange County city like that. They got off and they told lieutenant at the time it was the acting captain that day. And at the command center, one of the persons in the group of four basically said these are the people that we've been training, flying from New York to LA. They were lost at LAX. And the three names have been spoken of privately and then publicly and journalism and Andy green, who now goes by bruk Ben Joseph, Keith, Israel fuchs, and then Manning. So it's been an open secret who the investigation has looked at. And again, the FBI, according to the lawsuit documents that I referenced earlier, wanted to question and according to their field director that I interviewed a few years back, did question Manning about the audit crime. So at the bare minimum, you can call Manning a person of interest, and then with the parole hearings, the victimizer of the organization and the family, but in terms of the criminal conviction, something's getting in between. Some things in the middle, the ADC has long wanted to see the extradition agreement between the U.S. and Israel and with regards to Manning to see if there's answers there as to why that gap exists. Robert Friedman was a Village Voice journalist, and wrote a op-ed in the Los Angeles Times in 1990, where he was in Israel. And basically saw green and Manning at that time, and said they're here. They're living freely in these Israeli settlements. One was at that time it was also a particular settlement that followers of kahani would live in and basically they couldn't be arrested if they were in the settlements they had to be in Israel proper. But, you know, Friedman said you can find them there too. So it's not a secret who has been discussed in connection with the case, and it's not a secret and it hasn't been a secret where they are, and with regards to Manning his where belts are well known. He's incarcerated in Phoenix Arizona. We'll have more after this break. Facebook's safety teams protect billions of people each month. They lead the industry and stopping bad actors online. That's because they've invested more than $13 billion in the last 5 years. 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Unfortunately, it's easy to be unsafe online, but now it's easy to help protect yourself. Norton 360 with life lock gives you powerful device security, a VPN to keep your Wi-Fi activity private. An identity theft protection to help monitor your info and alert you to potential identity threats, all in one. No one can prevent all identity theft or monitor all transactions at all businesses, but you can opt in to cyber safety. Save 25% or more off your first year of Norton 360 with LifeLock, at Norton dot com slash LA times. That's 25% off at Norton dot com slash LA times. Gabriel you mentioned a lieutenant humi. He was one of the first people there on the scene at the site of oday's assassination. What are you telling you about that day? One of the challenges with reporting a cold case that is 36 years old is that people that have the institutional knowledge and firsthand experience of the case and the investigation are disappearing. They're passing away, and that's true of a lot of people from the Orange County side of things. You had Charlie stumpf, who was the commander or lead of the bomb squad for the Orange County sheriff's department. He had his team comb this scene of The Office on 17th street in Santa Ana, and they reconstructed the bomb like a big jigsaw puzzle. He passed away. The lead investigator on the case where Santa Anna PD was concerned was feral buckles. And he was the one that had firsthand knowledge up until his retirement in 1996. What was unique about humani is that he was the area commander of that part of the city. And deputy chief dispatched him to take control of the scene. So he was there within 20 minutes. And he witnessed the FBI's arrival within the hour. These guys come out and they come walking over to us and there's a couple of FBI agents and a couple of LAPD joint terrorist task force members. And they came up and they told us that they'd been tracking a couple of guys from New York up in LA and they lost to man LAX and they were probably responsible for the bombing and Ted time. I think you gave us the names of green and Manning. And really he has a firsthand experience of that scene. It was a big case in Santa. And I'm very high profile. And of course, it's a crime of international implications, but he went up into the office. He remembers seeing the destruction and devastation. He remembers the scene very vividly and what he did. And so that's, you know, for historical posterity, it's necessary to get someone like humani on the record. And that's the other challenge in this case is that because it's an open case of cold case and there's still at least on the surface and active investigation, people with knowledge are hesitant or do not have the clearance to speak openly about it. So humani is very valuable in that regard. And he definitely offers new details into that day and the investigation that followed. Lieutenant moon has been retired for nearly 20 years now, but the old days case is always wait on him. The reason we have laws is to punish people who prevent them from doing that again, or is it kind of a warning to others, look, we have lost about this. So when people avoid prosecution, it's annoying. I can't. I'm not going to sleep over it. I'm not going to cry about it. It happens sometimes, but she's we had at 1.57 warrants for guys that were and fled to Mexico. So we knew they were down in Mexico, a lot of when we knew their addresses, but this is big government and they don't care about the little people. It's significant. But matter in the big picture. From your experience, firsthand knowledge of the conversations that happened on the scene and in 1994, you know who did it, you know how they did it. And, you know, you knew where they were. Yeah. Or they came from where they went. All that was no. Everything is no. It was a very solid case. You know, easy to process. You shared with me that when he would walk from the Orange County superior court in saint Anna to the Orange County district attorney's office in the rhythm of his workdays, he would pass by the outer statue. And that kind of served as a reminder to him of this unsolved murder mystery, if you will. And he's always felt that it was. Higher up government institutions that got in the way of a very easily prosecuted case. So it always kind of had a thorn in the side element to it. And it wasn't just a statue. What is interesting is when that statue was first dedicated in 1994 on what would have been Alex 50th birthday, Mooney worked at. So you had Mooney, he said it was a light security day, but it was acrimonious because her Reuben who was as bellicose leader of the JBL was across the street in Santana and crossed the street from the statute dedication and was basically berating the family in the people in attendance of the dedication. And the FBI was there too as well just to keep tabs on everything. So, you know, the case had a way of coming up. So it definitely weighed on him on that day in 1994. In April, when he worked security for the statute dedication, and then in 1996, he goes with Ferrell buckles to the FBI field office in LA, where he got a front row seat in how the investigation was stymied in his recollection by the State Department. And so he has those memories in mind and he's open to speaking about his experience with the case and what he has seen. And as he mentioned to me, he expressed his remorse for the family because they have not been delivered justice for 36 years. Alex how they had three daughters at the time of his death his murder. And they were very young, and he never got to see them grow and get married and lived their lives. And that gnaws at a lawman who likes to feel dissatisfaction of justice being delivered and a case being closed, and surprisingly, it was really unprompted that he deemed out a man of peace. It was definitely the mere opposite of her Reuben. He was not Delacroix. He was not boisterous. He was very soft spoken and very eloquent in his media appearances, but he was a man of peace in that regard. If he found things that were disagreeable about his politics and stances on Palestine and Israel, it was very hard to hate Alex all day, unless, of course, you were embroiled in the JD L extremist mindset. So, you know, he expressed very forthrightly that he believed him to be a man of peace above all, no matter what disagreements there may be politically and it's just another case of justice denied and justice delayed. Audi's case is something that local politicians have never forgotten though. Former Congress member Sanchez press the House of Representatives repeatedly to investigate his assassination and then recently, Congress member Luca ra has continued that work. Absolutely. I spoke to congressman Correa about his resolution, House resolution. And what it seeks to do is basically enter Alexander's memory as a matter of congressional record. And recognize him as a victim of domestic terrorism. And as the congressman mentioned, it also acts to carry on with Sanchez's work before she left the office. And it also seeks to renew attention into the investigation. So it would be very interesting to see how the case develops and going forward, how all of this is going to coalesce because you have the ADC pressing the attorney general Merrick Garland to name suspects to provide details about the case while at the same time in Congress, you know, Rashida Talib has also cosponsored that House resolution. And so there's motion on this case after 36 years, where it all leads to, remains to be seen, but it's easy to be cynical because there has been concerted efforts to renew interest and not let the case grow cold in memory in action, but what really changes at the end of the day is getting closer, but we'll have to wait and see. What's important is that the three folks I mean, many people have passed on who've been involved in the case, but the three people who have been of interest internally in the investigations are still alive, so justice remains a possibility. Finally, what is it about the Audi case that has stayed with activists decades after his killing? It's always been important to the Arab American community, but when I wrote about his case 30 years later, the younger generation of Arab American activists in Orange County and elsewhere throughout the United States almost forgot about them, they had to relearn about him. He was just getting started. He was 41. It's hard to find audio clips of his appearances in the media or video clips because he was really just getting started. He joined the organization only for a few years. And before that was basically also a poet and a lecturer at orange coast college and graduated with a master's degree in political science from Cal state Fullerton. So he was a family man who just started a family and an activist who was really starting to shine and come into his own before his life was taken. So the new generation has had to kind of relearn his legacy over in the West Bank and he's never been forgotten. He's a hero in jifna Palestine, a martyr. And he's basically seen in that role, but also as a native son. Someone that if you traveled to that area, you're going to hear stories about how he was as a person. So his memory is spread between Southern California and the West Bank. Over here, and there's a bit of a renaissance, if you will, because the new generation of Arab American activists are basically taking the baton from their predecessors. And it will be up to them to continue to press for justice in the case. So really what we're seeing is a generational, like I said, passing of the baton. And we're going to see that level of advocacy continue. And in my work, I always try to not just have a focus on the case and the investigation and the persons of interest, if you will in the suspects, but it's always important, not just to ask who killed Alex all day, but it's always important to remember who was Alexander. Gabrielle, thank you so much for this interview..

FBI Robert Manning Manning oday United States government Department of Justice Israel saint Anna Alex O' LA times Patricia wilkerson ADC rabbi honey Phoenix American Arab anti discriminat Alex Audrey Helena ode Alex Saudis
"oday" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

07:45 min | 7 months ago

"oday" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"A ghost in Santana. It's there, but the people who remember are mostly gone. Absolutely. And that statue plays that role in a sense because cast like a ghostly apparition over the city. And then two, it also just remains there for people to inquire and ask questions. But yeah, you know it's this case from 1985, it's 36 years old now. And surprisingly, it doesn't go away. New generations will learn about him, even above and beyond the Arab American community. I think the Latino community in Santana has learned a lot about Alexander in the last ten years. And I think it's because of that persistent unapologetic push for justice that continues against the odds against what seems politically possible. What does a U.S. government officially say about the assassination of Alex O'Day? Well, the U.S. government doesn't say a whole lot. The FBI has been the lead agency in the murder investigation since 1985. And basically what they do year after year every October 11th is reassuring the Arab American community that the investigation is a priority that it is ongoing, and what they don't say is who they believe to be the authors of the crime. They have never publicly named the suspects that there are any that they have. And investigative journalism suggests that they do. I mean, they have a $1 million reward that has been promoted since about 1996 for information leading to a conviction of the crime. But it's just a very peculiar purgatory for the case, and it doesn't seem to break with any new developments over the course of the past few decades. So there is understandably a lot of cynicism within the Arab American community. But some of my most recent journalism suggests that it looks like the FBI has been, at least in the early onset of the investigation, pretty active in terms of trying to prosecute, but there's stymied. And according to my interview with retired lieutenant humi, it wasn't the FBI in 1996 that basically wasn't proactive. It was the State Department official in his recollection that said we need to look at the bigger picture of the U.S. Israeli relations in this case is going nowhere. There's a lot of speculation about oday's killer, but this is speculation that also comes from government statements and actions that sometimes contradict each other in 2016, for instance said, Department of Justice said that the oday family was actually victims of Robert Manning. Who's he? Robert Manning was one of three Jewish defense league members that had been discussed privately according to my reporting and others in connection with the Audi bombing. Never has he been officially named as a suspect we can't even say that. He was extradited in 93 from Israel to the United States in he stood trial for a male contract bombing. He was a hitman in a sense and sent him mail bomb at the behest of the person who paid for the crime, and unfortunately, Patricia wilkerson, a secretary in Manhattan beach, opened up the package and the bomb detonated and it exploded and killed her. So he is serving a life sentence for that crime. A retired FBI agent wanted to question him in the aude case and essentially he denied having been a member of the JD L, which was an extremist Jewish group founded by the late rabbi honey. And essentially, he says, I know nothing I did nothing, so he still in Phoenix Arizona is serving out his prison sentence. So why then does the United States government and Department of Justice say that the uday family is a victim of Robert Manning if they're not saying anything officially that Manning has anything to do with the killing of Alex O'Day? It's just this really peculiar legal predicament. It makes no sense, right? The American Arab anti discrimination committee, which is the group that Alex Audrey belonged to and was the West Coast regional director for, they are also deemed by the DOJ as they told me as victims of Manning's. And how can that be? It clears the way that classification internal classification clears the way for Helena ode to speak at the parole hearing as she did in 2018 in person in Phoenix, and then also in 2020 remotely. And the ADC president is also able to address the parole hearing in those years too as well as a victim of Manning's. But he's never been indicted. He's never been charged. He's never been convicted of that 1985 office bombing. In saint Anna that killed Alex Saudis. So it's a contradiction. It's a paradox. It just doesn't make any sense. What other hints have come out over the years about how much the U.S. government knows about the identity of a day's killers? It's been pretty well reported for the course of 30 plus years. Again, what I was able to do was corroborate a unnamed anonymous source, recounting of the scene in 85 in Santa Ana, where the FBI and LAPD joint terrorism task force members descended on the scene via helicopter and probably pretty dramatically in a little unusual for an Orange County city like that. They got off and they told lieutenant at the time it was the acting captain that day. And at the command center, one of the persons in the group of four basically said these are the people that we've been training, flying from New York to LA. They were lost at LAX. And the three names have been spoken of privately and then publicly and journalism and Andy green, who now goes by bruk Ben Joseph, Keith, Israel fuchs, and then Manning. So it's been an open secret who the investigation has looked at. And again, the FBI, according to the lawsuit documents that I referenced earlier, wanted to question and according to their field director that I interviewed a few years back, did question Manning about the audit crime. So at the bare minimum, you can call Manning a person of interest, and then with the parole hearings, the victimizer of the organization and the family, but in terms of the criminal conviction, something's getting in between. Some things in the middle, the ADC has long wanted to see the extradition agreement between the U.S. and Israel and with regards to Manning to see if there's answers there as to why that gap exists. Robert Friedman was a Village Voice journalist, and wrote a op-ed in the Los Angeles Times in 1990, where he was in Israel. And basically saw green and Manning at that time, and said they're here. They're living freely in these Israeli settlements. One was at that time it was also a particular settlement that followers of kahani would live in and basically they couldn't be arrested if they were in the settlements they had to be in Israel proper. But, you know, Friedman said you can find them there too. So it's not a secret who has been discussed in connection with the case, and it's not a secret and it hasn't been a secret where they are,.

Robert Manning FBI oday U.S. government Alex O' Manning Department of Justice Patricia wilkerson rabbi honey Santana American Arab anti discriminat Alex Audrey Helena ode U.S. saint Anna Alexander Alex Saudis Phoenix
"oday" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

08:13 min | 7 months ago

"oday" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"The times. There's always nice to be on. I have to admit I did not even know about the ode case until I became a reporter, even though I know that statue. So if you're walking through Santana, you see this big, you know, very serious statue of a man and you think, oh, you must be either some Roman or maybe a Mexican 'cause Santana is such a Mexican city. And then you go and you see the name Alex ode. Who is he? So it's almost like his case is a ghost in Santana. It's there, but the people who remember are mostly gone. Absolutely. And that statue plays that role in a sense because cast like a ghostly apparition over the city. And then two, it also just remains there for people to inquire and ask questions. But yeah, you know it's this case from 1985, it's 36 years old now. And surprisingly, it doesn't go away. New generations will learn about him, even above and beyond the Arab American community. I think the Latino community in Santana has learned a lot about Alexander in the last ten years. And I think it's because of that persistent unapologetic push for justice that continues against the odds against what seems politically possible. What does a U.S. government officially say about the assassination of Alex O'Day? Well, the U.S. government doesn't say a whole lot. The FBI has been the lead agency in the murder investigation since 1985. And basically what they do year after year every October 11th is reassuring the Arab American community that the investigation is a priority that it is ongoing, and what they don't say is who they believe to be the authors of the crime. They have never publicly named the suspects that there are any that they have. And investigative journalism suggests that they do. I mean, they have a $1 million reward that has been promoted since about 1996 for information leading to a conviction of the crime. But it's just a very peculiar purgatory for the case, and it doesn't seem to break with any new developments over the course of the past few decades. So there is understandably a lot of cynicism within the Arab American community. But some of my most recent journalism suggests that it looks like the FBI has been, at least in the early onset of the investigation, pretty active in terms of trying to prosecute, but there's stymied. And according to my interview with retired lieutenant humi, it wasn't the FBI in 1996 that basically wasn't proactive. It was the State Department official in his recollection that said we need to look at the bigger picture of the U.S. Israeli relations in this case is going nowhere. There's a lot of speculation about oday's killer, but this is speculation that also comes from government statements and actions that sometimes contradict each other in 2016, for instance said, Department of Justice said that the oday family was actually victims of Robert Manning. Who's he? Robert Manning was one of three Jewish defense league members that had been discussed privately according to my reporting and others in connection with the Audi bombing. Never has he been officially named as a suspect we can't even say that. He was extradited in 93 from Israel to the United States in he stood trial for a male contract bombing. He was a hitman in a sense and sent him mail bomb at the behest of the person who paid for the crime, and unfortunately, Patricia wilkerson, a secretary in Manhattan beach, opened up the package and the bomb detonated and it exploded and killed her. So he is serving a life sentence for that crime. A retired FBI agent wanted to question him in the aude case and essentially he denied having been a member of the JD L, which was an extremist Jewish group founded by the late rabbi honey. And essentially, he says, I know nothing I did nothing, so he still in Phoenix Arizona is serving out his prison sentence. So why then does the United States government and Department of Justice say that the uday family is a victim of Robert Manning if they're not saying anything officially that Manning has anything to do with the killing of Alex O'Day? It's just this really peculiar legal predicament. It makes no sense, right? The American Arab anti discrimination committee, which is the group that Alex Audrey belonged to and was the West Coast regional director for, they are also deemed by the DOJ as they told me as victims of Manning's. And how can that be? It clears the way that classification internal classification clears the way for Helena ode to speak at the parole hearing as she did in 2018 in person in Phoenix, and then also in 2020 remotely. And the ADC president is also able to address the parole hearing in those years too as well as a victim of Manning's. But he's never been indicted. He's never been charged. He's never been convicted of that 1985 office bombing. In saint Anna that killed Alex Saudis. So it's a contradiction. It's a paradox. It just doesn't make any sense. What other hints have come out over the years about how much the U.S. government knows about the identity of a day's killers? It's been pretty well reported for the course of 30 plus years. Again, what I was able to do was corroborate a unnamed anonymous source, recounting of the scene in 85 in Santa Ana, where the FBI and LAPD joint terrorism task force members descended on the scene via helicopter and probably pretty dramatically in a little unusual for an Orange County city like that. They got off and they told lieutenant at the time it was the acting captain that day. And at the command center, one of the persons in the group of four basically said these are the people that we've been training, flying from New York to LA. They were lost at LAX. And the three names have been spoken of privately and then publicly and journalism and Andy green, who now goes by bruk Ben Joseph, Keith, Israel fuchs, and then Manning. So it's been an open secret who the investigation has looked at. And again, the FBI, according to the lawsuit documents that I referenced earlier, wanted to question and according to their field director that I interviewed a few years back, did question Manning about the audit crime. So at the bare minimum, you can call Manning a person of interest, and then with the parole hearings, the victimizer of the organization and the family, but in terms of the criminal conviction, something's getting in between. Some things in the middle, the ADC has long wanted to see the extradition agreement between the U.S. and Israel and with regards to Manning to see if there's answers there as to why that gap exists. Robert Friedman was a Village Voice journalist, and wrote a op-ed in the Los Angeles Times in 1990, where he was in Israel. And basically saw green and Manning at that time, and said they're here. They're living freely in these Israeli settlements. One was at that time it was also a particular settlement that followers of kahani would live in and basically they couldn't be arrested if they were in the settlements they had to be in Israel proper. But, you know, Friedman said you can find them there too. So it's not a secret who has been discussed in connection with the case, and it's not a secret and it hasn't been a secret where they are,.

Robert Manning Santana FBI oday U.S. government Alex ode Alex O' Manning DOJ Patricia wilkerson rabbi honey American Arab anti discriminat Alex Audrey The times Helena ode U.S. saint Anna Alexander
"oday" Discussed on Computer Talk Radio

Computer Talk Radio

06:42 min | 9 months ago

"oday" Discussed on Computer Talk Radio

"Is benjamin rockwell. Now it's time to get down to business. It's time for us to assess how. It fits into the workplace how the workplace is impacted by technology in its various forms and how we can improve blood were doing. I've been asked to buy a few different people recently. Where do i think information. Technology is going. Where's the most critical area for people to focus on both in both as an employer but as an employee as an employer. What are the areas that you need to be driving your employees to provide as an employee. What do you need to be dealing to get ahead in the workplace above everything else we. We've got a lot of technology here but we're not always lever gene. The technology the best we can years ago we had just a few computers in the workplace and those computers were driving statistical analysis. And then we get away from that and we started using computers to send out letters and send out emails to do little chit chat online e l. instant messaging in all hate skewed. I can. I can talk to five different friends in five different offices around the world and We just talk about the weather. Well okay. let's get away from all of that and let's get back to what the core issue is with computers in the workplace it's data evaluation. It's data manipulation its statistical analysis. It's processing all of the information in regards to all of the widgets that the company has or at least all of the different. And i'm gonna. I'm gonna use the widgets term a couple of times throughout this but it's it's a widget is just a generic term. It can be a soft item. It can be a hard item it can be. Yes something you've manufactured in the company but it can also be a how many different people respond. How many people are asking this question. Verses that question how many Different interactions do you have this versus that. It's all of this statistical analysis across so many different realms. The important item here is to learn how all of the numbers work together. And whatever you're dealing with the statistics of the widgets again widgets being a generic term soft and hard. Basically cross all kinds of different questions. That might that might be asked of you learning how these all interact or important. You need to be able to sort out. Between incidents and problems these are two different. Terms in an incident is something. That's i like to present it like this it's incidental it's a one off. It's something that's just happened once. You need to be able to separate that from a problem. An incident is something broke down once. Your computer broke down. Once you had to reboot it. That was one incident now. My computer i need to reboot it five times a day every day and it has problems all the way route. I it experiences issues. Let me rephrase that inexperienced issues all the way through. If i don't reboot it. I don't go through those incidents five times a day. Most five incidents -oday become a problem that needs to be solved and incident doesn't need to be solved. It's already solved by the time you've finished with it. The problem keeps on going. This is coming from something called eitel. it infrastructure library. This is how they separate out the difference between incidents and problems but we can apply this all the way across the board Let's say we managed to produce ninety five witches we try to produce one hundred widgets but those five widgets we we struggle with those five widgets. I'll if when we do those five out of one hundred widgets if it's always the same thing that's happening. That's a problem. We need to fix the problem. If it's five different things that are happening. And they're never repeatable then they become incidents. We don't need to focus on incidents we need to solve the problems. We need to determine successes and failures and a lot of that comes from understanding the statistical analysis that under that comes from understanding. What makes us money. And what loses us money if we can make those ninety five out of one hundred widgets and it cost us ten cents for each of those five widgets. The don't get made and we're making in those widgets sell for five hundred dollars. Yeah maybe we don't need to worry about it but we need to focus on. What are the true successes. What are the true failures. Water the things that cost the company the most money to fix or to keep going. What are the things that don't cost us money to fix. And we start putting these altogether and we start getting to the bottom of all of these different statistics get into something called root cause analysis and that is how we solve the problems. This is how we move forward and we find out what is wrong with what we're doing for the company what the doing and so forth if we can put all of this together i think this is the most critical information technology that firms need to address. We need to be digging down to the bottom of each of the issues that are most important to the company. Solve them and then move onto the next problem and the next problem and keep solving them improving our competitive advantage. This is benjamin rockwell. You're listening to computer.

benjamin rockwell oday eitel
"oday" Discussed on Cloud Security Podcast by Google

Cloud Security Podcast by Google

06:47 min | 9 months ago

"oday" Discussed on Cloud Security Podcast by Google

"Turn intelligence into usable lodge. There's three components to it. So i is like the intelligence team operations in the first place right and so that's a whole bunch of intake right so things that we see things that we learned from infosec twitter things that you read about in records or white papers there threat research. Try like that. We have to take into account like there are theoretical threats. That get published end or proven. We don't know if we've seen them in the wild or we don't know if we ever well but all of those the inputs and so there's a tremendous amount of just prioritization kind of thoughtful operations. That just goes into taking all that stuff and racking and stacking it based on your intelligence requirements so the next step we've identified. The requirements like we refer to miss threats so threat can be a piece of software. It can be a person. It's very abstract but we've got a set of threats that we care about the function of threat research which comes next is to take that thing and understand how it works right. What are the behaviors. Motor targeting criteria. That us right. What's the software they use. Where do we need to observe it and so like a lot of that is breaking that down whether us attack or some other model but figuring you know answering some of those key questions in the context of a threat. That's important once we've done that it becomes pretty easy. You can kind of see the linkage between that in detection engineering team right now. Know what does it do. What do we know with high confidence. Louis no confidence. Where are we going to see this thing. Like where in our telemetry data sources are these signals going to appear now. The detection engineering team. It's definitely not an easy job. But now they've got a pretty concrete foundation to work from in the context. That's strat right. You can kind of look to your data sources and now you're just trying to make sure hey with using the tools at our disposal. Our we describing the software the behaviors the relationships that describe that threat. It's system right so it's iterative you know. We tend to like really optimized for things that are interesting much more so than things that are accurate when we go build those rules analytics strikes. So we're okay with false positives. We've got really good tools to deal with those energetic. Any detection engineering team. That's like dealing with a high quality at scale. Having tools to deal with false positives really effectively is important but really not optimizing. It's kind of a sweet spot right between being really specific and being overly general. Look at all the power shelf things and find. The bad loan is not a good strategy but building ten thousand targeted analytics for every single mutation. You've ever seen is also not a good strategy. That didn't work. Well for av right and so i go somewhere in between and then going back to the kinds of systems thinking is like understanding the tools you have your disposal and using those to figure out how to find that balance writer really optimizing for not missing things but in a way that you can afford so that balance in landing on the right balance point. How do you think about the problem telling good detection from bad and perhaps even more. Interestingly how do you feel good detection from great detection and finding enough this obsession for the last few weeks if not more so. I'm so looking forward to keith. Sensors anton isn't this like the obsession of your career. As far as i can tell a game. Whatever if you have to say. I think there's a couple of ways to think about. This good detection will think of as like the simplest thing that you should be willing to pay for is going to have good coverage for the majority of threats that you expect to see day in day out. And so the places where you'll see people optimize that i would say maybe aren't good detection is like you can definitely over optimize for finding extraordinarily clever attacks. You can really try to optimize heavily by looking at past o'day and trying to predict how you're going to find future oday when in reality whether you're dealing with a state adversary or whether you're dealing with ransomware operator something in between most of the techniques that you're going to see them use are going to be really consistent you're going to have a very small percentage of threats in practice are to use some really novel techniques you've never seen before or going to require some really esoteric form of analysis and so i would say good israeli like you can find that most of the time by just like looking at who can explain concepts like coverage prioritization visibility really simply. That's usually good detection because you're trying to say much of the staff and are saving a male and metal jokes later. That sounds like much of the stuff with fall out of that category right. I would love to talk about m. l. We should absolutely that for for a few minutes from now. So that's good right. It's optimized for the things that you need to do with most of the time and it doesn't well and a dozen consistently the difference between good in grade israeli like how. Well you can operationalize dancing right. I always like to remind folks. No one's hurting for security technology to buy right if you want more alerts or you won't more security tools. You are not going to have a hard time finding people to sell them to you but going from technology or a tool you can buy to an operational capability that's really affected and that through testing and otherwise like works when it matters. I think that's the difference between good and great and it has absolutely nothing to do or very little to do with detection and everything to do with like operational excellence right being able to take the same set of rules or analytics and be able to put those into practice and go from thousand investigative. Leads to the one thing that you need to stop what you're doing go address. And that's what's missing for most folks. I know like that's the only reason that right canary existed in the first place. And i know the only reason that like a lot of just md are and the security services market exists because it's exceptionally hard to go from even a really great product to an operational capability of finding containing responding to things in an amount of time that's meaningful and prevents damage but sounds like not just talking about what's on the left. What's on the ride. But you're talking about like a broader frame set in the people pro side around the detection logic. So it's basically a good detections in grade detections aren't about the language aren't about the type of Type of coal use. But it's kind of about the frame around the detection logic like what happens with staff. What kind of stuff comes in. What happens the staff that comes out who looks at what do they do. How do they define so. That's how i mean choppers in it may be in the more actionable terms. Is that fair or not i. There's another piece. I heard in there too which is great detection is quiet. Good detection is catching things but great detection is not catching the wrong things. And it's easy to go buy more findings. The challenge is buying analysts. Focus on.

oday twitter Louis anton keith
King George Preview: Racing Tips

Racing Post

02:32 min | 10 months ago

King George Preview: Racing Tips

"Is three thirty five askar on saturday. It's the king george. The six and queen elizabeth stakes over a mile and a half only six runners. If i told you that the forty two one outside and one group one last time you will realize it is a good rice. And here's the betting. The brilliant love heads the betting at thirteen to unreasoning out. Best prices as per racing post dot com and a quick plug. If you click on the best book price button it immediately brings up the latest odds and each way terms from seven of the leading. Mike is a great way to get the best value. Nice and easily. Love is thirteen right. The darby -oday our is five to two lone eagle six to one eight to one wonderful tonight. Nine mishrif and forty. Two one broom silent water. Rice is a rice to watch an enjoy or is it a race to get stuck into from betting spectacle. Start with keith melrose. Yeah think he's more of a risk to enjoy Likud this reysen. You've alluded to let elba oven there. That broom as forty to one. He wanted to grown predeceased clue. Last night i was less than three weeks will not a level. We're looking at here and can you. Can you realistically back horses. Short love than an i. i'd really. I'm a big final of i. Think if you ever beats new foe. She'll be are unbear- handsomely. I think she is a really really good horse. And i assume brooms a pricey as he's sort of presumed on pacemaker. Jd potentially because i think he made all it saw include so we've got the tactical element the only thing. I'm certain industries that every time i look opinion changes slightly. The only one that stays the same. I think a diaz to short. I don't think he was white. The best source on the day darby by suspect key lane would be fifty matt. Husky lost two front shoes that day. Adam kirby saved every autograph on nubian individuals Italian i don't think anything really got the chance to show why it could do. Even though he doesn't he's five to two legal sex to one if they were both see for one it'd be taken roughly the same amount of the market and i think it'd be closer to fee are not regard the deserves to be shorter and on him by just i think five to two is too short and our resolve this qualley will go as far as liam adult. I might just ball it and by club instead because massive fun but it's a really competitive and tough race as going to be mostly by watching for me.

Askar Keith Melrose Reysen Queen Elizabeth Likud Elba George Adam Kirby Mike Rice Matt Liam
"oday" Discussed on The Astrology Podcast

The Astrology Podcast

01:45 min | 10 months ago

"oday" Discussed on The Astrology Podcast

"Your sun and moon being so important and especially the sun and -oday chart or the moon and the night chart if you're studium is partially composed of one of those that's also going to add additional weight and it's gonna tide and more with your personality and certain types of personality characteristics than it might otherwise and then you can also learn rule ships in there as well that each of those planets also services that will arrive house. Oh houses and said a further not doesn't just import it's natural certifications but also The topics of the houses that have rules so it can get pretty complicated but when you write it all out so you know it's You know giving you all of that information about that. Stelling muslims and the fact that each of those planets rules one or two houses and it's like importing significant. That's the other reason why it's kind of like this. Like black hole. Maybe isn't the best analogy. I'm struggling to come up with a better one. But just the idea of that being this displacement field that just draws so much energy into it and has so much energy ca zecevic weight and due to the preponderance basically of planets in the chart being in one sector of the chart rather than being spread out evenly so that they're they're more Not balanced because balanced his threat term. But certainly there is a concentration or an intensification of energy of just one sign or one house which is somewhat unusual. Compared to most people just had like wanner Two or zero planets.

Stelling wanner
"oday" Discussed on Antibuddies

Antibuddies

08:04 min | 11 months ago

"oday" Discussed on Antibuddies

"Where you're having inflammation that's occurring in non pathogenic conditions and. It's kind of this thing where this is causing the spread of senescence. Where the sas factors can cause adjacent or distill Cells that are normal to become sniffen and sort of the kind of the adage. The bad apple spoils the bushel. Okay i think. I was getting confused with sas being only limited immune cells but it looks like it's something that's all no all cells want to keep wanting to keep in mind as far as i look at citizens most part of the normal normal process articles through this part of the wound healing process. So you have cells right now on your body snatching us put some meeting district on go to the state in eastern comes up comes into that area and deals with it. So that's something. That's normal toro body as we age as we get older you're lose the ability to regulate Glenn beck between a normal cell state. Anderson essence. Allstate's it's part of this is part of the normal daily process over your cells existing. Okay thanks a lot for that. Let's go to the next term. I was out be interested. No how do you define oxidative stress and oxidative legions. Matt can you Yes so oxidative. Stress is really this global state of stresses induced by reactive oxygen species. And so the way you do that is looking at one side of it which is Ross reactive oxygen species so they could be the production of them. The oxidative lesions in this case. Dna damage so you can have one of the most communist eight ox of wanting there's also cyclosporine addicts which is another Formed that it's something that can be measured by mass spectrometry on the flip side of that you also have your antioxidant buffering capacity and so what we know with age is that reactive oxygen species are going up there being produced more and also with age. You're antioxidant asi. The is actually going down. So things like you're losing catalase activity. You're finding increase rates of oxidized glutathione versus reduce gouda. Thia which is kind of one of the the first responder anti-oxidants in the body. When you were talking about the appearance these are these are alternate periods. Any metabolites is it. Because of the reactive oxygen species are super iron that is interacting with these molecules and changing them. That's when some of them can get integrated into your dna for instance right and causes damage. Well it's actually. The the ross is attacking sort of the hetero duplex dna and causing them. I'm sure it's probably also causing them on free nucleotides but that could also have complications for dna. Polymerase is incorporating them unless they have some massively cavern is active sites. Some of them do all right nice so with that. I think we can get into the introduction of the paper. You handle a late. This one aging is a risk factor in many chronic diseases and therefore targeting the process that made aging could be As we age our mississippi also loses its effectiveness against packages. A cancer of another point. You said a senescent. Union system limit. How effective explanations are you just. Immune cells are more marketing to cycle arrest. -oday secret i love. Thought site depends As we discussing technology such now. here's scientists the outlook. We know that as we age our release in citizens and becomes weaker however is the aging process that promotes yoon citizens. Or could it be that the senate signal system. It's what's promoting. The overall itchy process is brings me to the central question that these forks aims to answer. What is the role of sensing insisted justice. H all right. Thanks a lot for the introduction. You hit you with dad. We can get into this and the first question. The authors are asking what happens if the prematurely induced senescence in the hamid avoid compartment to answer this question the auditors used a strategy. That involves knocking out. This enzyme called e. r. c. c. One that is non normally involved in dna repair with impaired dna repair mechanism. The cells who will accumulate dna damage and become senescent early on since the authors. Were only interested in inducing. Senescence in the immune cells lets him. Id aboard excels. This knockout was restricted. Or conditional to the humid- board excels with this valve. I agree e. r. c. one flocks mice where only the valve expressing cells will be will. Get the sec. G knocked out. And this is this web is i. Think expressed by mostly hamid avoid stem cells. So this makes it slightly more specific Right here very general question about this marine models of aging and matt since you the aiding expert. I'll let you answer this one In this paper you guys use the one knockout model in the in the habitable excels. Are there any other models of aging and is there a particular reason that he went with this model so to answer your first question. Yes there's many many models of aging whether it's natural aging or in some cases accelerated aging and a lot of times we use accelerated aging models because their time cost effective so in this case we previously studied a hyper more mouse model of uscc one which has One nulla lille and one truncated Mouse ages about six times faster than a normal mouse so experiences and spontaneously occurring in dodges. Dna damage like a normal mouse would but just at a much faster rate and we've done comparative senescence analysis in this mouse model. And seeing that. It's quite similar. senescence pattern to actually age mouse and as many of the same features of natural marine aging as well as human aging and we went with this model to study the tissue specific effects but also the cell non autonomous effects. Who what's going on in the cells that delete ears and the cells that do not delete er c. One and that's kind of how you can start to tease out the Individual contributions of a particular tissue. That's aging on the rest of the mouse k. So with that coming back to the article the authors notice that these ear one condition lockout mice. Or let's call them the mutant mice for simplicity. From here onwards these mice had increased genotoxic stress around ten montafir age. These mice also accumulated increased. Eight oxo guanosine which is an indicator of in modification induced by oxidative stress. Eventually these mice also had leucopenia which the authors confirmed is due to the senescence behavior and not a developmental defect. These mice had fewer t cells in the spleen. And your in the bone marrow. This contrast with the wild type mice where aged mice had stable lymphocyte counts matt. How do you think these mice have reduced. Lymphocyte counts compared to the regularly aged.

oday Allstate Glenn beck hamid Anderson apple Matt yoon ross mississippi senate cancer sec matt
Lying Is Good for Your Heart? Ron Burgundy Explains

The Ron Burgundy Podcast

01:05 min | 1 year ago

Lying Is Good for Your Heart? Ron Burgundy Explains

"Remember. I grew up very poor with none of the advantages you've had. I didn't have a tube of chocolate ice cream running into my mouth all day. Long the way you did carolina. I didn't have your dry skin problem. Either oh we could afford growing up was an old phil co radio really i. I don't think that's true. Well i could be lying. I do a lot of lying. You know you know that. it's good for the circulation. Eighty percent of all doctors will admit that a few lies. -oday will contribute to good heart health. You've heard that right. i have no it. Gets you excited. Nervous will my wife discover my secret. Letters will the irs find out. My podcast is a front for money. Laundering i mean. The medical community is divided. More research needs to be done. But it's basically been proven true lying nice on the body. It's proven jesus which woman what are you. I mean you're catching every one of my lives. Today i'm lying with great power authority and it's no match for your which he powers i give up.

Phil Co Oday Carolina IRS
What the Heck are NFTs? Let's Ask Beeple.

Sway

04:11 min | 1 year ago

What the Heck are NFTs? Let's Ask Beeple.

"Mike welcome or should i call you. People your can just call me. Mike was weird. Call me don't you dare call me my dungeon from high school with swish e issue. So let's not get into these things which makes a lot more sense but explain people. It's like a fuzzy. Like you walk looking thing. I'd get over there okay. Reach it adds a toy from the eighties. Kinda like beeps and makes a sound. they're not that popular. If you look at just go people toy and you can see what they look like again. This is something. I named myself like years ago. Why as. I did not expect to be answering this question. Twenty years later right. Because is an artist. Moment of artistic reverie or what in my more solid like when you cover. It's is it beeps and so it like when you change the light it beeps. And so there's a sort of interplay between light and sound and the i work that i did looks nothing like the work you see. Now and it was really very like abstract audiovisual tightly sinked audio and video. So that's why i did it. So that that interplay between light and south. I say so you happen to like this toy was it who gave it to so our family actually gave it to my grandma and then and this was an toya head like growing up right. We gave it to her. When i was like ten or so and then somehow i just took it back right like five years later or ten years later and that was that it wasn't light bright or something like that. That would have been a different name for you. So mike winkle. But i'm gonna call you thank you very much. I appreciate it so way before this auction. You're creating digital art and showcasing places like instagram and twitter. That's where you started sharing. This is a project you started. I think it was may two thousand seven. Were you created and post new digital art. Work every day Talk about this effort and why you wanted to do this. Yes so when. I started this out The first one was made. I two thousand seven. I wanted to get better at drawing. And i'd sauna an illustrator out of the uk named tom. Judd who did like a sketch -oday in his sketchbook And he did it for about a year in like. I think i thought that was a cool way. To sort of like you know incrementally improved. And so i started doing a drawing every day And like posting it online again this just on my website and literally. Nobody was seeing it besides my mom and light three friends And so. I did that for like a year and If you look at the christie's actually you can see all of those drawings. In the upper left hand corner there are all sort of like they're in the lower right hand corner is the last of the like five thousand day And so after a year. I learned a lot. It had pushed me to sort of like try a of new techniques and so after that i was like well what if i use that same thing to teach myself a three d program which i didn't know and when i say three d program it's similar to what they make like pixar movies. Yes spain the art telling these software so the software basically has it's it's like a three d world where you can place any sort of objects or build any sort of objects and then you have lights virtual lights that you place and and play some around the people and then you have a virtual camera and you basically shoot a picture of the the people. The way i work now is really almost like i have a huge giant collection of three d models. There's marketplaces where you can buy. There's thousands upon thousands you type in bike. Here's know eight hundred bikes which by deal on and so you can just buy these models and then you can use them and stuff and so i can with one. Click pull those into the scene and then i can sort of pose them. Put them wherever i want. Scale the mob scale them down. It's almost like playing with toys. I've got the biggest bass toy collection. I could break them apart and put you know a new head on a new body on new arms on whatever and then sort of set up these scenes and take a picture of it. And you don't want to compare it to clip art but it is doing a collage online corrective some but in a three d format. Yeah it's like that because again. I'm taking these assets that you know. I had not built sort of putting them together in sort of a bunch of different

Mike Winkle Mike Oday Toya Instagram Judd Christie Twitter TOM Pixar UK Spain
"oday" Discussed on Fun Time Moms

Fun Time Moms

06:56 min | 1 year ago

"oday" Discussed on Fun Time Moms

"Or fucking job or like i'd mean my clock is just amazing docking word. Okay that's just like fuck is one of the one of the best vocabulary words series or you can't you can't fuck Heavy a now. Be a bird added like it's just a great fucking word so i'm guessing basically five questioning favorite celebrity. Mom i think you guys on on my favorite celebrity mom is fifty teagan. I'm obsessed with chrissy in. I wanna be best friends with her. I kinda wanna like slatter her. Dmz like hey christie jess alike. Let's be friends. I always take up for you. And that way means that the mother fucking hate mail but i also really liked chrissy teigen. I think she fits in with us now. Personality is a fun time. She's done by the time i definitely. She definitely like makes fun herself. And that's like part of being a mom like we'd like to make fun of some. I'll this show without Celebrity mom i of most personally relate to because i really feel like there's one are really in particular relate to know and i always say like that's a great at diesel terachi. Like she had a child very very young. And still you never really so my problem to raji. You say i won't really hers. Took her mom. Let's not so that's me. Grown suck right but you don't know her is a minor league we're seeing chrissy exactly is right. You know what. I mean by kit so i always joke and be like 'cause morocco is so fucking lacks of a her case as s. Kind of like me like she like she calls them dim babies like when they were boy. And i'm like that's why the closest like that we've seen example of so. Here's the next question. Cocktail wind will straight up. I'm a cocktail girl. I'll look like a nice. You know some you get a knife. Linda martini relies marcy. Can i get a lemon drop martini. Right limited in baca right. So i'm definitely a straight of girl like mallika story or straight up bowman do a cocktail. My favorite taco is a french marteen. So you wanna be most time next question worth then you go to care for your child. That is way is that right. Ain't never been called to your kid's school for house for chow school now. I really haven't ever been call for anything super crazy. Never call. I mean you know. Now i mean. My kids agreed to lot schools. So all whole lot more off in this. How would have liked to been called. But i would say what were there was to really bizarre fucking times right. Ralph like what the kind of call is right at one time was sean was in the principal's office after school. I had to come pick him up because he gets to spend in front of buzz because He walked up to a teacher in. Xm confronted a teacher took his ninja star from someone else. So sean said that older kid shovels at first grade he said oday menendez off a he's He let somebody one of his friends holding star in the cafeteria. The teachers in the cafeteria took the person like ripped it up as an industry as a piece of paper. It's a peace day but as like a a name on shot medic that he was in kindergarten first grade so he can make one himself. He got older came to make wealth form and whatever so it got taken by the teacher from someone else. Shaw welcome to the teacher. That the little boy said took the star and toward while up to you and said you took my star earlier. Usually like this is abc. Other getting on the bus okay. So he's getting a little yellow bus to come home and to managers are to dislike when star. He's like from so-and-so teams like oh yeah because you know he's not supposed to head shot punched him in his leg and then proceed again proceeded to get more vise like like he's just just like like bitch like i fly. Ran down bitch. I mean as i tell you then get on. A bus are kids. But if i pick between the three children of shortage their growth ray girl man. It's just so proud of him originally was over. At least it's house and may shot at talk about twenty minutes about. He has a job guy. He's shop in to see how he was like telling me about his workday. And i can make money. Why fall life. I'm making my proud of him. As a kid was was openly. I'm mcgee shopping. We get clinical delay mine and now now they're back the fuck you say found me around lab like what are they work like. How many oh this is not just the weekend rica. he's saying right. So yeah i was. He was like yeah so that was one of those bizarre calls. I've ever guide out his lead there. That was part of the most bizarre next question. Would you revolution ask site with hearing may fall carousel.

slatter christie jess chrissy teigen chrissy Linda martini teagan house for chow school raji oday menendez mallika sean baca marcy morocco bowman Xm Ralph Shaw abc mcgee
"oday" Discussed on Healthcare Business Secrets

Healthcare Business Secrets

02:46 min | 1 year ago

"oday" Discussed on Healthcare Business Secrets

"But you won't start out in the beginning with that. But as you reach a thousand as you which i think there's a ten thousand threshold you can get your group to ten thousand and higher it becomes as organic animal that is really fun and engaging and you say that they. They know me but i don't necessarily know them. The interesting thing is we have people that are so engage actually know allow these will never been in my programs. That's if you were starting again. How do you place white on a group. This say adds to women on your case or or any other medium. was a brick and mortar practice online program based practice. Here's the thing. I think that these video ads. They're going to group. You don't have to spend that much money whereas like webinar ads and all targets and all that actually ends up costing pretty high so people's initial budget are to be very highly skewed thinking that i gotta focus on webinar thing but even ten dollars five dollars a day on ads that feed the facebook grip. It is going to overtime consistently think about not. Even you add ten people to your group everyday just from five dollars hats in a month. Three hundred people men. That's three hundred dollars is not a lot of money and it's really worthwhile so it takes time but it's really worth it. It's one of those. Where as used slowly build on that it gets exponential growth at a certain point. So i think that you don't it doesn't have to be higher percentage even five dollars ten dollars a day on ads. I would even say if you want to initially You know if you wanna put a higher. It's fine but i wouldn't go twenty bucks a day and i never have gone over twenty dollars a day for ads running sujoy for people trying to facebook groups. Still don't run with a twenty dollars worth of ads. A day tron. How many applicants you getting into the group -oday fifty two hundred average right now. Polly route seventy you know. Oh and that's about twenty dollars of ads a day but i think there's something about video ads. My advice is to people would be to get really good at doing video ads. That are you know. I call it entertaining so that you're educating people but entertaining them like don't doom and gloom it but i use humor like my ads for facebook Odds join our group. A lot of them have humor in it. So i it's it's amazing What a good video ad especially if you only pay after they watch a certain period of time it can appear in front of a lot of people give you a lot of recognition and i find that video. Ads are more effective than by copycats into the face of the group. But that may be. Because how i gauge video and i just love it and people enjoy me on video so that for me was a good media but if that's not your medium i definitely was still do a copy. Ads now was still run at least twenty bucks a day just to joined a facebook group. Provide some really good value in my copy. Where do you get a lot of your influence. Where the.

facebook oday
"oday" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:37 min | 1 year ago

"oday" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"This two weeks stoppage for all youth and recreational hockey, effective at five o'clock. Quoting here. This is not the situation that anyone desires. The Commonwealth feels strongly that the hockey community has contributed to the increase in Cove in 19 cases over the past several weeks. And it is appropriate to reassess the guidance as it currently stands. Mass hockey goes on to warn that unless they are able to correct the issues I e compliance with Kovar guidelines, this shutdown could be significantly longer than the current two weeks again that pause, giving them time to address the issues and talked to the Youth athletes as well. And more kids will be allowed on campus that humans hammers this spring. The university has announced this Friday that it wants first year students and transfer students to return. Next semester. You Mass exploring options for students who don't want to come back, including a potential housing arrangement on the former Mount Ida College campus. So big news there you heard it here first. On Devil BBC News Radio the I Heart radio app. Andrew Oday. We're nearly upon a weekend, but first we have to Get to the closing bell. Andrew joins us now from Bloomberg. Yeah, and it looks like it's not going too hot. Right now. We are cutting earlier losses right now, the Dow losing 98 points. NASDAQ Down 16 has to be 500 down one. It should be pointed out that more stocks are rising than falling at the big board, so it's not quite as bad as it looks. Just looking at the indexes until summer. Quarter results are not playing very well in the market. The microchip maker report strong demand for its processors to power. A personal desktop and laptop PCs is people in America and elsewhere bulked up there at home Tech. But weakness in order is for big server processor has led to a bigger than expected revenue loss. Shares of Intel listed on all three major indexes are falling as much as 11% Today. This week, Amazon joined the growing list of companies allowing employees currently working from home to continue doing so until well into next year today linked in is joining the movement. Extending work at home through at least July 12th of next year and rode a Bloomberg business on W. B z Boston's news radio. What did he say? Complete election coverage from now until election day, and after Tony easy, Boston's news.

Andrew Oday hockey Bloomberg Boston Mount Ida College Commonwealth Kovar Intel Amazon America Tony
"oday" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"oday" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Apart just just soon as I can get there. So Bob hopped into his patrol car and drove the 24 hours to Montana. Once he got there, the authorities and captured David in a hail of gunfire. Hospital oday with laying there flat back. He had a handcuff elite. One leg went through the footboard. You saw me got agreeing. He's all of that is they use it in my nose. I can't even move like better move out of the blue for a while that you don't move way We waited there few minutes and said they were We had the Texas of all if you can walk your Willis, if you gain won't usually stay right here where I was told You know, I'm getting a little thieving already. And they want another all with me. Just like it all that injury. They were there, and I knew it. Yeah. Bob had to get a Montana judges written permission to extradite David back to Texas. Coming back from Montana when he'd sorted for he had in mind how he was going to rescue his girl from Andi. So he would probably kid down for my Children and I hate him. You're barrel. That's what slam the brakes..

Bob Montana David Texas
"oday" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

07:10 min | 1 year ago

"oday" Discussed on KTOK

"Hash out today's events. This is the drive with Leigh Matthews and resetting the scene of the drive on NewsRadio. 1000. Katie. Okay, talked about a Norman City Council member. Now that it looks like some of the Recall efforts are not going to go through retaliating against those who did sign the petition way. Don't know if it's going to happen. It just been suggested that it might happen. And we'll keep our eyes on that situation. The president was accused of being a climate arsonist by Joe Biden. I'm not sure what a climate arsonist is. But I think it's also adding to the fact that Joe Biden seems to be delusional if he thinks the president can control the weather. Now I know what they're trying to do. They're trying to appeal to the ultra left on the ultra let left embracement of climate change as a religion. I'm not one of these to deny the fact that the climate changes I know it does. I know that there were colder. Winters when I was a kid. And I also know that there were warmer winters when I was a kid. It just depends on what was going on with the worldwide climate that that what I am not willing to accept is that man? Is causing it. Is it caused by solar radiation, Possibly Is it caused by AH Ocean currents, Possibly But you just haven't been able to convince me that the time that man has been on this planet has been causing Climate problem. Yeah, the climate changes. That doesn't mean it's a bad thing. And I'm not goingto start driving around an electric golf cart. And then patting myself on the back for being so concerned about the climate. When I personally don't have any control over it. It's like asking for reparations. And that's by the way, one of the goals of the black lives matter. Movement reparations. They see Native Americans getting money from the government. They see. Japanese Americans who were detained and retained during World War two getting money from the government. And they're like, Okay, where's mine? I was my my my heritage was slavery. The unforgivable sin. Thing is the federal government did not enslave them. They were enslaved by The marketplace. That found it palatable. To go over in Africa, enslave people and then sell the slaves, and it wasn't just the United States it was worldwide. Yes, it was a horrible institution. I'm glad we've risen above it. But those some of those in black lives matter don't want us to rise above it. They want us to wallow with them in it. Why It gives them power. Political power financial power. Social power. And it also continues to perpetuate this idea that the entire United States is ripping itself apart. And I don't believe that I believe we've got some problems. I believe we've got some things that are being argued, But I don't think we're nearly in the state we were, say 1965 to 1968. We don't have National Guardsmen opening fire on people who are doing nothing. The only thing that the police know the police are not opening fire on people who are doing nothing. The police air opening fire on people who are about to kill them. It was just a peaceful protest. All really Then why did they insist on starting at midnight? To whom were they going to protest if they started in the middle of the night? No. This had nothing to do with protests that had everything to do with provoking a riot. Eight for a 1000 Lei Matthews, Katie okay dot com. Leah this from Damon, who says Ah I have heard. A lot of scientists believe the weather change is due to the polls moving, which they have proven o The magnetic poles. Yes, they do shift and they are shifting. And you don't really have to look any further than your compass to find that. Kevin writes Lee you were talking about Joe Biden a moment ago. My new comment when someone says Biden would make a great president Hey, I think you Dropped your brain over there, didn't you? Yeah, yeah. Wait for a 1000. Leigh Matthews, Katie okay dot com. Speaking of the election Election fatigue. It's a really thing As election Day gets closer, you're noticing, but you might be feeling more stressed out. Well, Doctors say that election stress is happening and it's happening more often, but you can't avoid it. Dr Oday Al Assaraf is a Swedish American hospital doctor who says social media has increased election stress over the past decade. This is what I've been saying. You can't get away from it. It's in your back pocket. 24 7. A doctor goes on to say Not only do the sights expose users to nonstop political coverage, they create a place for people who argue about their different political views. And what I'm finding is there arguing about them anonymously, which makes them feel more empowered and There is no There is no accountability. The doctor says, the more we overthink the future, the more anxious we're going to get, the more anxious we get, the more less the more less productive we are and the more problems that create in our lives. Dr Al Assaraf recommends taking a break from social media to avoid election stress. I'm no doctor, okay? But fans of this program you've heard me say this for the past five years I've been saying this take a break. You've got to get away from it. You shouldn't know what's going on in the world 24 7, even if they are news junkie. And I don't even consider myself a news junkie. I keep up with it because I think it's important for me a talk show host to know what's going on. But that don't mean I like doing it. I get I get, I grow weary of it. I really do. Wait for a 1000. Leigh Matthews, Katie okay dot com. Quick reminder to Goto Katie okay dot com for AH are four or five for less this week. It's Hacienda tacos Get a whole bunch of.

Leigh Matthews Katie Joe Biden president Dr Oday Al Assaraf United States Norman City Council federal government NewsRadio. Winters Africa National Guardsmen Leah Kevin
"oday" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"oday" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Look to take a commanding three games to none lead in the best of seven. Siri's Bruins players had their exit interviews today and after saying he was undecided about his playing future earlier this week, 43 Year Olds Oday No, Ciara clarified his comments today. I feel strong physically and I'm Ah I'm positive and I believe that I can still play this game and contribute to the team and then and I want to stay in Boston. I want to be Boston Growing. Red Sox play The Blue Jays tonight at 7 30 A couple of ex Patriots players have signed with teams today. Kicker Stephen Gostkowski lands in Tennessee and wide receiver Josh Gordon has signed back with the Seahawks. Brian Antonelli W B Z Boston's news radio to 13 traffic and weather together. The Subaru retailers are New England all wheel drive. Chop it God, the threes. They got some delay in getting out of town this afternoon. Mike got no surprise. The expressway South bound is just inching along here from the tunnel down to South Bay Air crash by Columbia Road gone. No. Once you clear South Bay, you're moving along fine. Until you get down the furnace Brook Parkway. Lots of brake lights from there to the range. Re split already. 40 minutes from the tunnel. The split with that struggle getting out of the city. The north on Expressway Grind Braintree, a passing the pontiff. But after that you're good. Coming in through three. South is now backed up before route 18 down to Derby Street. But after that you're good. All the way to the sagittal bridge. You're heading for the cape. Good news for you right now. The lower end of 1 28 93. They're not bad right now. 24 South Sounds good for now as well Up to the North 93 North is Champa Mylar. So coming up pass Route 60 in Medford, But Ruth, three is OK. The upper end of 1 28 fine route ones running an average 18 minutes from the tube in rage upto the Lynnfield Tunnel.

Boston Lynnfield Tunnel South Bay Ciara Champa Mylar Siri Subaru Red Sox Brian Antonelli Stephen Gostkowski Bruins Brook Parkway Braintree Seahawks Josh Gordon Medford Mike Blue Jays Tennessee Ruth
"oday" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

04:34 min | 1 year ago

"oday" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Facility like I had before, and I met with my business mentor and he convinced me to give it one more shot. This was in the late 2014 and what he Convinced me to do was to go outside the box. I had always been a lone wolf. Always. I'm an independent person kind of raised an only child. All my siblings were out of the house. I gravitated towards single sports, running out lawn ultramarathons racing motorcycles. That's what kind of personality and he said, You need to reach help. And you know it took that level of just hitting rock bottom for me to realize. And, you know, thank you thinking back on it. I don't really know how I did it because I wasn't paying myself and I had to hire somebody. And basically pay them $50,000 a year to help me rebuild. That wasn't making any money, right? So I went farther into debt to do that, But I took that last vote because I believed so much in what we were doing, really loved helping people and That was always my dreams with us, And that was late 2014. And then the next four years, we actually grew double digits, but we have we have lost every year till that point. Bringing in the other person and I will tell you he's a great guy. He's got a lot of talent, a lot of energy, but what he really did help me bring my own mojo back. That's what I was just going to ask you was it was it just Was it just that knowing he was there? I'm supporting you mentally. And motivating you, or was it just You tell me. What was it that led you to that next level? It was a combination he brought in. Look, he didn't bring in a there's no. You know, new new rocket science in the fitness industry, right? Didn't bring in anything that I didn't already know. But I was so burnt out that I wasn't I was just kept trying the same thing that worked in the past. I've been through 9 11. I've been to other recessions. I kept doing what worked to bring the company back, and none of it was working. And he brought an energy and that's what that energy did. It brought my energy back, and that's exactly what my mentor said. He said. Look, you know, people brought their businesses back. It's 2014 were way over the 2008 recession at this point. It's you now, and he was really honest with, you know, and I kept blaming it on the recession and you know this. These decisions are overhead and really it was made and so My lesson I took out of it Is that ability to really admit to your weaknesses and figure out a way T they're bringing another person or bringing a skill set. That's going to help you with those weaknesses, and and I think that's what people really need to be doing now because it's so unprecedented what we're going through, but it but the principle's the same principles apply. You have got to reach out for help. And so that really cool ending of the story is late 2018 when the business was Driving again and I was loving my job. You know, thinking I could do this forever again. We're making money. I'm loving it. We're helping people. He decides to make me an offer to buy the business and We went through all the negotiations, and actually, in April of last year I sold him the business, So he's now the whole How cool is that has been better. Great. Cool is and I love this story. Yeah. And when we come back when we come back, Yeah. When we come back, we'll talk about the books. Quiet the noise. We have so much more to talk about. With with Rami Oday. He is with us today and what's the best website now? It's coach Rommie are am I Coach Rommie? All one word dot com and that's the best way to get through today, and we're going to be bad. Don't you love this story? I love this story will be back in a moment. I'm Frankie Boy. His truck radio state. If you're young at heart, Let's keep it that way. Stay feeling young with Kyle look aged garlic extract designed specifically to help support and strengthen your cardiovascular system. As you age. Kyle look aged Garlic extract was founded on scientific research and has been the subject of more than 800 research studies over the last 45 years, revealing its significant cardiovascular benefits..

Kyle Rami Oday Rommie Frankie Boy
"oday" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

03:08 min | 2 years ago

"oday" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"I do not believe our comment on the boat carried out and. a poor product with nearly characters when US fighters for thank you they're just wider to land in Italy it was tearing him and the poor cruise ship hijackers over strong American protests the Italian government permitted him to plead to Yugoslavia. like so many babbling in the Middle East he does not see himself as a terrorist. my god what is it used everywhere I'm good everywhere has been. this is the. in fact. thing is the homeless for Fiji without the right to a possible. with all the right ingredients is really or not so even on his great. and in the state of subjugation and repression for forty years. around the corner. right here in Orange County yes that is the corner office of what used to be the headquarters as you mention of the American Arab anti discrimination committee the nineteen hundred block of seventeen street in Santa Ana suite number two oh eight that is all that is left of that week today the Santa Ana office of the committee was destroyed by a bomb out he was killed and seven other people were injured and some fair international terrorism may be taking root here the man who was killed by the blast Alex oday age forty one married the father of three young daughters. the bomb was powerful enough to shatter glass in several other offices free was everywhere the wall was blown out the windows were blown out comments on today's at western Medical Center were day died his brother Sammy told of numerous death threats received by his brother I don't have any idea what does it said in the past you have received some calls from people identify themselves as Jedi have. and as investigators search through the rubble for clues a short distance away a green family. in a home where there is more need to sound the phones and crying. I would so days family is in mourning. three daughters seven. seven five so that is just ahead. Sammy day describes his brother as a peace loving man who fled the Middle East for a better life in America. he says that makes his doubts even more better. no one comes to one. the more speech is very much sanctions. in the meantime president Reagan has condemned the incident Colleen is heinous and has ordered federal bomb experts to assist in the investigation the militant Jewish defense league has denied responsibility in the bombing but its director irv Rubin told CNN on two different occasions that he shed no tears for all day. Julie.

Santa Ana Middle East Sammy day irv Rubin Orange County US Alex oday western Medical Center Fiji CNN Italy Julie Yugoslavia. Colleen Reagan president director America. forty years
"oday" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

02:37 min | 3 years ago

"oday" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Your host of tales of the city on pet lake radio. Earlier this morning. I attended my third birthday celebration of poopie Duke beat a teacup poodle and teeny weeny AT Cup. Yorkie? The dogs of Lorraine RBIs. Lorraine was the first woman to run a national network. And she did it not once but twice for both lifetime and Showtime. She's also written six books and now uses her experience and reputation to advocate for a variety of organizations from dogs too. Women's rights Laurien tells me about some of her favorite foundations in the brief interview. I was able to get when pulling her away from the party now further party as I said before this was my third year attending and each year, Lorraine outdo herself even more I couldn't miss this event. So I walked sixty blocks for my -partment. Tila rains with echo because living in New York City. It's pretty difficult to get around with ninety pound dog very few cows will pick us up, and we need to change that. But that's for another episode. I've been to a lot of birthday parties in my lifetime. And these teacup pooches have one of the most extravagant ones complete with their own signature cocktails appetizers for both the dogs amd. Humans a short film detailing -oday life of PB dooby and teeny weeny and adjusting higher to sing a unique dishes of happy birthday to do as they're held up next to a cake that looks like a job. Giant cupcake you'd have to see it to believe it Lorraine department is one of the most unique combs I've ever visited so much. So that the New York Times featured it in their house pout column back in two thousand fourteen her home is decorated with the collective artwork painted, Florida ceiling in bright colors and murals and filled with modern furniture that looks like art in of itself. I kept echo on a short leash all morning in fear of his huge bushy tail wagging to art and knocking something over I quickly. Understood why ACA was the largest dog there by about seventy pounds. He could lap tiny balls of water scattered throughout in one gulp and snatched a piece of cake from the table bad dog. I don't know who had more fun, though, echo, or I truly a party to remember. So stick around because after this commercial break obvi- sharing some of the interviews. I was able to get the party. Hopefully, they'll show you just how. How chaotic wacky yet memorable ever? So classy, this.

Lorraine RBIs Lorraine New York City ACA New York Times Laurien Florida seventy pounds ninety pound
"oday" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

13:07 min | 3 years ago

"oday" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Consequences. Right. That's a phrase that people like to use and then their opponents and use it against them, generally and two to four year increments. And and then we scream at each other. But they do and the reality is you had means new laws is the new year starts and new faces. There've been some rather interesting ones, there's one I want to point out. And I know that the the majority of the people listening here Schnitt today, and how you doing Casey oday in for Todd today. The majority don't live in the greater Saint Louis area. But obviously, the whole Michael Brown story is is one that was obviously of national interest. And the reason I point this out is the they swore the new prosecutor in and. His name is Wesley bell. He defeated Robert McCullough. Who's prosecuting attorney? Now, you now you're dealing with a bunch of everyone's a democrat there. But ultimately, the the way the way they run their elections. You don't primary out you get the certain number in there. Then party affiliation does matter. But with that said Wesley bell was very outspoken individual because prior to this. He was a council member in the city of Ferguson, and he has he has been very vocal in throughout the whole Michael Brown thing, and then eventually to ultimately, the the no Bill with the grand jury and the opinions came forth, both at the local level at the state level. Does your member initially? It was handed off to you to where you had the. State of Missouri. And but you also had another municipality came in who involved themselves in it. And then of course, eventually was the Justice department under very colder. Who all reviewed the information in all did not feel that the shooting was not justified? So all of that's really important because Wesley bell never believed that regardless of the fact that everyone else up to and including the Justice department under Barack Obama and Eric Holder. Well, Wesley bell did. Did a little house cleaning here on his very first few couple of days in office. And one of the first thing she did was to fire one of the veteran. Prosecutors there whose name is Cathy Zito for zodda. And that's a name, you may know, you may not, but just know the Kathy alla alla zodda was the prosecutor who presented the case to the grand jury. That eventually. Well, did not not leave to indictment of the police officer, Mr. Darren Wilson, so. Yeah. And that was something that never sat well with Wesley bell. So the first thing he does. But you're out of here. Cleaned out. Not west not just not just that prosecutor. But also some of the others who were a quote, quote, unquote, loyal to the previous prosecutor there one one who did openly criticize this the the now elected prosecutor and a kind of get that because there's a certain amount of politics in there. And if somebody's going to be vocally, a vocal critic of yours. And they're in an upper echelon position. I don't think it's inappropriate to question would loyalties lie that being said, you have a guy or just want wanna campaign based on a delusion. At least according to all that had investigated this minus I guess the family attorney for Michael Brown's family and remember the city paid by Kel Brown's family some money due to the fact that they did not want to. Go through the whole process because of what the cost would have been. But ultimately with the criminal indictment of the law enforcement officer involved that never happened. And this guy held the garage, and and fired prosecutor for all practical purposes, I guess is wasn't a very partisan. Prosecutor was just somebody who is higher up. And and did a good job. At least according to the previous prosecutor, and one of the rubs is he really don't have any trial experience. Not as not as a prosecutor, though, the bell to bell spokespeople did point out that he who has been a city council member seventeen years has actually tried over seventy five misdemeanor and felony cases. But as a defensive turning, so he's you know, he's not never been in a courtroom situations. Just been on the other side of the aisle. We're not necessarily have a problem with that's not a very high amount of cases for somebody who is now in charge of prosecutions throughout Saint Louis county. So. That could get that could get rather interesting. In fact, the number of one of the things that has been a target. And and I think it's I I will give credit where credit is due. I think it's a smart strategy on the part of many of the the state and local democratic organizations is they have put a lot of effort into targeting the law enforcement and the prosecutorial positions. So depending on what the setup is the sheriff in some cases, police, whoever said of the polices elected. You have prosecutors have very structures in different states that are electable state attorney positions. And of course, attorney general a attorney attorneys-general or is it the other way round. I can never remember. But the point is that is some they target in fact, right live here. They just had a very popular sheriff who was outed and he was outed by one of his deputies. Who's kind of really big and do a lot of these social Justice things including getting rid of the program that had Wake County, which is the county in which the city of Raleigh is participating with ice. They've now gone essentially sanctuary except not in the full sense because the state laws regarding how that how much you can do since we're a home rule state. So. But yeah. So the guy they brought it. And that's first thing he did say he cut off the ice program. The twenty seven g or twenty eight G or whatever it's called and said, we're we're not going to be part of this anymore and ironically, he got into office. So literally the week after that you have the story that happened with the law enforcement officer in California who was gunned down the legal immigrant officer from g who who who came here who moved here. He had a young family spent Christmas morning with him, and he went out to work, and he attempted to stop what he thought was a drunk driver who was actually a gang member cream criminal illegal alien alien with multiple DUI arrest leading up to it who decided that he was gonna cut them down. And and then after he did that he went and went over to his relatives house who were hiding him who themselves are in the country illegally and concocted a plan that eventually would shuffle him to Mexico. So that he could escape any sort of ramifications for. What had what had transpired? So I don't know. I guess I would call that not a good look. And then there's and I'm not going to bore you with all the details or some local stories around here where there's a very activist nature in in some of the priorities. He have now elections have consequences. And the fact is that was targeted position than in the in the whole thing with with ice participation one of the largest counties in the state and the capital county, at least Riley live getting somebody in that position. You can make those changes based on department policy bypasses really having to get in there. And and and flip some of the lawmaking positions that are majority rule because there are a big big big margins that the Republicans had though they are a little less now because Republicans here do really stupid things. So with that being said, I I've noticed a few of those stories, and I just thought these Saint Louis one would definitely be one you're interested in. Although I don't know where it goes. Right. Like people tend to core focus on the city of Chicago when it comes to danger, right and the murder rate, and that was that was an easy target just due to the volume of people you have there. But when you actually get into, you know, murder rates and and shooting rates in communities based on a per one hundred thousand people Chicago's not number one cities like Saint Louis cities like Memphis cities like Philadelphia Baltimore. And up on there and intend outranked, Chicago. And there, and there's different reasons for that just the way they're structured how big the municipalities are versus how many suburbs you have. And where crime has actually counted. Like if it happens a block over here. It's not in the city of Chicago. It's in the city of buffalo grove, and you get just to this. Right. So those consequences. No, if you have somebody who comes in and you're in a city like Saint Louis who was constantly among the top ranked four murder. And you have police that are trying to police that and you have a prosecutor there who has rejected the opinion of three different investigative agencies held under the I guess the oversight of multiple political backgrounds. Especially when you look at the track record of the individuals, and he's rejected that because he's a member of the Ferguson city council, and he knows better. Law enforcement in the end in Saint Louis county is that something they're paying attention to. And you know, the Ferguson effect is called the first in effect for reason. And it's it's it's a it's a concern that's out there. And I look I understand what a hot potato the whole topic is defending everything that police officers do, but you know, we see several several stories seemingly a week doing this where you have a process like where was this other one was Frederick spur. I'm trying to remember exactly where it was re you had some students who were having a party, and they just release the body. Cam video I'm gonna find this for you. But they release the body Cam video, and according to the students, basically officers hit approaches to women I believe they were either married or they were a couple out in front of the house, and there had been annoys complaint or department, I should say, and they said are you guys having a party and immediately. There is a ton of attitude. That's coming there in the officers. I if you watch the whole thing, they probably weren't going to do anything. Tell them. Hey, you got to disperse this. It's it's it's annoys violation. And that would have been the end of it, and it escalated over the series of half hour now that we have all of the body Cam video where? There's there's zero give their screaming eventually the officer decides they're going to arrest. One of the women the handcuffs come out, and at that point, they book back into the replacement and apartment, they just told police had been cleared a partygoers that's full of party goers. The whole time these women are screaming, you wouldn't do this to to white people will lo and behold inside the party, it's mostly white people. Not that any of that should matter. If you just look at the behavior that led up there. Those officers. I thought the officers refine eventually there's a taser deployment. But there were protests, the NWEA CPA and others, and I and I will give credit to the NWC P, and this particular community once they saw the video they rescinded their support the girls position as they should if they have is. But ultimately, you had a community that was wrought with tension over something that if people are being intellectually, honest, you would you would realize that that's not right? The whole narrative was complete utter farce. But on the flip side, you also have you have three officers to it, which are indicted one who pled guilty here recently to essentially destroying video, or at least attempting to hide it. And there was a guy who was facing fifteen years in prison for a series of crimes. He did not commit the officers acted way outside the bounds of what they shouldn't. They should be prosecuted. But that's when you try to look at things through the lens of all, right? What's right and what's wrong without the lens of? Well, you know, all this all the stuff that keeps various activist groups firmly employed. So Schnitt, eight hundred eight hundred eighty nine ninety nine strategy. Would it make a huge preview? I have a question or preview a project. I just wanted to point that out, and I started ramble. But I have a question, and it's a little lighter topic. I think it's interesting, but I wonder if it's too little too late..

prosecutor officer Wesley bell Michael Brown attorney Chicago Saint Louis Saint Louis county Schnitt murder Justice department Ferguson Robert McCullough Missouri Ferguson city council Casey oday buffalo grove