35 Burst results for "O L. Time Warner"

Small America Vs. Big Internet

Planet Money

03:40 min | 2 months ago

Small America Vs. Big Internet

"When we met grant goings a few months ago he was holding a copy of the local newspaper and he was so proud of the story on the front page. It was about this new kind of municipal uber system in his town. So for like a Buck Fifty. You can call come pick you up. Take you to where you're going. We're super excited. Grandpa is a total wonderful civics nerd and for the past fifteen years. He's been the city manager of Wilson North Carolina. The city of Wilson has a population of about fifty thousand people. It's downtown is full of these giant old brick warehouses that used to be filled with tobacco. But now there's a microbrewery barbecue restaurants. This city has managed to transform itself into a manufacturing town they attracted bridgestone tyres and Merck pharmaceuticals but they were starting to worry about keeping those businesses because by the time grant got to Wilson in the mid two thousands. The city had a problem. It's Internet. They're hearing from businesses that the Internet not so great and maybe worse they were also hearing from the little league parents facilities would go down frequently and so someone will be halfway through registry the kid there would be some type of breaking service. They'd have to start. All over again. Crashed Little League registration in two thousand and five. I mean come on in other parts of the country. People were discovering nickelback online. Wire with no problem. The Internet could be so much better so grand goings called a meeting with the local Internet provider. Time Warner Cable and the local telephone company and then we sat down and we basically had a few Ask so number one was. We asked them to heavily. Invest in upgrading. The system we. We'd sort of felt like we knew that answer no interest. Yeah the answer was no time Warner cable. Now Charter didn't agree to an interview for this story but you can understand their answer. They're like. Why would the existing company invest a ton of money? Just to wind up with the same customers. They already have. It's a questionable business decision at best. But that's okay no problem. Gran had prepared option number to partner with us. What if Wilson pays to build the top of the line Internet infrastructure fiber optic cables? Then Time Warner could offer their service over these super fast lines town had built. The answer to that question was where the second largest cable provider in the country. Why would we partner with you? Which only left option number three? The city would do it alone. Grant told Time Warner fine. We'RE GOING TO BUILD. And run our own fiber optic network and that's when the laughing started and they very quickly exited after that they literally laughed at you in your office absolutely. Yes and have admitted that did that like light. A fire for you did for me. That's the day that you said it's on it's hello and welcome to planet money. Kenny Malone and I'm Wilson Fair no relation to the city of Wilson and not only would time Warner cable laugh in the city of Wilson's face. They would actively fight to stop the city from building. Faster Internet it is a fight that has now spread to dozens of other states. We started reporting the story before the pandemic. But it's more relevant than ever because this is a big part of the reason that it's very hard to move to little towns around the country and make a living working remotely

Warner Cable Time Warner Wilson Wilson North Carolina Grant Little League Partner Kenny Malone Nickelback Bridgestone Gran Merck Pharmaceuticals
AT&T CEO John Stankey on the launch of the HBO Max streaming service

Squawk Pod

07:51 min | 2 months ago

AT&T CEO John Stankey on the launch of the HBO Max streaming service

"Joe Kernan. Kicking things off with John. Thank you this morning on Squawk box. John Thanks for coming on today. It's great great to have you with us you me on. I know you have high hopes for. Hbo We all know HBO. Obviously it's synonymous with some of the greatest things ever on video. Obviously game of Thrones Sopranos etc. You WanNa take on Netflix. And I understand. I think that's interesting because I don't know whether it's true or not. But supposedly someone said maybe we should have some kind of alliance with Netflix's someone suggested that you and you said we want to crush Netflix's Adams John you want to replace net flicks or at least be a very potent competitor refrains US Navy. Some on what I would call not accurate reporting on the New York Times Are hellacious is going to multiple streaming services knowing forward in pretty consistent. I think if you look back over the last year of domain around my conversation that our goal frankly is not to be. Netflix's our goal is to be something different and there are other senior services are starting to show up on the market that clearly different ease for the customer. Hbo Mass is going to have a unique focus in a unique position with the customer in play our game. Our goal is at crush flights. Our goal is to make sure that we meet customer needs engaged every day household. Find something worthwhile in time with us. And that's what we're GONNA see foes I guess they didn't so that was in the New York Times but that was that was not accurate according to so that. That's not a quote from you that that's interesting Anyway but I I guess the reason I led with that John is that I think about net flicks and everything. That's there and from documentaries to movies to programming that they generate themselves. That is a big universe of things that they have how will HBO? Max and I just said you're not going to strive to be everything to all people but you probably do need to add some things to the offering to make it so attractive that people have it in addition to the other streaming services absolutely a clearly customer Nanna. What's current as from kind of traditional media through the pay TV bundle and general entertainment content coming into the streaming world has credible number of choices of what to do with their time and then he going all dynamics in the digital environment about France capabilities to good use generating content? Like there's no question. There's more choice after today than there ever has been in paradise choices. Feel Max Niece resolve needs on the customers. Says you know I'm looking for something? That is this particular need of where I stand right now at my mood or my family situation that it's the first thing you think about that. I can go and no one wanted to find something. That's curious down. Who in meaningful selection of high-quality is Gonna? Hit the mark for me in the consistency. That happening time and time again clearly. The a hallmark more for the bran and for the service. And that's what we believe where you will focus on a more carried. Orderly got such a talented team. It warned me be do dat curate in that fashion just doing it for the demo outstanding the entire family. And you point out that that it's it's not much difference in price from what people are paying for now with with. Hbo So you have done some surveys. And what you saw one out of five people might decide not not to go with with Max. But it's not not much of a difference between just converting what they have now into HBO. Max Oh you don't you. Don't see any churn in that respect a difference were selling at that price day with just the HBO product which is a product that has half as much content is what HBO. Max New Offering Margaret. So you twice content same price and I think if we're seeing all of us everybody who's in the streaming business utility matter fact increasing during these unfortunate moments going through right now at this pandemic that's increasing dramatically so the performance of house value arrive actually increasing as a result. So you know our job is to make sure. The customer finds the equation to be done that for over thirty million customers with a long period of time in our goal is to extend that out beyond the family. I think we've got a really strong probability Andrew John. It's great to see you this morning. And congratulations and good luck on the on. This launched the question. I have two questions. The biggest I think is a distribution question. Which is and. Maybe you can explain what's happened with the likes of comcast parent company of this network. Amazon and Roku which a stoically with been strong distribution partners for the HBO product but are not on board at least from what I understand at the moment with HBO. Max and what that does to your reach a Bra List and distributors who are working with us the traditional and the market is the pay TV. Marcus actually signed on going to carry four. They're going to be successful years with. Hp Amax just like they were HBO along the providers doing that. Frankly you mentioned your parent company I'm optimistic still opportunity for something to be on there. I suspect that there's an opportunity that need other pay. Tv providers are given the vast majority. The ECO system is a likely become interview just useful. Come her moving forward. I think the interesting dynamic you're alluding to is Roma who Amazon at this point elected mocked distributors. I got and I didn't expect first of all have distribution across the entire race. I think must be doing something rightist. Somebody believes now to be more in conflict with your business so I don't necessarily take a bad sign but I do find it a bit ironic when I think banning litigation heard prior to the Time Warner eighteen transaction closing the concern was about withholding content from traditional distributors. And what we have now. We actually have dynamic where we have. New Technology viewers individual H. Who are likely not student and I think that dynamic is an important one understanding shows fast. The market's moving how we got to respond to those changes. I just to follow up with one other question which relates to this which is speak to the marketing challenge which. I think there may be one in terms of getting people to download the APP because some of these cable operators aren't going to necessarily be carrying it as an on demand on the box if you will so so what has to happen given that you do have these multiple brands and getting people to understand that they need to actually go get this. Get this particular product. It's a good question this

HBO Andrew John Netflix MAX New York Times Amazon Joe Kernan Time Warner General Entertainment United States Comcast France HP Marcus
Melanoma Medicine

2 Docs Talk

08:15 min | 6 months ago

Melanoma Medicine

"Just to be clear there are lots of different kinds of skin cancer knowing them as just one of many chewed chewed happens to be the kind of cancer that comes from land sites which are the cells in our skin that make pigment and it's the third most common type of skin cancer right right behind squamous cell and Basal the Cell Carcinoma. And I would say it's also the scariest meaning people rarely die from squamous or Basal cell cancers but definitely can with melanomas right but let's not feed people out the five year survival for all. MELANOMAS is greater than ninety percent so that's good true. The thing to know is that survival rates are dependent on the size of the melanoma. Ah really the depth of the melanoma so if the melanoma just involves the top layer of skin. That's good treatment is almost always curious. Yeah but if the melanoma extends down into deeper layers of the skin or even metastases to different parts of the body then the five year. Survival rates dropped precipitously so for stage four disease which is the worst. The five year survival rate is pretty crappy. I think around twenty five percent. Yes so for obvious reasons. There has been a big emphasis on prevention and early detection. The idea being if you can find these things before they grew too big or too deep in prognosis will be better right so the first thing with respect to prevention is who is at risk because the risk of developing a melanoma is not the same for everyone. Yeah so people who are fair complected have blonde hair especially red hair and blue or green. Eyes are at an increased risk from Elena's. Yeah I think it's like twenty times more common in white people than black people. Yeah all white people I guess. Yeah Yeah and also if you spend a lot of time in the sun or -taining booth that's not good. Yeah we're talking to you. Donald trump does he couldn't attaining booth. I thought that was just a Tan from the spray on. It might be anyway if if you've got sunburn when you were a kid or teenager that's also not good. You know every time I right now. I'm just like checking every box I just cringe. I mean growing growing up. We spent so much time at the local pool. My mom would just drop us off at ten. For Time. Warner cod same. The lifeguard lifeguard was our babysitter but anyway that wasn't good. It was fun but not good. Yeah also win. The lifeguard wasn't there we douse ourselves with ketchup. And then fall at the diving boards like we'd been shot. I still feel really guilty about that. But it was also not good in a little disturbing. No good for the soul. But we digress. There are also some heritable disorders orders and genetic mutations that ran families that's put some people at risk and Radiation therapy in childhood also. So that's not good and people who just have a lot moles that increases the risk of developing melanoma. Okay so that brings up a question. If you're somebody that has a lot of moles. How can we tell them? Melanoma from Benign Neva or a normal old mole. What is melanoma look like? Well there are some characteristics that can help us tell good from bad but before we get into those we should probably say see. That doctors aren't really very good at predicting good from bad. I mean we're better than a crap. Shoot you mean better than fifty fifty right but even dermatologists the folks that look at these things all the time. I'm only get it right about seventy percent of the time so means that means if you're a good dermatologists you're still be removing normals. Pretty often right so anyway. There are a couple of tricks they teach you in Moscow to help you get it right one being the ABCD rule. Okay let's see if we can remember that far back as stands for a symmetry if the mole is asymmetric metric. That's not a good time right and be is borders. The borders are irregular. Also not good for color so lots of different colors red white blue also black and gray not good a mole should be just one homogeneous color right not a variety just read is okay just blues okay but not various colors then. D is diameter if the mole is six millimetres wide greater gus worrisome and finally which stands for evolve if you've had them all for years and then suddenly it starts to changing color shape size. Whatever north boy no moles should not evolve? Yeah they should remain uninvolved evolved. Yes also let's not forget. The Ugly Duckling will or one of these things is not like the other rule exactly so if someone has a lot of moles and they all look alike except for one. Maybe that one isn't just a mole and the ones that do look like just them all could also pretend that the potential is there that they could be something. It's very rare but you know we're not saying we're not diagnosing every normal here if it doesn't meet these criteria are not hard and fast. Yes that's true okay. So now everybody out there. Listening has stripped down birthday suit in his examining themselves with magnifying glass. Thanks for the mental energy me my pleasure but the thing is dermatologists are really working to improve public awareness of skin cancers I including melanomas true for good reason over the past twenty to thirty years a number of cases of melanoma has just skyrocketed in fact the number of invasive melanoma Mama cases has doubled from nineteen eighty to two thousand eleven which is scary because these are later stage melanomas the ones with a bad prognosis. Yeah but here's the deal. Most people think this is due to increased diagnosis from screening not a true increase in the number of cases. Well then we have a problem. I mean if the number of cases week diagnosed has doubled old because we're doing a better job screaming than we should see a corresponding decrease in mortality. Exactly but that's not what's happening. Mortality has decreased only a very little bit certainly not close. Goes to what you would expect with such a huge jump in diagnoses. And here's the other thing. The United States Preventative Services Task Force the USPS T.F. The the folks at review the body of research on a topic to see what the scientists telling us. These folks don't recommend screening. Let me repeat that they don't recommend screening. There's just not enough evidence evidence to say it really works so we're diagnosing more and more melanomas but it's not really affecting mortality. People are dying almost as much as before right and this is something. We're starting to see fairly early regularly and medicine. These days across many specialties We want to believe it. Screening the general population for cancers works. But this may not always be the case. Yes yes so the risks of not screening. We get you'll miss a cancer if it's early enough to do something about it but the risks of screening or not as well known or appreciated right and we've talked about this on previous podcast screen and can lead to false positives unnecessary procedures increased cost to patients inside in general anxiety pain suffering. All those things get so maybe we need to not necessarily screen more people but screen the right people right screen people who have a higher risk of the disease than the general population. Okay but it's not all doom and gloom in fact there's some really good news out there about MELANOMAS. There is for one. The number of melanomas diagnosed in young people is going down. We're seeing it less and less and young folks not exactly sure why this is happening. Maybe it's due to increased emphasis on prevention. I mean I was out there with baby oil on my kids. Were not out there with baby. Yeah so there's there's a big difference right there yeah. Meeting more people stayed out of the sun or covered up. More people wearing sunscreen. That kind of thing. Yeah I slathered sunscreen on my kids way more than my parents ever did for me. I was religious about a real then still there were a few cents sunburns in their same. Because we're so pale but well. I'm wondering if you've been getting questions from friends and family lately about the safety of Sunscreen because of that study the FDA publish this yeah right so this is a study that showed chemicals in sunscreens are absorbed systemically Klay levels at the FDA would normally require choir phase one through three testing before approving exactly. So here's the thing we have no idea what these chemicals are up to. And our body wants to gibbs or maybe they're up to nothing they're totally harmless more. Maybe not we just don't know but we do know that using sunscreen prevents skin cancer sir. That's not in doubt so we need more studies. That what I hear you saying. We need more studies to figure out what's going on. But until then dermatologists are recommending. Continued it to use sunscreen because the benefits are so great. Yeah and the risks are basically unknown. If you're really freaked out about it you can use zinc oxide based or titanium oxide Bay sunscreens trains. Those aren't absorbed. They just sit on the top of the skin right there barriers. But don't stop protecting yourself from the Sun. We knew the benefits to some protection. So keep up the good work mom and

Cancer Mortality FDA Cell Carcinoma Donald Trump Sunburn Diving Elena Moscow Radiation United States Preventative Ser Gibbs Usps
Predict the Future with these Megatrends from Rohit Bhargava

The Small Business Radio Show

08:15 min | 7 months ago

Predict the Future with these Megatrends from Rohit Bhargava

"This is the time of year that I make my predictions for small a business having a good run for about five years in a row. I've been way off these last few years. My next guest. The person that's always knows what the next trend is reheat. bhargava is the founder of the Non Obvious Company and as an entertaining original and non boring keynoter on Innovation Trust. He previously spend and fifteen years in leadership roles at two renowned AD agencies. Lebron Ogilvy Rohe's Wall Street Journal bestselling author of six books and book by deliver rickie notes in thirty two countries around the world. He's a popular adjunct professor of storytelling at Georgetown University. His new book out this year is called. Non Obvious Mega trends real heat. Welcome back to the show thank you. It's always awesome to talk to you. It's been three and a half years. I looked it up. I know I can't believe leave it. I miss a lot of trends so every year you publish a book with the last nine years you published book on non obvious trends but this year you say this is not MBA mega trends and visited last one. Why are you stopping after it selling so much? Well I think one reason is because I wanted to WHO Head out on top style like one of the big reasons so It was it was kind of time. You know it's been a decade. I've been working on this project for After ten years and every year I do neutra and predictions and it felt like twenty twenty was kind of a significant moment in all of our lives right. If we're doing things differently we're thinking about the world differently. Were kind of projecting forward. It was sort of a perfect time for me to think about how to write this a little bit differently. I'd say twenty twenty and last thing I turned around it was like the year. Two thousand is just crazy the on line that said Twenty twenty was twenty years ago but nineteen eighty was twenty years ago. Exactly exactly so I want to call it a couple of your mega trends. The one you talk about his `gendering you say that traditional gender divisions are replaced with more fluid understanding of gender identity forcing a reevaluation. How we see one another I think for those who are of my generation which is really you know the boomers? We have a hard time with this thing called engendering. Why isn't important in business? Gender used to be this pretty simple Sort of answer to a question right. It was either this or that. It was the second question or the question we asked on a form And and it straightforward and now it's become kind of a statement for a lot of people This is how I wanted to be seen in the world and so you know we we get hung up a lot on this idea of gender and I don't understand understand it and it seems kinda strange and thinking about it but if if we put it in terms of identity as in we all just want to be understood and addressed in the way that we see ourselves you know that makes sense wants to people like I get that you know and so I think for small business owners and for any of us one of the things that we need to think about is are we unintentionally driving people away by just assuming that they fit into the boxers that we put them in so is it another F- for small businesses. We think of as a another way to define persona a buyer's persona and now gender becomes a flower our or a non gender and becomes a factor. Yeah I mean that is that is one piece of it you know. It's the customer personas but the other is just these kind of Unintentional things we might do drive someone away right. I mean. How important is it really for you to ask that sort of question for example In an interaction right. I mean depending on what you're selling you may not necessarily need to know that like if somebody's interested in what you have to sell and you have a great product or you have a great service and you're trying to get in front of somebody buddy like don't lose their attention because you're unintentionally offending them. I thought it was really interesting when I think this with your lift or Uber where you go on and you can set your preferred pronouns so again that is more personalized service and the driver doesn't insult someone unintentionally. Yeah this basic sailed right. I mean anybody who's he's gone through. Sales trading is like oh address customer by name like asking their name and and use their name because everyone loves hearing their name and I think this is a reflection of that too like people want to be addressed with correct Pronoun and yeah. I've been getting emails from people who in their email signature says my preferred pronoun is and they tell you right and I know a lot of a lot of people say yeah well I just don't get it. I'm thinking to myself. It's not for you to get. It's the way they want to be identified and And I think that that that is a great is a great point right. I mean I I think we do kind of get hung up on this. I don't get it I don't understand it You don't have to necessarily understand if someone says my name is so and so you. You don't always know how to pronounce it right. So you ask you do your best and you move on right absolutely well. megatrend number three talk about instant knowledge as as we consume bite-size is knowledge on demand we benefit Hillary more quickly but risk for getting the value of mastery and wisdom. This scenario that I'm really concerned about that. People want instant knowledge but no one's is willing to go deep. has that really affect us. I think there's a couple of ways I mean it's A. It's a great example of a mega trend that it isn't inherently positive or negative. I mean look if I can go onto youtube and I can learn how to fix a leak in my toilet myself like that's awesome. I mean that's great. That's good for everybody What's bad is if all we have is that type type of knowledge and no one ever believes that? It's worth spending that extra time to become a master to become an expert. So how does it affect us in business as we're trying to attract customs that's one of the biggest things one of the biggest tenants of content marketing. You know which I know you talk about. Is We want to educate our customers. Because we're the ones providing the Education Gatien. We're building trust and building credibility and I think this fits perfectly into that because when people want instant knowledge like who do they get it from right. And if you've got for example a financial advisory refer and you're trying to educate your client what they should do with retirement and they're going online to watching videos from someone else. Educating them you know what are they gonNA think right. They're gonNA start thinking well. Why isn't the financial advisor? Educating me why do I feel dumb when I walk into that meeting with my adviser and I don't feel dumb after these videos. Maybe I should make a change. Do you think there's still a place to help people with mastering wisdom because there are some people in Emily that always want to go deeper. Of course yeah I mean I think that that the nice thing about instant knowledge. It's it can be a gateway to mastery and wisdom. Look I can go online and I can watch An acting class with Henry Winkler you know or I can learn how to play the Banjo. Which Steve Martin and those was a great man I'm GonNa but am? I going to be a professional banjo player. Maybe not but that's okay because I can start with that and if I do find something that I love something that I'm passionate about then I'll spend the time because because the thing with mastery and wisdom is for a lot of people we become masters and experts in the things we love it and that's not going to change because that's a human desire in centers in me. Because when I I used to own one thousand nine hundred ninety three Ford Falcon. It didn't have any seat belts in it because they weren't required at the Time Warner and drive it. I need to have seat belt so I go online. I'm thinking how am I going to solve these seatbelts. I wonder if anybody's nobody's ever done it. And of course there was probably six places where you could watch videos of install belt nine hundred sixty three or four falcon. It's like who would've known Yup because the thing about Expertise is and when we learn about things from people like that. They've become an expert because they're passionate about it and one of the things they WANNA do. They WANNA share that expertise Jason. That's really cool that we have instant access to that. I love your megatrend number four. You call revivalism overwhelmed by technology. Complexity people seek out a simpler experienced. I often established and remember more trustworthy. Time that's kind of like a complex statement. I think some people are looking for a place that is simpler but wasn't really more trustworthy the time or just only a couple of sources who were trusted. I think maybe a little of both And I think maybe we remember the past a little more romantically than and we should. But I think that revival isn't was a really interesting one because what it meant to me. And the implication for any small business was sometimes this thing that we consider to be bad this word that we consider it to be bad which has downgraded actually might be good because a lot of times what we think about when we think about downgrade is that it's less optimal but a downgraded experience for example is something that maybe is more humid. I mean there was a great story that I wrote about a grocery brand in the UK the created. Are

Twenty Twenty Non Obvious Company Lebron Ogilvy Rohe Wall Street Journal Georgetown University Adjunct Professor Founder Time Warner Innovation Trust Rickie Youtube Henry Winkler Steve Martin UK Falcon Hillary Advisor Emily Jason
U.S. companies force workers to train foreign replacements

The Personal Computer Radio Show

02:00 min | 7 months ago

U.S. companies force workers to train foreign replacements

"At and T.. Sticks it to American tech workers forcing them to train foreign replacements since at and T.'s reportedly laying thousands of American workers after forcing them to train the foreign replacements who have been imported through the H.. One Visa Program. At and T.. In Richardson Self on public spectrum and yet the Goal Nafta American workers by forcing them to train the H.. One be replacement this is unacceptable. The H. One B. Program is completely broken and must be changed disbanded as it is not addressing shing shortages in the job market. It is supplanting qualified Americans. It is particularly ironic that. At and T.. is engaging this blatant abuse of American workers while they are dependent on publicly on spectrum in order to build a five gene network if any company should be a good corporate citizen it it is a t and t the SEC. Should investigate whether at and T. is meeting their responsibilities under the recent at and T. Time Warner merger and should should be blocked from additional spectrum purchases based on the egregious abuse of immigration laws every year more than one hundred thousand farm workers of brought brought to the United States on the H. One B. Visa there are about six hundred and fifty thousand H. One B. Visa Foreign Workers in the United States at any given moment when Americans are often laid off in the process and forced to train the foreign replacements more than eighty five thousand Americans annually potentially lose their jobs offs of Foreign Labor through the H. One B. Visa Program despite claims by the big business lobby American workers who have been replaced by H. One B. Follow workers say there is no shortage of talented and qualified citizens for high paying white collar jobs current and former. At and T.. Employee said that they they are being laid off after being forced to train the H. One B. Foreign replacements.

Visa Foreign Workers United States T. T. Time Warner SEC T..
HBO Max launches in May 2020 for $14.99 a month

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:33 sec | 10 months ago

HBO Max launches in May 2020 for $14.99 a month

"Another streaming service scheduled to debut next year eighteen to you says its war course streaming service H. B. O. Max will launch in may it'll cost fifteen dollars a month the same prices HBO now the company officials predict many users will switch to H. B. O. Max because there's more to watch like friends and Sesame Street the service plans to launch fifty original series in the first year part of a two billion dollar initial investment AT and T. which spent eighty one billion dollars to acquire Time Warner thinks HBO Max will be profitable in twenty twenty three Brian Clark ABC news

H. B. O. Max HBO Time Warner AT Brian Clark Eighty One Billion Dollars Two Billion Dollar Fifteen Dollars
Red Sox president: Keeping Mookie, J.D. 'difficult'

Ron St. Pierre

00:25 sec | 11 months ago

Red Sox president: Keeping Mookie, J.D. 'difficult'

"The red Sox say they're not ruling out keeping on fielder's Mookie Betts and JD Martinez team president Sam Kennedy says it's going to be difficult but there is a way for them to retain both stars and remain under the competitive balance tax threshold Boston have the highest payroll in the Major League Baseball the last couple of years and of course the owners John Henry and Time Warner last week said they want to get under that two hundred and eight million dollar cap good luck with

Red Sox Fielder Mookie Betts Jd Martinez President Trump Sam Kennedy John Henry Major League Time Warner Eight Million Dollar

How I Built This

08:37 min | 11 months ago

"So what are the guiding principles of creativity is that some of you very best ideas. Come out of sheer frustration products like honest tea or cliff bar olders dyson these all came about because their founders couldn't find the beverages or energy bars or shoes or or vacuum cleaners that they wanted so they invented them but in the case of Tristan Walker. I think it's safe to say that he didn't just start from a place of mild frustration. He actually started from a place of being fed up even angry because for most of his life he had felt completely league ignored totally overlooked whenever he walked into the shaving. I'll drugstore virtually all the big shaving brands were making products that worked well on men with relatively straight hair but tristen couldn't find a high quality razor that worked on his curly facial hair without leaving razor bumps olivarez neck Kajol line and he knew that like him many African American men were dealing with the exact same problem so he decided to design bevill a shaving system with a simple single blade razor that was easy on his face and he wanted everything about the product to look and feel great not like the dusty boxes of shaving products for African American men that we seem to be on the bottom shelves at the drugstore and his ambition to build a black owned and led consumer Marand as big as Johnson Johnson or proctor and gamble but of course when I tried to raise money from all those VC firms on sand hill road in Silicon Valley and he got a lot of knows but eventually he was able to launch his company with a razor some shaving cream but of oil and brush and over the past five years his brand has grown to include more than thirty specialized hair and beauty products for men and women which are now sold and lots of big retailers lers across the country a few weeks ago. Tristan sat down to tell me how he did it in front of a live audience at the Lincoln Theater in Washington. DC tristen Walker Central. I'll take it so let's start. Let's start at the beginning. Tell me about about out your childhood knew you grew up in Queens where I like to describe. It is a bit of the Rosa grew from concrete story. I grew up in Queens New York projects. It's Welfare Bouts of homelessness that sort of stuff right and I realized very early at one goal in life and as as wealthy as possible as quickly as possible Salaam. I realized three ways to do it. I was to be an actor athlete that didn't work second second was to work on Wall Street that didn't work in the last entrepreneurship and then thank goodness. I came to that realization. We were a little boy. A A your dad died. He was killed killed and you grew up with an older brother and your mom. What did your mom do yet for work so oh my mom worked three jobs mainly New York City Housing Authority Administrative Assistant? She spent some time working for Time Warner Cable and she did some retail all at the same time within seven days. I don't know how she did it. She did it. Thank goodness for her. It was not easy but she persevered and as a result of I think her perseverance good fortune beam I graduate college in my family and she she really in what what do you remember about like your neighborhood growing up as a kid I mean would did you do. Did you add in do much because I couldn't do much like my father was killed. When I was three years old? I don't remember too much about him other than the fact that he was killed when I was three years old which is a little bit telling to Kinda type of environment that I did grow up in so you know I lived probably the first six seven years of my life live in Jamaica Queens New York forty projects in the time I turned around seven years old. We moved to flushing Queens. Another project can development and it was much of the same right. My mother was like you're going to be the one you're not gonNa go through this stuff very disciplined. Stay home. Get Your studies and you're not going outside. When I snuck snuck outside? She caught me. I got in a lot of trouble but that was really kind of my life right. Get to school get home. Do you work repeat and you know that discipline actually Kinda got me to wearing them. Now school easy for you has a kid yeah. I was a good student because the discipline that was inspired me I always excelled right. I tended to be at least up until high school anyway at or near the top of my class you know and I kinda slow down when I say that stuff because by the time I got to high school. I realized I didn't even know what a verb was right. I wouldn't do this entire time. All the way up until my high school years doing really really well at the top of my class not even knowing what verb now and that sort of thing was as a teenager you ended up going to this really elite private boarding school hotchkiss in Connecticut the way I like to describe posh kisses is the first time I got to see how the other half lived. I went to school literally rockefellers Ford's right and I learned a couple of things first name mattered to being wealthy wasn't same as being rich and the last and probably the most important was I can compete with each and every one of them while while while I didn't know Oh what a verb was I learned and by the end of my four years they're you know on a roll like that. Sort of thing you know is then absolutely just wonderful experience for me but transformative in a little bit different from how I grew up was it was the transition for you when you got there because you were like fourteen years old. I've been living away from home since I was thirteen fourteen years old and were the first few months at hard for you. academically we get to the school and I realize I don't even have a computer and you know all of my other classmates had computers that sort of thing and I went to leave as the English professor who is my adviser at the time and I remember he took me to this basement. We're all used textbooks are and then he was old compaq like Presidio L. Computer that we had the like hall out and take it to my room so academically. It was very tough because I wasn't equipped with the tools to compete but over the years accelerating so you fish you go to Stony Brook University New York to study economics. Most most students don't necessarily know what they're gonNa do but did you have a sense of what you want to pursue their and what you thought you would do after I mean I was always thinking about the after I wanted to get wealthy yeah I was pretty singular in that help very singular in that hope and overtime that's kind of morphed and changed and the things that are important Ed Morrison changed but I knew I was very very very focused on how to get there and Wall Street was the next greatest option. All this silicon valley stuff at new idea about my world was New England so you're thinking do this degree and I'll go into finance plows e- economics is the closest degree we had at Stony Brook again to Wall Street Okay and in between my first and second year of university I got an internship and Lehman Brothers back office halfway through I I said I want to try some of this front office stuff so I left that enjoined trading desk at the time just observing so when you graduate so you you went actually went to work for Leman and then as a traitor and then everything and eventually JP Morgan in that time at that time time period. Did you still think this is what I should be doing. This is my sort of path to the worst years of my life. This is two thousand and five when I joined the company and as a traitor. Your job is to make money

Tristan Walker Queens Time Warner Cable Queens New York Jamaica Queens New York Stony Brook University New Yor Facial Hair Lincoln Theater New York Johnson Johnson Washington Silicon Valley New England Walker Central Ed Morrison Ford Lehman Brothers Jp Morgan
Trump says it's 'great news' activist investor involved with AT&T because CNN is 'bad for the USA'

Chris Plante

00:59 min | 11 months ago

Trump says it's 'great news' activist investor involved with AT&T because CNN is 'bad for the USA'

"President trump has been very critical of CNN now he's praising news this morning trump is that there may be a buyout of C. N. N.'s parent company AT and T. there's an activist investor Elliott management's thinking about taking over AT and T. trump tweeted great news that an activist investor is now involved with A. T. and T. as the owner of very low rating CNN perhaps they will now put a stop to all of the fake news emanating from its non credible anchors of course CNN has been very critical of trump in their coverage Christine Romans with more on this. Ellie had management proposal for AT and T. and a letter to the board Eliot call Time Warner quote spectacular company then questioned eighteen tease a strategy here's a language eighteen T. has yet to articulate a clear strategic rationale for why eighteen T. needs own Time Warner well it's too soon to tell whether a TT can create value a Time Warner we remain cautious on the benefits of this

T. Trump Time Warner CNN AT Elliott Management Christine Romans President Trump A. T. Ellie Eliot C. N. N.
Will HBO Max work and will consumers pay?

KCRW's Hollywood Breakdown

05:10 min | 1 year ago

Will HBO Max work and will consumers pay?

"I'm Kim Masters and this is the Hollywood breakdown joining me as bounty of the Hollywood reporter and Matt. We've known that this industry is disrupted and Warner brothers and Warner media. Its parent are sort of the ultimate case study. You're right now of what is going on. Warner Brothers was the premier studio in this industry for so many years and being the chairman of Warner Brothers was the biggest deal imaginable and they have now announced that an Sarnoff who who comes from the B._B._C. America America and has really good experience and is very well regarded but is completely almost completely unknown in Hollywood is going to be the chairman of Warner brothers and at the same time the Warner media is announcing in the launch of this H._B._O.. Oh Max which is the streaming service that they have been building toward and they are pulling programming from all over the place to service this thing. This is a huge priority. So first of all your people were going to have to look at that they do. I need this will this H._B._O.. Max Idea Work and at the same time within the industry. There's a question of well gee. What does this mean for Warner Brothers? I mean is Warner. Brothers now going to be subservient to the streaming service and does being chairman of Warner Brothers really have any kind of clout and prestige or are you just going to be taking orders effectively from Bob Greene Blah who runs the streaming service as well as these other cable channels and H._B._O.. He reports to <hes> John Stanky the. Head of Warner media as does and Sarnoff but it's not so clear what it all means in terms of who has power this really does represent a sign of the Times entertainment because when A._T.. And T. bought the Time Warner assets it was very clear that the crown on jewel was not warner brothers. It was H._B._O.. Because they could leverage H._B._O.. To create a global streaming service that will hopefully in their words compete with net flix and that's what every conglomerate is trying to do right now. They're trying to leverage with their assets are create new stuff and go head to head with Netflix so you're seeing warner media pullback a lot of the content that was out there most notably friends which has been streaming on Netflix is now going. Going to switch over to this new H._B._O.. Max they're gonNA start doing with a bunch of other shows on the C._W.. On Turner on the Turner Networks Like T._N._T.. And T._B._S. Some C._N._N.. Content this is all going to be funneled into this H._B._O.. Bill mack streaming service will be pitched as an add on to H._B._O.. Or as its own thing a little bit more expensive than the traditional H._B._O.. Costs currently and that's where we're at right now because comcast is doing the same thing with the N._B._C.. Universal shows like the office just pulling it away from net flicks doing their own thing. Disney is launching their own thing. We're going to get into a very stratified ecosystem where the streaming services are tops and the contents suppliers are going to be the studios that they own and. Hopefully others they think I mean has made a Fortune Selling T._v.. Shows the T._v.. Division has been lead you know Big Bang theory two and a half men all of these shows in different networks very profitably and enjoying all of the reaping all of the rewards that followed followed and they just sold a huge project to Netflix Sandman so they're still looking to get that cash coming in the door obviously the I don't even know how you sort it out and I think more importantly people in the industry. I don't know how you sort it out if I'm making a T._v.. Show and Warner Brothers is making that show at what goes to H._B._O.. Max what goes somewhere else. What do I sell to C._B._S.? A._B._C. or or Hulu or whatever so I think it's it's almost like this dizzying situation within the industry of figuring. Bring out who is going to emerge victorious and how these things are going to be sorted and that's that's a potential big change for Warner Brothers which as you mentioned has been this people say there are the arms dealer of Hollywood in the sense that they have sold everybody but if you look at what Disney is doing Disney is very purposefully holding back a lot of their stuff and they are trying to create an ecosystem around this new Disney plus streaming service that will be the one stop shop for Disney. Now Disney has a very strong consumer rebrand and people know Disney and they want Disney oriented content. It's not quite the same for Warner Brothers. They don't have that brand name they just you wouldn't the average person on the street wouldn't even know that one brothers produced two and a half men yet. It's probably the biggest revenue generator that the company has so I just I think it'd be very interesting to see how warner's approaches this ecosystem and who they sell to and who they don't and from the consumer standpoint of course the question is how much does this cost they said it will.

Warner Brothers Warner Media Time Warner Warner Disney Hollywood Chairman Netflix Sarnoff Kim Masters Comcast John Stanky Reporter Hulu Matt Turner Bill Mack America Bob Greene
FCC, AT And DOJ discussed on This Week In Google

This Week In Google

01:55 min | 1 year ago

FCC, AT And DOJ discussed on This Week In Google

"Back to team mobile and sprint, you got the chairman of the FCC all hot and bothered. He's excited, you got the DOJ ready to sue. At basically people are saying it's a push fifty fifty we don't know what's going to happen. I'd like to see a merger us t mobile. I think sprint is pretty much useless in our area. Be nice. Nice to see a merge. Especially if they live up to that pledge to get ninety seven percent five G coverage in three years. That would be awesome. You don't think they'll do it? Well, even if they did do it, you know, there's no guarantee on pricing. There's no guarantee on the quality of the network. There's, there's a lot of things. It's one thing to say building something out. It's another thing to say building something else. It's good in coverage doesn't mean quality speeds coverage, just means you can get a bar possibly there. You remember AT and T and Time Warner the merger, and they told everybody that wants that merger happens. We are going to hire thousands of new employees. What happened? They fired fired was twenty seven thousand five hundred jobs. So it just shows you could promise regulators, whatever you want, and you can actually lie to the kids. See you cannot lie to the SEC. So I always find it interesting to look at what companies say, in their, you know, their ten ks their stock events with the FCC sorry SEC, because the FCC, they can just do whatever they want AT, and T promised seven thousand new jobs. Actually that wasn't the merger that was to get a tax break, I apologize. They cut twenty th that was for the big federal tax break. We did get. And you remember they, they gave the one thousand or three thousand dollar bonuses to people as part of the town.

FCC AT DOJ Chairman SEC Time Warner Three Thousand Dollar Ninety Seven Percent Three Years Five G
What To Expect From Alphabet's Earnings

WSJ What's News

03:29 min | 1 year ago

What To Expect From Alphabet's Earnings

"Our main story this morning alphabets are names, Google's parent company is set to release numbers after the bell today and for investors. There will be a whole host of questions from what the company is doing to police the spread of misinformation on YouTube to how it's planning on combat in competition from Amazon Charlie Turner has been speaking to our alphabet reporter, rob Copeland about what we can expect. Rob investors will be watching the performance of Google's YouTube division, but financially that's a tough chore. Isn't it exactly you know, YouTube is really a blackbox inside Google? The company wraps its earnings inside the legacy search business and the search businesses one of the most spectacular profitable businesses in the history of the earth. So it's very tough to see how YouTube is doing well how much liability does you to face because of events like streaming the New Zealand massacres that putting a damper is that turning people off of YouTube. Definitely the last thing. Google wants is headline risk. And that's exactly what YouTube gives it right now. They have really tough bargain to strike when there is a big news event like the shooting at the mosque in New Zealand. They could shut down New Zealand, for instance on YouTube, but they would lose a tremendous amount of money in advertising. And frankly, they might not even stop the proliferation of the video. I'm curious how much competition does YouTube face from other streaming services, or is it still the dominant? One overall, it is the dominant one in certain categories and for certain types of videos, but Bernstein's faces incredible competition from twitch for people making videos on themselves playing video games, it has a new product YouTube TV product, which would like to compete with Time Warner and apple TV. And quite frankly, hasn't caught fire at all. And you write that Google doesn't break out you tubes finances. So that metric is tough to figure out anyway, exactly and analysts and investors have begged for more information and the company has shown no. No indication that it wants to get into that. What about Amazon and the competition from there? Rob the ladder is impacting Google's dominance advertising. And search isn't exactly they face a truly existential threat from Amazon that we really couldn't even imagined a year or two ago consumers are starting to go directly to Amazon to search for things if they want a Hanes t shirts that used to put it in Google and Google could sell you ads on it. If you don't go to Google, and you go to Amazon, I it is just a death for alphabet. So investors will basically be king on those two things. Can we expect any surprises? This is a company that very rarely surprises. They rarely give out really any interesting guidance as well. The thing is search is so big that it can mask larger larger problems one thing that investors have been looking at is the margin, which which fell last quarter a little more than many analysts were expecting. And it's right now at twenty one percent, which is a spectacular business over time. Time that should fall. But if that falls again this quarter and just another quarter. That would be definitely surprise. I don't know if you know the answer to this. But I'll ask it. Anyway, you know, it's one of the FANG stocks. How's it doing in relation to the others? It's doing okay this year. It's about in line with the market. It wasn't doing. Well last year. I think it actually fell last year. So there is a lot of opportunity here. But the question is is this a growth company anymore, or is this the beginning of a winter for an old, man? Wall Street Journal reporter, rob Copeland.

Youtube Google Amazon Rob Copeland New Zealand Reporter Wall Street Journal Charlie Turner Fang Time Warner Bernstein Apple Hanes T Twenty One Percent
Newest contenders in the streaming wars: Apple, Disney and more

Talking Tech

05:03 min | 1 year ago

Newest contenders in the streaming wars: Apple, Disney and more

"Talking tech is brought to you by wicks dot com. Create and publish a stunning website all from one powerful platform, go to wicks dot com to create your very own professional website today. That's w I x dot com in stay tuned after the show to hear you can take advantage of special offer for talking tech listeners all aboard away wrong podcast. This is the talking tech pod. Hi, I'm Brett Molina. Hi, I'm Kelly Lawler. We're ho co-hosts of the mothership podcast your favorite USA today network podcast about the culture, if you like technology that I'm guessing you probably have Star Wars in avengers. And all that fun stuff. That's all we talk about on this pod. So if you wanna listen in just find us on itunes or Stitcher or pretty much anywhere. You can find a podcast like this lovely one were hosting right now. Talking tech. We're filling in Frankel, Jeff. Yes. Hi, Jeff hope you're enjoying your time off. So. Yeah, right now, we're gonna talk about streaming services because we have another one on the list Disney. Plus, it is among eight thousand give or take a couple hundred streaming services that are out there. The big six. Or what we calling the ones that are either already available that are dominant and the three new ones that are due this year that we think will be dominant. So that's Netflix Amazon Hulu, apple plus Disney. Plus, and whatever Warner media calls it their service, which will have like, friends and some other stuff. I don't know they're weird. But it's the AT and T Time Warner merger streaming service. Let's feng. Let's just hope they don't use pause on the title. We'll see what God now, so Disney. Plus, they announced all the shows and movies and all the stuff they're going to have on there and the price. It's going to be I believe six ninety nine per month or roughly seventy dollars for the year. What's your take on Disney postal may take on Disney? Plus is that their way better at this than apple is? And that's probably because they've been in the entertainment industry for many decades and apple thinks that they can just reinvent the wheel with a black and white video of famous people talking about the importance of art. And not give out any details or show any clips and Disney knows that they need to wet fans. Appetites the price is insane. The price is going to be a big deal because I don't think apple can afford to make the price that low and Warner media certainly can't it's way lower than that flicks right now, they're most popular package is twelve ninety nine a month. And the family angle is not to be trifled with, you know, Disney's been family for many decades, and they've survived better that a lot of the Oji Hollywood studios. Well, I mean for Disney the big advantages, they own all the content, and you know, at least with Netflix, and Hulu what they've done is. They've gotten the rights to a lot of shows and movies, and then they've kind of backed in with their own original shows. Disney has a ton of stuff already. They have their own Disney properties. They have marvel they have Star Wars apples at a at a bit of a disadvantage because they have none of the properties right now. It's going to be all originals. It's going to be a lot of originals at once more originals than any other service has yet to debut with. So that's a new strategy. I don't think it will work as well. And I think Disney has low key been preparing for this for decades because they had that whole Disney volt thing which ends up being in their favor. Because like it's not like we own a lot of those things on DVD or we're used to seeing them a lot earlier. So the idea that like I watch Bambi whatever I want now is very appealing because I couldn't when I was a kid, and they're going to have a lot of the marvel movies out first and foremost on their service same Star Wars. So there's a lot of incentive to get involved between this and the price. I think that I mean, I think it's going to be very competitive. And I think you're gonna see a lot of people jump on it early on. And. Yeah, family friendly. I don't think they're any kind of adult are level type movies TV shows or anything it's mostly very much. Surrounding kids and family stuff. So it's going to be a very interesting niche. The streaming wars have begun that Tatan Bumba Obam that'll do it for talking tech today. Thanks so much for listening. Don't forget we are co-host of the mothership podcast, and you can find us on itunes, or Stitcher or soundcloud or any app has podcast were therefore, you're sometimes having a great idea is the easy part getting people to hear about your idea. Not always so simple. But now there's wicks at wicks dot com. You can start and publish your website for free wicks as artifice design intelligence. Creates a stunning website for you in just a few minutes. You can choose from over five hundred stunning templates or start from scratch just answer a few questions about your business to get started wicks provides you with an all in one business solution to grow your online presence. Plus all sites include built in SEO tools. So you can easily get found online. And in search engines like Google and Bing, build a website of your very own with wicks today. And if you go to wigs dot com and use our code talking. You'll get ten percent. Off any premium plan with wicks premium plans, you'll get more storage, a free domain for a year and much more. That's wicks w I x dot com promo code talking for ten percent off your premium plan.

Disney Wicks Apple Warner Media Netflix USA Jeff Brett Molina Kelly Lawler Tatan Bumba Obam Time Warner AT Frankel Oji Hollywood Studios Bambi Google Bing Hulu
The future of Star Wars: All the known movies and TV series coming your way

Bloomberg Markets

06:12 min | 1 year ago

The future of Star Wars: All the known movies and TV series coming your way

"Disney is trying to reshape the media landscape this morning, and at least it's reshaping the picture for a shares. Shares surging more than ten percent to a record high. Joining us in our Bloomberg interactive brokers studios. I'm so pleased to say terror Lachapelle who covers all things media and deals and telecom for Bloomberg opinion, terra, I find this deal fascinating. They unleashed Disney. Plus, which is the answer to net flicks. But can we start with just how limited is this offering at first I mean, this offering six ninety nine a month and a lot has been made of the price. But it's because there's not going to be a whole lot on it to begin with. If you're a really big Star Wars fan, perhaps there's a dry there because they are going to be able to have all the old Star Wars films. Which wasn't a sure thing we didn't know that. There was a big surprise last night because doesn't it actually sold the rights to those movies to Turner awhile back? So they probably had to pay big time to get those rights back for the Disney plus app. So if. Star wars. Okay. You've got that a Star Wars series is going to be on it the mandatory orien-, and then a lot of old Disney movies. So if you have young kids, perhaps it's good for that. Because we know kids don't mind watching the same movies over and over again. It's a great way to keep them. Busy. That you know, it's it's build a sort of the family app compliment to ESPN, plus and Hulu, which are the sports and more of the content. I guess you could say, but to me it really is forced to per fans of Disney and six ninety nine you know, you really not getting a whole lot for that price at first what's the vision for Disney? Plus, I think Disney plus is the product of the center of the future of Disney, which is kind of amazing. And I made the point in my column today that that's why the name kind of concerns me because Disney plus implies it's sort of like an add on as supplement to the real Disney. When really they're sticking their future on this app. And it's not gonna be profitable. And until two thousand twenty four which is going to be a few years after CEO Bob Eiger, who's leading this mission as long gone. He's retiring in twenty twenty one. So there's still a lot of questions about what this is going to look like how it's going to disturb the rest of the empire as an increasing amount of content goes to the app and not to. Sneeze other properties. How's this going to be the future though? I mean, I assume that eventually it will have more content. You're talking about the limited offerings at the initial out. What is the content eventually? And how does this end up being the monster revenue driver that Disney really needs? So I think what they're envisioning is as we've sort of seen this bulk innovation of the TV industry that Disney is increasingly going to keep anything that comes that's made by Disney on Disney. Plus, that's where you're gonna have to subscribe to get it or ESPN, plus and Hulu, and maybe they'll be some sort of bundle of those three apps. But basically, if if you're a Star Wars fan, if you like marvel movies, if you want Pixar movies, National Geographic content, you're gonna have to subscribe to Disney. Plus, so they're really sort of. Monopolizing that content for their own app. And it's not going to be available in other places. I mean, you can still, you know, big big films. We'll still go to the movie theaters, and maybe people will still pay to go. See those marvel productions maybe that still draws people out to pave and go to the movie theaters. But at the end of the day, I think what they're saying is the app is going to be the new home of Disney, and you need to subscribe. If you want anything Disney, so people are focusing on Netflix today. Netflix shares are slightly lower. But to me the real losers here, potentially the big cable networks. Absolutely. I mean, Disney right now is very dependent on the traditional bundles still, and they're not fully moving away from that by any means with Disney plus app yet. They I hearing from keagan part of peak global market intelligence that Disney gets about fifteen dollars a month per subscriber from its top twelve TV networks, which is a ton of money, and they're gonna have this app for six ninety nine. They generated about three billion dollars in box. Office ticket sales last year from its films and eventers endgame opening later this month could be the biggest opening ever. So they are still very dependent on these former revenue streams, but I think Disney possible accelerate this court cutting trend because if you are such Disney fan, why would you subscribe to cable one hundred dollars hundred dollars a month or you could just get Disney for six ninety nine. And I think that's what they're really hoping for. Although can you really get it for six hundred nine. My question is when they actually start to incorporate more offerings onto Disney, plus can they possibly stay at this price that undercuts net flicks. I mean, that's the reason why people were so odd by it because it just blows that flex out at the water in terms of in terms of discounts. Right. I mean, they've left themselves a lot of over to raise the price at six ninety nine. It's much cheaper than net flicks at twelve ninety nine, but again, Netflix has more I would say diversity of content for adults at least. But yeah, they've left themselves a lot of room. And I I would imagine the company hasn't said anything about this. But I would. Imagine that over time as bigger hits make it to that app. And they're increasing number of originals. They will have both the wherewithal and the need to raise the price. Okay. So going forward four net flicks. What is sort of the key test about whether this will actually draw people away from it? Yeah. Because I think right now the draw. Netflix is good enough for the price. Right. Maybe it doesn't have always the the best quality movies. And it doesn't have some of the TV shows you like to watch on cable. But at the end of the day at thirteen dollars a month. That's kind of a great deal. The question is over time. Does it lose that appeal as Disney plus comes on board, and then AT and T launches some apparatus HBO and the other assets bought from Time Warner, and there's all these other free ad-supported apps coming coming out. Now this year. That question is do people still need to pay for net. Flicks. I think for a lot of people it's going to be sort of the base case. It's kind of like what you need. And then what else can you afford to pay for? But for others for parents, maybe doesn't plus a lot of their problems, and they don't need flex, and that'll be interesting to see over time does that flex sort of that that premium. I honestly want to use that quote for the rest of my life, maybe for parents, plus solves all of

Disney Netflix Espn Bloomberg Interactive Brokers Hulu Bloomberg Lachapelle Marvel Productions Ceo Bob Eiger Pixar Time Warner Turner HBO AT Three Billion Dollars One Hundred Dollars
Post 'Game of Thrones,' can HBO still be HBO?

KCRW's Hollywood Breakdown

04:20 min | 1 year ago

Post 'Game of Thrones,' can HBO still be HBO?

"I'm Kim masters in. This is the Hollywood breakdown joining me as Matt Belony of the Hollywood reporter, and Matt there was a big splashy premier in New York last few days for game of thrones. That has been a huge hit for HBO, and it is ending, and it is ending as Richard player, the longtime head of HBO is has resigned and is leaving and John stanky the new head of Warner media installed by AT and T. The new owners of what was Time Warner is looking to HBO to generate more content. I don't know. I mean, I wasn't at the premiere neither you, but if for reading about it from a distance it felt to me like is this the end of something or can HBO continued to be be. Oh, well, that's the big question is game of thrones. For the past decade has been the HBO signature show and you see up to thirty million viewers for one show, which is unheard. And of and now they are facing for the first time a post game of thrones HBO, and yes, there are as many as four they're calling them successor series in development, and who knows if those will work, but can they amass the same audience and grow it to the extent AT and T wants to grow it without that signature show. Yeah. And veep is ending too. I mean they've been on such a role. And so I guess one of these spin offs is casting. But of course, it's going to be a while before that's show. And and the question is a site. Geiss question will people still be there when it returns to they love game of thrones? And that that ongoing way can they maintain that that level of whatever it was about game of thrones? That has so many people so in love with it. And and at the same time are they going to just hold onto their subscriptions waiting. Yeah. We did a pole this week in Hollywood reporter that. It show that twenty eight percent of people have unsubscribe to a channel or streaming service based on one show coming to an end, and that's an interesting stat. Because if there was ever a show that would drive interest in network, it would be game of thrones. Which is the number one show on television. That's one issue. The second issue is that AT and T is really pushing HBO to be more of a volume player. More shows more demographics, creating content for and really trying to ramp up the output, but game thrones was game of thrones. Because HBO took its time it spent lavishly these final six episodes are reportedly costing more than ten million dollars each, and they really, you know, it was a bespoke product that turned into a massive hit is AT and T going to give that kind of freedom to create. What will what will ultimately be the next game of thrones that we have no idea what that is. Now. Yeah. I mean, the lavishness of that party was old school HBO. I felt like it was HBO still being HBO. We we know very Well Matt that HBO throws some of the splashes parties that anybody throws in Hollywood. So are they even gonna continue that tradition? This is a regime change there. So we don't know how many of the people who were at H B O are now going to remain, and whether this transition in I have to say looking big picture at all the stuff that was acquired in this Time Warner acquisition HBO is now in transition. Bob green black arriving at Warner media running HBO as well as the some of the cable channels, Kevin CJ HARA gone. At Warner Brothers studio. There's just a lot going on right now at this company. And it feels like a lot of uncertainty is AT and T has only just really taken control of this company. HBO is the key here. They've gotta get HBO. Right. Because that is the two billion dollar a year cash cow and AT and T needs even more. Out of HBO because it is highly leveraged, thanks to this eighty five billion dollar deal to buy Time Warner and therein lies the potential irony. Thank you, Matt. Thank you, that's felony editorial director of the Hollywood. Reporter. He joins me this Monday at two o'clock on the business. I'm Kim masters, and this is the Hollywood breakdown.

HBO AT Time Warner Hollywood Matt Belony Warner Media Kim Masters Reporter Warner Brothers Studio New York John Stanky Richard Kevin Cj Hara Editorial Director Bob Green Eighty Five Billion Dollar Twenty Eight Percent Ten Million Dollars
Wikileaks may bring Trump's latest crisis (The 3:59, Ep. 526)

The 3:59

04:47 min | 1 year ago

Wikileaks may bring Trump's latest crisis (The 3:59, Ep. 526)

"Welcome to the three fifty nine. I'm Joanie Saltzman. And I am joined remotely this morning by our own Maggie rear than Maggie. Thanks for coming. Thanks for having me this lot of fun. So as taping right now, the former fixer and lawyer to President Donald Trump is testified to congress and WikiLeaks is rearing its head last night. Michael Cohen prepared statement claimed that Trump was aware that an associate Roger stone was in contact with WikiLeaks about the release of trove of hacked emails from the Democratic National Committee, so Maggie the Trump presidency has faced a lot of questions about what the president knew win during his campaign. If this claim is true, how big of a deal is that the idea that he knew that an associate was in contact with WikiLeaks. It's really big deal. I'm not a lawyer. But I mean, this is this is illegal activity. Right. So the whole Wiki leaks stuff. I mean, that's trafficking stolen information from people's Email. So, you know, anybody who knew about it and was a party to distributing that information that's criminal activity. So. So right there crime has been committed right though. It's big deal. There are questions too about Michael Cohen. He's testifying before congress before going to prison because he lied to congress. So how much how much how skeptical do we need to be about what he is telling congress now? Well, I mean, and that's clearly with the White House has been saying like this guy is already been out there. He's a known liar. You know? So how much of it? Can you really believe, you know, it's hard to say I mean. I don't know. I. Soobee Lisa's also come out and said that what Michael Cohen statement is untrue. We can excel itself has denied it. So there's a lot of questions still even as we get more information while there seems to be a greater appetite in the US government to take on text bad behavior. Yesterday. The Federal Trade Commission said it would create a technology task force that would look into competition in the tech industry. Maybe how does this fit into attitude towards Silicon Valley lately? Well, I think we've seen over the past year or so that. Politicians policy makers everybody wants to clamp down a little bit more on Silicon Valley. Right. I mean couple of year years ago, these companies were really like. Sort of the golden children of of of DC, right? Everybody loved the tech companies. And now everybody's a little bit more skeptical. So I think what we're seeing here is, you know, this really should be oversight of the FTC under what we see in terms of current law. But I think there's been a lot of skepticism that the agency is really up to the task to handle it. I mean, they they aren't just focused on Facebook in tech companies, but they have have to oversight over like, all consumer goods and stuff. So, you know, I think this commission is is trying to show that they're gonna be up a little bit on their antitrust staff, and that they're going to focus and get some real expertise in there to look specifically at these companies. But I again, I still think that there's some skepticism I think that there are some consumer groups or saying, they don't think it's it's enough that we need other kinds of reform. I'm in in that kind of thing. Yeah. Yeah. Finally yesterday, the US government lost its appeal hoping to unwind AT and T giant eighty five billion dollar Or with Time Warner which is the parent of TV networks like HBO CNN TBS things like that. That means the two companies have no real hurdles to keep themselves from completely intertwining. Do you have any sense about how eighteen might try to ingrain Time Warner with services now that there's nothing holding the back? No more questions. Well, they've already been doing it. Yeah. They're gonna be coming out with with services. I mean, you know, that you're covering what they're up to. So this really was kind of an annoying thing. That was cloud hanging over them. And now that I think that it's all cleared up. They just feel like they can kind of move full-throttle. I mean, one of the big things here is like the government's not gonna appeal. So this is not anything that's going to have any chance of going to the supreme court. That's us for today. I'm Joanie Sol's men with Maggie Bearden. Thanks again. Maggie, thanks for having me. And thanks for listening.

Maggie Michael Cohen United States President Donald Trump Federal Trade Commission Congress Wikileaks Maggie Rear Joanie Saltzman Silicon Valley Time Warner Democratic National Committee Roger Stone Maggie Bearden President Trump Supreme Court Joanie Sol Facebook White House I. Soobee Lisa
U.S. appeals court approves $81 billion merger of AT&T and Time Warner

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

U.S. appeals court approves $81 billion merger of AT&T and Time Warner

"Federal appeals court has cleared AT and T's purchase of Time Warner the US circuit court of appeals in Washington. DC rejected the Trump administration's claim AT and T's eighty-five. Billion dollar takeover of Time Warner would harm consumers the decision called the government's objections unpersuaded. It was rare for the government to try and stop a merger of a distributor and a supplier AT and T said it hoped the unanimous ruling would end the litigation Time Warner's content, including CNN and HBO should help AT and T compete with Netflix and YouTube, which produce content and sell it directly to consumers without a cable

AT Time Warner Trump Administration United States DC Washington CNN Youtube HBO Netflix Billion Dollar
Judges OK $81 billion AT

Rush Limbaugh

00:20 sec | 1 year ago

Judges OK $81 billion AT

"A federal judge allowing AT and T's merger with Time Warner to proceed last June. A US district court judge ruled that the eighty five point four billion dollar deal was indeed legal and said go ahead department of Justice appealed saying the merger would reduce competition and lead to higher. Consumer

Time Warner AT Department Of Justice United States Four Billion Dollar
"o l. time warner" Discussed on The Vergecast

The Vergecast

03:31 min | 2 years ago

"o l. time warner" Discussed on The Vergecast

"To the web app store and install webs on your phone from there and you know what i would put the verge on that web store in a heartbeat tim cook is honestly more likely to completely shut down the ipad division i was wrong talking solution is because when the island was first launch there were no apps and steve jobs payments he got onstage and said we have a suite solution for you you can make websites was like one of the most like obviously cruel things he's ever counterpoint counterpoint how many electronics you have installed on your computer right now that you use on a daily basis that's like solution some my favorite thing in the world but it's it's pretty pretty good compromise on crow s you can want you can go to like the unstable channel to get like new features and stuff but also you can switch to dev boat and they terrify they let you know you are so unsafe now but you can do whatever the hell you want your so unsafe when are you sure precedent keel the this keyboard war verte back to like a clean safe stay but they allow you to do it and i'm like i mean a nice result of this i don't i don't wanna like league we'll the legal system as club but nice this apple juice the state us okay you open up setting scrawl the way to the bottom you press into something you go like five deep into some sort of decision dri and then there's a jailbreak button press jailbreak can you imagine if the decision is ruth bader ginsburg like mapping out an entire ui jailbreak just straight up she decided they're still be fun you guys heard of george hot i hate you so much for making me do this yes what if you entered the conomic owed and now what the phone out just like you could do level apple is no longer constitutionally whimsical enough to do shit can conomic coat it yeah you tighten the kanani code and that turned onto from way over i'm going to say i'm gonna i'm gonna offer to more piece of apple news one fasten than to i'm just brings us back to the top of the show won the air power charging matt rumor to finally start shipping in september falling quote unquote technical hurdles which is i o s yeah it's great come on they don't know other operating system and put it into charging on your watch it's in your laptop how about a car got thing he works all right and then finally i keep saying everything the entire world is just trying to make your phone little tv into that end apple and oprah are teaming up to make content which to me is like i don't know what apple was doing with original content the heap spending money to get it keep making deals like this i don't think they're good at it we'll end to to to really bring it full circle like where is the home for this content supposed to be because my understanding the last time i quit apple music the the video stuff was in apple music which is not a good place to go watch video right they have app and so it's going to be the home i was for a controlling your actual tv no that's the remote oh the tv app is like when you have an apple tv all the services feed into this interface shows.

"o l. time warner" Discussed on The Vergecast

The Vergecast

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"o l. time warner" Discussed on The Vergecast

"Through the app store us thirteen dollars a month because they are literally passing the thirty percent apple fee on to you the consumer so the big question here i think if the supreme court takes it an apple loses and they send it back down to the court and appaloosas again and doesn't appeal most of the paths on this branching logic chain and napa winning but if happily is this is the thing that breaks the idea of the closed apps store ecosystem so like this is the case to watch to see if consumers even have the right to sue apple for apps store pricing because they have no other vendor for applications on there but i guess like the the flip side of that is does apple have the right to have a close platform that is doesn't allow you to install arbitrary apps on it right so that's like a is again the first question is just should be developer suing apple or consumer suing apple the press apple's precedent is it should be the developers because we sell nothing to consumer we sell distribution services to developer right consumer saying who gives a shit you're the only people that we transact with so that's like the foundational question then the question is is the app store tax justified or is it does it consumer should they have a choice because they cannot by astronaut vendor well what remedy is this class action lawsuit seeking money millions of dollars and they're saying you've you've overcharge us by millions over the years for all these absolutely they're not seeking a you have to stop it remedy but if the court says this is unconstitutional pay this money they don illegal i don't think founding fathers thought this through sure washington like let me run anybody from a practical standpoint lincoln ran lennox advocate goodwill from like hey we're the company that we make money by selling hardware yeah and like like it's so frustrating trying to buy like a book for kindle audible like going to like apple or you go to amazon site because you have to buy it through amazon's website because you can't even like shop from amazon's apps for digital products on the phone an amazon site hey show you.

apple napa washington lincoln amazon developer thirteen dollars thirty percent
"o l. time warner" Discussed on The Vergecast

The Vergecast

04:49 min | 2 years ago

"o l. time warner" Discussed on The Vergecast

"It so many times on the verge cast we've introduced your segments and i've said advertisers if you wanna just by the name i'll sell it to you agree we had incoming in the advertiser literally vestige our team and said we don't know if this offer is a joke or not but we're interested okay and we had to tell them it wasn't jokes i'm telling you now advertisers if you want to buy paul segment you it's hunt one hundred percent real yes you can name it anything you want anything that anything and he you are allowed to sit in a fifteen minute brainstorming session with me where we would determine the yeah one contingencies that will be on a broken zoom paul every week but it has the same name it's true i'm for sale cheval group which i've decided it's spelt s h u v p and i think that is the how the right that the sound that phone makes when it's keira exits body chevy chevelle upo has great the find x we have one i played with it's great really yeah i haven't played with it i've just been looking at it laughing so so obviously the context is there's this vibrio next phone yeah with title keira yeah a little little is a little camera about comes out cubs out that phone you can change the sound really so it's in the sound is software defined so when the camera comes up it can either make mechanical it sounds motor warring it can make a sifi noise and then there's one that just literally sounds like a fucking parade okay there'd be required for a second show oop all right but find x apple's like cute little tab cab no we'll have the whole phone it's so good and it also is the rear cameras yes of the the front cameras popping up also the rear cameras are public out it's a credibly just terrible it's wonderful it's so non utilitarian but it's just it's beautiful in technological so it's a delight your crazy also it doesn't have a fingerprint sensor it only has faced a mock so every time you pick up the phone and swipe up it has it's incredible right so unlock the phone you have to make it chevette type and then look at it it's great every time you pick it up it goes so that's never gonna break but what i love about it is some companies like through the notch it's great i love it the software on this phone is a direct rip off of the iphone like the most shameless rip off the iphone ever made but it's i like it will give them the the aesthetics of the phone are very a samsung galaxy esque yeah where does merger they got the best ship chevelle in the biz eddie i love papa cameras we like this is the stuff samsung used to do just like regularly the put out whatever crazy hardware they could make stylus of phone yeah like here's some parts we put them in a box shook the box and now it's a phone simpson's too they're too good for that now there's no crazy samsung is over you gotta look to up oh and vivo what's the third one they they all deny that they're the same company but they share one plus they literally will not cop to the fact that they are one company with we've had reporters try to dig up chinese business documentation and be like no no no it's the same company they're like we share in ownership but none of us ever talk and then like a one plus comes out like that's just that phone whatever cameras are beautiful are you dan dan had one as you know and he showed it to me and i was like i love it a love it it's snaps off but i love it it's it's gonna do that thing where you drop it once and then it's it's start making the sound this is oh it's also not waterproof because it opens up yeah i just can't do it but i love it i i'm a unabashed fan of harboring invasion i wanna talk about two or three things before you wrap up we're going to little over here but there's a big case the supreme court just took a case where a bunch of consumers are suing apple over apps store pricing i think this is very confusing there's a lot of bad headlines out there and it's an antitrust case i i just.

one hundred percent fifteen minute
"o l. time warner" Discussed on The Vergecast

The Vergecast

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"o l. time warner" Discussed on The Vergecast

"Richard butler that that i would enjoy more than anything i should i'm just hoping audience yes thank you sorry so you know richards fantastic if you've ever dinner with him like literally just waiting in line with them fun so that's going to be an interesting thing the people like that who have had this track in credit richard astonishing track record at hbo great shows and i'll go back to the my book richard was the only person richard was the pr guy for hbo by the way you really was that was essentially he was dreams alive for pr people i know he was any work for jeff bucs who jeff yukos's ran hbo at the time of my book and and richard was his marketing and pr person so he he moved himself and his records been really so impressive and i really enjoyed talking to him all the time but he was the only person jeff bucs was a little bit upset by the deal but richard was the only one in that entire book and the entire time who was really objecting to what had happened and with the merger largely because the stock of time warner suffered a lot of people who had been there there you know he's got a real soul so he was really upset for receptionists and various people got screwed when that stocks tanked essentially but he was always suspect i never he just was the only one who was like this deal is not gonna work and here's why and it was super smart about it and so now he's the guy that's gotta make it work with essentially another version of a o so i think that'll be i mean he's got a lot more power now and a lot more savvy obviously but at the time he he literally the all of those people went along with it all the time warner if you wanna except for richard so i think it'll be kind of an interesting moment for him he's put in the lauda a lot of pressure on hbo not to change or whatever but to be the competitor to netflix right they're gonna right they have to steal sure but what if he goes to them hey i need double the money give me netflix is spending money like a drunken sailor over the left ear so i need double the money and he's got a lot of money right what if he does that they're gonna give it to them i'd give it to them i give richard any amount of money to make something cool but are they are they going to give him a hard time is he gonna want to sit there with like like a committee that tells them what he can do like that i mean jeff beauge just handed him the money right to do it but now he's going to need really big money and so i would be interesting richard a room saying to john stanky i need twice as much money for hbo to make money what kind of people are they going to be they're gonna say yeah yeah sure game of thrones guy like shirl you can do it again or are they going to go like well give us an idea what we can you know you could see that that cultural clash very obviously but we'll say maybe the surprises that the mobile guys will surprise us and based super there is taking very good wall street journal piece described the forthcoming culture clash just had one vignette that i thought set at all which was all that nine eighteen t executives employees period of its hundred thousand all but nine fly coach whereas everybody at time warner has concierge service at the airport it's just like yeah that'll be nice that'll be so we'll see but i'm coach they do they all like oj no they're flying coach i guess they're paying for gogo interacts i had dinner with richard butler and he does not fly coach office dinner i enjoy always seek him out he's a lot all those those executives are fun they're great they're they're hollywood people so we'll see let's see how that works okay thank you very much for.

Richard butler richards
"o l. time warner" Discussed on The Vergecast

The Vergecast

04:04 min | 2 years ago

"o l. time warner" Discussed on The Vergecast

"Right and seeing what the talent can create at each of those places and you see that talent move back and forth and among and between them but you don't you don't see them competing with each other really on their on their core businesses that are making all the money to pay for that content so we've talked about time warner allott and at and it's competition and brought up content and it's funny to me because i really did it used to work for a while aol is now part of reisen person who hasn't i always joke the vox media founded on revenge the whole company had some experience while they're out to prove it we can get it right a lot of revenge going on here right into anyhow but ailes part of variety so it's another carrier bought a content company tim armstrong co vail went out and bought yahu he bought a huge number of digital advertising companies and he's going to glue ads all over everything but they're not in this i mean have gandhi in like you know they're not getting whatever thanks for the money oprah's not going on go ninety right it's not gonna she ain't so how do you see the the future of aol today just sort of get subsumed into the muck i you know what i don't care i wish i did this is someone who wrote a lot about ya the other day literally in new york i'm like i call him today like you know what i mean i loved him i mean he's he's tim armstrong's very funny and entertaining but i just don't even like verizon's got a jump on in here like with the money they gotta start buying up stuff like to dissuade you know that's probably good news for vox meteors or yes four buzzfeed or well who's gonna vice really or at this point someone eventually but but i like nancy dubuc who's running now but it's you know you have to wonder what they would variety gotta do now they've got a that's just yahu and aol is not going to cut it right like at this point they gotta like you know again directionally correct right they were first out the gate with this stuff but huffington post their idea yeah we're going to buy a bunch of basically recreationally correct print assets at scale the height puffing post and ails stable of sites and all of yahoos web pages and we're gonna glue ads on them and that's the future yeah but then what eighteen looking at nexus like all of these are gonna get sucked up you know that company was supposed to go public or bought by ninety different people and now it's back in the play so you know they're gonna assemble all the parts that are necessary the advertising the technology advertising technology parts the content parts and see if they can get people to buy it alternately would good thing for people like you and i what matters in the content space is great storytelling great content gate great creation and you can't digitize that so easily even if you can distribute them it's good people do find it like they really do it's very easy to find great contact think about all the great television out there now and so anyone who's just create a person who creates great content is in a really good situation which is nice i just the question is can they marry the advertising technology and the marketing and stuff like that to create you know bigger things and that's that's the big question it seems like you were saying directionally correct they had the right idea is wrong time certainly the wrong cast for salaries well if it's the right time and you know the the technology's here in mobile's here is this the right you know these people better than anybody i know is this the right set of personalities to pull the stuff but at and t stuff yeah i thought randall's smart i mean i don't know i mean i think you're gonna see a lot of clashing there's there's randall in john stanky right at eighteen drug psyche is if you don't know these a ceo of what is now called warner media which is yeah which is time warner eighteen i'm just met him casually but he seems pretty pretty conservative conservative just like a business guy like business guy he doesn't he doesn't i'd love to see dinner with him and and and.

"o l. time warner" Discussed on The Vergecast

The Vergecast

04:04 min | 2 years ago

"o l. time warner" Discussed on The Vergecast

"And report mode i asked to decide seeing hockey wants to sell it to disney but comcast sure because he's comfortable with disney right but you know comcast got a lot of money like it's that's a can't like ultimately he you know he wants that money so he can shove it down fox news throat i guess i don't know but thank goodness he has money to do that yeah richer is one of my least favorite names going on right now so so it just you know the fact that he's selling is really interesting to me that's what i'm talking about is that that that he's too small like rupert murdoch is do small he's got a move to a bigger than in a lotta ways when i'm thinking about disney buying newscorp for example i'm like they may not be big enough to take on like right disney is not big enough to take on and so that's why at and t getting back to the eighteen thing is is the concept behind the original merger of aol time warner was this idea to create this entertainment and communications and distribution behemoth that was the idea behind it and it was a great idea and it was the right idea and here we are today a very smart out great for consumers i'm sorry not great for consumers i don't think it's very you know very smart media ceo who we both worked for told me that he thinks that at deal is is way smarter than the al deal ever was yes yeah yeah but it's time has come it looked smart today right i i it's so easy to put off that like i history i'm like really because it's the concepts behind it are exactly the same like they're very similar it's just they were difficult people hitting up against each other and fighting over you know status and that time media was so much more arrogant that they could behave like that now they're sort of not which i think is different is there a model for a behemoth of size being successful this is something i've been thinking about as well is companies of the size you know they're not nimble they're not fast now they tended trip over themselves all the time and then sort of devolve into constituent parks even time warner right it was a behemoth and you know there see started selling off pieces of it everywhere he could because he needed to break it up to create value is there a model for a behemoth of the size being successful over time i've been thinking about lately because i think right now there's a there's a sort of a discussion at me and so kind bali that all all it matters of these big companies now like different people call him fang different different names i think far had cost on the frightful whatever five but there are i think most what's happening here now is the big companies are running everything you don't see as many like i was trying to think of hot startups like in the snapchat airbnb school uber there aren't any are there like they're what's the next class they own exist big companies okay cashed out i'm trying i'm just going to burn bird land like come on like think about it there isn't there isn't like we had like one time it was airbnb snapchat uber pinter's there's a bunch and then now you can't come up with i can't put five on my hands right now of that of that excitement hit box dropbox there was like a dozen at least the unicorns right now they don't exist because the big companies are sort of either sucking up everything doing it pretty well themselves now whether they can stay nimble i don't know but certainly you don't see a lot of innovation coming from the small companies anymore do you think that i can be like a government or regulatory pushback on that there's a lot of interest in sort of rethinking how antitrust work so you yeah got to rethink antitrust completely like that's the problem i mean some of these companies are like nation states at this point i think remarks literally refers to facebook as a country sane conception lion can't live i should like he should well.

hockey disney comcast
"o l. time warner" Discussed on The Vergecast

The Vergecast

03:53 min | 2 years ago

"o l. time warner" Discussed on The Vergecast

"Was that digital distribution and the ability to distribute things in homes and that time via cable especially was a critical differentiator for that company to get the content into people's hands i think the problem was devices didn't exist there wasn't mobile mobile changed everything right to be able to do that and people just weren't so it wasn't a commercial thing even though was most commercial consumer focused company at the time and so i think they had like i said it was the right it was a right concept that there was an enormous pushback especially from the cable groups of people who are so old school you couldn't even you know i it was hard to even speak to them because they were so in an old way of thinking of things you know there's a lot of pushback from the movie studios over all even online advertising they thought it was stupid at the time now you know they wanted to be a newspapers they wanted to advertise in newspapers or reviews and now everything that they remember them talking about it well was his stuff they're doing today without even thinking such as clips online ads debut in trailers online that was that was in the thinking back then it just was it was too early i guess was it really just culture clash you have this pulled another amazing line from the beginning of this book this is carrigan in the book it was like watching someone fall down a flight of stairs in slow motion and every bump in thump made me wince so these so many internet companies later would have that description i was the uber and yahoo and others yeah i think it was a huge culture quest look they came they came in and they essentially bought the company even though they talked about it as a merger they bought it they took over the culture they took over the time one yeah they took over the leadership they were in place and look these guys were arrogant like and they're all guys by the way mostly and almost largely and they were super era that some of them had had some sketchy backgrounds or a couple of dealmaking people that were sketchy like no question there was some ways they made money that was sketchy a lot of ponzi scheme round tripping that was disturbing that they you know they'd played fast and loose with how they created themselves and there was also the the dot com bubble the price of aol at the time was so inflated and now today when you look at facebook and others it doesn't seem that way right it was a little bit ahead of its time in terms of being high price but it was i think it really sent the people time warner around the bend thinking they've worked all this time you know doing you know the basic work of media and then these guys come in with his fake stock and run things and tell us what to do and so it was you know both were wrong how they approached it in that aol people were wrong to be this era that and so lecturing even though they were pretty much correct about what they were saying the time warner people you know being so stubborn and on willing to understand that things were changing so drastically not just in television but the magazine business of which they had an enormous business that it was dying even before they realized it the movie business to change every every part of their business the cable business at change we interesting because i look at it as what time that connections restore the that using computers crt's there was no video streaming to speak of and now time warner at that time still own time inc timing has been spun off part of the company then critical of revenue and everything else and it seemed like what they wanted to do was al was going to distribute time inc news magazine on aol service and one day they would get to the video side and now we're just you know twenty years hence or whatever and now the plan seems to be we'll timing has gone it's it's a company but at is going to distribute time warner's video assets over its devices and services right it's like it's literally the.

twenty years one day
"o l. time warner" Discussed on The Vergecast

The Vergecast

03:09 min | 2 years ago

"o l. time warner" Discussed on The Vergecast

"Giving us a lot of really interesting new ways to meet people and they're totally stealing all of the innovative features like from bumble where women could message for that was their big thing now tenders going to let people do that tinder also launching tender places which gives you a map of places you've been you confuse people who've also been there who use tender and that's exactly like this happened that did that i happen actually today had news saying they're going to have a map as well and i just felt sad i was like happened knocking tinder chew off but yeah they're they're also just shamelessly taking features too but yeah so now facebook is launching a dating app and it's gonna go head to head with match group and it's like to me that'll of the monopolies i have some gossip about the facebook dating up when i say gossip i mean this is information i have not verified with a second person but former facebook employee was saying to me like so this facebook daily was announced fa there's a history of things being announced at efate that never ships such as anonymous lockin and this person was saying that it was very notable that it that facebook never said who is working on facebook data and never said what part of the company this is even supposed to be coming out of and also there was no timeframe for launch it was just something that they're going to explore so this person sort of try to make a bet when i didn't i do not bet sources when they come to me with formation but i tried to bet me that facebook dating will never launch so it was like a just like a marketing thing like someone made like made it up as basically an ad and if like off people are into this they will actually find somebody to build it you know it could have been a trial balloon i i believe they've had a lot of meetings about it and i believe they've mocked it up and i'm sure it's been proposed internally there forever and i think it made for a really kind of cute fun thing to talk about during an event that facebook spent most of polish sizing so it definitely kind of help to lighten the mood so you know i do think there's there's kind of something in the works there but you know whether it ever launches is still an open question i will say i think is gonna launch you're in it i think you should bet casey source what about what about dating tv the app and there's a guy talent dating apps used to work they record a vhs tape and send it in it could be it could be tv all right here's what's going to happen we've talked a lot about merger mania there is women who were this company care swisher who is one of the best big company reporters best tech reporters best meteo reporters ever do it in this is a fact when aol time warner she wrote a book about it called it must be a pony in here somewhere she knows all the characters i thought your half an hour to compare aol time warner to eighteen thousand time warner so listen to just listen to cara in general in life but we're gonna play that rick well i'm gonna read an ad we're gonna play that this comeback and paul's to do thing let me read this this episode of the verse gas is brought.

"o l. time warner" Discussed on The Vergecast

The Vergecast

03:52 min | 2 years ago

"o l. time warner" Discussed on The Vergecast

"Vox media which that's great i will say see of comcast personally hates me so don't worry okay real quick i mean these dating apps so much for sutton all the time it seems like one company owns every major match group yes well this'll be two days now match group now owns hinge which i was personally very sad about because i use hinge they bought hinge and now they basically own every dating they own okay keep it tinder they own a bunch of they own over forty five dating apps i didn't even know there are this many in the world but there are there international brands match dot com obviously plenty of fish i don't know like a bunch of apps and they literally just own every dating avenue freaks me out holdouts there's bumble and they just sued bumble mashed group to sued bumble because as some people may know the those the co founder of tinder went to bumble because she had like a whole issue there and now they're suing fumble for copyright stuff i think the swipe interfaces insight so i said okay do you have deep thoughts on this oh i mean i do it's a it's a fascinating thing and in its own way or minds me exactly of what facebook does which is they're just sort of hyper alert to any app that comes along that gets a significant number of users that has to do with communication particularly oriented around communication that younger people use and once they had a threshold facebook swoops in and buys them and they don't have to worry about anyone ever competing with them and match metric is done the exact same thing with dating apps so i told you like is gonna compete with match yes down that's going to happen so i said i could get from is gt every single story i can this facebook instagram and not being prevented by buying instagram what's up is now in retrospect being seen as an antitrust failure because it clearly reduced competitions market do you think anyone at the fcc doj is even flagging the fact that match group is literally just reducing competition in this market because at and time warner went went through because it was a vertical merger number of competitors in each market stayed the same literally reducing the number of batters zero percent chance anyone in the government is thinking about this anyone of the government's on hinge i told you i think it's super funny like we are talking about these like behemoths combining and facebook instagram to me is the example of maybe that should have been scrutinized more closely but at the time instagram was just like some silly photo app and nobody cared and now it's like effectively the future of facebook and if they were face made to compete with them more directly might be very different situation but all these little dating apps it's to me the the comparison casey looks like i'm crazy no i think you're totally right i think in a world where facebook owns most of the social networks it's also fair to say that innovation has really slowed right like the only major innovations come out of social networks in the past three years i would argue have come out of snapchat right or or or sort of derivatives of things that snapchat did which speaks to the reason why you want there to be competition dating apps are actually super innovative right the only way that you can grow oh to a big number of users and a new dating up is to have some new insight into human behavior tinder is a great example where there was something really just kind of pleasing about through swiping through duck of cards and they were able to build a great business out of that so yeah i am concerned that match group is just kind of swooping in in consolidating the space because traditionally dating apps of.

Vox media comcast zero percent three years two days
"o l. time warner" Discussed on The Vergecast

The Vergecast

04:13 min | 2 years ago

"o l. time warner" Discussed on The Vergecast

"About tucson tv and his main point was youtube is great but i need to be everywhere there's not a platform like youtube that gives me sort of the audience scale potentially the revenue scale everything else is sort of feeder into youtube but i need another place and it seems like this is the other place that feels a native to youtubers because they're already doing tons of stories and so i think the question is this is why instagram had tons of influencers they're they're already capturing so much of their creative attention they can capture even more than they can capture more audience attention and presumably sell more ads so i think that question dealer what's going to be here i think it's gonna look a lot like instagram's stories crossed with youtube and you're gonna see that same class of people sort of immediately takeover in a way that snapchat discover they went to big legacy media brands and you know like whatever people magazine is doing undiscovered just looks embarrassing it doesn't feel how insane is it that snapchat miss that influence or vote it was sitting right there vine with collapsing it was sitting right there they were always suspicious of the influencers because they never saw themself as a place for people to be influenced right it was always about br can you closer to your real friends and not about how many friends you have it's about how do we sort of let you talk to the people who matter the most in your life and like king back like might not have a great role to play there that's why i've thought discovery was always a weird fit for their up though right is because they have been suspicious of the influence of crowd so i don't know casey did they say they were going to pay influencers to make content no and it's sort of straight the only way that i can explain that is that this thing is still kind of an experiment and so they're just going to kind of roll it out and i think they don't wanna promise creators money until they know that it is going to be a hit i think it'll be enough of a hit that they can pay the audience money but my guess is you'll hear about that within the next six months but in the meantime it is a bit itchy that instagram is like hey like khimik suffer a platform and like we'll probably pay you eventually right from one of the richest countries in the world what do i favored stories from this disaster of an event is a ninja twitch livestream or he jacob rogers from a variety greg reporter interviewed him and he tweeted videogame lesser ninja was busy resetting his instagram password as i interviewed him about tv so that he could get access to start using i yeah i mean look there are twitch stars there youtube stars they're instagram stars if you're any one of those companies you're trying to figure out how to capture the other right to bring them over to your platform yeah so fascinating is they got they got the attention of people like ninja and mark has brownlee to like jump over to instagram in like a pretty big way like they did a a really good job like getting a bunch of big names to pay attention and like try out the platform right away because we talked about time youtubers are frustrated right vr happy to to look at something new well something that i think we should watch i mean look once we have twenty five million followers on any platform you're going to be fine but you know there is also a downside to the availability of so many platforms and so many platforms coming after these influencers because it it actually seems to not be paying offer them all of that much you're one person you only have so much time in the week that you can create new content and now i feel like there's this expectation that if you are an m kb hd you're expected to make your weekly youtube video and your weekly tv video and you've got to go scrapes tweeted on twitch for a little bit and something about it feels messed up to me like you know like ninja is is the probably the most famous streamer in the world right now and he's broadcasting himself twelve hours a day like these are not good jobs we talk about these these are really great jobs like if i only have enough instagram of followers like.

youtube tucson twelve hours six months
"o l. time warner" Discussed on The Vergecast

The Vergecast

03:44 min | 2 years ago

"o l. time warner" Discussed on The Vergecast

"And sao paulo and something happened where like i think it was just basically zoom conference call issue i should say because i don't i don't know what software they use but if you've ever used any work video conferencing software you know that it's the bane of your existence and i think instagram heart into that reality you know they make a live video product maybe their next pivot as they're going to do work video chat everyone's final pivot every coming what's the biggest problem we can solve that we have every day it's it's it's a very hard problem apple only just now managed to solve it with facetime looking down at google and i've said like what what is the deal with video work video it doesn't seem like it should be that and they just they shake their heads we wish we knew no one can figure out the smartest people in the world baffles the apple then just figure out they litter literally open the drawer where they stored the i chat code and they were like rifling through the file folders they're like i guess we're here this one i found the envelope with rhonda what's anyway should not talk about video conferencing for an hour so casey what is it so tv is is two things one is it's a new section of instagram which you'll need now see as a glowing orange orb at the top of your feed and it's a standalone app and if you tap in video from people you follow and things that instagram thinks you'll be interested in will automatically start to play it's again it's vertical video and now you as a user can upload up to ten minutes and if you're a super fancy account with millions of followers you can up up to an hour and instagram says that eventually they hope to get rid of all time limits and you can just upload however long a video you want to here's why i think this is a smart move from instagram i think historically social networks have been terrible places to watch video because we just don't go there for video right you think about how you use a social network your thumb never stops moving right you're always scrolling through the feed your tapping around your clicking and social networks like facebook in particular although also twitter have been building these experiences where they just sort of accept the they expect that you're going to stop scrolling and watch you know game of thrones or you know they're they're cheap rip off of it where i think instagram was really smart was they said the only way to get people to watch video on their phones as you have to make a first class destination for it that you actually seek out and that's what tv is so yes you can find it inside the instagram but even there it's a home for video you only tap on it if you're ready to sort of lean back and watch the standalone out functions the exact same way this is the move that snapchat should have made with discover but never did and i think that ultimately if you believe that you have really good video on your platform you have to make a standalone destination for it or you're ultimately not that serious about it i think the app is very well mate it's it's very clearly a first gen apps like notifications are still coming in on instagram when you get comments on your stuff or whatever i posted a video and because it's a brand new video platform did what you must do in a brand new video platform is take video somebody else made also a copyright infringement and i put that up it was reuben engagement enter did a video of me lip synching slim shady from what the microsoft video did awhile ago it's incredible so i posted that but what i love about the interface is it's auto play which find whatever but while you're watching video you can just swipe up and kind of like browse through other recent videos and other channels and if you get bored you just have on the next one and it starts right away and you can swipe up again and so.

sao paulo ten minutes
"o l. time warner" Discussed on The Vergecast

The Vergecast

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"o l. time warner" Discussed on The Vergecast

"Sir i cast the flagship podcast of the verge podcast network which is part of the vox media podcasts at work which is part of media which it this point is not going to be part of a larger conglomerate as near as i can tell but we'll probably happen soon given the current damn near lie i'm a friend we have an all star crew today paul's here hello speaking vox media podcast network casey newton host of converges joining us hey everybody ashley carmen host of watch push button is joining us there and indeed is here hosted processor hey how's it going she's not a podcast now but video experience yeah peter makes the moving picture i dance like a monkey in front of the camera it's great hey casey if we're the flagship what is converged what kind of boat is it converge is a what kind of boat is it it's it's like you know the kit the the car from nightrider imagine if that were a boat that's what converges so a corporate talk it it's a lot of technology and they're very smart and also kind of funny is it like the though it's the lotus from the james bond movie that converts exactly ashley exactly what kind of boat is why canes canes me mmediately a jetski speeding off screamed crying it's the end of the big pin video with like zooming out we go all right there's a reason i wanted to ashley on our show casey and ashley not case ly there's a reason i wanna casey and ashley on our show i would say this is this is news that's going to feed into almost everything we talk about on the show this week but instagram announced gt v which is is near as i can tell a direct competitor to youtube feeds off of all of the video stuff that's happening in ceram lately casey i was washing your twitter feed it sounds like the event was just a pure disaster so just walk us through what happened with the announcement and then what the product is you know it really was and i let me say everything about to say none of it matters even a little bit but you have to understand that tech a'demos are incredibly well produced they spend incalculable amounts of money on them these things are choreograph down to the the last like where the napkins are placed and man instagram went all out on this event they rented out a concert venue in san francisco that hasn't even re it is apparently about to reopen it's called the fillmore west there's a fillmore east anyway they had dade created like seven rooms where you could take these funny instagram photos against beautiful backdrops they had a make your own berry bowl they had four different kinds of fancy toast it was like the ultimate instagram event and when it came time for the thing to start it didn't and forty five minutes went by forty five minutes door than rig nine forty five minutes well honestly i wrote a story because there have been so much reporting that that had happened leading up to the event that i thought you know this is a really good time to sort of pour out my thoughts and feelings about what this new instagram video experience is going to be the last thing i'll say about the the sort of failure is they had brought an all these very famous instruments stars who had collectively tens of millions of followers and they told us to to a thirty minute long event and so i thought we were going to sort of get to hear from all these people who he knew back stage 'cause they're posting about it to their instagram well kevin system the ceo comes out on stage he starts the event and they wind up just doing the entire thing in ten minutes so the entire thing was over in an incredibly short amount of time do they tell you why it was so late i'm told he was technical difficulties they were trying to have simultaneous events in new york.

vox media forty five minutes nine forty five minutes thirty minute ten minutes
"o l. time warner" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

Knowledge@Wharton

04:44 min | 2 years ago

"o l. time warner" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

"The auto lite becomes part of ford content is different because we customers expect content to be licensed broadly that is they want hbo even if the carrier that they subscribe to is not an hbo owner and one of the things i fear from a lot of vertical mergers in this industry is that where you're going to get silos that is we're going to get firms that have their own content and in order to get that content you are going to have to subscribe to their service and that is going to put up a certain amount of customer resistance because if you know if hbo is not owned by any backbone supplier then it's incentive is to licensed to everybody on the other hand once hbo is owned by a cable company or a satellite company the those incentives change and whether licenses to rivals or not as an open question depending on on the facts but we can no longer be assured that everybody's going to be able to get hbo and isn't that if you get those silos veloping that's when you potentially get the the harm to the companies like sling box like hulu that are doing the tv as well the government push that very hard you know these are these little bundles are all licensed programming like youtube for example says its programming in they have been extremely attractive on the market particularly to people under forty or so that is the one area that's really growing in this market and if if content is tied up it's going to be hard for these skinny bundles to deliver the programming that their customers want eric what do you see the future of some of those companies the smaller ones that are that are in this and because they are making inroads right now in drawing a lot of people to their services so i think they have to grow quickly enough either organically or by combining so that they have bargaining power to fight back against something like at t time warner so that at and t time owner when it makes the does the calculation herbs talking about do we do better by keeping h b o to ourselves sure we give up licensing fees but maybe people switch from hulu to us when they make that calculus the the other side has enough viewers and would pay big enough licensing fees then the content will remain available to all of the channels and whatever channel the customers want so i think the future you know the future whenever an industry gets bigger more powerful players is at the other people had better combine and get their negotiating power up to par or else they could be just squashed i think on that front does that there are lots of friends that got slang and you know that there too many firms in that isn't it and the problem is they're all consolidators of content they do not have their own contents david have to do what nets like and i'm on video has done in the last several years they will need to make their own content and giving their size and profitability that's unlikely and therefore will need to consolidate and you know in terms of the calculus that eric talked about and we discussed earlier that is the core point that what are they comic what they comic analysis behind sharing the content you on as a platform with your competing platforms and the way i'm thinking about it as for instance if you could acquire one customer from the competitor by withholding content you can call one customer to move toward you for every five that you lose the life sensing opportunity for that sort of not attractive because the margins are really high on the licensing and for the customer that you move have bigger margin in an absolute but you would also have higher costs and so that's not compensate for the five or four six for whom you lost licensing revenue so my feeling is that the pressure will not come on the on the slings will not come from eighty and t and comcast it will come from the fact that they do not have their own content and so they're easily replaceable number one really values them they could.

ford
"o l. time warner" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"o l. time warner" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"It is a highly political accompany and one that really you know sort of has its finger in the political winds let's not forget that it was revealed just a month ago that they had hired michael cohen to try to do their bidding in front of the trump administration so i'm not sure that this is like disney or like some of the other companies that that you name i think they will be highly attuned to what the trump administration thanks and this this raises another point in one that you're caller just raise the notion of big being bad by the way that the way that antitrust used to be in law used to be in use to look at until robert bork and his colleagues got their hands on the on the federal courts and and essentially change that vision to look at essentially prices and just about nothing else and were bored just to remind listeners the former solicitor general under president reagan became a federal judge supreme court nominee right but the larger point is antitrust in its original ration under teddy roosevelt the former president justice louis brandeis looked as bigness as bad not only for consumers but also for democracy when you have integrated companies particularly one that does have its finger to the political winds that's not necessarily good for diversity viewpoints and for choice so you know yes it is true that the justice department has been disinclined to challenge vertical mergers over less forty years but that's just because enforcement has been week not because the law doesn't allow for it and what i really worry about this decision doing is tapping down growing movement to strengthen antitrust law and to look at these vertical mergers more skeptically want to take a call now from zephyr hills florida david good name welcome.

disney robert bork reagan justice department michael cohen president teddy roosevelt louis brandeis zephyr hills florida forty years
"o l. time warner" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"o l. time warner" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Now there was another statement roughly at the same time in twenty sixteen a from may kandal rahim very distinguished attorney on such matters and what he had say particularly matters because he was later made the head of the antitrust division and the department of justice under attorney general jeff sessions here's what he had to say on canadian television the fear of it and a pack that media i think we'll get a lot of attention however i don't see this as a nature antitrust problem in court of course deller hime saw a major problem with it and he sought a vigorously to oppose it he is not yet said whether he will appeal the judge's ruling yesterday geegee sewn you've been a voice for consumers for many years and even in this deal and even from this administration one that you've been critical of in many regards you feel they took the right stance in opposing this deal what did you see the potential harm for consumers here even after judge has said that there's no evidence presented there would be any harm look as is usually the case when it comes to mergers like this consumers a huge losers there's absolutely nothing in it for them a merger of this kind will lead to higher prices fewer choices and less diversity of news and programming particularly pause in this case at and t will have the incentive inability to favorites own programming not only on its cable systems but also on its broadband internet access and david you made a really important point you know when you're i guess talked about net flicks being vertically integrated netflix is no more vertically integrated than time warner it does not have internet access without internet access netflix google and facebook ceased to exist.

attorney david netflix kandal rahim geegee facebook
"o l. time warner" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"o l. time warner" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Through and the subsequent mergers that your previous guests was talking about go through what does this mean for us i mean you can talk about hat you know these companies have to be allowed to do these things this at the other thing but the fact is if this doesn't violate antitrust at these mega mergers we're talking about and that are gonna come down the road don't violate antitrust what does i really like someone to tell me so a concrete examples something that violate jim let's let's get an answer your question randy milch you've been general counsel for a major telecommunications firm and the minute we have left for you at the end of this first segment sketch out for us you know what is antitrust really mean in this era where pierce's though there's one merger lining up after another lake planes at o'hare well i think that you know you need to distinguish between mergers that are traditionally viewed with a lot of suspicion like mergers that two competitors take one another out of a market and we've seen a lot of evidence in in the last few years that those mergers are going to be strongly looked at and many of them defeat it and not even tried so i don't think that this is a death knell for any trust i think that you know we have now a fear that big is bad we have some reason to have that fear it's not an unreasonable fear but big as bad is not an antitrust theory and biggest band is not a principled way to make decisions we need something a little bit more principal and i don't think that this verger for whatever the concerns we have one that fits into that mon we're discussing the eighty five billion dollar merger of at and time warner randy milch chip please stick around but we'd like to also invite you our listeners to join the conversation do you want more governors government scrutiny of big deals or less government involvement how much do you think the government's opposition let's talk about the elephant in the room hinged on cnn's involvement in the deal and the president's antipathy towards cnn i'm david folkenflik in this is on point.

randy milch general counsel pierce principal cnn president david folkenflik jim warner randy milch eighty five billion dollar
"o l. time warner" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"o l. time warner" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"Are the really the result of pressure from let's say amazon netflix hulu bet is the argument at and t is making to defend the merger so they certainly are saying that and they may well believe that well and then how does that change the equation downstream does amazon start an isp it might creating a nice piece of difficult business the interesting thing right is only netflix has really jumped with both feet into content when everyone talks about facebook and apple and google and amazon even amazon spending billions on it it's still kind of nibbling around the edges of content meanwhile the content guided also move to compete against these guys because they're gonna be coming but they haven't shown up yet this takes on added weight of course because we are immediately post net neutrality regulations what could this mobile consumers now it's it's remarkable isn't it nothing's going to change tomorrow and i don't think anything's going to change in six months and for thinking really practically companies won't get merged for some period of time it'll take some time to digest and then they're going to act on their best behavior because they don't wanna have headline saying that somehow you're hbo service has gotten less good because hbo is now owned by at and t or any any version of that but over time the fear from lots of wellmeaning consumer advocate says over time these guys can't resist changing things tweaking things and by the way you know comcast which bought nbc you that was supposed to restrict its behavior kept getting into trouble for years because it wasn't theoretically behaving as well as it should have been and that was that was the concern you heard people bringing up with this case which is like look he's companies can't help themselves so it's like putting a cookie jar in front of a kid eventually it's gonna put his hand in there so project out five or ten years what is the media landscape look like you if look at and t is going to buy time warner everyone else is going to want to buy other media assets i don't know i've still not persuaded this makes sense if you own hbo the value of hbo is that it's available on multiple other outlets maybe that will become an old fashioned notion and we will move to a world where you can watch.

facebook hbo comcast nbc amazon netflix apple google six months ten years