22 Burst results for "Nyu Stern School"

How Social Media Affects Our Psychology & Why Our Phones Are Becoming Irresistible

The Model Health Show

04:44 min | 3 months ago

How Social Media Affects Our Psychology & Why Our Phones Are Becoming Irresistible

"Our guest today is Adam Ulcer and he is an associate professor of marketing at New York University Stern, school of business, and then affiliated professor of Social Psychology Nyu's psychology department, and in two thousand twenty he was voted as professor of the year by the student body and faculty at Nyu Stern School of business. He's a New York, times bestselling author of two books including the book were diving into today irresistible the rise of addictive technology and the business of keeping US hooked his one of the most popular Ted talks. Ever with millions of US talking about this very subject. They were diving into today. He's been featured everywhere from the New York Times to the Atlantic wire popular science and Adam also has a PhD in social psychology from Princeton University where he focused on how people reach the judgments and make the decisions that shaped their lives, and now we're gonNA dive into this awesome powerful important conversation with Adam Alter Adam. Welcome to the model show. Thanks for hanging out with us today. Yeah. Thanks for having me Sean, good to be. So I've got to ask you first and foremost I want to know your superhero origin story because this topic is so palpable. So important but how in the world did you find yourself interested in this domain with tech in how it's kind of relating to our lives? I think the super the Superhero, the super power for an academic is that when we get interested in things that other people get interested in, we can actually studied them and that's what happened with me. I I. Think a lot of people were talking about tech, the encroachment of tech in their lives especially that personalized know I was sitting on the couch next to my wife, we'd spend two hours on our phones. We wouldn't be interacting with each other I remember being on a flight between New York and La, and I don't even remember the flight because I opened a video game on my phone. was an APP plated six hours landed and was like what just happened time melted away. So I think a lot of people probably millions of people who are experiencing some version of that in the roughly two, thousand, thirteen, fourteen, fifteen. But for me it, it was something that I had the capacity to actually study to investigate, and so I did I started to look into it and had a few critical questions like am I the only one experiencing this? The answer was very clearly no What what else is gripping us this way in what should we do about? It is something to be concerned about and that's how I got interested probably six or seven years ago. Yes and it through even through that time. Can you talk about first and foremost for us? Like you said is not you're not alone by a long shot but how has our investment in our time grown from? Prior, you know somebody just here in the studio, one of my guys and he wants to get a flip phone now since the flip phone to now, how is our investment time grown over time to getting on the Internet in in Tech? Yes. So we spent we spent about eighteen minutes touch to phones before the first iphone before two thousand seven. So you gave up like a stood of an hour everyday to your fun, which is not that much time some time but it's not that much time. Now today the average for an adult in the United States and it's very similar across the. Developed world is about four hours. So it's it's increased by a factor of about twelve thirteen fourteen and if you if you imagine that being expanded across the lifespan, we're talking between ten and twenty years of your life depending on whether you're alive or heavy user of the fun. So you're giving up effectively one or two decades of your life to this device. Unbelievable and the thing is even when you say that number I bet so many people like well, that's not me. How can you quantify that because a lot of people feel the same way until they get tracked, they think that they may be fifty percent of the time that they actually do. It's true in two thousand fifteen reached out to this guy who created now colt moment and Marmon was one of the first really sophisticated track is that to what you were doing on your phone how much time he was spending occasionally you get these Ping, sang a you happy with your engagement right now and he he said to me. Before you use it before you install it on your phone and tell me what do you think how long do you think spending on your phone and? He said to me most people have no idea and that was true for me too I guest and so I guess like. I thought an hour but just to be concerned about her I said, how about ninety minutes I'll say ninety minutes a day and I started using this track and was three three and a half hours a day. So I was I was under estimating by more than half and I said to him that's crazy that I have no idea how much time I'm giving up and it's such a lot of the white indict and he said it's totally typical most of us are using twice or even three times more than we think we are.

New York Adam Ulcer United States Nyu Stern School Of Business Professor Of Social Psychology Sean New York Times Associate Professor Of Marketi Professor Marmon School Of Business TED Princeton University LA
"nyu stern school" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"nyu stern school" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Both domestic and foreign players who set out to sway and divide voters with lies and distortions spread through social media this week a new report outlines the threats we should be watching out for in twenty twenty and where they're coming from to begin with I think the the Russians we'll be back but joining them this time around I fear may be the Iranians who have already been here and started to spread disinformation on social media and perhaps the Chinese as well that's the report's author Paul Barrett of the center for business and human rights to NYU stern school for business he warns that the threat from domestic this information is also growing the volume of material coming from within the United States it is undoubtedly greater than that that comes from abroad in other words we're doing this to ourselves but what exactly should we be watching for as the twenty twenty election approaches that's what we want to talk about in a regular troll watch segment. back in two thousand sixteen it was Facebook and Twitter boss that with the main sources of election related disinformation now the Paul Barrett says there are other platforms to worry about we identified Instagram as being in particular probably the the one to watch the most closely disinformation is increasingly accomplished by means of images as opposed to text an Instagram of course specializes in images Facebook which is Instagram's parent has not done as much with Instagram in terms of protecting users.

Paul Barrett NYU stern school United States Facebook Instagram Twitter
Allen Adamson, CEO And Ivers discussed on KQED Radio Show

KQED Radio Show

02:08 min | 1 year ago

Allen Adamson, CEO And Ivers discussed on KQED Radio Show

"Uber says it's teaming up with a company called cargo twenty shopping app for uber riders the idea is that why you're in car you'll be able to buy things like luggage or make up or what have you kinda like sky mall the for uber right drivers will get a cut so there is an incentive for them to sell to you but really this is an old marketing technique right selling stuff to a captive audience but our consumers really up for that experience marketplace Merrill segera reports on the strategy cargo has actually been around for a couple years it's so website you can use to buy stuff your uber driver has on hand she won't stand at the Yale school of management says that makes sense it solves an immediate need you know why you are writing what do you need you may need some water you may need some kind of small snack which you can get it right here now cargoes launching as a full fledged apps separate from over and it's going to start selling big ticket items little ship to your house Allen Adamson who teaches at NYU stern school of business says this is less likely to work because if people want to shop online mother in an over they can just go to another online retailer and he says this could backfire it's going to damage the usual brand if uber drivers are trying to sell you a kitchen sink because cargo is relying on writers as a captive audience stuck in the backseat and forced to listen to potential sales pitches from drivers who by the way get a twenty five percent cut of those sales the drivers certainly motivated is a is a get squeezed into a tighter and tighter margins in our they're desperate to make an extra dollar just crave the CEO of cargo says he doesn't expect the worst drivers to become pushy sales associates I don't worry about it because we don't charge Ivers detail one anyway but Adams in says there is a risk that reach Ehlers and marketers need to be aware of the cost they can't really is the disruption to the customer experience and the negativity it produces and customers when they feel captive these days if you're that customer maybe your next online purchase is noise canceling

Allen Adamson CEO Ivers Adams Ehlers Merrill Segera Yale School Of Management Nyu Stern School Of Business Twenty Five Percent
"nyu stern school" Discussed on The Business Builders Show with Marty Wolff

The Business Builders Show with Marty Wolff

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"nyu stern school" Discussed on The Business Builders Show with Marty Wolff

"My friend, Jennifer, you know, low she is a global speaker and empowerment catalyst. She has done a heck of a lot of stuff. And if anyone's wondering, I am in New York City today with all those sirens in the background Jennifer somewhere in New York City to hopefully somewhere quieter, welcome to the business builders show. Jennifer. Thank you so much. Yeah. I can guarantee there will be a siren at some point in this conversation. It's it's not us. It's the city. So we're going on. Today. We're gonna talk about Jennifer's methodology of self directed empowerment. She's recently published a manifesto known is coming. You're also you've coached a female founder recently who won the one million. She was the one million dollar winner of the we work creator wards global finals, which is beyond awesome. But where I wanna start my friend is actually it's at page. Thirteen of your impairment manifesto where you say. At the peak of my dream career in the world of food media, which I spent twenty five years building the rug was pulled out from under me by an illness. Let's talk about let's go back. Let's talk about how you became that globetrotting digital media pioneer and food podcast her with the culinary media network. And I want to say what happened in the opinion from that. Yeah. Well, you know, I I had never planned on having a food career. You know, I went off to the NYU stern school of business thinking, I was going to be a Gordon gecko type and take over Wall Street, and I got into my first finance class in hated it. So I knew that was not my path. And I ended up finding a bunch of ragtag entrepreneurs like me who realized we wanted to do something a little bit different. And so I did end up with it wasn't called the starting up at the time. It was called a new company because you know, that was wasn't trendy it to be an entrepreneur but ended up with a food startup right after school. And so I went on this kind of journey through the food world where I did a little bit of everything. But knew that the kitchen was not where I wanted to be. And I discovered that chefs have a really neat philosophy about life. And about what it means to them to cook for someone. And I thought this is this is something nobody is really talking about. And so I set out to create. A new kind of way to talk about food, which and it started as a blog in two thousand and three when I think I was on blogger or blog spot, and it ended up turning into this online food magazine for lack of a better term that I learned how to code myself, which was really hilarious. And then I met this. Chef who was doing this weird thing called podcasting. I'm like, what is podcasting? And you know, he explained that the whole phenomenon to me. So we decided what if you know, like reese's, peanut butter cups. What if we put together the chocolate on the peanut butter what would happen and in a thirty six hour period. We decided great, let's create a media network. So we pulled together like eight shows from stuff that he was listening to and people we liked and so we went from nothing to the world's first food punch in thirty six hours launched and it ended up on all the wires. And we were off to the races from there. Oh my God. Okay. So we're going to get to the story of how it all ended. But what was you were doing some pretty incredible stuff any experiences that you had? So tell about that. So that we can all have better. Food envy. It really what you know. It really was a dream life. I my first media trip. I was invited to Italy for the trouble festival for me. And I was chasing truffle dog through the woods with a microphone. So we could capture the moment of what it's like to go Trump will hunting, you know, when I was drinking wine for breakfast. And I mean, we we went everywhere..

Jennifer New York City NYU stern school of business reese founder Trump Italy one million dollar twenty five years thirty six hours thirty six hour
In 2019, your smartphone will no longer be king

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

04:24 min | 2 years ago

In 2019, your smartphone will no longer be king

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by. Indeed, are you hiring with? Indeed, you can post a job in minutes set up screener questions than zero in on your shortlist of qualified candidates using an online dashboard get started today at indeed that com slash marketplace. That's indeed dot com slash marketplace. In two thousand nineteen your smartphone will no longer be king from American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm Molly would. Hey, happy new year everyone. Welcome to marketplace. Tech twenty nineteen addition the future looks about the same as yesterday. Right. This week. We've been looking at what the near future of this year might look like in business and technology. So today an actual futurist on the big trends that will influence tech. Amy Webb is a professor of strategic foresight at the NYU stern school of business and the founder of the future today institute, she said one big trend in two thousand nineteen and beyond is that your phone won't be the center of your life anymore. It'll just be the center of everything else. People aren't rushing out to buy brand new phones with the frequency that we used to now that may not be revelatory. If you look back to nineteen ninety nine we had all these different devices. In addition to a dumb phone and in just twenty short years, all of those different devices have converged into a single device. Ice. So we spent the past two decades converging into one device. We're going to spend the next two decades branching backout and rather than the phone being our primary thing that we look at all day long and have all these features on instead, it'll be the connective tissue tying together. Many other gadgets and devices like smart, yoga, pants, smart, glasses and smart, watches and lots of other different peripherals that help to optimize our lives. So let's talk about this sort of ambience technology future. It relies on connectivity. And we keep hearing that five G is going to be a big part of twenty nine thousand nine. How real is that it's been a while since we've upgraded to the next generation of our wireless infrastructure five G is that ecosystem it's the fifth generation. There are trials underway in different parts of the world. The question is where do we go from here because in order to build out the? Ecosystem you need a lot of investment, you need huge widespread. Collaboration between our four major wireless carriers in the United States, and you're gonna devices and at the moment a lot of the forward momentum that we're seeing is actually not in the United States. It's an Asia. So China has been testing products and services Japan is doing everything it can to ready five G networks ahead of the twenty twenty Olympics. So will twenty nineteen be a pivotal year in the United States. I would say possibly if everybody can come to the table, and and agree on some things. What else do you think is going to be big in two thousand nineteen? We don't a lot of times think of biology as being a really important technology platform. And I think we're going to start to see some serious movement in two thousand nineteen that will challenge our assumptions new types of diagnostic tests, some of which we can start doing in our homes to genetic editing, which will be in the headlines multiple times throughout twenty nineteen. That's a be web professor of. Strategic foresight at the NYU stern school of business and founder of the future today institute tomorrow on the show it looks like this is the year. The space economy is getting real we'll talk with marketplace's Kimberly Adams about the plans and the opportunities, I'm Elliot, and that's marketplace tech. This is a PM. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by. Indeed when it comes to hiring. You don't have time to waste you need help getting your shortlist of qualified candidates fast. That's why you need indeed dot com post a job in minutes, set up screener questions than zero in on qualified candidates using an intuitive online dashboard. And when you need to hire fast, accelerate your results with sponsor jobs. New users can try for free at indeed dot com slash marketplace. That's indeed dot com slash marketplace. Terms, conditions, and quality standards apply.

Nyu Stern School Of Business United States Amy Webb Professor Founder Asia Molly Kimberly Adams Olympics China Elliot Japan Five G Two Decades
Can science fiction help us grapple with gene editing?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:56 min | 2 years ago

Can science fiction help us grapple with gene editing?

"The. If we're talking about, gene editing. You had to know we were gonna talk about Gatica from American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm Molly would. News broke this week about a Chinese scientists who says he edited the genes of two twin girls while they were still in the womb. The goal was to make the girls immune to HIV, but editing human genes at that level is ethically. Controversial and illegal in many countries. It raises questions about creating genetic traits that can be passed on and about a future where people choose the genetic traits. They want in their children, not surprisingly, it's topic. Well, covered in science fiction. I belong to a new underclass. No longer determined by social status for the color of your skin. Gatica gentlemen. Now, we now have discrimination down to a science. That's from the nineteen Ninety-seven movie Gatica about a future where your genes determine whether you'll succeed in life or be considered invalid. Amy Webb is a professor of strategic foresight at the NYU stern school of business and the founder of the future today institute, she told me there are plenty of benefits to gene editing technology, but Gatica social commentary was all to present the parts of that movie that I think were so spot on it wasn't necessarily the technology itself. But the application of that technology throughout society, I think it's entirely plausible that we could be heading into a situation in which due to certain circumstances and the distribution of wealth and the distribution of health care. It's plausible that we could have engineered humans who succeed in life. You know, I'm not talking about huge changes. I'm talking about small things like eradicating certain diseases for certain groups of people in everybody else's kinda just left to deal with Darwinism on its own. So when you see news like we saw this week with at least one Chinese scientists saying that he was doing gene editing on babies before they're born. Do you think to yourself? Okay. The future has arrived. And now these storylines are gonna come to pass to. Yeah. We'll the problem is that that future arrived a couple years ago. So what we heard about the news? This week was not the first instance of a Chinese scientists using crisper to edit the genome so already like twenty fifteen there were we heard about that was that was the first time that we heard about other experiments happening. We did it ourselves in the United States in two thousand seventeen it's just that. Some of the circumstances were different. But this is not our first foray. So what we're really talking about is what happens when we alter or edit, our, gene pool, and whatever the result of that is heritable. On the one hand it's possible to weed out certain genetic disorders on the other hand. It's theoretically possible to create babies with six fingers on each hand. So that in that scene Gattaca where there's a piano player with twelve fingers playing an extraordinarily complicated piece. You know, playing playing a piece that was built for somebody with twelve fingers. You know, it's the aerobically possible that we could be moving into a future in which we are bestowing upon certain people genetic capabilities biological capabilities that other people don't get. You know, that's the real sticky problem with germline editing. It's what becomes heritable, and what are the consequences of that both good and bad? And with that points to is maybe not a Huxley in future, necessarily, or even what we saw Gatica where you know, based on your DNA you were assigned to a worker class or to an elite thinking class, but it's it is possible that we could be moving toward a sort of new economic class of humans. If you were family had enough money and the resources to edit you before you were born. You know, you're going to have certain advantages, and we may find that society discriminates against people who weren't engineered that that does look like a real possibility. Even if we don't have people with six or seven fingers on each hand to play extra hard concertos, right? I mean, these technologies always starts out as we want to prevent disease. But it feels like at some point some version of designer gene editing is inevitable that people are going to want it. Right. So the problem is we tend to use the word designer next two, gene editing a little too often. And I think that makes a lot of people think of almost like an all cart list of genetic traits that you get to choose from. I wanna baby that has curly blonde hair and green eyes and his six and a half taller, whatever. There are some real benefits that that we can be moving toward. As as humans once we are able to add it certain traits, right on the other hand, what are the consequences of that? And I think. We can quickly wander into all kinds of weird scifi scenarios. I think in practical terms. The consequences. We would be dealing with immediately have to do with economic and social status consequences. Amy Webb is the founder of the future today institute, and some of you have been asking what happened to related links. They are not gone. I'm just sick. So I'm conserving, my voice and my energy. But hopefully, you enjoy this extra long interview and hopefully with an sleep broke Kotei and zinc related links. We'll be back tomorrow. I'm elliot. Marketplace sack. This is a PM. Listeners like you who give to marketplace do more than just keep us on the air. You help us grow and get better. It's a way to directly support independent reporting and journalism you trust and to make it possible for us to tell the stories of modern life through our digital economy. And when you give today the impact of your gift will be doubled. Thanks to our friends at Candida donate now at marketplace dot org to make your donation. Go twice as far and thank you.

Gatica Amy Webb Founder HIV Molly Nyu Stern School Of Business United States Gattaca Candida Huxley Kotei Professor One Hand
"nyu stern school" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:07 min | 2 years ago

"nyu stern school" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"This is Bloomberg law, June Grosso. The Justice department has granted conditional approval to CVS an Aetna for their proposed sixty eight billion dollar merger one of the largest in a series of recent deals that stand to transform the healthcare sector. The combination is among the most significant healthcare mergers of the past decade, it would create a giant with a hand in insurance prescription drug benefits and drugstores across the country. Speaking at the Morgan Stanley global healthcare conference last month, CVS CEO, Larry Merlo said the deal would be good for consumers. We intend to transform the consumer health experience through a model that is easier to use a model, it's less expensive and a model consumers at the centre their care. I guess is Nick. Kind of as a professor at NYU stern school of business. Nick, the approval comes just a few weeks after the Justice department signed off on a fifty four billion dollar deal. Combining health insurance Cigna with pharmacy benefits manager Express Scripts now, it's approving the combination of one of the top US drugstore chains with the third biggest health insurer. What's your take on this consolidation in the healthcare market? First of all, I I wanted to know that. Justice doesn't have any problem with the spectacle murders while he did have a problem with the AT and T Time Warner merger. So I don't quite understand how it can be consistent to intervene in one vertical murdered intervening others, but the crucial thing here is one that stands weather all the merger that might be excellent. By one of the parties. Let's say Aetna to three ensured customers to guide them to go to CVS to fulfill prescriptions to do various things and that would be a serious concern. Now. Of course, this is something that hasn't happened yet. So the department of Justice says, well, we're going to approve the merger and see what happens, but at the same time after this thing happens, it might be very hard for the department of Justice do anything. Well. The deal was opposed by consumer organisations who said consumers could end up with higher drug prices and fewer choices but making del regime. The head of the antitrust division said the deal has the potential to improve the quality and lower the cost of healthcare services for American consumers, which side has the better argument there, it's hard to say, I mean, I would say that it's more likely outside with a consumer groups. I would worry about the possibility that post merger. We will see behaviors that wanted to be restricted for consumers and Expos more expensive for consumers. The fact that the potential of over lots of good new things, it's it's true. One has to ask the question whether a multi billion dollar merger is required to create the positive stuff. I mean, wouldn't this two companies have some joint agreement and create a lot of. Positive stuff without having to converge. I mean, that's something that people especially in finance companies are exposed to significant amount of that have to ask is it really necessary birds to be able to get benefits across the two companies could this deal. Also put pressure on rivals like Walgreens to come up with their own deals. Absolutely. I think the pressure is there and the pressure was huge. They're going to be pressure to combine retailers BPM, personal managers and insurance companies to the extent possible to be able to rival to to be able to deal with the rivalry. What's now? The combine. Aetna CBS and the Cigna Express Scripts murders, Nick explain in layman's terms, how consolidation has increased across the healthcare sector and the effects you say, well, you know, there are three. ABC's the insurer the personal benefits manager and the retailer the insurance gets a prescription from a doctor, and and as it the the P B M determines essentially how much money the retailer is going to get and how much money they is going to get. And then the retailer fulfills the prescription. Now in the beginning, we have three different parties, and it's one place its role in each one in in a competitive market dealing with rivals. Now, if you start combining them vertically, then you reduce the amount of petition that can expect you can expect horizontally between shorter insurance BPM and the retailer the retailer so that kind of danger here, the create silos going all the way vertically, which might the views consumers toys and also increase what the consumers ultimately. Hey, not directly. But what that employers pay for example for insurance? That's Nick economies. A professor at NYU stern school of business. The Justice Department's anti-trust division signed off on the transaction with the caveat that the company's complete agreed to sale of Aetna's Medicare prescription drug plans to another insurer coming up on Bloomberg law. Fifteen more confirmations of conservative jurists as Republicans continue to shape, the federal judiciary and three British traders who were part of an exclusive online chat group known as the cartel and the mafia on trial for market manipulation in New York. I'm also this is Bloomberg business is. Streams are where our kids play. And. Many provide the water we drink, but.

Justice department Aetna Nick CVS NYU stern school of business Bloomberg department of Justice professor Morgan Stanley June Grosso Cigna Express Scripts Larry Merlo Walgreens market manipulation
"nyu stern school" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"nyu stern school" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"After this I had was launched Scott. Galloway professor of marketing at NYU stern school of business says Nike has made a brilliant marketing move. Nike. Sales are thirty five billion dollars. Two thirds are from consumers under the age of thirty five. And if you're under the age of thirty five and can afford one hundred and fifty dollar pair of Nike flying racers, you likely skew towards a higher earner, maybe dwell in a city which means most likely you lean left in exchange for potentially alienating one, three billion of that thirty five billion dollar franchise. They strengthen the relationship with thirty two to thirty four billion. Nike isn't the only brand that's chosen to align itself with edgy and political subject. UK based, lush coz medics company protested undercover police tactics. It put up stole window displays with a mug of a police officer in and out of uniform using the tagline paid to lie. It admits it's gone too far and is made mistakes, but ethics director, Hilary Jones says, heartfelt campaigns. Unrelated to its companies cool business a not about to stop a surprisingly put sales up. I would hope that what it was was customers standing bias. Do you think we are living in an Arab house where it's allowed for corporate bodies and entities to take a stand that is nor overtly controversial, young people care about the things they care about. They used to exchanging information and I think they want brands to be Paul to that. So getting into trouble is a measure of you doing the right job. I think getting into trouble to measure of, we can't stop assails even when we know it's going to get into trouble Nike and Lajja just two firms, many others far less controversial, of course. But perhaps it's a sign of the times that in the Twitter age, people are more willing to embrace.

Nike NYU stern school of business professor of marketing Scott Galloway Twitter Hilary Jones officer UK director Paul thirty five billion dollars thirty five billion dollar fifty dollar
Stocks end mostly lower, tech shares drag Nasdaq down 0.9%

Bloomberg Businessweek

00:40 sec | 2 years ago

Stocks end mostly lower, tech shares drag Nasdaq down 0.9%

"Thickness after the close of US trade, and we're going to pick up the conversation in just a few minutes again with Scott Galloway from NYU stern school business. Talking tech talking his book. We'll wait a minute. He said the worst brand which he talked about of the year. And he's gonna give us the best. Best friend decision. Best brand moment. The single moment happened this week, we witnessed it. But we don't know what it is yet before we get to that. Let's get to Charlie Pellett. And I thank you very much. Here's what's going on game. Stop posting disappointing. Second quarter earnings putting pressure on the beleaguered video game retailers management has it weighs a possible sale. Shares of game stop now. Lower by four point

Nike Scott Galloway United States Charlie Pellett Bloomberg Businessweek Carol Massar Amazon Nyu Stern School NFL Google Facebook Twitter Bloomberg NYU Professor Of Marketing Apple Colin Kaepernick PM Canada
"nyu stern school" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:40 min | 2 years ago

"nyu stern school" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Bloomberg radio my special, guest today, is professor, Richard Sylla he is the author of numerous books on finance he is, also the professor emeritus at. NYU stern school, of business of economics, he has taught. Numerous courses on market history interest rates central banks. And he is the author of. Such books as genealogy of American finance a history of interest rates. And most recently Alexander Hamilton on finance credit and debt let let's talk a little bit about your background you have some really. Interesting history you studied for? A time, at the Indian statistical institute at Calcutta tell us about that was a that was after my undergraduate education at Harvard and I was a fairly good student at. Harvard what did. You study undergrad I studied economics? I was one of two people in Harvard's. Class of nineteen sixty to nineteen fifty eight they wanted to say they were going to major in economics to out of eleven hundred by the time we graduated something like a quarter to a. Third of the class majored in economics so I knew before I got to, Harvard that I wanted to study, economics but that. Wasn't taught so much in high school in the. Nineteen fifties and so I and one other. Person harvests eleven hundred class that we wanna major. Economics and four years later about a quarter of the class majored in economics. So you also got a master's at Harvard, and a, doctorate that, was after my tour of duty in India so let's let's go back, to India what what made. You say I, know I'll go halfway, across the world. I was lucky enough to get a traveling fellowship. Or scholarship after I graduated from. Harvard where I could go any place in the world and study. For a year was financing for a year and what I did was the chose India because was halfway around the world and. I had a class from Reinhold Niebuhr the famous theologian in class so I can emerging markets when I was. A senior in Harvard and I took the class from Reverend Reinhold Niebuhr and, he got me interested in India So the combination of being awarded this fellowship and having. Learned something about India made me choose India to? Spend my year away this is nineteen sixty three nine hundred sixty to sixty three that's when I was at, the Indian statistical institute in Calcutta. So what was Calcutta like in the? Early sixties because even today it's a fairly is. Frenetic the right word. Of fairly frenetic country with enormous challenges facing it but, some tremendous assets, as well what was. Calcutta like in nineteen sixty two was a very interesting for a young man I thought it was I was an eye opener in a way you know they would say and I, saw this they would say that one hundred thousand people just slept on the pavement every night and that was the poor man's air conditioning because India can be. Kinda hot pavement is kinda cool. And so people would get, away from the heat by just getting down bedding down on the, concrete because it was a little cooler than the, air around them literally one hundred thousand People on the streets in, Calcutta had, millions of people, but you know basically. India is a country that's like one third the size of the United States but, has about four times as many people that put those two together you've got a country that's about, twelve times the density of population short we have in the United States well so so you're studying at the Indian statistical institute what did you learn well I. Studied you know economics Finance. And these people were statistical institute so I got some econometric training there I don't remember. The details of what I study but I do remember meeting famous British scientists named j b s Haldane who. Had kind of gotten the cut up with Britain and moved. To India were Indian clothes you know a dhoti and all, that. He was one? Of, the great scientists of the first half of the? Twentieth, century so I got to know him and, that was kind of a lot of fun to get his perspectives on the world so did you know back then you want to, go into academia and to put a little context for this you've been at NYU for, just about thirty years. Since nineteen ninety, nine, before that you taught at a few, other, schools right how how conscious oh, were you of the lure of academia back then well I think I. Was kind of your member the late fifties and early sixties were a great time to be an American. University, because we were worried about the Russians and Sputnik, and the government was? Putting, a lot, of money, into Financing higher education and so. It any young person in the late fifties early sixties thinking about a career academia would look pretty good because. Of all this interest of the government and beefing up our. Intellectual talents and so but so I as I mentioned I, wanted. To major in economics, before I got to Harvard and I was my? Interest, in economics was kindled even more at Harvard, and after taking this year off or even before I went out to India I thought I wanna come back and get a PHD, the only question was where and Harvard let me in You know there's always a family thing to my, wife, wanted to. Study the issues one year after me in college but, she wanted. To go to grad, school in the history of science and Harvard was really good in that so your wife is studying the. History of, science did that, influence you to, move from economics to the history of finance not so much I think the how did I go from being any communists the becoming an economic and financial historian that's where it particularly influential mentor comes in fascinating, coming up we continue our conversation with professor Richard Sylla. Discussing.

Harvard India Indian statistical institute Calcutta Richard Sylla professor NYU stern school Reinhold Niebuhr economics Finance government Alexander Hamilton Bloomberg NYU United States Haldane Britain
"nyu stern school" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:01 min | 2 years ago

"nyu stern school" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"This is Bloomberg Welcome to Bloomberg law I'm June Grosso ahead in this hour. The government is not giving up on blocking the AT and t. Time Warner deal it's appealing, the judge's, decision a federal judge says he'll stop, the Trump administration from recinding DACA sanctuary cities win on federal funding at the ninth circuit and four cities are suing the Trump. Administration over attempts. To kill ObamaCare Just after judge Richard Leon. Cleared the eighty five billion dollar deal between AT and t. and, Time Warner. AT and t. lawyer Daniel Petrocelli talked about the court's verdict the. Government could present no credible proof and support any of its theories, this decision was a sound and proper rejection of all of the government's arguments to stop this merger but, the government says it could have presented that. Proof if the judge hadn't? Constrained its presentation of. Evidence and it's appealing his decision my, guest is nNcholas economies professor at NYU stern school of business Nick unsealed transcripts of. The trial. Show that during. Private sidebar conversations the, judge shot down the prosecutors arguments that he decided were repetitive or unhelpful and. Certain lines of testimony including a crucial element of the government's case is that a strong argument I think that by itself is not going to, be able to to reverse a decision I. Mean it's true that the Did, not allow the government all. The time the government wanted to present its case. But this actually happens in trials I mean it's up to the judge I don't think that's enough to reverse a decision what could make the difference is that the judge was pretty absolute. Rejection over the government. Theory that the Dodd said that the merger would not lead to any increases in prices. To consumers, that's a bit extreme You don't reject the government's position does didn't have to conclude that all she needs, to conclusion was that the increases would not be substantially reducing copetition but he went. To the extremists that there would. Be no, increases at all in prices. To consumers for deliver content for for cable service. So that is something that is weak so it is conceivable that the court of appeals on reverse based on that point what about the government's claim that the court ignored fundamental principles of. Economics in common sense I don't think the, judge understood at all the government's case didn't understand. The economics of bargaining so that's why. The government comes out to the court. Of appeals and says look I mean this doesn't understand the economics of bargaining the. Economics of bargaining are, an important part of mainstream economics therefore reverse based on on that at the same time to a large extent it's the government's responsibility to explain to so the judge we thought an economist right he's he's a judge so the government, should have explained much much better these economics of Ovar gaining and how they apply so one thing is how they apply the other thing. Is what they are if the judge. Completely ignored significant parts of economic theory that would be for reversal on the other. Hand if understands the basic idea of bargaining but rejects the way the government specifically interprets Effects that could. Not be reversed from looking at the evidence do you think that the judge didn't. Understand the economic theories, I I actually think that the the economic fury went way over his head yes AT&_t.'s general counsel David Makati said in a statement appeals aren't? Do, over so what do you expect AT and t. to argue in its. Response He's going to say well understands the basic. Theory he doesn't, need to understand anything more than what he understood and. In fact, the predation by the judge over the various facts was correct and in fact nothing bad is going. To happen because of this merger I mean you have. To keep in mind that judge side that one hundred percent with eight So agency. Was find nothing wrong in what the judge says so Nick. The deal is, already done if the government does win what will happen they'll. Have to unravel, the deal they'll have to sell Time Warner yes I. Don't think, when you say the deal is done yeah the deal is done on paper but Agreement between, the government AT and t. that I'm wondering what would, be the end, of February of nineteen run as. A separate company so I don't. Think, there is going to be anything that cannot be reversed. What, are the odds that this'll be, reversed I would say the the probability that the court of appeals will reverse, this is small I mean I would say it's it's it's ten percent or less I wouldn't say that it's much more than that they have to find an error of law and if. They find that there are a lot of inequities in the trial might that. Be enough my that add up to enough It's hard to it's hard. To say outwardly it depends on whether the. General theory of the government makes sense to the court of appeals if they, think if we were the judge was really completely differently Ability but usually courts of appeal try to? Be very specific to the case and try. To limit their intervention to specific actions of the Dutch Nick do you see any signs in. The market of reactions or the ramifications of this deal being approved Well I mean you have to keep in mind. That, somehow. The market in the very beginning thought that this. Was a good deal for. AT and t. completely sure suppose there is no legal challenge and it goes through is it clear that eighteen is. Going to be. Able to run Time Warner thanks. Nick that's Nicomedes, professor at NYU stern school of. Business coming up on Bloomberg law four cities have had enough of executive actions that are slowly killing ObamaCare and they're taking the Trump administration to. Court I'm June Grosso it's twelve minutes past the hour this is Bloomberg what's.

government AT Time Warner Nick Bloomberg NYU stern school Richard Leon Daniel Petrocelli June Grosso Trump professor recinding DACA Warner Dodd executive David Makati Ovar general counsel t.
"nyu stern school" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:56 min | 2 years ago

"nyu stern school" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Long I'm June Grosso ahead, in this hour the government is not giving up on blocking the AT and t.. Time Warner. Deal it's appealing. The judge's decision a, federal judge says he'll stop the Trump administration from recinding DACA sanctuary cities win. On federal funding at the ninth circuit and four cities are suing the Trump administration over attempts. To kill ObamaCare Just after judge Richard Leon cleared the. Eighty five billion dollar deal between AT and t. and Time Warner, AT&_t.'s lawyer. Daniel Petrocelli talked about the court's verdict the government could present no. Credible proof in support it any of its theories this decision was, a sound and proper rejection of all of the government's arguments to stop this merger but the government says, it could have presented that proof if the. Judge hadn't constrained its presentation of? Evidence and it's appealing his decision my, guest is nNcholas economies professor at NYU stern school of business Nick unsealed transcripts of. The trial. Show that during. Private sidebar conversations the, judge shot down the prosecutors arguments that he decided were repetitive or unhelpful and. Certain lines of testimony including a crucial element of the government's case is that a strong argument I think that by itself is not going to, be able to to reverse a decision I. Mean it's true that the Did not allow the government or. The time the government wanted to pretend it's case. But this actually happens in trials I mean the up to the judge I don't think that's enough to reverse a decision what could make the difference is that the judge was pretty absolute rejection. Over the government's theory that the the judge said that the merger would not lead to. Any increases, in prices to consumers That's extreme You don't reject the. Government's position it didn't have to conclude that to conclusion was that the increases would not be substantially. Reducing competition but he went to the extreme, and said there would be no increases in prices to consumers for delivered conduct for for. Cable service so that is something that. Is weak so it is conceivable that the court of appeals would reverse based on. That point what about the government's claim that the court ignored fundamental principles of economics and common sense I don't think the judge understood at, all the government's case didn't understand the economics of. Bargaining so that's why the government comes. Down to the court of appeals and. Says look I mean this doesn't understand economics of bargaining, the economics of bargaining are an. Important part of mainstream, economics therefore you reverse based on on that at the same time to a large extent it's the government's responsibility to explain these. Economics to the judge we thought an economist right he's he's a judge so the government should have. Explained much much better economic sofa bargaining and, how they apply so one thing is how they apply the other thing is what they. Are if the judge completely ignored significant. Parts of economic theory that would be counts for reversal on the other hand if. Understands the basic idea of economics of bargaining but rejects the way the government specifically interpret Effects that could not be reversed from looking, at the evidence do you think. That the judge didn't, understand the economic theories I I actually think the, economic fury went way over his head yes Know AT&_t.'s general. Counsel David Makati said in a statement appeals aren't do over? So, what do you expect AT and t. to argue in its. Response Is going to say well understand the. Basic fury he, doesn't need understand anything more than what he understood and. That in, fact the predation by the judge over the various facts was correct and in fact nothing bad is. Going to happen because of this merger I mean you. Have to keep in mind that the judge sided one hundred percent with So fifty was find nothing wrong in what the judge. Said so Nick, the deal is already done if the government does win. What will, happen they'll have to unravel the deal they'll have to sell Time Warner yes I don't. Think when you say the deal is done yeah the deal is done on. Paper but agreement between the government in eighteen? P that I'm wondering would be the end of February of. Nineteen run, as a separate company so I don't think that is, going to be, anything that cannot be reversed what. Are the odds that this'll be. Reversed I would say the the probability? That the court of appeals will reverse this is small, I, mean I would say it's it's, it's ten percent or less I wouldn't say that it's much more than that they have to find an error of law and if. They find that there are a lot of inequities in the trial might that. Be enough might that add up to enough It's hard to it's hard to say outwardly it depends on whether the general theory of? The government makes sense to the court of appeals if they think if. We were the. Judge really, completely differently that is, an ability but usually courts of. Appeal try to be very specific to the case. And try to limit that intervention to very, specific actions of the Dutch Nick do you see any signs in the market, of reactions or the? Ramifications of this deal being approved Well I mean you have to keep in. Mind that somehow. The market in the very beginning. Thought that this. Was a good deal for the n. t. I'm completely sure suppose there, is no legal challenge and it goes through is it clear that eighteen is going to be able to run Time Warner thanks Nick that's Nick. Economies professor at NYU stern, school of business coming up on Bloomberg law four cities have had enough of. Executive actions that are slowly killing ObamaCare and. They're taking the Trump administration to court I'm June Grosso it's twelve minutes past the hour this. Is Bloomberg what's the.

government AT Nick Time Warner Trump recinding DACA Warner June Grosso Richard Leon professor NYU stern school Daniel Petrocelli Bloomberg _t. David Makati Executive t. Eighty five billion dollar
"nyu stern school" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:21 min | 2 years ago

"nyu stern school" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Claiming Russia will be pushing very hard for Democrats in the twentieth eighteen midterm. Elections we've heard a lot about. This we've had US intelligence agencies confirm that there was Russian. Meddling let's get into this with pallbearer deputy director of the center for business and human rights NYU stern school of. Business very familiar to our, audience former senior writer at Bloomberg BusinessWeek back with us in Bloomberg headquarters and our Bloomberg eleven three a. Studio nice to have you here with. Us. Great, thanks Carol reading some of this report mean. Democracy let let's just put it out. There democracy is under attack by the. Kremlin it is not only in this, country but all across. Europe this is really a global, phenomenon and it's part of Putin's larger strategy to try to destabilise democracy to the advantage of Russia and, Paul you've looked deeply into this. Clearly Social media played a massive. Role that is not news what did, you find if anything. That surprised you about the technology, element here well I mean what's important I think to underscore is that the technology supporting Russian disinformation is, evolving that likely later this year When and if Russia inner tries to interfere with our midterm elections they'll be using different means that, what was done last year will not continue and one of the one of the things that I think the social media companies need to prepare for is researching, the type, of artificial intelligence that will be able to pick out things like so called deep fakes which is the technology that allows someone to fabricate audio or, video such that someone who is uninhabited in this. Technology. Would actually think that a speech being given you know took place when in fact it was just it was just fabricated or video and audio of a of a war scene could be could be, fabricated, and this is going to be inundating social media soon how, we we've often talked to it's certainly a business week, about kind of the hacking and? Things that, go, on, on on the web and on the internet that it's kind of? Like a whack whack a mole that as soon as you figure out one? Strategy, they've got, a new strategy like you're just talking about can we keep up with it Ken Facebook Google Twitter do they They have the means the technology the people to actually keep on. Top of it almost certainly have the technical capacity what they need is the will in organization and one of the recommendations we make in our report is that the social media companies and Google for that matter a, setup internal teams that specialize in Russian disinformation so people who would know publicly identified as the people who are keeping track of what the Russians are up to, and certainly, there will be other threats beyond Russia's so it's not like we will be focusing on Russia for all time but for right now Russia's the most, potent threat at Pau I have to ask you. Because. One of the most fascinating things. About your report is this notion that you'll we talk so much about what happened here in the United States this is a global phenomenon the Kremlin has its sights, set, far beyond the United States how did that manifest itself in, different places well Putin realized that disinformation and cyber attacks. Would be a cheaper form of? Something that, was, historically, known act active measures which is goes back to the cold war era and had to do with the shaping of opinion to favor then the soviet union and he began experimenting with this in places like estonia and georgia in two thousand seven two thousand eight then even more dramatically in ukraine in two thousand fourteen and then it'd be it began radiating west all across europe and really arrived on our shores in two thousand sixteen and i think that's the way to conceptualize this that this is a much larger campaign as you say to boost russia's influence to recover some of what was lost when the soviet union fell apart and maybe a much bigger problem because you say one of the more i guess ambitious recommendations these internet platforms kind of rethink their advertising i mean this is how these guys make their money he it is a problem but the same things that make disinformation in the form of phony facebook pages that that generate social controversy the same thing that makes those effective make advertising general effective on on the internet The same type of negative emotions fear anger and so forth So this is something. I think, that they they will need to continue to rethink I mean I just think about. The transparency, issues like know who you're selling something. To write I mean asked the questions and figure it. Out, it's not so? Difficult, only about thirty seconds left here Paul what happens next well what's next is the. Big question that the federal government faces and the president faces what, will we do when we have these problems in the fall two thousand eighteen and if Trump tries to obfuscate all of this will be in big trouble if, other people and individuals step forward and and identify this stuff we'll we'll be better off pallbearer deputy director of the center. For, business in human rights at NYU stern school of business also our. Former colleague here at. Bloomberg. BusinessWeek great to be with you thanks for coming in thanks I'm gonna put that report to out on Twitter, at Carol, Massar and at Jason Kelly and. Also act up oh Barrett or, you're. Listening to Bloomberg markets I'm Carol Massar. Along with Jason Kelly quick check on the markets for everybody you've got a gain of about twenty six points on, the Dow SAP just up About thirteen NASDAQ up about sixty two You are listening to Bloomberg, radio back toward the national news headlines Nathan Hager internet. Nine, one. Newsroom,.

Russia Bloomberg Carol Massar NYU stern school US Bloomberg BusinessWeek deputy director Kremlin Europe Putin Paul Jason Kelly pallbearer soviet union BusinessWeek Barrett facebook Google
"nyu stern school" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:50 min | 2 years ago

"nyu stern school" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"And that's. Has horizontal mergers such as the proposed merger between, the t. mobile and sprint or the proposed aquisition also folks Bhai Disney and then there is the vertical issues now that haven't been vertical cases for very long time Settled so the government went on to live in a case of the fifty fifty chance winning in the case of eighteen now at the same time It wasn't based on was for the doesn't get convinced then they were slammed they. Were they were killed by Land. Isn't good. Enough yeah I mean But but I don't really expect that the that the government. Is going to stop pursuing antitrust matters I was a bit surprised that it gave an. Okay. To the Disney folks murder since Disney number one in production of fulfillment and FOX's number two and the government says it's okay. I. Mean I'm surprised by that and, wasn't it very quickly done yes he goes on also, very quickly but I'm more concerned about the results, quickness We if you're lower. Number one and number two to merge that's that's very disturbing because they're all sprint, and t. mobile and number two three and four and I don't think. It's a good. Idea for, them to merge and if the government is willing to a lot of number one and? Number two what would stop the government, from saying, number three number four is okay the different industry so Nick what merges are on the horizon that an appellate court. Decision in this case might impact I think it might implicate vertical mergers, for example Comcast is also trying to, buy folks and distribution and FOX has content mainly so. It might be affected, by that. There could, be a lot of other vertical mergers in in healthcare. Details. Many different mergers that are being, contemplated but those might might be impacted by Whatever the court of appeal says in this case thanks Nick that's Nick, economies, a professor at NYU stern school of business coming up, on Bloomberg law the commercials for and against the confirmation of judge Brett Kavanagh, to the supreme. Court are already running we'll talk to the chief counsel of one. Of the groups mounting a fight against the confirmation I'm June Grasso it's nineteen minutes, before the hour this is Bloomberg imagine time is running out in just. Either twenty years. It is, estimated that particular giraffe numbers have fallen from thirty.

Nick Bhai Disney FOX Disney NYU stern school of business Bloomberg June Grasso Comcast chief counsel murder Brett Kavanagh professor nineteen minutes twenty years
"nyu stern school" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"nyu stern school" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To complaints that his company has too much power here's germany's representative manfred weber it his time to discuss breaking facebook monoply because it's already too much power in only one hand bringing this story home to the us a coalition here is pushing for the federal government to break up the social media giant geeky these senior silicon valley editor tanya moseley explains a team of progressive advocacy groups calling themselves freedom from facebook have launched a petition and they're asking the federal trade commission to do several things the biggest break off instagram whatsapp and messenger turning them into their own companies the term for this is called trust busting like what was done to the bell phone system in the early eighties scott galloway with nyu stern school of business thanks this idea just might be better than any other form of regulation trust busting is a good thing oxygenating for the marketplace it's not a punishment this is the way we keep the good times going and continue our innovation economy breaking facebook says galloway could unleash the ability for smaller companies to actually compete against the social media giant and a statement facebook pushed back on that saying the average person uses eight different apps to communicate and stay connected facebook they say only operates a few of these it's unclear if the ftc will act on this but they are the commission currently investigating whether the social media giant violated a twenty eleven privacy agreement in its dealings with cambridge analytica the british research firm used by the trump campaign during the two thousand sixteen election for the california report i'm tanya moseley meanwhile yosemite national park officials cannot say of stormy weather led a hiker to fall to his death while climbing half dome but mondays slick conditions will be one of many factors investigators consider the california reports ingrid becker is in yosemite this week and filed this.

california yosemite national park scott galloway editor manfred weber germany yosemite ingrid becker representative ftc nyu stern school tanya moseley us facebook one hand
"nyu stern school" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"nyu stern school" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Com the time is six thirty one from k q e d news i'm brian watt several advocacy organizations are calling on the federal government to breakup facebook senior silicon valley editor tanya moseley explains a coalition of progressive social activist groups is asking the federal trade commission to split off instagram whatsapp and messenger from facebook and turn them into their own companies scott galloway with the nyu stern school of business says it's a lot like what was done to the bell phone system in the early eighties i would argue that in fact it was the right promotional break these guys up more jobs more hiring more back funded companies probably more merges mac which i think this unlocks innovation facebook says regulators reviewed its acquisitions and concluded there was no harm on competition the ftc is currently investigating the company over whether it violated user privacy in its dealings with cambridge analytica the now defunct british research firm used by the trump campaign during the twenty sixteen election i'm tanya moseley k q e d news one of the tallest buildings on the west coast san francisco salesforce tower is officially open san francisco and salesforce officials held a ceremony at the nearly eleven hundred foot tall building yesterday mayor mark farrell says the building has changed san francisco skyline and light chance the transamerica pyramid before it now the salesforce tower is going to dominate and highlight san francisco's skyline for decades to come the tower also features led light display showcasing images from around san francisco i'm brian watt cake news support comes from.

brian watt tanya moseley facebook ftc san francisco mayor mark farrell editor scott galloway nyu stern school of business eleven hundred foot
"nyu stern school" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"nyu stern school" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"The market treasury yields dipping oil up for a fifth straight day bringing its weekly gain to almost nine percent west texas intermediate crude up six tenths of one percent right now sixty seven forty eight for a barrel of wti gold is up eight tenths of one percent thirteen forty four the ons the tenure up three thirty seconds with a yield of two point eight two percent sp down less than half a point right now we'll call that unchanged the dow down fifty six down two tenths of one percent nasdaq lower by nine dropped one tenth of one percent i'm charlie pelletan dat is a bloomberg business flash thank you charlie the government has wrapped up its case to block at and t takeover of time warner now at and t is going on the offensive putting on its first witness in the trial that will determine whether the eighty five billion dollar merger goes through our guest is nicholas economies professor at nyu stern school of business nick how far did at and t go in establishing its case against the merger well i i think the worst certain weaknesses in the testimony of the of who was the key witness as kid gonna miss for the the government and i think i think the at and t was able to poke some holes on his testimony at the same time i do not believe that eighteenth 'cause minus to establish theory that says consumers are going to be better off after the merger the government then been able to establish a theory that consumers will not be better off after the merger well i think the theory that's beautiful proposed was it was a good theory and a good model but the the eighteenth lawyers were able to poke holes in his testimony and say well you said different things in your position than you say now and the position you said the model is not everything but there could be all kinds of other reasons why the negotiations between cable systems and they might come out differently so that's a problem because the government has to rely one hundred percent on superiors model that shows that the consumers are going to pay less if other factors are taken seriously into consideration than.

professor texas bloomberg nyu stern school of business one percent eighty five billion dollar three thirty seconds one hundred percent eight two percent nine percent
"nyu stern school" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"nyu stern school" Discussed on KQED Radio

"United states the euro area and japan as well as in emerging market economies that's a very broadbased up one that we haven't seen since two thousand and ten wage ellison is an economist with imf she says the expected growth this year is being led by the us and emerging market economies part of it has to do with stronger commodity prices oil prices are rising for example places like argentina russia and brazil are emerging from recessions and we also expect to see demand being of its stronger in the united states this year because of the tax cuts and central banks the world over have been trying to stimulate their economies for years and that seems to be working after a decade of turmoil consistent growth is a welcome change says mark zandi chief economist at moody's analytics breathing seems to be working in the same direction but first time in a long time i i could say that tokyo pretty good but the world's economies should not be patting themselves on the back too hard according to peter henry professor at nyu stern school increasingly road rocked widow out here is still below the critical klark local to grow he says the tax cuts in the us r a sugar high and even imf predicts the deficits they 'cause will be a drag on the economy later both henry and the imf suggest the world's economies use the good times to prepare for the bad focus on infrastructure education improving workers skills in new york i'm sabri benachour short for marketplace on wall street the day take a gas what are you thinking you feel unlucky we'll have the details when we do the numbers and one way to keep track of what's going on in this economy is to measure things over time right yes statistics of course but also how people are reacting to what's going on last time there was a shutdown in two thousand thirteen we found a.

imf sabri benachour peter henry tokyo mark zandi brazil argentina japan new york oil prices nyu stern school professor moody chief economist central banks united states russia
"nyu stern school" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"nyu stern school" Discussed on KQED Radio

"United states the euro area and japan as well as in emerging market economies that's a very broadbased pickup one that we haven't seen since two thousand and ten boya jellison is an economist with imf she says the expected growth this year is being led by the us and emerging market economies part of it has to do with stronger commodity prices oil prices are rising for example places like argentina russia and brazil are emerging from recessions and we also expect to see demand being of its stronger in the united states this year because of the tax cuts and central banks the world over have been trying to stimulate their economies for years and that seems to be working after a decade of turmoil consistent growth is a welcome change says mark zandi chief economist at moody's analytics breathing timothy working in the same direction but first time in a long time i i could play that tokyo pretty good but the world's economies should not be patting themselves on the back too hard according to peter henry professor at nyu stern school increasing road rock with a lot easier it's so below the critical car club with a croke he says the tax cuts in the us are a sugar high and even imf predicts the deficits they ours will be a drag on the economy later both henry and the imf suggest the world's economies use the good times to prepare for the bad focus on infrastructure education improving workers skills in new york i'm sabri benesch worked for marketplace on wall street today take yes what are you thinking you feel unlucky we'll have the details when we do the numbers.

imf peter henry tokyo mark zandi brazil argentina japan sabri benesch new york oil prices nyu stern school professor moody chief economist central banks united states russia
"nyu stern school" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"nyu stern school" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Well it probably is access to capital is the kind of the mother's milk of growth and and fair competition and one of the defining principles of a market is no one company has an outsized influence on them marketplace and we may be getting to appoint a distinctive traditional antitrust metrics you have one company that can literally muscle any other consumer company out of out of the way amazon can start soaking or sucking the oxygen out of a room such that when it shows up its competitors a week before it's even entered the room where the sector so yeah it's a unit the bottom line is tax policy an antitrust has not kept pace with this new group of innovators we've just never seen anything like this before i've tom asked brooke this is on point we're talking about amazon ready to come through your front door with deliveries crushing it on wall street making moves on may be delivering your prescriptions and chased by everybody will talk about in a few minutes ford's h q to a second headquarters in north america that they're uh very loudly talking about a planning to build you could join us this hour are you happy with all this with the reach of amazon they're making tv shows the running the cloud is there anything amazon won't do charlotte howard of the economist joins us right now from new york she's been writing about it you can lead to her work at our website all point radio dot org scott galloway at nyu stern school of business author of the four the hidden dna of amazon apple facebook and google scott a report here that the nasdaq as of this morning declined to a record high ever empowered by amazon apple sheer so there's amazon power you know were pushing it up.

amazon tax policy tom brooke north america new york scott galloway nyu stern school facebook ford charlotte howard google milk
"nyu stern school" Discussed on Masters in Business

Masters in Business

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"nyu stern school" Discussed on Masters in Business

"My special guest today is scott galloway of nyu stern school of business as well as el to inc he is the founder of a number of internet startups uh any specializes in digital branding ii reached out to professor galloway after seeing is four horsemen of uh of the internet video one youtube a few years ago we've interviewed him twice before for masters in business he is not only our first threetimes guest he's likely to be the only one scott galloway welcome back to bloomberg thanks berry is this snl do i get a jacket where does it it's like the masters yucca green jacket and it says mi beyond the powerbooks cards yeah exactly exactly it's it's all good fun for everybody let's talk about your new book the four the hidden dna of amazon apple facebook in gugel the first question is why the four and why these four so i believe as consumer companies these these are countries of tapped into a basic instinct ah and have had a bigger role on outsize role on society who we are as people and uh than almost any organisations in history much less companies also i think is a tremendous amount to learn from these companies in our role as professors of business go i think is to help people develop a currency and skills so they can create economic security for them and their families and to really understand these companies are there has to understand the intersection between technology innovation media and have it have an advantage i think there's something we can all learn from really understanding these companies so if i'm a first she a business student at done what take away do i do i get from these four showed if first here's an interesting way to look at i think the first year in business was one of the highest roy investments in individual can make we took a kid he's making seventy thousand tournament or kitties making six figures it's turner within fourteen months.

professor galloway berry facebook turner nyu stern school of business bloomberg fourteen months
"nyu stern school" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:32 min | 3 years ago

"nyu stern school" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"A special and view as i said with emmett professor from the nyu stern school of business tom david gura thank you so much hope you can participate in this interview as well as neural beginning and it's won't say interesting the author of crisis economics and so mourn as we all did may be miss amplitude a financial crisis but was really out front honoree russian to the mean and it was a mean mean was in it i mean it was something in two thousand eight in two thousand nine right now norio there's a lot of people talk in bubbles they talk schiller bubbles they talk qe bubbles and that are we anywhere off the mean like we were in july in june of two thousand seven not yet there has been severely leverage in the financial sector especially among nonbank financial institution there's been some averaging of the corporate sector but i would say that in two thousand and six and seven wearing the eighth inning of that the credit that cycle in terms of fraud than i said bobble right nominee move i be in the fourth inning men in there is some is a fraud than as by one extreme of other way sean exotics as says that would cause a now the financial crisis in the next but months you a written repetitively in your associated with democrat party economics in the idea of working with president clinton years ago yeah what are the ramifications not so much of trump theory or trump a belief but what are the ramifications of the rhetoric and methodology out of the white house on a daytoday basis while it creates a huge amount of uncertainty uh policy politika even geopolitical so far that is not really a fact that the markets the market have discounted bad that uncertainty because they believe that may be he's on may and economic another advisers i got grading prevent radical action weather a war with north korea as opposed to extreme protectionism modest supplementation from occurring by but i would say it's not that positive the economic growth and while the president who was elected on a populist programme of land to but lower costs wide look callers is being behaving gap as a cookbook crowd so tomase while like no hooked up while police goes it talks as if is paul police but for example of bags i would hope you'll stay set the title of your next what an baby it should be because.

professor financial crisis fraud north korea president emmett nyu stern school of business tom david gura democrat party clinton paul