35 Burst results for "Nyu"

The Case Of The Pricey Fritos

The Indicator from Planet Money

01:52 min | 2 d ago

The Case Of The Pricey Fritos

"So we are on the case for scott horsely following the fritos clue number. One fritos is owned by pepsi. Pepsi owns frito-lay which makes free does in fact the vending machine scott uses in. The white house is all pepsi products and all of the products and the machine. Not just the fritos got more expensive so we called pepsi. they would not comment. They declined to comment. Okay find out thanks. i know. Luckily there was a second clue. A note left the scene of the crime. There is a note on the vending machine from the the people that stock the machine to are valued patrons effective in the next couple of weeks. The prices in the vending machine may be adjusted to offset increases. We have received in product costs from manufacturers so presumably the wholesale cost of the fritos have gone up and they're passing those along to us but it is kind of curious at a time when corn prices are down. And you know there's only three things in a frito. There's there's corn corn oil and salt. Well how naive to think vaga free does. Caroline dimitri is an applied economist at nyu who specializes food studies and seem kind of offended by the idea that might only have three corn prices at anything to do with the price of corn chips right by the way we tried calling the vending machine company. Sometimes yeah but they would not call us back. Nobody wants to give us a comment so we turn to. The experts and caroline is an expert. She says the price of a processed food like fritos has almost nothing to do with well. food prices. Just break that idea that you have that food actually. The food costs are an important component of any food product. That you buy in the grocery

Pepsi Scott Horsely Frito Caroline Dimitri White House Scott NYU Caroline
Managing Atrial Fibrillation With Lifestyle Changes Dr. Christine Albert

Cardionerds

03:07 min | 3 weeks ago

Managing Atrial Fibrillation With Lifestyle Changes Dr. Christine Albert

"Thought we could start by discussing some of your major contributions to the management of atrial fibrillation even since my medical school days. It seems like the emphasis. On lifestyle management for diseases such as atrial fibrillation has increased exponentially as we learn more about arrhythmia mechanisms and now we specifically screen patients for sleep apnea diet alcohol use et cetera. So from all of the landmark clinical research that you've conducted over your career. That's far could you. Maybe summarize for us. What you feel are the biggest takeaways whether in eighth hundred prevention or in any of your other areas that sudden cardiac death. Thank you when i started doing. Research on the epidemiology of heart rhythm disorders really wasn't an emphasis as you say on. Risk factors for h. fibrillation or sudden cardiac death. And then you know a group of us not just myself but amelia benjamin in the premium study and patrick eleanor. We all started to get interested in looking at atrial fibrillation as you would cardiovascular disease and some of the major findings are really related to lifestyle and how it can impact each relation including body mass index. And wait and wait reduction. We've done several studies. One who first authors tetreault who's also electro physiologist at brigham women's hospital and she published a very important study in jack. Where we showed in bunks women. Even being slightly overweight had elevated to risk of fibrillation. And then if you lost weight you lower that risk. And in addition some of the other research we did was around. Exercise and showing that exercise is beneficial to atrial fibrillation. But as we all know too much. Exercise can actually have an adverse effect and this again was a study that was done by tony acer who was also an electro physiologist and his now at nyu worked with me for a while. So both of those manuscripts were very important. With regards management of atrial fibrillation. In addition we also published one of the first studies looking at alcohol intake and h fibrillation. Now there have been multiple multiple studies showing that alcohol is related to atrial fibrillation. And as you know a randomized trial now that shows that if you abstained from alcohol you lower your risk of atrial fibrillation so all of these studies are not just by myself but multiple. Investigators have really changed the practice where we as clinicians think about lowering. Risk factors as electra physiologists event and approach sanders. Work in australia really took it to another level by actually doing clinical trial in showing that reduction of weight and modifying risk factors lowers incidence of atrial fibrillation. So now it's really one of our pillars of treatment and it is rewarding to see something go from observational research to clinical trials in actually to

Atrial Fibrillation Cardiac Death Amelia Benjamin Patrick Eleanor Tetreault Brigham Women's Hospital Apnea Tony Acer Cardiovascular Disease NYU Sanders Australia
Mother Wit With Certified Nurse Midwife Tanya Tringali

The WoMed

05:42 min | Last month

Mother Wit With Certified Nurse Midwife Tanya Tringali

"Tanya thank you so much for joining me on the woman today. I'm so excited to speak with you. Happy to be here tiny. I think you are our first midwife on the podcast. You very cool yeah. I've had a couple of different fertility. Experts instead steph combat now knowing that's a certified nurse midwife so welcome as my first day. That's so cool. I always knew that you know women and children were going to be the focus of my nursing career. But before i fell into the nikki world i was definitely researching the nurse midwife route. 'cause berth itself is just so cool it is it is. I don't think anyone really gets it unless they're actually a delivery room. I i totally agree. And there's so much you just don't think about ever until you're pregnant. I mean i. I have a twenty year old at this point so my birth and i only have one child. Mike was a long time ago. But i am definitely one of those people that didn't think midwives existed when i was first pregnant. I really thought that you only heard midwife. In historical novels such And so such a learning curve for me to be pregnant. I was young. I was pregnant. But i was notably unhappy with my experience from the very first visit. There's gotta be a better way. And then i was in prenatal yoga class and heard somebody say midwife and my ears perked up it was like what is going over there and before you knew it. I was like sitting in the corner arms and noble reading every book. Get my hands on and kind of knew where i was going to go. Navigating a pregnancy and a new career path essay in time. But it's amazing. How many people. That don't know what a midwife is or if they do they think we only attend home births like all those minds of misconceptions that are you know fun to answer all this questions. So is that kind of what drew you into. Midwifery where are you a nurse. I already at this point or not. I went to performing arts high school. I moved to new york with the state. Can hundred bucks. When i was seventeen years old and then i was pregnant at nineteen years old. It was very sort of meant to be kind of situation. Like i never doubted the moment i was pregnant. I never doubted that thing never crossed my mind to do anything else. I've no judgments about what anybody does ever but for me it felt right even though it was really strange. I didn't think it was supposed to feel right. And you know very quickly. I realized that these two experiences. We're going to be very late to figure it out about midwifery. By the time. I was twelve weeks pregnant. And i was on a hat so like i was my first birth as a dula when i was six weeks postpartum and i went to a few births and i said screw it and i was a nursing school and then i got through nursing school with the sole intention of being a midwife by ban i needed to come up for air for a minute. Yes i waited. I worked for two years. The labor and delivery nurse waiting for my kid to be old enough to go to kindergarten and i went to midwifery school while she was intended artem in first grade. So that's that's how it all happen. So those two journeys were intimately linked for me. I'm going to sound just like alexis on shits creek. But i really loved this journey. Well kids. I can't say i know the reference because i tried to watch a few episodes of ships creek like when it first came out and for whatever reason i didn't get into it and everyone says how amazing it is and how the pandemic has changed the way the show comes across and i feel like i have to give it another. Go definitely definitely give it another go. I think the first time. I watched the whole season through or like the whole first thing like shits creek as a as a whole i am. I watched it all the way through. It wasn't really until the second season that i was like. Okay yeah i really get it. And then i just started rewatching watching it all again because it's sometimes need to turn on those. Those calming lake funny shows like parks and rec is gone off netflix. Now and i still have shits creek and meant just. It's great to have on during the day. And i'm just laughing but off now so i'm gonna have to give it another go with all my free time i would. So what was midwifery school like for you. Like what's all involved in that so midwifery school kind of ties into another big piece of my life. I think i guess. I tend to Dotson things at the same time. I so i went to nyu new york university for nursing. Okay and when it came time to go to midwifery school. I wasn't super excited about going to one of the campus based programs in new york like it wasn't about that i thought i wouldn't get a good education at all the new york based schools. But i knew that they would put me in a clinical site and that it wouldn't be my choice and i had really clear beliefs about time to wipe. I wanted to be and where i wanted to train. I had i gave for a free standing birthing center and i was really interested in doing center. Work home birth. Were all of that. And i just at the time did not really want to be in the hospital understandable. I figured out that there were some distance education programs. And that at some of the distance. Ed programs you actually had to find your own clinical site and while that might be a deterrent for some people for me gave me the freedom to figure it out

Shits Creek Tanya Steph Nikki Artem Mike New York Alexis Nyu New York University For Nu Netflix Dotson
Diving More Deeply Into Diversity

Yeah, That's Probably an Ad

06:24 min | Last month

Diving More Deeply Into Diversity

"Welcome to this special episode of. Yeah that's probably an ad. I'm coat m. your community editor and this week is a really special one. We have some inspiring guests in our room with us as it is black history month and as we continue these important conversations about race racial injustice social justice within our marketing and advertising communities so I'd like to introduce jason. Rosario who is chief diversity equity and inclusion At bbdo worldwide gabriel director of global diversity and inclusion at abercrombie and fitch company and jasmine cruise brand manager at beach. La and head of marketing and brand strategy at in her shoes movement. Thank you so much guys for being with me today I have excited to chat absolutely so before we kind of dive deeply into the conversation Let's start with jason Tell us more about kind of what you do. And what you're trying to do such a question i'll try my best to answer it as distinctly as possible. But i think i'm a jack of many trades but specifically at bbdo. My remit is to lead a global diversity efforts across the network on an enterprise level. And so what that means is to. My job is to figure out how we might be able to apply inclusive principles to every aspect of the organization from recruiting and retention and partnering with hr on kind of core cultural diversity equity inclusion initiatives. All the way through to pot a week rate more inclusive representative Client output in. How do we advise our clients to think through these lenses if you will so Broadly speaking that's my role Outside of that. I'm an advocate for a masculinity in mental health I started a or launched. An agency called the lives of men which uses the conversation around modern masculinity to explore. has implications on diversity equity and inclusion allied ship and the intersection of those conversations and mental health. So that is a sickness. I can put it Thank you for all that you do in the various spaces that you're a part of What about you gabby Where are you at with this new gig in terms of What you're trying to do within nf yet. I've been A diversity equity inclusion blinding practitioner for the last ten years in really this new hampshire with. Nfl has been really really exciting. discussed really the more fascinating part to me In having an opportunity to lead the effort goes beyond just diversity as a practitioner For me it's really all the other parts that keep me up at night The parts that would influence Candidates employees associates to wanna stay within an organization. So it's really around the side of the house that deals more with inclusion More equitable workforce building that sense of cultural belonging in an organization. And that means that are focused. Can't just beyond diversity for the sake of boxes but migiro really is rather to try and influence and create the type of environment where employees associates feel that they can bring their full selves to work each and every day in creating more accessible equitable workforce and in addition to that. I mean you know abercrombie and fitch. It's really really interesting. Time to work in the space where our mission is really been dedicated to amplify engaging in power empowering folk small different backgrounds and really foster in an open environment where folks can come together. Listen learn and really take action to move from conversations toward action and influencing the products that we're creating to reflect our global customer so it's been really fascinating You know i start my career in higher education working in nyu and columbia then pivoted to citi group Leading our diversity inclusion efforts early career talent and then transitioning to the fashion industry which is really really exciting opportunity to make a make an impact end create product that has the opportunity to create social change right across our across our communities in really interesting way. I have so many questions About kind of what you all have seen so far but first jazzman How do you include that d. i. lens as somebody who's on the agency side and also trying to you know achieve more equity in the greater world. Yeah i. I'm just so to be part of this conversation and hearing from jason gabby amongst inspiring folks so I think as an account manager really partnering with clients and but also partnering with leadership in how we infused diversity equity inclusion not just from an internal perspective but so that emanates within How we partner with clients We just ensuring that yes. We're being responsible and that brands are being responsible but also Figuring out how what we can do to not just check the box like abbie said but actually make tangible change. And so i think for me personally. It's just something that i've always been about which led me to Being part of the in her shoes movement A nonprofit base-year l. a. And so i have this unique Intersection where i get to see What does social impact look like from grassroots Point of view but then also in my day job like how. How can we partner with clients in doing this. Great work in continuing this great work especially with brands that wants to create

Bbdo Worldwide Gabriel Global Diversity Fitch Company Jasmine Cruise Brand Jason Rosario Bbdo Migiro Abercrombie Citi Group LA Beach New Hampshire NFL Fitch Jason Gabby NYU Columbia Abbie
Did Alec Baldwin Know about Hilaria?

Juicy Scoop with Heather McDonald

08:37 min | 3 months ago

Did Alec Baldwin Know about Hilaria?

"Did alec baldwin really know and i. I don't really know. I really. I think i think he's a weird guy You know he was awful to kim bassey basing her his wife he was. You know awful to the daughter. When she was about thirteen is the famous. You know voice message that he left her. They were going through very very contentious divorce. And a lot of lawyers involved a lot of custody battles between alec and kim. And i think it was about thirteen and i think either she flaked on their time alone or didn't wanna go over to the dad's house which happens a lot when kids are about that age and their parents are separated and he left her. The message saying your little pig. And i guess kim did submit it in her divorce findings and it went public. And i mean there's even a youtube video of door the explorer like with the voice of it. I remember my sons went saw. It went very viral since then ireland. A very pretty girl also very popular and instagram. She is an adult now. kim has really not been acting. I haven't seen her in much. She's sixty seven years old. I did not realize that she was actually older than alec But i don't know what she's up to but when this story broke down a couple days after christmas who was the girlfriend. That is like kim coming over with a bottle of wine and let us fuck and talk even if she didn't care about hillary under five kids and that you know because obviously she was nicer daughter ireland. But there's just got to be some satisfaction in knowing that your ex husband's wife is been proven to be full of shit as far as this still doesn't mean she's not a nice person. A charitable person. But this is weird in a nutshell. She grew up in boston. She went to high school here. Her parents are white her. She's relatives all the way from like the revolutionary war or whatever. There is no spanish in her blood at all. The dad got into teaching some spanish studies. The data and the mom who are still married moved to spain in two thousand and eleven. And i think the brother might have gone there as well and visited or whatever and she went on in so many interviews so many things to say that her family lives in spain so in one interview. They're like now wait. What happens like i came here. I came here when i was nineteen to go to school at nyu. And the two female interviewers are like. Oh from spain yes. My family lives in spain. now. She didn't say i was born in spain and then she tried to say in correcting that when she didn't think it was going to be a big deal like the first day this broke. She did an instagram Tv like right to camera and then she took it down and that's when she said What i meant was. I moved from boston to nyu when i was nineteen because all these people went to high school with hillary in boston so i thought that was really interesting now. They met her and alec met. According to. everything's been researched. Is he walked into a restaurant. New york was there and she was there and she was speaking perfect spanish to a waiter and he said i must tell you and she said you must know me now. I think he just was like loved that little sexy spanish. You know much like a selma hayek. Who was his love. Interest in thirty rock for in two thousand eight two thousand and nine. He met hillary in two thousand and eleven. And i think that just was kinda like hot. It's like it's like the couple. Let's see we're here. They are getting married. I'm looking on my youtube for those of you. That like to watch on youtube all the photos from their wedding and she kept very much with the spanish theme. She has this long traditional spanish. Veil that covers your head. It's very you know it's from that type of style and they. I think they had a spanish speaking priest. They found eight. Spanish church catholic church in in new york to get married in and she did interviews forty people from my family over from spain so it was crazy. You can imagine how crazy it was with the spaniards here. Well those people are just people that live in their vacation home that like retired there and came over and then she said oh my god and my relatives there like how do we say your new. New name is baldwin baldwin. They don't their spanish. They don't know how to save baldwin. I mean it just continues on alec. Baldwin goes on david letterman and starts imitating his wife spanish accent and he goes and it's not being racist because she is from spain and she you know and so he's doing he's playing into it and i just think people sitting back loved it and the more that they loved it and encourage it. I think he just went along with it. I don't know that he ever really asked her about her high school life. He might be one of those guys. That doesn't really ask. I don't know. I ask a lot of questions. But you know. I just interviewed emily simpson from real housewives of o see and. She said she's never really asked her husband about his mormonism and they've been together twelve years so i don't know how other couples work but i think he loved the package so kelly just said what do you think when he met the parents and they didn't have an accent. I don't know that he really cared to get to know the parents a lot of you know there. He's an older guy. He has his wife. She's popping out babies. She's really sweet to him. She's down to boehner many time she can whip up a nice meal. I dunno and you know he has to. He's one of these guys that works a lot and he kind of has to. I don't think he's enormously wealthy as a star you know. He needs to take the. He does like a show with celebrity. Some game show. I forgot the name of it to the truth or to tell the truth. I don't know what it and he said. I take paycheck like i. There's jobs i take straight up. I need the paycheck. I've got you know six kids including ireland. And you know home in the hamptons home in new york i think he has really expensive lifestyle and But i think he totally loves and loves what she was. and i don't know i just. I don't know that. I think she was kind of used to presenting herself. Like that was starting to get into it and then like on their first date you know she said oh for the first five weeks we just held hands and then you know five months into the relationship. We got an apartment together and so it's just fascinating. I want to see a movie made about this. I really do of when do you go. When do i stop. Or for some people like madonna. Who picked up an english accent. When she was living in england did she just become so used to it that she kind of forgot her old way of speaking. Like if i had to do an impression of drew barrymore war. I could do her for an entire week and then i could. I do for a month. Yeah could do for year. Probably and then. Maybe i'll just forget if it was part of my life if i had to do this just like when somebody became becomes an actor in a really intense movie. They sometimes say i'm not going to get out of this character the entire three months. I'm doing this movie. I'm going to be like this one. It's break time at lunch. I'm gonna. That's what i'm gonna do because that's how i do it so i don't know it just fascinating and then at first ireland defended her and i'm so sick of people bullying you know and being cruel. What do you care and stay at people's lives. You don't know well. I think it's one thing to be an actor and you put yourself out there as an actor but in this day and age. If you're an actor or television personality that also goes and makes a huge presence on instagram. Then i really think you cannot bitch because if you're going to open your life on instagram if you're going to profit from instagram than people do know you those nine hundred thousand people that follow you do feel like they know you and they feel deceived

Spain Alec KIM Kim Bassey Hillary Ireland Boston NYU Youtube Selma Hayek Alec Baldwin Spanish Church Catholic Church Baldwin Baldwin Emily Simpson David Letterman New York Baldwin Boehner
As Americans start to receive Moderna vaccine, questions arise about a new COVID-19 strain

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

04:15 min | 3 months ago

As Americans start to receive Moderna vaccine, questions arise about a new COVID-19 strain

"Tonight. The cdc says this corona virus variant this new strain found circulating in the uk could already indeed be circulating in our country. Undetected pfizer. Says it's highly likely that its vaccine effective against the new strain. It'll take roughly two weeks to know for sure but the company says it could produce a new vaccine to match the new strain in six weeks. Well for more we welcome back to our broadcast dr. Selene ghandour clinical assistant professor of medicine and infectious disease at the nyu still of medicine in bellevue hospital in new york. She was recently named to the president-elect's corona virus advisory board a doctor gander. First of all. It's great to have you back. Second what is your level of concern on this new strain. And what's the truth about. Existing testing will the testing. We have if you're lucky enough to get one. Expose it well brian. There's a lot that we still don't know about this variant. But i do think that we need to take this very seriously as a potential new threat We don't know if this new variant is in fact more transmissible we think it may be based on modeling that we don't have concrete data on that yet we don't know if this new variant could be more deadly most of those who have been infected with it in the uk so far has been on the younger side and they tend to have milder cases of coronavirus to begin with. So it's a little hard to say whether there's going to be a significant difference in severity of illness and finally we don't know for sure. If the vaccines that have been developed by pfizer by madonna and others will protect against this new variant. We think they probably will. But if there are further mutations that accumulate in these variance where the change even more. It is possible. They could evade the vaccines we've developed. Thus far i heard someone say today. We can try to use the defense production. Act to make more vaccine to keep the pipeline full of pp which just don't know how to make any more doctors and nurses a personnel staffing as becoming the issue. We have ground them all down between spikes of this disease. What are we going to do in these hospitals these regions that are running above full. Tilt we we really can't defense production act our way out of this one. You can't manufacture doctors and nurses and while you can play around the margins by promoting medical students to first year residents or trying to bring people out of retirement. That's not gonna make a huge dent in this what you really need to do. It's a supply and demand problem right and we have a major demand across the country. What is driving that is transmission and really the only way to get ourselves out of. This situation is to flatten the curve. It's what we've been talking about for months. Now which is reduced the number of cases so that health care systems. Doctors nurses can cope with the number of patients that are being asked to care for. Where do you come down on shot shaming. We have a report later in our broadcast uses as an example thirty one year old member of congress from new york in perfect health. Got her inoculation Before doctors and nurses across the country some of them who are begging for there's and putting hands on patients every day. How should people view these lines and the notion of cutting in line. I think when you have enough an elected official who steps up and wants to get vaccinated. I do think there is very important symbolic value in that to show the american people that they trust the process by which this vaccine was developed and you factored approved by the fda and so i think the value of that messaging is worth it for. Somebody like that to be back. Stated early dr selene gander. Thanks for your work. Thank you very much for agreeing to come on and take our questions. We always appreciate having you. Thank you very

Selene Ghandour Bellevue Hospital Pfizer UK Infectious Disease CDC NYU New York Brian Madonna Congress Dr Selene Gander FDA
Cant Deport a Movement

In The Thick

05:03 min | 3 months ago

Cant Deport a Movement

"What's up. Welcome to the podcast about politics. Race and culture from a poc perspective money. Sam and i'm lorella joining us as a special guest. All the way from brooklyn is a daas. She's an immigrant rights lawyer professor at new york university school of law and co director of the. Oh so important. Nyu immigrant rights clinic alina. Welcome to in the thick. Thank you so much for having me. You are the author of the recent book. No justice in the shadows. Which is what we've been saying. You know people in the shadows is not a good thing for democracy and your book you write that. Roughly three hundred thousand people are formerly deported from the us every year with a million more turn back. Just you know. Within the border area you talk about how the immigration criminalization and deportation systems are intertwined desire to maintain the racial status quo in other words the white supremacy and white majority of this country. You talk about how the use of the terms like criminal alien one of our favorites. Yeah falsely separates immigrant communities into categories of good versus bad right. And we've also had this presidential election where one candidate didn't denounce white supremacists and in this mist of a nationwide protest for black lives and a pandemic that has disproportionately affected black and communities following the election right. it was declared that joe biden had one right. Donald trump who previously had said. He wouldn't commit to a peaceful. Transfer refuse to concede and his allies started referring to vote as what a surprise quote legal or illegal and they especially tried to discredit the vote counting in cities with large black populations detroit philadelphia atlanta. This idea of like even votes now becoming good and bad legal and illegal criminal or non-criminal. It just permeates throughout our entire electoral politics so alina. Can you talk about how the immigration system has been set up to protect a particular type of immigrant absolutely and this is one of the things i focus on in. The book is really a historical perspective. Because we're told that our country is a welcoming country in that people who face deportation must be facing this. Because they've broken the law. They violated the laws where the laws are actually written and the foundation of the laws are designed to treat immigrants a- suspects to exclude them and to exploit them and we know this from the very origins of this country right there first naturalisation law that congress row because the constitution required them to come up with a universal naturalization law was limited to free white persons that's the foundation of our rules about membership in belonging and we police migration in this country initially focused on black people an indigenous people right so for the first century when voluntary immigration was mostly why congress was focused on fugitive slave laws that allowed black people to be removed from free state's to slaveholding states and the indian removal act that allowed indigenous people to be removed from their ancestral lands to make room for property white man and those are the tools that congress picked up on when it decided to focus on immigrants because they had chinese immigrants arriving in large numbers but eventually that led to the national origins quotas where we explicitly used racism to decide who could get a visa a spot in this country and mexicans in particular were actually exempted in order for southern businesses to use them for cheap labor so instead of excluding them that's why in the nineteen twenties southern segregation has proposed criminalizing unlawful border crossings. So that when people's labor was no longer needed they could be easily police imprison than deported. And that's the legacy of our immigration laws and while we may have gotten rid of the national origins quotas in nineteen sixty five. We replaced it with a system that essentially perhaps immigration including mexican immigration for the first time to twenty thousand nieces when hundreds of thousands of people have been going back and forth and the laws created this kind of undocumented population at created this false sense of illegality and as a backlash to legal immigration suddenly coming from asia africa. The caribbean you saw this rise of law and order policies nineteen seventies eighties war on crime. The war on drugs suddenly treating immigrants as criminals. And that's really what's laid the foundations for the modern immigration system today where police have been taken over as essentially immigration agents to create a pipeline for deportation and that replicates all of the racism that we see in policing generally and combined so that immigrant communities kind of double ranked in their communities.

Lorella New York University School Of Alina NYU Congress Brooklyn Joe Biden Donald Trump SAM Detroit Philadelphia Atlanta United States Caribbean Asia Africa
Why the Treasury wants its money back

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:40 min | 5 months ago

Why the Treasury wants its money back

"There are days of which this is one when we are obliged by the news to get just detached down in the weeds so we will because we have to. But we'll do it gently back in march in the cares act. Congress authorized the treasury department to let the federal reserve us about four hundred and fifty billion dollars to fund. A bunch of fed lending programs programs that would and remember back in march and april. The fear factor was pretty high in this economy. Right these programs would stabilize credit markets. And in a way thus backstop the whole economy. Well yesterday treasury secretary steven mnuchin. Told jay powell. He wants the money back. In other words those lending programs the secretary said are none the fed not known for its political loquaciousness. Said in a statement. Yesterday afternoon it would prefer the money and the emergency programs. Stay where they are. But after noon sherpao roach secretary mnuchin and told him the money's on the way so we will get to the what it all means thing with lopez and genus smile. Like in a minute but first marketplace abbreviation shore with what exactly these programs did in different ways. These programs all allowed the fed to get down and dirty in the mud of credit market so for example a couple of them allowed the fed to actually buy corporate bonds another loved the fed to buy short-term bonds from state and local governments another allowed to indirectly by up car loans and student loans they essentially stood there and said you know we'll be a buyer of these things will support these markets yousef obasi is global market strategist at stone ex. Now the reason we care that the fed could buy these securities. Is that for a while. They're in this pandemic. It was looking like nobody else would and if nobody wants to buy up for example loans. People aren't going to get as many loans and loans are what kept some businesses. Live and local governments functioning. You're talking about essentially the entire credit markets could've yearly froze if the fed didn't step in with these facilities the fed supported credit market so credit markets could support people. Chris campbell is chief strategist at duff and phelps and former assistant secretary of the treasury they allow for serbia liquidity or money available to banks or institutions to have them to be able to lend you money by all accounts. These programs worked. Edward altman is professor of finance emeritus at nyu. The treasury felt that it has succeeded so well that it's no longer necessary. Oldman sees that is. Ill advised to give them the looming threat of further shutdowns but secretary mnuchin has said businesses need grants now not loans. The four hundred and fifty. Five billion dollars in question could be re purposed into a miniature stimulus. Deal before a new president is sworn

Federal Reserve Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuc Jay Powell Mnuchin Treasury Department Yousef Obasi Stone Ex Congress Lopez Chris Campbell Edward Altman Treasury Duff Phelps Serbia NYU Oldman
Its time to talk about voting technology. No, not that kind of voting.

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:29 min | 5 months ago

Its time to talk about voting technology. No, not that kind of voting.

"The pandemic has forced lawmakers around the world to get creative about passing legislation but in the us members of congress still have to show up to vote in person or have another member cast a proxy vote on their behalf but a report out last week by the house administration committee says congress could conduct remote voting if it wanted to securely and with existing technology beth. Simone novak studies the impact of technology on governing as a professor at new york. University's tannin school of engineering. She says remote voting is already happening in other countries and in several. Us states via apple or roll. Call by phone. You know when we have our voices or our faces that's the best form of authentication of who we are. It's no different in many ways as we've seen from all of us working online that we can simply of express our opinion out loud this on zoom the same way we do in real space. It's really not the technology so much. That's the issue at the technology exists for members of congress to securely vote remotely during the ongoing coronavirus epidemic and we've already seen lots of uses of zoom and other of videoconferencing technologies to allow for example committees to me and the business of lawmaking. Go on around the world to if the house administration committee says it safe and already available. Why the pushback. So we've seen over the course of the pandemic. there were a lot of people from both sides of the political aisle who were worried about turning congress into a museum but people felt that really. This went against tradition. This went against the way the people were used to doing things. Don't forget that from legislators used to doing business in the hallways and face to face doing zoom meeting or doing a webex or getting online to have a meeting that was completely new and in fact training was needed to get people used to the idea of having a committee meeting online then part of it. Frankly is party politics and just objecting for the sake of objecting. One of the advantages of virtual committee meetings that you've had more openness. It's been more accessible to people who may not be able to fly to washington to testify for example do you see voting also potentially increasing If you don't have to be there in person. So we've seen examples from around the world of legislatures who have seen their attendance rates and participation rates. Go way up not needing to miss a vote. Because they're in their home district or need to be a need to be somewhere else. So i think we definitely have seen instances of greater rates of participation. We've also seen the ability for for example committees to bring in witnesses from all over the world. Something very difficult today to do today during covid but even pre covid would have a hearing with a few witnesses who would usually come a potentially from where it's convenient near in the beltway area or the usual suspects. We have the ability to have much more diverse participation and more participation in hearings and. I think what's really exciting. Is those legislatures that are turning to technology not simply to do what they do offline but do it online it's those who are really using technology to innovate in new ways to do what i like to call crowd law in other words to use technology to engage the public in the legislative process. So we're seeing lots of examples of this kind of crowd law innovation taking advantage of new technology to hear from more people more diverse people and to engage ordinary people in a process. That's typically been done of really far away from them and often to much behind closed doors but lawmakers could have problems connecting to the internet right. I mean we've seen some government officials lose their connections during committee meetings. Is the infrastructure ready for this. We have to take some baby steps to ensure that we have backup plans in place right. That's why in brazil they have a system that both works with an app and with the telephone. So there's a backup plan. I've been a witness in a congressional hearing and the person who testified with me had to do so frankly from her car because it was the only place that she could get reliable connectivity we have the tools and techniques and the processes in place that can allow us to develop procedures that will work including with backup plans so that people can for example is they're doing in other countries vote maybe not during the hearing but afterwards so they have a window of time in which they can actually register their participation if they can't get online then well and a reminder of the stakes here which is you know if you have people talking in the halls and having having backroom meetings that's potentially spreading covid. Do you think there will be more pressure on the house to adopt to take this step. In the coming months i think with especially with a change in administration and a posture. That will be really much more proactive. In terms of things like mask mandates social distancing requirements and public health and safety measures. I think we're also going to see some a changing culture and when you keep in mind the fact that the average age of a senator is sixty three. The average age of a member of the house is fifty eight and again. The cove is rising all over the united states. I think we're going to see both the necessity of really instituting procedures that help keep people safe but also really a change in culture in really trying to demonstrate for the american people the right ways to work safely and to act safely and that's going to create pressure. I hope for greater uses of these technologies. Frankly it's not cova today. It could be a natural disaster tomorrow. We have to be prepared to continue operations of government even the event of a disaster. We don't wanna be without the ability to legislate to provide the american people with services that they need to provide them with their stimulus checks and importantly to conduct oversight over the executive branch Especially in a crisis you know. We have the world's arguably most powerful national legislature and it deserves to have a modern and safe digital infrastructure. Beth novak directs the governance lab at. Nyu's hand school of engineering

House Administration Committee Congress Simone Novak United States Beltway Apple New York Washington Brazil Beth Novak NYU
How Social Media Affects Our Psychology & Why Our Phones Are Becoming Irresistible

The Model Health Show

04:44 min | 6 months ago

How Social Media Affects Our Psychology & Why Our Phones Are Becoming Irresistible

"Our guest today is Adam Ulcer and he is an associate professor of marketing at New York University Stern, school of business, and then affiliated professor of Social Psychology Nyu's psychology department, and in two thousand twenty he was voted as professor of the year by the student body and faculty at Nyu Stern School of business. He's a New York, times bestselling author of two books including the book were diving into today irresistible the rise of addictive technology and the business of keeping US hooked his one of the most popular Ted talks. Ever with millions of US talking about this very subject. They were diving into today. He's been featured everywhere from the New York Times to the Atlantic wire popular science and Adam also has a PhD in social psychology from Princeton University where he focused on how people reach the judgments and make the decisions that shaped their lives, and now we're gonNA dive into this awesome powerful important conversation with Adam Alter Adam. Welcome to the model show. Thanks for hanging out with us today. Yeah. Thanks for having me Sean, good to be. So I've got to ask you first and foremost I want to know your superhero origin story because this topic is so palpable. So important but how in the world did you find yourself interested in this domain with tech in how it's kind of relating to our lives? I think the super the Superhero, the super power for an academic is that when we get interested in things that other people get interested in, we can actually studied them and that's what happened with me. I I. Think a lot of people were talking about tech, the encroachment of tech in their lives especially that personalized know I was sitting on the couch next to my wife, we'd spend two hours on our phones. We wouldn't be interacting with each other I remember being on a flight between New York and La, and I don't even remember the flight because I opened a video game on my phone. was an APP plated six hours landed and was like what just happened time melted away. So I think a lot of people probably millions of people who are experiencing some version of that in the roughly two, thousand, thirteen, fourteen, fifteen. But for me it, it was something that I had the capacity to actually study to investigate, and so I did I started to look into it and had a few critical questions like am I the only one experiencing this? The answer was very clearly no What what else is gripping us this way in what should we do about? It is something to be concerned about and that's how I got interested probably six or seven years ago. Yes and it through even through that time. Can you talk about first and foremost for us? Like you said is not you're not alone by a long shot but how has our investment in our time grown from? Prior, you know somebody just here in the studio, one of my guys and he wants to get a flip phone now since the flip phone to now, how is our investment time grown over time to getting on the Internet in in Tech? Yes. So we spent we spent about eighteen minutes touch to phones before the first iphone before two thousand seven. So you gave up like a stood of an hour everyday to your fun, which is not that much time some time but it's not that much time. Now today the average for an adult in the United States and it's very similar across the. Developed world is about four hours. So it's it's increased by a factor of about twelve thirteen fourteen and if you if you imagine that being expanded across the lifespan, we're talking between ten and twenty years of your life depending on whether you're alive or heavy user of the fun. So you're giving up effectively one or two decades of your life to this device. Unbelievable and the thing is even when you say that number I bet so many people like well, that's not me. How can you quantify that because a lot of people feel the same way until they get tracked, they think that they may be fifty percent of the time that they actually do. It's true in two thousand fifteen reached out to this guy who created now colt moment and Marmon was one of the first really sophisticated track is that to what you were doing on your phone how much time he was spending occasionally you get these Ping, sang a you happy with your engagement right now and he he said to me. Before you use it before you install it on your phone and tell me what do you think how long do you think spending on your phone and? He said to me most people have no idea and that was true for me too I guest and so I guess like. I thought an hour but just to be concerned about her I said, how about ninety minutes I'll say ninety minutes a day and I started using this track and was three three and a half hours a day. So I was I was under estimating by more than half and I said to him that's crazy that I have no idea how much time I'm giving up and it's such a lot of the white indict and he said it's totally typical most of us are using twice or even three times more than we think we are.

New York Adam Ulcer United States Nyu Stern School Of Business Professor Of Social Psychology Sean New York Times Associate Professor Of Marketi Professor Marmon School Of Business TED Princeton University LA
UN General Assembly: US-China tensions flare over coronavirus

Weekend Edition Saturday

03:34 min | 7 months ago

UN General Assembly: US-China tensions flare over coronavirus

"Pandemic is a test of international cooperation. One, the U. N secretary general says the world is failing is NPR's Michelle Kellerman reports that failure Was on display at the ongoing General Assembly. The secretary general is trying to use this virtual General Assembly to get countries to work together to fight the pandemic and many other global challenges. But one Security Council debate showed just how hard this will be. You know shame on each of you. I am astonish, and I'm disgusted. That's the U. S ambassador to the U. N. Kelly Craft accusing her colleagues, though not naming, which ones of playing politics with covert 19 members of the council who took this opportunity to focus on political grudges rather than the critical issue at hand. My goodness Craft defended the Trump administration's decision to pull out of the World Health Organization and said China should be held to account for quote, unleashing this plague onto the world. China's Ambassador John Joon, says the US is just trying to blame others for its own failings. The United the States has been spread in political virus on this information. And for 18 confrontation on division. Up to that point, it had been a rather dry Security Council meeting about global governance in the wake of covert 19. There was a lot of talk about multilateralism and a few veiled swipes at the Trump Administration's America first approach, Kraft said. The U. S has given you n agencies $900 million to counter the pandemic and compared that to others on the Security Council. NYU's year 4.6 million South Africa 8.4 million Indonesia five million. The US does give more to the U. N than other, says Richard Gallon of the International Crisis Group. But this is not just about money. Foreign diplomats had grown accustomed to trump attacking. Yuen arrangements like the Paris climate deal on mechanisms like the Human Rights Council. But they were genuinely shocked the Washington would walk away from the W. H O during a global pandemic. Speaking via Skype, he said diplomats are worried about what he calls a nasty fight between the US and China as Beijing tries to increase its influence in the world body on a day to day basis, Chinese diplomats in New York are often Very assertive, increasingly hard line and sometimes bullying colleagues from smaller countries. The reality is that for most members of the U. N, neither the US nor China Is offering an attractive vision of the future of multilateralism and the world needs multilateral solutions on a range of issues beyond the pandemic, says Latisha Courtois, who represents the International Committee of the Red Cross. She's raising the alarms about the forgotten conflicts from Yemen to this, the hell region of Africa has a triple threat of climate conflict and called it mansions. And for that they need to be a collective approach. The U. N Secretary General Antonio Guterres made the same appeal all week, reminding diplomats that the World Sol a previous period of fragmentation a century ago. The result was the first World War. Followed by the seconds. Over. 19 is casting a dark shadow across the world. And he called the band eh Mika warning that must spur US toe action. Michelle Kelemen. NPR news, the State Department

United States Security Council China Trump Administration General Assembly Dry Security Council Secretary General Antonio Gute Richard Gallon World Health Organization Michelle Kellerman NPR Human Rights Council U. N. Kelly Craft Michelle Kelemen Latisha Courtois NYU
Mueller prosecutor says special counsel 'could have done more' to hold Trump accountable

The Daily 202's Big Idea

04:42 min | 7 months ago

Mueller prosecutor says special counsel 'could have done more' to hold Trump accountable

"A former top prosecutor on special counsel Bob Miller's team writes in a new. Tell all book where law ends that the Group failed to fully investigate trump's financial ties and should have stated explicitly in their report that they believed he obstructed justice. Andrew Weissmann claims that Muller's efforts were limited by the ever present threat of trump disbanding their office and by their own reluctance to be aggressive against a sitting president. The team made sure it's work was logged into a computer system in a way so that it would be preserved if trump got rid of Mueller but Weissmann says the pressure caused them to pull punches. He likens it to a sword of Damocles hanging over all of their investigative decisions, leading them at certain times to act much less forcefully and more defensively than they would have if they were investigating anyone but the president. Weisman says it led them to delay and ultimately forego entire lines of inquiry though were quite promising particularly regarding this president financial ties to Russia. This bothered him deeply because in America no one is supposed to be above the law not even the president here is a key paragraph from Weisman's new book which comes out next week, and which we got an early copy of he writes quote. We still do not know if there are other financial ties between the president and either the Russian government or Russian oligarchs. We do not know whether he paid bribes to foreign officials to secure favourable treatment for his business interests a potential violation of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. That would provide leverage against the president. We do not know if he had other Russian business deals in the works at the time he was running for president how they might have aided or constrained his campaign or. Even if they are continuing to influence his presidency. Weisman was considered one of the top prosecutors at the justice, department had been a senior supervisor before Muller brought him onto his team. Now he teaches it Nyu law school in the book. Whitesman lays particular blame on Muller's number two errands assembly for stopping investigators from taking a broader look at trump's finances and he writes that he wonders whether investigators quote gave it their all Weisman lambasts attorney general bill bar for among other things giving the public a deeply misleading four-page summary of Moore's work before the full report was released publicly. bowlers report was far more damning than the anodyne description that bar put out. It was upon reading bars misleading four-page memo that Weisman decided yet moral obligation to write this book. Weisman is critical of Molar himself for not stating plainly that he concluded trump obstructed justice which Weisman says the evidence clearly shows Weissmann said in an interview on Monday with my colleagues Matt Sabotage and Spencer Sue that he told more, he would have stated that conclusion in the teams final report. More. Critically, Weisman complains how he felt more was wrong not to green light issuing a subpoena for trump's testimony, and he also details how he personally pressed the special counsel repeatedly to do so. The office also declined to compel testimony from the President's son Donald Trump Junior, or even to seek an interview with first daughter Ivanka trump who was involved in a lot of the potential misconduct described in the final report. Weisman's primary task was to lead the team called Team N, which investigated former trump campaign chairman Paul manafort for financial crimes in hopes that he'd flip to become a useful witness another team team are was tasked with exploring whether the trump campaign had coordinated with Russia to influence the election and another team six hundred was tasked with exploring whether trump had obstructed justice. Weisman is critical of that ladder team teams six hundred saying that an FBI agent assigned to it complained to him that it was quote pulling its punches and shooting down her views. And weisman alleges that its leader Mike driven another veteran former prosecutor. Confided in him privately that he would not have been. So mealy mouthed about saying the president had obstructed Justice Weisman's says driven. told him quote if you and I were in charge this is not how it would read. I should say here that Zebedee Moeller Andrew even did not respond to our requests for comment about what said about them in the book.

Justice Weisman President Trump Donald Trump Ivanka Trump Donald Trump Junior Muller Andrew Weissmann Prosecutor Special Counsel Russia Bob Miller Russian Government Zebedee Moeller Team N Paul Manafort NYU Financial Crimes
Stay Weird With Stacy Ossei-Kuffour

Unladylike

05:10 min | 7 months ago

Stay Weird With Stacy Ossei-Kuffour

"So stay we thought we would warm up a little bit because We were delighted to find out that one of your favorite things in the world. Is Felicity. So. What is it about felicity? Well. It's a couple of things I think. For me growing up I I didn't realize it until. Now but I was really obsessed with the WB like. The WB. Children out there will be like, what is she talking about and I think for me? I became obsessed with felicity because she was like I mean obviously Carey is stunning I'm talking about like I know are but I think really affected. Me Was it. It was about this woman who didn't know what she wanted, but she knew she wanted Ben and saying it now it's like such an eye roll but I just thought it was so cool that she. Didn't do anything that her parents or friends wanted her to do and she like just dropped everything and moved to New York for this guy and Mike as a eleven year old a twelve year old I was like yes. Hi. I'm this is I'm going. This is where I'm going I. totally forgot you're going here. So unbelievable. I know this from high school. This is Susan this is. This is. versity felicity while. All right. So I'll see you around. and. Just told myself that I was going to do the same thing felicity did and obviously I mean I there wasn't a boy that I was like in love with and moving to New York for but I researched that like the school that they were modeling it after. Was Nyu, and so I decided that when I was gonNA turn eighteen that that was the school I was GonNa go to. So it's crazy to say now and you know when I did turn eighteen deny auditioned for nyu I didn't get in and so it was heartbreaking and all that stuff and obviously I realized I was not in TV show in not felicity. But then I auditioned my sophomore year and then I did get in and so I moved I dropped everything and moved to New York did you also? Like seek out a job at Dean and Deluca to really out. Absolutely, and they were like no ma'am and I was like please and it's crazy because i. think when I went in there I couldn't afford like not even a Bego I think it was like seven dollars an onion Bagel. But I was like for me like walking Dean and Deluca was like walking into a museum felicity just had an extreme profound effect I. Mean even now I go back and just watch the pilot discussed. Makes me feel good. So getting a little bit into your work to words that we noticed while researching up on, you two words that positively came up a lot to describe your work either by like your own words or other people describing your work. Were dark and weird. So I was wondering what those words, those two words mean to you. I think if I'm honest both of those words like. Growing up had a negative connotation for me I. Think. People often thought I was extremely weird and you know I was a pretty dark kid in terms of the stuff that I was into I mean publicity isn't that dark but I was really into. Buffy obviously but also these. Books where like it's just you know murder and incest, and then I think a lot of my friends were reading goosebumps which I was into but then like my sister was reading just rl Stein. So I was like wait what's that and so I kind of ditched goosebumps because it was like. And got into Rl. Stein. The adult books recalled Rl Stein and so I would read those a lot and those kind of just kept my. I think I was obsessed with a lot of stuff but I didn't WanNa read the Kitty Shit. I really wanted the adult books and I fought really hard. To like, trick my parents into getting me the staff and pretending it was a PG and That's just show you the kind of kid. I was just like I was beyond curious like I wanted the content I wanted I just wanted to grow up really

Felicity Rl Stein New York Deluca Dean NYU Carey PG BEN Susan Murder Mike Buffy
Whats Up With Mortgages and Real Estate

Motley Fool Answers

04:39 min | 7 months ago

Whats Up With Mortgages and Real Estate

"Well, it's been a crazy year pandemic thousands of businesses closed millions of Americans, unemployed. The stock market is still up for the year at least so far your portfolio may not be your only acid or even your biggest asset fact according to Edward Wolff nyu economist. For the bottom eighty percent of Americans in terms of assets. Their number one asset is their home about sixty percent of their net worth is in their house. So, how has residential real estate fair during the virus crisis and how might that change in the future here to help us answer those questions is Jeff Strauss, key senior writer and analyst at Bankrate Jeff welcomed the Motley fool answers. Hey, bro thanks for having me. So let's start with the current state of the house in the housing market. Let's get to the numbers. How have prices been holding out during the recession was surprisingly really well, prices are still going up and I. Think I like a lot of people that fill victim to the whole recency bias flaw. That the last time we had a recession home prices just absolutely collapsed. We had fifty percent drops and values in many parts of the country and so back in March when we started going into recession again I think I know a lot weather's thought. Oh, here we go. Again in terms of home prices and that really hasn't happened home prices have held up home sales are down but if you were people have put their houses on the market and so the supply and demand curve has just shifted. So we've got basically more buyers than there are houses for sale. So we're seeing a lot of bidding wars I keep hearing these tales of a nondescript. House getting thirty and forty, and even fifty bids over a weekend. So home prices have held up surprisingly well, they're still going up part of that is because we've got record low mortgage rates and people have more buying power and then part of it also is just that the pandemic has really changed. Qui Bowls thinking about housing I mean if you're going to work earned, your kids are going to school in your house very much. You can make do with less space but now the that were crammed into to one space and people are working from home and taking classes from home it's You suddenly start to think, Hey, I could use a bigger house. You got a couple of interesting points that I. Let's start with mortgage rates. Crazy low. Thirty year mortgage thirty year fixed is around three percent little bit above little bit below dependent where you look. Fifteen year bit below that. One interesting thing I've noticed though is normally the adjustable rate mortgages are the lowest. But from what I've seen there at the same as a thirty year fixed or even a little higher what's going on with fat? Yeah. That is a weird situation and it's funny that you mentioned arms because it seems like nobody really pays much attention to arms anymore with with fixed rate mortgages being so low for. So long at as you said, they're in the the three percent range or even below for thirty year fixed but they've they haven't been much above that the past decade I am I think they briefly spiked up to around five percent but. When fixed rate mortgages are so low it's in they've stayed consistently low. People just sort of You know lose interest in arms. So it's that's part of it. Part of it is a just that there. There aren't as many lenders offering arms, and so there's there's less. Less apply less widely available so that that probably has something to do some of it also is that the without geeking out here too much but the rates were were based on Libor the London interbank offered rate for a long time in libraries going away at a new indexes coming in so that that might have something to do with it. and then in in times of economic uncertainty, we we do see this this pattern where arms suddenly get more expensive than fixed rate mortgages but you know it's intriguing. I talked to a lot of consumers a lot of. Lending officers lot at mortgage brokers. Nobody's talking about arms they're all talking about. The thirty year fixed and they're they're talking about how many points should you pay? Should you do a thirty or fifteen ten? What's? What are the advantages of different types of of fixed rate mortgages and? That just seems like an arms have been sort of forgotten. They were hot thing fifteen years ago but I almost never hear anyone recommending God's

Jeff Strauss Edward Wolff Bankrate Jeff Motley Qui Bowls Writer Analyst
A Love Letter to Short Men

Does This Happen to You

05:21 min | 7 months ago

A Love Letter to Short Men

"DOT COM and at her website Carlin Betcha. Dot Com and here is a love letter to short men. Your height is not an issue unless you make it one. It's one of the most common openers I see on dating apps a man's height. It's usually the first thing men list and sometimes height is the only thing listed. Yep just height nothing else as if those two numbers measured in feet and inches contain multitudes. I understand why it happens. We are a society obsessed with looks we treat beauty and both genders as a currency attractive people make more money are viewed as more agreeable and somehow more valuable. This is part of the halo effect, a psychology term where we assign one single trait beauty to other characteristics kindness. Personally I have never seen a woman who cares about height in fact, I find short men hot, not all of them but many. Let. Me Tell you a not hot short man's story. I recently wanted to date with a five foot five inch guy within fifteen minutes of our meeting. He ass is my height a problem. It was not until he mentioned it. I had not even looked at the height he listed on his profile. I then spent the next twenty minutes assuaging his fragile ego and explaining why many women like short men it was exhausting at one point I think he read the weariness in my slumped shoulders and tried to self correct. I'm only asking because you're right about love and sex. Sure if you went on a date with a dermatologist, would you ask her to examine the fungus between your toes? I didn't say that, but I wanted to my sarcasm is a feral beast. Then, there are the many many short guys who lie about their height. You know who you are. I once went on a date with a guy claiming to be five foot eight inches. He was five foot four inches. That's a four inch lie. If we're keeping track I wore three inch heels for that date that put me at five feet eight inches. Greeted him with a hug. This was pre pandemic days his head landed on my chest. Awkward. For most women height is not a deal breaker but lying is So. Here it is short men the painful truth your height is not the Lady Boehner killer. You think it is it your lack of confidence that makes women's ovaries shrivel up and never want to go on another date again, I have dated a lot of sexy short men and they all had one thing in common nothing to prove when Tom Cruise five foot seven inches was sexiest man alive multiple times. Did anyone add a footnote sexy for a short Guy Hell? No. When Bruno Mars five, foot five inches shakes what his momma gave him are women getting out there measuring. Sticks Adriano. then. There's Napoleon. Napoleon. Never had complex about his height nor was he even really that short you can feel his confidence oozing out of the impatient love letters. He wrote to Josephine one read a kiss on your heart and one much lower down much lower. Nowhere in that letter, will you find a postscript saying unless my height makes you not in the mood? Yet Napoleon somehow got his name attached to the height inferiority complex known as the Napoleon. Complex. The Napoleon Complex states that short men tend to be more aggressive lie more and try to compensate for their short stature by being exceptionally cruel. But researchers found the opposite to be true. One study from Nyu phone short men are thirty two percent less likely to divorce than tolman. The study also found women married to short men reported greater happiness and short men did more housework than tolman. Yes. There is a correlation between happiness and a freshly floor. Clearly short men are doing something, right? I pulled over twenty of my most dateable girlfriends for this article I asked the same question. Are you attracted to short men most had similar answer? It depends on the guy that's a nice way of saying that is not the package. It's the meat inside. So

Napoleon Napoleon Complex Carlin Tolman Bruno Mars Tom Cruise Lady Boehner NYU Adriano. Josephine
Coronavirus Pandemic Hits New York City's Economy Hard

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:08 min | 7 months ago

Coronavirus Pandemic Hits New York City's Economy Hard

"Dot com slash NPR to learn more. Let's talk about the change happening in New York New York City was hit early. It was hit hard by the pandemic, but the situation is today so much better. The number of virus cases has dropped significantly, but as NPR's Jim Zarroli reports the economy there is still struggling. I'm standing in Hudson yards, which is a huge complex of apartment buildings and office towers and high end retail stores on Manhattan's West Side. There is a lot of excitement when this place opened almost a year and a half ago but today at least by new. York standards there aren't a lot of people here just a few tourists some dog walkers a security guard or crossing this giant windswept plaza. The buzz that you typically feel when you're walking through midtown walking through any parts of Manhattan it's just not there Dustin Jones lives nearby. He's with nyu's Shack Institute of real estate anyone that's been in New York City and spent any time here knows this doesn't feel normal New York is the nation's most densely populated big city and it was hit early and hard by the pandemic Catherine Wild of the partnership. For New York City a business group says half a million people fled many of them were well paid professionals in finance advertising and technology who could work remotely. She says, hotels stores theaters and restaurants had to close. We've got two hundred and thirty thousand small businesses that basically for the most part have been out of business since the middle of March even those that stayed open are struggling two and A. Half years ago. Kasan Davol Mar opened the Likud cafe in Brooklyn she wanted to have a kind of neighborhood hang out serving healthy. Haitian food. It's been a rough year in February I thought we were doing well, and then by March I was like we're doing worse than we've ever done by April we were closed. The cafe is open again and serving mainly takeout food but business has dropped off again lately. The, loss of so many businesses has meant hundreds of thousands of jobs have disappeared unemployment in the city hit nearly twenty percent in July. I ran into Howard begin sitting in a park in Manhattan. He's jazz musician and with all the live music venues shut down, he's living off his savings occasionally if I can find. Production type work. I. Can I can do from home I do that. But my work pretty much ground to a halt on March sixteen having Merck's since then. With so many people not working egan, it's causing real budget problems I'm on the subway the one train I take it all the time and it's often packed at this time of day today there are only about six people in this car all of them sitting very far apart from each other people have been scared to ride the subway ridership is. A quarter of what it normally is and fare revenue is way down I. Mean what you have is a public health crisis that spurred economic crisis that it's Verte fiscal cruzes. Andrew Ryan of the Citizens Budget Commission and Advocacy Group says sales and income tax revenue also down and the city faces a nine billion dollar budget deficit the next year and a half. There is some reason for optimism virus cases have dropped sharply. Museums are reopening. Restaurants are serving customers at outside tables. But tourists have mostly stayed away and Catherine wild of the Partnership for New York City says only about eight percent of office workers are back at their desks. This is a comprehensive, all encompassing problem like we've never had before and wild worries about what will happen when people do return new. York. City where people live

New York City Manhattan Catherine Wild York NPR Howard Jim Zarroli Dustin Jones Citizens Budget Commission Brooklyn Merck West Side Hudson NYU Egan Shack Institute Of Real Andrew Ryan
Computer scientist, pixel inventor Russell Kirsch dead at 91

Latest In Tech News

03:18 min | 8 months ago

Computer scientist, pixel inventor Russell Kirsch dead at 91

"On Russell, Kirsch inventor of the Pixel passed away this week. Bit of sad news rest in peace but In case you're wondering who the inventor of the Pixel was. Now you know computer scientists, Russell AAC Kirsch, the inventor of the Pixel and undisputed pioneer of digital imaging passed away on Tuesday in his Portland home from complications arising from a form of Alzheimer's he was ninety one years old Now, Russell might not be name you immediately recognized his contributions to computer science made digital imaging possible born June twentieth nineteen, twenty nine in New York City demographic parents from Russia. and Hungary I attended Bronx High School than nyu Harvard and eventually mit in nineteen fifty one he joined the National Bureau of standards where he worked for fifty years and helped to invent the Pixel and create the first digital photograph It was a one seventy, two by one, seventy, two pixel image of his son Walden created in nineteen, fifty seven and is now iconic and was named. One of life, Magazine's one hundred photographs that changed the world in two thousand three and we have that image appear on the screen One of the first digital images ever created made from two superimposed scans at different thresholds since each pixel could only show one bit of information that being black or white as DP review points out Kirsch never stopped improving and his most famous invention even after retiring in two thousand and one and a twenty, ten interview on wired, he outlined his attempts to create a system that uses. Variable. Shape pixels instead of the squares that have dominated digital imaging since he invented him in that interview, he called square the logical thing to do. But laments that the decision was something rarely foolish that everyone in the world has been suffering from ever since. So at the right bold age of eighty-one, he began working on a masking system that creates six by six pixel areas and an. intelligently. Divides those areas into the two sections that have the most contrast before refusing to pixels on either side of the seem that idea never caught on but he explained the technology and its benefits in detail in a video below it's the thirteen minute long video if you wanted to watch that. But while the incredible accolades described above certainly gives you the sense of Russia Kirsch the. Engineer. The best personal picture of Kirsch probably comes from a two twenty twelve blocked by ant man named Joel Runyon who encountered him in a coffee shop in Portland after revealing net Romanians Computer and images on it probably wouldn't exist or exist as they are without Christmas contributions to engineering and computer science eighty-three-year-old Kirsch shared the following words I. Guess I've always believed that nothing is withheld from us. What we have conceived to do most people think the opposite that all things are withheld from them, which they have conceived to do, and they end up doing nothing Mr, Kirsch may be gone, but his legacy will live on every day in one of the approximately three point eight billion photos that are currently being captured every single day. May He rest in

Kirsch Russia Kirsch Russell Portland Alzheimer National Bureau Of Standards Nyu Harvard Joel Runyon New York City Engineer Bronx High School Walden Hungary Russia.
Teenagers Surfing on the Wave of the Apocalypse

Lost Notes

04:30 min | 8 months ago

Teenagers Surfing on the Wave of the Apocalypse

"And welcome to another edition of the shape of things to come. I'm bill floor and I'm Dean Miller and our guest this week artist student teachers. Start off where everything starts off with. Let's introduce ourselves. Then Dan My teachers. Yeah. Go ahead. Base I was more comfortable from the time. I was little kid with what were considered freaks than I like drag Queens I like boys, hugh tweets, their eyebrows I wanted them to put my makeup on J. I Sing I mean going to a dead boys concert with you're sitting in the front row at CBGB's and stiff baiters. Ripping out his pubic hair throwing at you. That's disgusting. But it was amazing. On wore I play drums as teenagers. We were filming gigs for the mumps we were helping the erasers build up their sets for their shows and we've been very involved and so there was kind of this organic thing that came together. You know maybe we should maybe we can do that. You know I mean maybe we can do that. By Play Guitar. Let's say you had. School. In one hand and. Being in a band and hanging out with blondie. David Bowie and the other hand and it was impossible to do both things. Boy Do you think would happen. There'd be less school-going. Joe I buy another talk. I wanted to be a rock and roller I play guitar, and I just wanted to make wild noise. Or. Unveil. muschamp coffee you would see warhol walking around with his polaroid and handing out copies into you magazine. So this is what I thought. Every teenager did it didn't occur to me that. What an unusual environment this what? We're here sort of to talk a little bit about the band place music and give people a chance to find out what the student teachers are really because I think a lot of people in New York even though I know most of the people in the band from the New York area don't know that much about student teachers. Any. Seems to be a mystery to herself and everyone. While sometimes, that's effective. I don't know. Imagine this group of teenagers in the late seventies in new. York. City. Most of them are still in high school, a couple of recently graduated. They're obsessed with bands like television and Patti Smith the Ramones Roxy Music. Most of them come from fractured family lives and find community in the club scene. But get this in the span of six months they go from not knowing how to play instruments to headlining their favorite clubs. Then opening IGGY pop getting interviewed I'm GonNa have their favorite radio stations eighty nine point one W Nyu. How do they make that happen? This Ragtag Group of best friends lived and breathed the scene. They spent all their time together by records running fan clubs. Reading. Rock magazines. They'd go to shows together and off often get mistaken for being in a band so. One day in bills living room they decide. Why not? Let's form one. Just. kind of said that everybody everybody's all play drums and I'll play guitar. Okay. You play Bass and I said, okay. Then lawyer said well, I don't know if my voice will be good enough because she was gonNA sing. So maybe you should be from female rhythm section and then we We all hated. Wouldn't bands felt like sports teams. And with David I both being gay and Philip, and then later Joe being straight boys and then, Lauren? Laurean. Laura being the female rhythm section we really love what we did visually. I think it's more important than we have a concept an idea. I A music. Actual technical ability because we knew our instruments well enough to be able to contain the idea to an extent. But you guys can make it. I mean you think you're gonNA make it after the All of us into. Your knew we weren't musicians and none of us cared but we cared about is that we were gonNA have a blast. We were going to be cool. We were GONNA be the coolest kids and we weren't going to imitate anyway.

New York David Bowie Joe I Mumps Dean Miller Pubic Hair DAN Patti Smith Hugh Laura Warhol Iggy J. NYU Philip Lauren
"nyu" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"nyu" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"Well, actually, nearly every culture some psychoactive recycling has been consumed ritualistically, and then we flash for to current day, and you have places like John Hopkins NYU certainly in many others doing research. What are these compounds? Good for what are psychedelic where did they seem to show promise? You know, most of the researchers in this renaissance and it's good. You mentioned Johns Hopkins because that's that really. They really drove a lot of this research, a very good and prominent researcher name rolling Griffith who we both now who had been studying drug abuse for years and years got very interested in psychedelics and drove that agenda there, and it's interesting. He got interested in it because he had had his own mystical experience in his meditation practice that got him very curious about consciousness, and so he began with the study that had no medical benefit or use at all. Which is could you use Silla Sivan, the active ingredient in magic mushrooms to occasion, a mystical experience? And there's a definition of that that Henry J O that William James help develop that would have enduring value for somebody's life. And he proved that in two thirds of cases, you could do that. At and then he went about and other people too. Well, okay. How might that experience? Benefit people who struggling with mental illness. The first and most beautiful study. They did there was with people who had cancer diagnoses. And that's really what got me interested in. And that was really the germ of the book was interviewing people with terminal diagnoses who's who were paralyzed by fear anxiety at the prospect of their death or their recurrence, in some cases. And they had these transformative experiences that in many cases completely removed. Their fear is the most astonishing thing. So that was one important indication picking up again on work that have been done in the sixties. And then there were the scores that were measured in that test included, anxiety and depression. So there was signal there. There's some value in depression..

Griffith John Hopkins NYU Johns Hopkins researcher cancer Henry J O William James
"nyu" Discussed on Pick the Brain

Pick the Brain

05:42 min | 2 years ago

"nyu" Discussed on Pick the Brain

"I was walking downtown in Manhattan the day, and I was approached by group of very sweet young ladies. But it came out that they were NYU freshman, and they were majoring in musical theater. Of course, come on. Science majors running after me. What musicals are you doing? I enquired. Well, one of them said looking down at her shoes. We aren't allowed to be in plays are yet. Our freshman year. Now, they were paying very high tuition. Tuning not do what they love doing. I think I said. Well, hang in there. What I should've said was. Don't wait until they tell you. You are ready. Get in there. Sing. Now tell the story. Because. The world might say you are not allowed to yet. I waited a long time out in the world. Before I gave myself permission to fail. Please. Don't even bother asking. Don't bother telling the world, you are ready. Show it. Do it. What did Beckett say? Ever tried ever failed? No matter try again fail again, fail better. The world is yours. Treat everyone kindly. And light up the night. We all bought into this lie that you've got to feel ready in order to change. We bought into this this complete falsehood that at some point you're going to have the courage at some point you're going to have the confidence, and it's total bullshit, frankly. I don't realize swear out, so okay, it's complete garbage. And so there are so many people in the world, and you may be watching this right now, and you have these incredible ideas, and what you think is missing his motivation. And that's not true. Because the way that our minds are wired, and the fact about human beings is that we are not designed to do things that are uncomfortable or scary or difficult. Our brains are designed to protect us from those things because our brains are trying to keep us alive and in order to change in order to build a business in order to be the best. The spouse to do all those things that you know, you wanna do with your life with your work with your dreams. You're gonna have to do things that are difficult uncertain or scary which sets up this problem for all of us. You're never gonna feel like it motivations carved. You only feel motivated to do the things that are easy, right? Because I studied this so much because for me one of the hardest things to figure out was why is it so hard to do the little things that would improve my life. And what I've come to realize what we'll talk a lot about today is that the way that our minds are designed is our minds are designed to stop you at all costs from doing anything that might hurt you and the way that that that that this all happens is it all starts with something super subtle that none of us ever catch. Ch and that is with this habit. That all of us have that nobody's talking about. We all have a habit of hesitating. We have an idea you're sitting in a meeting this incredible idea. And instead of just, you know. Saying it you stop and you have to take. Now, what none of us realize is that when you hesitate us that moment that micro moment that small hesitation it sends a stress signal to your brain it wakes your brain. And your brain all of a sudden goes, oh, wait a minute. Why is he has attained? He didn't hesitate when he put on his killer spiky sneakers. He didn't hesitate with the really cool track pants. He didn't hesitate with an acetate. Now, he says it tasting talks up must be up. So then your brain goes to work to protect you. It has a million different ways to protect you one of them's called the spotlight effect. It's a known phenomenon where your brain magnifies risk. Why deplete away from something that perceives to be a problem? And so you can truly trace every single problem or complaint in your life to silence and hesitation those are decisions. And what I do. And what's changed? My life is waking up and realizing that motivations garbage a never gonna feel like doing the things that are tougher difficulty. And certain or scarier new. So I need to stop waiting until I feel like it. And number two. I am one decision away from a totally different marriage..

Beckett NYU Manhattan
"nyu" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

04:13 min | 2 years ago

"nyu" Discussed on Revision Path

"To be out in the world a bit more and for my particular role that was hard to do. I was at a small liberal arts college where things were very socalist on physical presence on the campus and providing mentorship and support in that capacity. So I kind of did a parallel move where I, I done some administrative work and thought, oh, this is so interesting that I actually like working on behalf of creative people as much as I like teaching and. In some ways. I started to find that that kind of leadership administrative kind of work enabled me to have more creative energy for my own studio work. And that was really the sort of clincher though I love that I left academia to get an a second degree in design and technology just so I could really kind of focus and think about like, is this what I think it is? And that sort of gave you the opportunity to dive in and sort of think more and have some more hands on experience with what kind of stuff I actually liked to do. You know, sounds like an all come and feeds into each other. You know the educational experience of teaching experience feeds into the strategy work as into the studio art, which I guess is a good thing. You're always pulling from like this constant well of inspiration when you talk about it always sounds like it I planted and it just falls into place. It always sounds so neat. When when I'm talking to people who are just starting out their careers, I'm like, does not what it feels like is just what it looks like. You. So I think the, you know, the fact is that like everyone right now, it may be studying something as like studying something that won't even exist. By the time you hit the professional, the professional sphere, most likely now does your current studio work still have that same technology focus? You know, it's interesting. The last thing that I did was a game design project and it was it was a commission for NYU game center, and I was the only artist in that group who had something that was completely analog. Like I did a like role playing game that was face to face real time. No technology. It was about technology. It was all about imagining how technology might work, but there was actually no tech in the experience. So I don't know the more I helped pe- other people think about what they should be doing. Sometimes when I have time on my own, I and obviously still engaging with technology, but I've. Not creating digital solutions are create projects right now. This real time RPG. Can you tell me a little bit about that? Like what was that? Sure, sure. Yeah, it was a lot of fun. It was called lesbian and it was all about because I was running. I was commissioned to run a game that would basically run in one evening. It's an interesting exhibition that NYU game center does every year called no quarter, and it's sort of a game expo there about four of us who were commissioned to do games, and I was really interested in thinking about queer spaces and specifically thinking about the kinds of spaces that we create intentionally and what you tohp, how utopia can often become dystopia. So I basically I set my game on a lesbian separatists commune and made the every game table. Basically the minute you sat down to participate in the game, you become. A member of this lesbian separatists commun-. Then there's a game runner who is a call to game dyke and the game dyke runs the game, explains it to you helps you understand it, and then you're basically faced with historical, some fantastical, mostly historical issues that have faced these kinds of separatists communities over time. So you take your, you know, your given tools and strategies are sort of cards you're given, and you have to use your tools in strategies to come up with solutions to whatever problem has been placed on the board.

NYU
"nyu" Discussed on Waking Up with Sam Harris

Waking Up with Sam Harris

03:37 min | 2 years ago

"nyu" Discussed on Waking Up with Sam Harris

"Always trust your feelings. This is the exact opposite of instant wisdom from every culture I've looked at. So here's epoch. Titas. What really frightens in dismays us is not external events themselves, but the way in which we think about them, it is not things that disturb us, but our interpretation of their significance and it's a great truth because you find it in many cultures, here's Buddha, our life is the creation of our minds. With our minds, we make the world, here's Shakespeare in hamlet. Others, nothing good or bad, but thinking makes it so so you know, we choose how to interpret things. We have a lot of leeway in how to interpret things. There are a lot of 'em bigamous things in the world and we get to choose, am I going to take this as a personal attack, make gonna brush it off and say, the person probably didn't mean it as a personal attack. And so just give you one example. So I did a panel discussion here at NYU at NYU law school, and. There was a student. There was a law student who eat. It was arguing that NYU is systemically racist, and I asked her to to explain what and she said violence. She said perpetrates violence on its students of color really violence. Like if you explain this to me, what do you mean that NYU is systemically racist? And she said, well, it's undeniable that NYU was not built for people like me because she's Hispanic and really. Wow, okay. I don't deny that it wasn't built for you and they built it in eighteen forty. They weren't thinking of of Hispanic women. That's true. They might have been expecting all white males. But you know here we are in a panel with a gay, a gay black, a philosopher, Anthony, Appier, and Chinese a Chinese woman. He needs Suker Sohn, and I'm Jewish Jewish man. It wasn't Bill for any of us and so, but it's amazingly open as an incredibly open plays. Credibly, welcoming place. And so to take the fact that it was built by white men and to turn that into an obstacle for yourself, you, she's basically self marginalizing. We're giving kids the tools to self marginalize even when they arrive at one of those welcoming institutions they could possibly find themselves in. So again, we are setting. We're setting kids up for failure. If we, if we can teach kids to think this way we can guarantee that no matter what we do, they will feel marginalized and unwelcome. Of course, the I gen retort to what you just said is that you're invalidating this woman's experience. Oh, no. It's gone up since then. It's I'm invalidating her existence. We're still assert that she, poof, she will cease to exist. I wonder she feels unsafe. So I guess this segues neatly into your third untruth, which is this kind of black and white thinking about there being good people in the world and bad people in the world, the us versus them schema. Yeah, this is the most. This is the most pernicious of all. So yeah, the the untruth is life is a battle between good people and evil people, and this is this is social psych one. Oh one. All these experiments Taj fell minimal group experiments. It's very easy to turn people to get people to join groups and then fight or dislike the other group. And this is the bedouin proverb me against my brother me and my brother against our cousin me my brother and cousin against against the world or against the stranger either way. And so what we do in the chapter and this is what we tried to do throughout the, but we don't come in and say, oh daddy, politics is terrible. And social Justice warriors. We don't do any of that..

NYU Suker Sohn NYU law school Justice warriors Taj us Anthony Appier
"nyu" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

The Moment with Brian Koppelman

03:40 min | 2 years ago

"nyu" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

"And that's what I say to everyone like find the great story, Utah. That great story then find the ways that you're putting in stuff that men don't start with the good. Tell me that you're doing this story about the issue. I am no, not interested, and also you're not gonna look. It was important that doc made money because it opened up the driver. Silly why they're safe. You wanna send me message go to Western Union. Tell me the story. That's exactly. I think that was Billy wilder. Okay, but, but let's talk about how you broke in. Okay. So tell the story of where you were in your life and how you broke in two. I just tell it in a narrative. I enter tain -ment, but then how you got yourself into children's TV and got your own show going. It really started with children's TV. So basically I was I come to NYU. I went to the gallatin division. I was working in arts management. I worked at mabul mines. I used to sit with a desk facing literally facing Ruth mala check all day, which was fucking amazing. And I graduated from there. I went to Seattle. I realized I had ambitions came back to New York. I started working at the creative arts team which is was housed at the time on at NYU. So I was working on the NYU campus. There was some kind of paperwork mistake and I had been coded as faculties. So suddenly I got classes even though as an office manager. So I started a journalism masters and I love polish. And I love all of that stuff, but partway through there was a guy who worked there who one day came to me and he said, he's two things. I have a job for you. He was an actor and he said, I've heard about a job at Sesame Street. It's an inter- sorry, an internship. It was very specifically an internship and I was twenty seven and only twenty seven year old thinks they're too old to start their life in new. But so I did think that and then he said, I'm moving out of New York and I have an apartment and the apartment is always giving you apartment. No, it's crazy. So he but this is a good start. So he he had an apartment on fiftieth street between ninth and tenth. It was rent stabilized and he said, will you can definitely get it because I'm subletting it. But the guy can't take it back over because he's in prison. So you have to accept a couple of collect phone calls, but if you do that and we can convince him so it three hundred dollars a month. Now it had plywood floors, it had holes to the outside. It was a piece of fucking shit, but for three hundred dollars a month, I could afford to go take the internship and we won't even get into the few months later when the guy got out of prison and kept calling me and saying, I'm feeling very stones about that a permanent, and it'd be like this piece of shit where you're arrested from. So clearly there was cocaine under the floorboards which I chose not to open up and find out. Did you. No, I stayed. I have a feeling you did I, this is my. Is that he asked to come see the place, and then he came into the shit and that it was probably gone anyway. So that apartment afforded me the classic like back then you could still figure out things like that. But you do have to have some money to afford. I went, became an an internet says me. I was then hired in the international department. I was very quickly sent to Mexico to work on the Mexican Sesame Street assessment. I worked in Mexico City, and then they put me in charge of the theme park in Monterrey Mexico. I had no idea what I was doing and the guy was so lovely, and he loved to show me the things he was fixing on his own and it'd be like, oh, don't tell me the home. I got don't show me your Elmo that you made. You're not supposed to like, don't show me and it was. It was all fine until he showed me how they were fixing the rollercoaster by themselves. And I was like, well, now I have to tell someone. So then I started taking became an associate producer. I started taking over shows, I went to Finland, and then I. Writing or are you writing?.

Billy wilder NYU New York Utah Elmo Sesame Street tain -ment Ruth mala Seattle gallatin division Mexico City Finland Western Union cocaine office manager Mexico Monterrey Mexico producer three hundred dollars
"nyu" Discussed on Bad Science

Bad Science

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"nyu" Discussed on Bad Science

"Yes. Where were you read his resume? What was it? But you just read his resume. That's correct. But I don't know still, this happens to me all the time. We've only done like fourteen fifteen episodes and I all the time science will come in. I'll have a description of their job for what they study. No clue what their day to day like critical thinking to the yes to the okay. Do you want me to read it? I can read it, but if not, you know, take a ticket guess. Swing, yeah. Okay. Go either one. Wait, we have to. We have to digital. Right? I want you to guess what his life is like, what is he studying? What is he? What is he doing? Context clues tells me that he is part of NYU so far what I was going to say so far masterful. Studying? I think I heard philosophy and computer science. Yup. Okay. This is true. He has a PHD in both secrets. Yeah, it's like only one PHD it's only one PHD berry. Sorry. I hope I do. You taught. Wow. That's incredibly disappointing Kristoff. I thought I had a double PHD here now just the one now, just the one we could do on our own. Well, I thought I was doing the comedy parts. I guess they are doing the science. Feel bio means wanted him to carry this carry it now. That's true. Okay. So you guys don't want to even try to. But I. Not the Greg, it is the correct answer. I guess what is east scientists? They studied different things different research being out in the field. Some of them are digging. Some of them are on a roll day. I don't know broad. You study like the Allah g. No. All right. You're not listening. Right now. Criticize what plus for guessing. Do you teach? Do you teach.

NYU
"nyu" Discussed on First Mondays

First Mondays

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"nyu" Discussed on First Mondays

"We feel very good about our arguments in opposition, but we feel even better after the confirmation of or after the domination of of judge Cavanaugh because he wrote the majority in our favor in that decision. So as much as we like to have pre report merits cases where we're hopeful that that wouldn't we'll get to wh-what briefly, just for a health law listeners, what's the five second version of the issue case? Sure. It's a Medicare act about whether the Medicare act requires notice and comment rulemaking different and apart from the as requirements. Yes, it's a, it's a page Turner. Yeah, I'm impressed. You actually were able to summarize that quickly because I Mike spirits most most health laws user kind of complicated, right? Well, this one is fortunately it is a, it's more of a not in the weeds of the substance of the health law, but really it's a, it's a administrative law case. And so we have that going on. We've been involved in. We have some other Mikus and other things, but we've been involved in these Indian child welfare act cases equa as we. At NYU. It is the traditional one l. problem set for like the thing that you right. So if you ever meet at NYU kid talking about equa, they'll know what you mean. Yeah. So those challenges have gained a bit of traction in the years in the in recent years, I think become somewhat of a conservative cause to attack the child welfare act and and we do represent Indian tribes as I mentioned earlier. And so we've been involved in the defense of the constitutionality of the Indian child welfare act. I argued a case in the ninth circuit a couple months back defending along with the United States defending the constitutionality of challenge out by the Goldwater institute essentially making it sounds like it is..

NYU judge Cavanaugh Goldwater institute United States Turner Mike five second one l
"nyu" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"nyu" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Yeah undoing oh my son is on his way to college in august if you believe it and listen malls berg talk is my well you know what go to my facebook or twitter and i'll get in touch with you okay send me your i love you guys they take care of all right you take care all right folks maybe i save this for tomorrow at this point yeah i think we'll save this for tomorrow to show the insanity but i will mention this again here this great organization called campus performed dot org and they go they do a lot of great things so they went to nyu in new york city probably right not far from jewels and they asked these students of the great nyu right you got to be a brainiac and pretty wealthy or you get a lot of aid to go to nyu and they asked these students to weigh in on the pick that donald trump made for supreme court justice of course he had made the pick he still hasn't made the pick didn't stop them from weighing in on a nonexistent pick so please this is our future these are these are the people who are future leaders people who think they know what they're talking about it's sad we'll do we'll we'll let you hear from the house this for a tease we'll come back tomorrow and let you hear that after we'll talk about the pick tomorrow we'll have a lot to talk about we'll get another few calls in at eight eight eight.

facebook new york city twitter nyu donald trump
"nyu" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"nyu" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"The diplomatic answer and that was enough from a mom to be like okay and then getting into a school at that time when it might still be as prestigious as nyu was a big deal in building their confidence i would imagine that would allow them to feel like sort of xl little bit like nyu grade school for whatever happens with this acting you went to stint furred did did yeah coup but then i went after i finish stanford i went and lived in new york city and dated a girl who who isn't nyu student in the acting program there and i had i met a bunch of those missing not not remembering nobody would know but i got i got like a sense of that program and kind of what goes on there it's so impressive yeah it was it was fun man i don't know how you are in academic environment but as a creative person and when you're trying to express something that is so intrinsically a part of who you are especially when what you do is so tied into the rhythm of humor and comedy and it's not about diving into the mind of a character it's about finding the music in the moment and finding and mining the laughter and that's an instinct jewel thing you can learn it to some degree but the language of laughter is so you can see on contorted my body it's so in the back of my neck and in the base of my spine and in my stomach and it's in my ear lobes it's like i can it's an energy and so when you go to school and you have that's the language that i spoke at the time and people are like you should be playing prince's and you should be this don't be a funny man be a serious man did do you want people to take you seriously don't you this is acting and i'm like oh i want that experience that i had when that woman came in with a frowning face and then left beaming i do it for them don't wanna do it for critical peers i don't wanna do it for anyone who has an understanding of how the magic works i'm not doing magic for other magicians i'm doing it for the people that want to be transported somewhere so that was.

nyu grade school prince nyu new york
"nyu" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

Radio Cherry Bombe

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"nyu" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

"And did a three semesters at the journalism graduate school nyu will good for you good for nyu lucky us you got into nyu so where did it go from there how did you so you hadn't had internships you hadn't really followed the kind of traditional how do i get a media job path exactly my first semester was so rough because it was like learning a new language and i was like doing right thing do nothing but my second semester i when everyone starting internships i actually didn't get one but because i just couldn't i don't think i have the experience and it was really hard and other people who had done a lot of like journals rang but on their schools newspapers and the like and i hadn't but actually turn out to be a blessing in disguise because i was only doing class and i actually took a class cone eating new york which who would have thought would end up being titled the radio i think i called this episode new york bites maybe it's not too late yeah i think nyu in mind if he's that class and and why is taking over new york i'm gonna steal their class exact people don't know what i'm talking about nyu has bought up like half the real estate and city that's what i'm referring to and this class we it was the our program head merrill like this was her class and she brought in like adam plot to talk to us who's the was your teacher meryl.

nyu york new york adam
"nyu" Discussed on Working Interferences Dental Podcast for Dentists

Working Interferences Dental Podcast for Dentists

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"nyu" Discussed on Working Interferences Dental Podcast for Dentists

"It's like four times mine well wilder yeah what was the difference in years seven okay seven years i think could account for well what do you think has debt would have been if he would have gone to oregon hundred fifty and what is it at nyu four hundred fifty yeah clinton went to nyu he did super cool yeah yeah he he had i mean is for culture shock went from nyu manhattan his wife going into med school you went to demoines iowa nice i even still ochoa mfs like i don't want to generalize in characterize but own fasd really good like they really do they i mean they worked their asses off i'm not saying that like oh they're popping out a couple of paradigm only evolve teeth in and make an eighty grand a month for it like no no no they work their ass off but like there are plenty of opportunities for all of us to do really well and it and the ton of different types of practices of you and you do thirds all day on teens there's there's ethics stuff does oral path stuff there's the hadn't hadn't had cancer sorta stuff there's trauma like there's just all kinds of places that you can go when you're s and all of it seems to to typically reimburse pretty well so tyler i think you're going to be good he'll be fine so the big question is is is he a big enough of a pain in the ass to be a process honest that's been only what he's asking right to comes down to that right is so processed on us are generally and i think they would pretty much agree process can kinda be pains in the asses right at least academically.

clinton oregon nyu manhattan iowa cancer seven years
"nyu" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"nyu" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This she sought this experience at nyu where it's this research was going on and she went in her experience she traveled into her body and she saw under her ribcage this black mass and she realized it wasn't her cancer it was her fear and she said to this and i don't want to use this obscenity but she said get the f out and when she screamed at it it vanished and she said after that experience it hasn't come back she said i learned i can't control my cancer but i can control my fear and that changed her life and so how widespread is this research i mean is it just a couple of places where is this happening so the big centers of research so far have been right here in new york at nyu at johns hopkins university there's been very important research at ucla as well and and imperial college in london so far these are the big centers of research however now that we're moving into phase three trials which is the last step before a approval by the fda which is that step where you try it on humans well no we've been trying it on humans but small groups we've done phase one which is polly pilot study phase two is know groups of about forty say and now face three is going to be groups of hundreds and this is where you really prove out is this for real because in a small group you have a little more control over selecting volunteers and and your guides are extremely well trained and committed to the work so face three which should get started later this year that will be three hundred patients probably and it will be the at maybe a dozen sites so there will be universities and medical centers all across the country doing this research and it will be available to more people which is very exciting and do does it didn't require fda approval who approves this how at some point the fda will say yes this has a medical use we approve this and then doctors can prescribe it well there's one other step the da the drug enforcement administration has to reschedule it right now at schedule one they have to move it to schedule two or schedule three which are which are potentially dangerous drugs that doctors can prescribe and at that point.

nyu new york ucla johns hopkins university london fda
"nyu" Discussed on The Business Builders Show with Marty Wolff

The Business Builders Show with Marty Wolff

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"nyu" Discussed on The Business Builders Show with Marty Wolff

"I wanna use the word deep i mean that in a good way because it's got so much information in it so here's here's the next question if you will you used a format you interview dozens maybe hundreds i don't know how many people the format of the book explain how you did at like who you interviewed why you interviewed them why were the right person why were the right peop why were they the right people for your book shift ahead well first of all we went on did fairmont of research which also was another benefit of connecting with nyu and we spoke to as you said lots of organizations more than one hundred some large them small some startups some establish some growing rapidly some almost gone and some totally gone and and we were looking for you know why why was so many companies struggling to stay relevant to try to avoid becoming their father's oldsmobile and in terms of the structure most most organizations failed we there were no magic follows the three steps drink coffee have your orange juice and you'll be successful but so a lot of the book is focused on what are the some of the obvious warning signs said if you're doing this it's not a good sign of your prognosis for being successful tomorrow interesting use the phrase not your father's oldsmobile at the end of the interview i want people to say say answer they really delivered when they ask where's the beef.

nyu
"nyu" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

KBOI 670AM

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"nyu" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

"The united states so you could use your skills in this particular company country and then start moving over but i think in effect john you sort of don't get the sort of the the geology or the ecology of the system exactly right if you assume that the only thing we have to worry about is making sure that people can go to citizenship let me give you another example the university of chicago nyu we all take in very large numbers of students and what happens is many of them including nuns at i know what they do is they want to take the new york bar for example and they want to stay in practice here for two or three years and then they want to go back to their home country so for people with that kind of plan a temporary visas extremely efficient way in which to do this thing so i think what happens is rather than take the political risk to some extent the social and economic risk of a huge expansion in permanent invitations by sales right at the bunny what you do is you head you bet you split the thing both ways if it turns out that somebody's here for five years and it's all working out well i would assume that renewability would become a against something you could do either on the basis that they're close to a permanent alien maybe not quite maybe ten years or in some cases they'll be on a road to citizenship and others are not i mean i think you could run all of these programs but the key feature doing all of this is when you let them in the government does not engage in industrial policy and seek to determine either the wages of the occupations but which these folks are fit so as you mentioned that the top of the hour in immigration is a very imperfect science the political sentiments on this and as you move out from the employment context into other context it's clear that they're really deep passions on the subject so it's not the kind of thing for what you can have categorical clean solutions it's sort of more like national security and economic liberties they're always gonna be trade off and so what i'm trying to suggest this we don't have to go to the end of the road the first step down and you.

united states university of chicago nyu new york three years five years ten years
"nyu" Discussed on KARN 102.9

KARN 102.9

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"nyu" Discussed on KARN 102.9

"Happen i recognize that some crackpot judge from nyu was say that's unconstitutional shuttle unconstitutional well i tell you that judges unconstitutional when it when the constitution was written it was never ridden what the attempt to have crazy drugaddicted judges in filthy robes overturn laws that makes sense that's what's unconstitutional but we're in the grips of an insanity in this country like you can't believe like an absolute power of a filthy dumb judge in a black robe he has the absolute power more than a president who gave this judge the power to do the things he's doing to overturn a president that overturn electrical gave them the power who gave him that power who gave the aclu this power nobody they took it they stole the power suspected shooter in custody seven people dead fourteen injured we will not hear about the drugs this idiot was on will not hear about the drugs earlier about the weapons and we can talk about the weapons and what needs to be done but i i'm sorry we need to talk about the drugs s s r i selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors they're very helpful for some and very dangerous for others numerous school violence acts of violence suicides associate with ssris because there's only so much serotonin that your body can preserve until eventually it the levels disappear the purcell goes into hyper mania or hype it depression at goes insane hold.

nyu president
"nyu" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

03:14 min | 3 years ago

"nyu" Discussed on WDRC

"T r hoffman dot com welcome back to tell his medicine dutch welled up in here and we're talking about the relationship between the microbiome what resides in your intestinal tract and heart health that i recently delivered a lecture of this uh at nyu here in new york city in conjunction with uh a great uh young gastroenterologist uh lien chan who has pleased to make the acquaintance of because she's involved in research on the microbiome over there at nyu sowa my alma mater uh one of the places that i steadied at has really really made some fantastic advances in the thirty or more years since i was there um in addition to potentially making you fat yeah literally the veteran your gastrointestinal truck can make you fat how do we know that will through technical fecal transfer in experiments if you transfer the bacteria from the intestine of a fat rat to within rat the thin rent will get fat and part of its due to the effect on the table a and part of its due to the effect on appetite the bugs in or intestinal tract actually commandeer our appetite centers and may cause us to eat more really quite fascinating what's going on there but of course obesity is a prerequisite to cardiovascular disease so that's one of the ways that i talk about it by article would you can fight d r kaufman dot com but in addition there's something made in the gut called tma o uh trimethyl amine oxide and trimester be oxide he is potentially as much of a risk factor for cardiovascular disease as cholesterol or ldl cholesterol or c reactive protein her whole desisti it's uh really among the major risk factors associated getting a heart attack or stroke and is said that people who consume a lot of choline or carnitine choline cubs from fish eggs dairy uh and uh uh eggs and carnitine of course cavs were meat uh that those people make more tma oh but many studies suggest that mediators and even people consume highfat dairy lots of eggs don't have were cardiovascular disease what's up with that is it about their dieters about the bacteria their gut that convert these foods into dangerous tma o it's something very interesting came up will they were studying tma there's a natural substance that can inhibit tia mayo very nicely and that is reserved troll and it may be the the.

nyu obesity carnitine new york tia mayo
"nyu" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:42 min | 3 years ago

"nyu" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"To say on for him health care guncontrol y'all ears what you're going to get matters 60 wcbm shall you know this of your normal person you went about your business but if you are a sicko goes to nyu colombia harvard ghost state or the other denizens of lower living uh illiberal more how to the wider anniversary of trump's election by getting in public space in howling howling yesterday and they were shouting shrieking screeching yowling this is what they have become from the savage nation to the medicated nation of one generation is the country permanently broken have meds and ads finally destroyed america this is what they consider to be protest thous screaming at the sky and they called themselves anti fascists well let me tell you something screaming at the guy if that's the best the anti fascist i don't think the fascists are afraid of them the left wing refuse fascism group which has so she'd with the revolutionary communist party sharp with signs drums and a host a chance who's gonna end this fresh nightmare shedding medicated children children you want to know what real fascism is you wouldn't be screaming in the streets you'd be in a concentration camp morons iverson kgb fascism organiz another refuse fascism or of refuse refuse said we are screaming enrage we are screaming in pain but were screaming in unity and solidarity because we have a plan in a way word your way forward is the way of death you stupid you stupid creature you do you know what you led to the you know what people like you led to an other countries the ash can of history ask all of those who fled fascism if you're really anti fascist you are the hysterical fascists of today now that the other big story you wanna hit a scream again anyone even need to hear the scream again of the the opposition in america a robert let's hear the screams against the people understand how sick the opposition rarely as how mentally deranged thoroughly well gene gene gene the lead rose terrific with the colleges look with the colleges a produced they can't debate they can argue that care reasons they scream this is.

trump america nyu