36 Burst results for "Nuclear Power"

U.S., Australia and UK Unveil New Security Partnership

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:55 min | 23 hrs ago

U.S., Australia and UK Unveil New Security Partnership

"The biden administration's efforts to counter chinese dominance in asia and support allies in the region is gathering steam. This week the us uk and australia agreed a landmark security pact in the indo pacific. The move will see australia. Build nuclear powered submarines for the first time the pack will also cover artificial intelligence cyber and quantum technologies. So what does all this mean for australia. Monaco's contributor in canberra ardebili. Gary sent us. This report the news that ustralia is going to be getting nuclear-powered submarines came out of the blue five years ago. We signed an agreement with the french to provide us with diesel-powered submarines. It has since become clear that these technology would not be adequate to meet security challenges. Plus they wouldn't be delivered for almost twenty years at the same time. Need security partnership between australia. The us and uk was announced called aucas. All of this is pretty big knees. Even if you're not someone to spend a lot of time thinking about submarines the full details haven't yet been announced but it is clear that it's all about sending a strong message to china. Tensions between australia and china has been increasing over the past few years so this deal is all about australia. Proving to beijing that it has big and powerful allies that it can rely on but it will get australia. Offside with other friends new zealand and pacific countries are avowedly anti nuclear. Oh new zealand has already said it won't allow the subs in its waters. Australia is a signatory to the nuclear nonproliferation treaty. So we can expect that e inspectors will be doorsteps wanting access and china has put out a statement. Saying it's irresponsible big questions now. Are this tacitly. Say that his strategy is undoubtedly in a cold war situation with china. And just how much safer will australia. Now be

Australia Biden Administration Indo Pacific Ardebili Ustralia Aucas UK Monaco Canberra Asia Gary China United States New Zealand Beijing
Fresh update on "nuclear power" discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

01:06 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "nuclear power" discussed on WSJ What's News

"The headlines and business stories moving your world. Today we begin. With aws j. exclusive federal prosecutors plan criminally charged a former boeing pilot. They suspect of misleading aviation regulators. About safety issues blamed for two fatal crashes of the seven three seven. Max this is according to people familiar with the matter who add that mark faulkner is likely to face prosecution in the coming weeks. He was boeing. Seven three seven max. Chief technical pilot during the aircraft's development and attorney for foreigner didn't respond to our requests for comment a justice department spokesman and boeing declined to comment. We have much more on this. On wsj.com france said it had been betrayed by the us after being pushed out of a multibillion dollar deal to supply submarines to australia as we talked about this week. President biden announced a new security pact with australia and the uk that would include a long term agreement to build nuclear powered submarines for australia. Australia confirmed on thursday. It was withdrawing from the french contract secretary estate. Antony lincoln said there was no regional. Divide separating the interest of america's land and pacific partners and today will be following a meeting about kobe. Nineteen vaccine boosters and outside food and drug administration advisory panel is set to me to weigh evidence on the extra shots a topic that has divided federal health officials. We'll keep you posted on the journal app. We've talked a lot lately about commodities such as oil gold and silver but now uranium is getting the attention of investors and in case. You're wondering uranium is used in nuclear power plants. So why is this happening. let's turn to. My colleague will horner who covers commodities from his base in london. We'll good morning mony. marc will. What's happening here will uranium. The commodity is really kinda riding very sharply and has really captured the attention investors. You're in prices. Have shot up to about forty dollars pound from thirty dollars a pound the of the year. And that's because supply of uranium has been reduced over the last ten years but recently there's being growing interested in the role of uranium nuclear power. In efforts to mitigate climate change and so some expecting demand for uranium will rise some traders as we've been reporting are are comparing this to the rise of game stop and amc. What's echoing here. Will you have both big institutional investors like hedge funds and individual retail traders betting on uranium. So read it's wall street bets page for example which we know so well for game. Stop name see. There's been a lot of bullish chatter there among those retail traders about uranium and there's even a specific page on red. It's called uranium squeeze which is dedicated to reason investors who are keen on the medal and want to invest in it and bet on it obviously a lot of online discussion will. What's the long term view on. This will not. Everybody is as convinced about the rally. There's kind of mixed opinions about the role of nuclear power in sort of global efforts to to sort of challenge climate change and the very steep price rise for uranium and uranium mining stocks. Is some investors just concerned that good suddenly reverse and changed course well horner. This morning from london will thank you. Thank you mark just ahead. Germany prepares for its national election..

Boeing Mark Faulkner Australia President Biden Antony Lincoln Justice Department MAX United States Food And Drug Administration Mony Kobe Horner France UK Marc London AMC Germany
Australia Dumps French Submarine Deal for US Nuclear Fleet

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 1 d ago

Australia Dumps French Submarine Deal for US Nuclear Fleet

"Australian prime minister Scott Morrison says the nation has decided to invest in US nuclear powered submarines and dump his contract with France to build diesel electric subs on Wednesday president Joe Biden has announced a new security alliance with Australia and Britain that would develop an Australian nuclear powered submarine fleet as a result Australia has notified Franz that it would end its contract to build twelve of the world's largest conventional submarines Marcin hood said US nuclear submarine technology wasn't an option open to Australia when the earlier deal was struck in twenty sixteen the U. S. house until now only shed the technology with Britain it's a move that could deepen a growing chasm in US China relations I'm Charles the last month

Scott Morrison Australia Joe Biden Marcin Hood Britain France Franz United States U. S. House China Charles
Was There a Conspiracy Between Democrats and China During Trump's Presidency?

The Dan Bongino Show

00:54 sec | 1 d ago

Was There a Conspiracy Between Democrats and China During Trump's Presidency?

"I told you, isn't it awfully coincidental that CNN puts out a tweet on January 8th of 2021 the same day Mark Milley is alleged to have called a Chinese Communist Party general are nuclear powered enemies. CNN puts out a tweet the same day saying how Nancy Pelosi is quote been assured. That there are safeguards in place against a president Trump nuclear launch. I want to know immediately immediately like today, any lawmaker listening in D. C. We need answers to this right now. Was there a conspiracy between the Chinese Communist Party Democrat leadership, notably Nancy Pelosi and the Joint Chiefs Chairman and whoever else in the military was involved with this? To engage in a coup. To destroy the constitutional powers of the president, United States Donald Trump at the time, that is the question right now.

Chinese Communist Party Mark Milley CNN Nancy Pelosi Joint Chiefs Donald Trump United States
Where Does Gen. Mark Milley Allegedly Conspiring With China Rank in Biden Disasters?

The Dan Bongino Show

01:50 min | 1 d ago

Where Does Gen. Mark Milley Allegedly Conspiring With China Rank in Biden Disasters?

"It's really hard to rank which Biden disaster is the greatest and I mean worse, this disaster of all But I would have to say coddling a joint Chiefs of staff chairman who now in a new book. Bob Woodward book is alleged. To have basically committed treason in the book. Bye. Conspiring with the Chinese Communist Party. To defend a straight. Donald Trump is the commander in chief. I don't know where that ranks up there. Jim 12 and three It's I don't know It's tough. It It's got to be one Jim say he's got to be what? I don't. I don't I don't know. I'm having to believe in our people behind. No Southern border. Economy exploding vaccine mandates. This is close. If there is a 1234 and five they're only said separated by decimal points. Folks. The story is about as deeply disturbing as I've ever heard. And here's an irony. I didn't mention during the podcast this morning, but I thought if during the break there Remember Stuart Sheller from the Marine Corps member Stuart Sheller. He was, uh, he put out a tape demanding our tape. Excuse me, a video fashion aging myself a video demanding accountability for the disaster. The military disaster in Afghanistan, you know, demanding accountability like a qualified military leader should do. And Stewart Scheller was relieved of his command member. That story about the Marine seems to have exited the headlines because Biden does so much terrible stuff. Um, the headlines evaporate so fast here. But it's It's really odd how he was relieved of command, and they've been targeting him Stewart Scheller, and yet it's alleged that Mark Milley was conspiring with a nuclear powered communist enemy of the United States. And yet the leftist media celebrating I'm No, I'm not kidding. I've got the, uh I've got the audio to prove it.

Stuart Sheller Chinese Communist Party Biden Bob Woodward JIM Stewart Scheller Donald Trump Marine Corps Afghanistan Mark Milley United States
IAEA Sends Experts to Japan to Review Fukushima Water Release Plan

UN News

00:54 sec | Last week

IAEA Sends Experts to Japan to Review Fukushima Water Release Plan

"The international atomic energy agency. I a and japan have agreed on thursday to a time line on monitoring the treated water to be released from the fukami shot chai nuclear power. Plant an i. E. eighteen met with senior officials in japan to officially launch a review process of the water that became contaminated with radioactive elements after an earthquake and soon nami in twenty eleven. The first in a series of visits to monitor the treated water. That will be released in. Twenty twenty three is part of a es commitment to keep the process under observation before during and after the water discharge the i a special task force for water. Disposal will meet in the coming weeks to prepare the reviews. I chief rafael marianna. Welcome japan's invitation to conduct the first technical review by the end of the year

Japan International Atomic Energy Ag Earthquake Rafael Marianna
Hollywood and Big Tech Rely on Big Government in California

Mark Levin

01:09 min | Last week

Hollywood and Big Tech Rely on Big Government in California

"Other people in Hollywood don't have to live under the conditions they vote for. They get on a private jet. They fly around. What's the big deal? So taxes go up, they deduct them. What's the big deal? We'll just charge a few more million for the next movie. The next Snickers commercial. Whatever it is We can afford anything they throw at us. Yes, of course you interfere with them. And their mansions in Malibu and Beverly Hills and then my God, none of Then you got big tech. Tech. Big tech relies on big government. Not only for sales, why do they rely on big government for special protections? The federal government were to say today. Hey, no more business with Communist China. Alright, you're giving aid and comfort to a now a nuclear power that's naming big taming big nukes in our cities. That is the enemy. So they're all in bed with big government. They're all in bed with the Democrats. The Democrats are big

Hollywood Malibu Beverly Hills Tech Federal Government China
"nuclear power" Discussed on Pantsuit Politics

Pantsuit Politics

08:31 min | 2 months ago

"nuclear power" Discussed on Pantsuit Politics

"On nuclear power forever. I've been so excited all week long because it also just feels like it's like such a good progression you've done all the research and now get to tell you about the like on the ground experience here in paducah. Yes so tell me everything. I tell me how you feel about nuclear power. Oh i love it. I'm all in where you all in before the series series. Change anything for you. Did you hear anything. That was surprising that you didn't know. I thought the the big aha moment i had was when you were talking about three mile island because i had watched chernobyl which is the hbo series about the meltdown. So good and it shows you this idea of like so many things have to go wrong and it was interesting to hear that sort of same thing. Play out in three mile island. I loved your accident theory. Thought that was so so interesting but i just even before i started listening to your series. I'd listen to to environmental experts on As recline show and they were talking about like one of them. I thought was really interesting. She was like i'm like dyed-in-the-wool environmentalism used to be like if you grew up in the environmental movement you were anti-nuclear and she was like and i'm just totally shifted into the belief that like it is a viable option and we definitely should not be shutting down nuclear power plants to build fossil fuel power plants. That's for dang shore and our best options. This is where she really was like singing. My song are in places where there's already nuclear. Which is that. The data paducah gashes diffusion plant. And like i would be so thrilled. There was a nuclear power plant in paducah at the site particularly if there was a way. I'm going to head myself. Let sorry whether his you hear about the history of the. Tell me tell me what happens at the paducah. Power plant okay. So the paducah gaseous. Diffusion plant was built in the nineteen fifties. It's really interesting to listen to my grandmother. Talk about the building of the power plant. Okay so this is out in west paducah really really close to where i went to high school. Sorta in the bigger like county area. It's not like it's like downtown right. That makes sense. But it's you know put. It goes on the confidence of the ohio and the mississippi river. So as you talked about near water source so it's right on the river up a little bit you can see it as you cross illinois in when it was built the influx of people to build the factory created like towns where there weren't towns so she talks about all the workers coming into heath high school like in areas. Now that are so rural. And so like you know. We have west paducah. We have what's called kevel. I'm trying to think of wickliffe. Some other towns that like we call them towns but if you were driving through there you'd be like what are you you talking about. But at the time when they were building the plant they have like movie theaters. It's like blah mind-blowing wickliffe at a movie theater and grocery stores in this huge influx of people and that was just to build it okay so it got built in nineteen fifty two and it was picked as one of the few sites. I think they had like you. Know twelve sites to choose from and it was one of the six chosen by the government to do this. Uranium enrichment i for nuclear weapons and then over time it became a source for low enriched uranium for nuclear power fuel so it ran from nineteen fifty two to two thousand and thirteen it was operating for a very very long time. A lot of a lot of people point to the the power players like album barkley. Who was vice. President is credited with sort of like pushing to get the site here mitch. Mcconnell is credited for keeping it open for so long. I think at one point it was the only one operating in the uranium enrichment plant operating the united states so now it is a clean up site so the government sold it to like a corporation that does the cleanup. It's a superfund site. As we as. I mentioned i think in one of the patriot comments on remember but it is a supervisor side. I think we talked about the show. And it's so interesting to watch like the way the contracting works for the cleanup and the way that like it's broken down and some people's contract win with the federal government. Somebody else will bring in. And but what's exciting to me. Especially as i was listening to your series like probably a couple years ago and we've met with people and we will go to our chamber days In washington dc some of these smaller companies. That are trying to figure out how to take the waste from the enrichment and use it for power. That's the technology that's really exciting to me. Especially after like bill gates in this. Pbs special said that. there's enough. i think what. I forget what they're called so they were put producing the uranium for the rods. Like you talked about. But there's something left over. And they call it. I think they're called pellets. Maybe and there's like enough of these pellets being stored and paducah to power the entire united states for like decades and ever since bill gates. I've heard bill gates said that. I'm like obsessed with this idea. That that paducah capri the energy source for the whole cadre. I mean they used to call us the atomic city. That was what west paducah was. There was like a sign called the atomic city on my way to high school. There's a lot of businesses still that will like we've the atomic city roller girls. And there's a new atomic city like Indoor go kart track now like so that. It's still around in the story a narrative of our city. And obviously it's hugely important. I think one of the big things that you see a lot that happened in paducah is win so you had the influx of people building the plant but then you had an influx of highly educated people running the plant and you saw like so we have a huge arts community and paducah. We have a symphony and things that you wouldn't expect from a small town in paducah or in western kentucky and that came from the plant because we had this influx of people in running the plant and they wanted the things that they used to get in cities like symphonies and museums. And whatever nice restaurants. And so i think you know i think our town we have so much. We owe so much to the plant as far as our economy and even are sort of culture. And you know that's not to say it was without problems. Obviously we never had a meltdown or anything. Any terrible accident. There are some employees that have sued the government. I didn't i was looking at lawsuits. In the wikipedia patients was interested in the eighties family of former employees. Joe hardy brought a lawsuit relating to medical conditions that he believed incurred while having worked at the paducah plant in his widow eventually settled for just twelve thousand dollars. I thought was kind of such a small amount of money. But there i mean you know. There's jokes about the plant and what it does. But i've never experienced or seen that it's not like my family who my grandmother grew up in west paducah. We all attended the high school out. There had any sort of increased cancer incidences or anything like that now. That's just anecdotal. I but i see it as a real positive for our community and it was really hard when it got shut down shut down. Can you tell that part two thousand thirteen story. I mean it was operating for over fifty years. But do you know why i think. Because there wasn't demand for the enriched uranium either from the weapons or the energy component and. They'd kept it as long as they could now again. It's still an employer based on the cleanup and all that. But you know. I would love to see it functioning i would again especially if we could figure out a way to use the waste in particular. I think that would be amazing. Yeah and especially. I know it's uranium but the plutonium aspect seemed exciting to me. The fact that you're you're always creating more inputs basically even as you cycle for it hugely dangerous and and when i think about the the fusion prospect i both feel like that sounds terrifying for human beings to have that power but also fantastic like just the energy. Potential of it is fantastic. Sure is the center point of like so many spy novels so many military movies like you know. I feel like all the movies in the eighties. Were like we did it. Nuclear fusion like that sound centered. Thing that they all they all rotate around a cast powers. The world's best podcasts. Here's a show that we recommend hi there i'm kendra adachi and i'm the host of the lazy genius. Podcast a weekly show helping you be genius about the things that matter and lazy about the things that don't everything can't matter right otherwise you turn into a robot.

paducah wickliffe heath high school bill gates hbo atomic city west paducah mississippi river barkley Mcconnell united states mitch illinois ohio Joe hardy washington dc Pbs federal government
"nuclear power" Discussed on Pantsuit Politics

Pantsuit Politics

09:32 min | 2 months ago

"nuclear power" Discussed on Pantsuit Politics

"That's one advancement. That looks good. There is a radioactive element thorium. That might be better than uranium to us in creating nuclear energy. It is even more energy dense than uranium. It is very common on earth. We actually have a stockpile of thorium buried in nevada here in the united states and there's tons of thorium that is easy to find us on the moon. It is really easy to recycle back into the energy generation process. I'm gonna link a ted talk from a nasa scientist who was looking at thorium to generate energy for a lunar colony and realize. This might be a really good solution on earth as well. We have manufacturers developing new safer ways to use and create reactors all the time one of those new scale which has vowed that flips open automatically during power failures which would send water back into the reactor core to cool it. This is a direct response to some of what happened the three mile island and chernobyl. It makes the system less prone to human error. Okay so that's my pro and con list. What problem are we trying to solve is where i kind of came back to in my own analysis. I think this is so hard. I think climate change is so difficult in terms of analyzing. It's not hard to me to say. Climate change is a very real problem that we need to approach with urgency. The next layer. The how i think is so hard and so thinking specifically about nuclear. I tried to consider what ethical. Framework to bring to this in the ted talk that i mentioned from jennifer granholm. Now the secretary of energy she just kind of offhandedly said you know when we think about renewable energy we have to think about. What does the greatest good for the greatest number. So that's utilitarianism as an ethical framework. Would what provides the greatest good for the greatest number. But i think as you start to sort through that you have to say for whom for what generation of people and how do you look at economic issues versus risk issues versus how much power could potentially be created so other ethical frameworks beneficent. Just what is right and good. And i'm not sure there's an answer to that around nuclear power. What would it mean to operate under the least harm framework. I don't know that either. My brain kind of instantly goes well that takes nuclear power off the table because the potential for harm is so great it can be so catastrophic when it goes wrong and and yes. Catastrophe can happen around all kinds of things you know when we assess risk a lot of people often say well you drive a car right. We'll right but the generational environmental impacts from nuclear failures are enormous. And i don't think we fully understand them yet but i also know that the generational consequences from fossil fuels are enormous. So i don't think least harm helps us. I don't think respect for autonomy helps us because again who's autonomy at what point in time and that's how i feel when i think about the justice of nuclear power about Deontology the idea that we adhere to our duties when we try to solve problems If we think about rights you know what our rights i i do. Think that living in the modern world we should think of electricity as a right to which people are entitled but ooh is really hard in the next step of that analysis. I don't know what the virtues are around nuclear power so if you interested in ethical frameworks. I'm gonna put a link here to a powerpoint that i go back to often to just remind me of these frameworks in a very succinct way. What i'm telling you. I have not found them to be helpful around climate change and assessing what we should do next on nuclear power. I want to read you. A couple of things politically from the new yorker. Nuclear energy scrambles are usual tribal allegiances in congress. Democratic senators cory booker and sheldon whitehouse. Have co sponsored a bill with republican. Senators john barossa and mike crepeau that would invest in advanced nuclear technology and provides support for existing plants. That are at risk of closure a climate platform drafted by john kerry and alexandria cossio. Cortez included a plan to create cost. Effective pathways for developing innovative reactors and yet some environmental organizations including greenpeace climate justice alliance deplore nuclear energy as unsafe inexpensive. Perhaps most telling is the ambivalence that some groups express although the union of concerned scientists have warned about the climate impacts of shutting down nuclear facilities. It has historically sounded the alarm about nuclear risk. Ed lyman. it's director of nuclear power. Safety told me that because there are so many uncertainties associated with nuclear safety analysis. It's very hard to make a conclusion about whether it's safe or not. He noted dispiritedly. The climate change could increase the hazards of nuclear plants which will have to contend with more extreme weather events from mother jones. Few issues divide us as cleanly as nuclear power according to a two thousand nineteen pew research center poll forty nine percent of americans support opening new plants while forty nine percent are opposed so his. I think more about this. I am compelled by the math of nuclear energy will let me disclose this verse. I came into this research expecting to be solidly in. The camp of nuclear power is too dangerous. The risk is not outweigh the potential benefit. The research has shifted my perspective on that because i did not understand the potential benefit. The potential benefit is enormous. It is possible according to one scientist on basically the space of a football field with certain forms of nuclear energy to power the world for a year. And i love the idea solar and wind and i think we should pursue everything aggressively and i think we should have more than one way of creating electricity in the world at all times but when i think about the land that will be needed to do solar and wind well the cooperation among different entities to do solar and win well the trade offs associated with hydro electric energy. Don't know enough about geothermal. I'm gonna try to learn more about that. It just seems to me that one the genius out of the bottle like we cannot go back and unspoilt the first atom that led to the creation of horrific weapons and the potential for so much harm created by nuclear power and so it exists in the world and it has a very positive application. Potentially a generational sustaining application and applications. That could help us. Explore the universe more and discover amazing wonders. And so i don't wanna be left behind as the united states in understanding what that potential looks like and in developing our capacity to harness that potential for good. I found this paragraph in a swedish editorial of all places. The question is who would not want to build a simpler electricity. System based on reactors that can very well be an operation for eighty to a hundred years producing enormous amounts of electricity around the clock and regardless of the weather at a price we can afford to ensure the well being of the global population and from an industry that responsibly manages. Its waste unlike all other electricity producers. So while i think there are enormous problems with nuclear power. I think there are dangers in terms of both security and environmental impact and the safety of human beings right now and into the future when i look at all of those problems alongside every other answer to creating enough electricity to meet the world's demands and keep people living inhumane ways for this foreseeable future. I think we have to keep investing in nuclear and we probably need to scale up our investment in nuclear and we probably need to embark on an enormous education campaign around nuclear. And i also think we need to keep in mind. In addition to the scientists we need organizational theorists looking at and pressing scientists. On how simple. Can we make these systems because i absolutely think that normal accident theory makes a ton of sense and will continue to present problems. So how can we take everything that we've learned and continue some advancements in this field. That's that's where. I'm landing at the end of several days of pretty intense research. I'm very interested to hear where you're landing on. This and i know many of you are going to bring life experience and expertise to this discussion. That i don't have. And i always welcome you telling me what you think. I've gotten wrong. What i've missed what i'm not seeing. What's important to this overall picture. Thank you all so much for being here and showing up for the hard work of learning about this over the past few days and i will be washing the comments here closely. And be back here with you tomorrow with sarah. Hello my friends. Welcome to the nightly neons. Sarah and i are here to talk about nuclear power. It's become my new favorite topic..

ted john barossa mike crepeau alexandria cossio greenpeace climate justice all jennifer granholm Ed lyman sheldon whitehouse nasa cory booker nevada united states hydro electric energy Cortez john kerry pew research center congress jones
"nuclear power" Discussed on Pantsuit Politics

Pantsuit Politics

09:08 min | 2 months ago

"nuclear power" Discussed on Pantsuit Politics

"It's beth here for the nightly new ones. I hope it yesterday's episode was helpful. Kind of framing up. What we're actually talking about. And a lot of these scientific concepts are going to be important understanding the disasters that will discuss today. But i want to just walk us through a little bit of a historic timeline. And then end today thinking about just the current state of nuclear power in the world and then tomorrow will talk pros and cons and where i ultimately land ultimately is probably a strong word but where i land on nuclear power and i'm very interested in your thoughts as well. Today is going to be a quick and dirty walk through history and if you find yourself like frustrated because you want to hear more about multiple elements of what i'm talking about. Please know that i see you. I really struggled in my research with scope creep because there were lots of paths that i wanna follow but i also want to respect. Everybody's time and try to keep this digestible and as tight as i can so radio-activity like we talked about yesterday. The fact that we have these unstable reactive atoms existing in some elements was discovered in the late eighteen. Hundreds and our understanding of radio-activity really started to develop in the nineteen hundreds the early nineteen hundreds nuclear vision. So that idea that we can split are adams was discovered in germany in nineteen thirty eight and the next year the potential for that chain reaction where the split in adams released neutrons that will continue to split and split and split creating all. This energy was discovered by a french scientists about this same time. Albert einstein in the united states goes to president roosevelt and says there is a potential to create a massive nuclear weapon here research around the creation of a nuclear weapon. An atomic bomb starts to accelerate in the nineteen forties in that period includes the creation of the manhattan project where we're collaborating with canada. And the united kingdom and what the manhattan project was attempting to do was to create one atomic bomb from uranium and one from plutonium. The big challenge they faced. I was getting. Enough enriched uranium. It's that remember. We have that. Tiny percentage of mind uranium that is especially unstable and we go through that process with centrifuges to try to pull out those unstable isotopes and make our uranium pellets that we discussed so so that process was a huge challenge. We get the first successful nuclear test in the desert of new mexico in nineteen forty five now nineteen forty five were in world war. Two germany has already surrendered but the empire of japan had not and as you know. The united states used the successful nuclear technology and bombed hiroshima and nagasaki leading to japan's surrender. Of course the united states is now demonstrated this capacity in the world and so we get the soviet union stepping up its efforts to develop nuclear weapons program in nineteen fifty two. We take this up a notch. So i talked yesterday about in nuclear energy. We want to get moving on energy created from fusion instead of vision fusion the bringing together of two atoms we tested our first fusion bomb the hydrogen bomb in nineteen fifty two and then the soviet union followed shortly thereafter in nineteen fifty seven. The world gets kind of optimistic about nuclear energy. As a peaceful way to harness these advancements made in the realm of weapons if we can control the energy created from this activity then look at what all we do right and so in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine. The united nations creates an association to look at international nuclear energy in one thousand nine hundred sixty. We start to see the application of nuclear science and medicine and the united states. And the soviet union. Keep ramping up their capacity in their technology around weapons and in the early nineteen sixties. The arm race between the soviet union in the united states is getting really bad and both sides are testing increasingly powerful nuclear weapons and then china gets nuclear power. And that's when everybody kind of freaks out so in the late nineteen sixties. We get an international non-proliferation agreement countries who have nuclear weapons are supposed to disarm them as much as possible and really like cut it out with future development countries who don't have nuclear weapons are not supposed to get them in the seventies things shift nineteen seventy-three we have a worldwide oil crisis and france and japan start using nuclear power the next year and nuclear power plants start to be built around the world which provides an opportunity for our countries that have nuclear weapons to sell some of their technologies to smaller countries. And then of course. Some of those smaller countries take the technology. That's being doled out for power and start. Developing their own weapons programs most people including in the united states started building lightwater reactors the kind of reactors we discussed yesterday. Because they were fairly simple they were available. They were inexpensive compared to other kinds of reactors and the water was available. We kind of had an a water is plentiful attitude. Our friends in canada were using heavy-water reactors that was a path that i almost diverged down for a long detour. But we won't do that. Suffice it to say we started to see an uptick in countries using nuclear power and then we have another pause moment because of three mile island in nineteen seventy nine march twenty eighth three mile island nuclear generating station in pennsylvania has a partial meltdown. So let's talk about what happened and see if we can follow along given our rudimentary understanding of how nuclear power works from yesterday. Operators at the plant are trying to fix a blockage in filters that clean the water used in the reactors and these filters are there to pull out impurities in the water that would accumulate in steam generators. It's just about decreasing corrosion from those impurities in the water and these blockages were very common. The the way that operators normally fixed the blockages was to blow. Compressed air the blockages. But that didn't work so they decided to try to blow. Compressed air into the water itself and use the force of the water to clean the filter when they did a little bit of water was forced passed. A stuck open valve and went into an airline and that little bit of water caused the pumps to turn off which caused the turbine to trip. Because heat and pressure were increasing in the reactor's cooling system. The reactor performed an emergency shutdown and control rods. Remember we talked about that. Yesterday were inserted into the core to stop the nuclear chain reaction but the reactor is generating heat and the heat isn't being removed because the turbine has stopped. There were some valves. That should have helped with this problem. But those valves have been improperly closed for maintenance. They were not supposed to be closed while the reactor was operational but they were and from there. Just a lot of things went wrong in terms of both equipment and human decision making and what we got was a partial meltdown. The top of the reactor core was exposed. The heat caused a reaction between steam and the nuclear fuel rods and this released zirconium dioxide and hydrogen and additional heat. The cladding around the nuclear fuel rods melted and that damaged the fuel pellets holding the uranium and that released radioactive isotopes to the reactor coolant which produce hydrogen gas which caused a small explosion years of investigations at the federal and state level. Reveal all sorts of problems here. Procedural issues organizational issues cultural issues. Mechanical issues there were lots of culprits. What happened here. Officially three mile island caused no death. There have been lawsuits and unofficial investigations claiming above average rates of cancer and birth defects in the surrounding area of variety of epidemiology. Studies have concluded that the accident has no long term observable health effects of course there are lots of environmental impacts and it was very dangerous. It was very scary. I think something interesting to pull out from three mile island as we continue thinking about. What where we wanna be on nuclear power. Today is charles perrault's normal.

soviet union united states adams manhattan japan germany president roosevelt Albert einstein nagasaki hiroshima canada united kingdom new mexico united nations china france pennsylvania cancer
U.S. Senate Candidate Sean Parnell Says Biden Isn't Being Tough on China

The Dan Bongino Show

01:50 min | 2 months ago

U.S. Senate Candidate Sean Parnell Says Biden Isn't Being Tough on China

"Know, but they need to know to so on this China problem with Biden. I mean, we've got a serious issue right now, Sean again. We're talking to Sean Parnell. I mean, the guy is weak. And China. Listen, they're not the economic superpower we are. Let's not overdramatize they maybe in the future, but they're not now. I mean, they have one aircraft carrier. I think that's going to be nuclear powered, coming online. What we have nine or but when we got a few more, I mean, so they're not really on par with us. But there it's nothing to sneeze at. Either. Their military is significant, and this guy is weak. I mean, he's out there yesterday in the press conference, mumbling, stumbling bumbling around. You know, your thoughts on this guy is Commander in chief. Given your service in the military? Well, I think there's no question that he's weak, and I think many of the questions that people in Pennsylvania have and probably across the country is who's really running the show. And I think by and large, most people believe that, you know, he doesn't take China seriously enough. Now you're right not to build China up too much. But the fact of the matter is that in 10 years Like they will have an economy that eclipse his hours. If continuing has that we're on right now, From an economic standpoint, from a military standpoint, I mean, look, they're not shy about their geopolitical goals. Their goal in China is to depose the United States of America as the lone world superpower and I mean, and if you look at the way that we've handled this whole lab leak theory, which I don't think it's a theory. Actually think coronavirus Lab. China has not had to face any repercussions for that at all. And it doesn't seem like no Biden is inclined to hold China accountable for the play today, at least on the world. So yet my fear Is that leadership is about strength, especially when you're leading the number one superpower in the world with the strongest military in the world, like projecting strength at all times, and Joe

China Sean Parnell Biden Sean Pennsylvania United States Of America JOE
North Korean Defector Evaluates American Education System as 'Anti-American'

The Dan Bongino Show

01:58 min | 3 months ago

North Korean Defector Evaluates American Education System as 'Anti-American'

"Korean defector. From North Korea. Kim Jong un the I mean maybe. And if you were ranking the worst people on Planet Earth easily top five Probably on the medal. Stand. Top three, maybe gold. Worse people Earth, right? She comes from North Korea. The facts comes here goes through college, and she says, This is the story orientation. This North Korean defector was scolded by a university staff member for admitting she enjoyed classic classic literature such as Jane Austen. The woman from North Korea said. I love those books. I thought it was a good thing. Then the professor center. Did you know those writers had a colonial mindset? They were Racists and bigots center subconsciously brainwashing you. It only got worse from there, as she realized that every one of her classes at the Ivy League school was infected with what she saw as anti American propaganda reminiscent of the sort she'd grown up with. This story is stunning. She's a North Korean defector from a sworn nuclear powered enemy, the United States, one of the worst human beings on planet Earth. Kim Jong UN Tubs. What is the worst guys ever? Ever. Yet she comes over here, where people starved to death by the tens of thousands. If not hundreds of thousands don't even know the nobody's bury the dead and mass graves. And she says, Yeah. You know, the North Korean school system wasn't as bad as you guys here, folks. This is stunning. As I said in the beginning when we opened up the show, and I meant it. Isn't it frightening? That attacks being promoted by foreign enemies of the United States to destroy the United States from within. Are being absorbed and used by left this within the country to do exactly that. Anti American propaganda critical race theory.

North Korea Kim Jong Ivy League School Jane Austen North Korean School United States
Reading the Story Upside Down, There Likely Were Bats Being Studied in the Wuhan Lab

The Dan Bongino Show

01:39 min | 3 months ago

Reading the Story Upside Down, There Likely Were Bats Being Studied in the Wuhan Lab

"We've been lied to every step of the way from people involved and who have experienced with the funding that was used to fund the Wuhan lab that I believe could have could have created a bioweapon and I believe at a minimum, engaged in gain a function research and created the supercharged coronavirus. People involved in it have not told us the truth from the start. We have laid out a case over the course of the last two weeks. How This is the biggest scandal of our time that a foreign nuclear powered enemy the United States may have used our tax dollars to create a super virus that wiped out millions of people is bar none. The biggest story of our time. And we will never get to the truth because we haven't yet learned to read the media upside down. You have to learn to read these media stories upside down when you do that, like the author of This Wall Street Journal piece says, we confess as we can finally get to the truth. So learning how to do that. You see this Peter Dash AC tweet again. The guy who ran the Eco Health Alliance and gave some of this taxpayer money through Eco health alliance to the Wuhan Institute. He says. Hey, there were no bats in the Wuhan lab. For genetic analysis. We just released them back into the lamp. Now, if you're practicing with the Wall Street Journal author says, And he says, when you're learning to read propaganda, there's an element of truth, but read it upside down now. Producer Jim What would that mean? If Peter Dashnak told you there are no bats in the Wuhan lab, and you're reading it upside down? Producer? Jim What does that mean to you? Quick test. Mhm. I was actually asking a question I could drink some of that tea and you answer too fast. Yes, it means just the

Wuhan This Wall Street Journal Peter Dash Eco Health Alliance Wuhan Institute United States Jim What Peter Dashnak Wall Street Journal JIM
Did Attorney General Barr Expose Hunter Biden Story to Devalue China Blackmail?

The Dan Bongino Show

01:57 min | 3 months ago

Did Attorney General Barr Expose Hunter Biden Story to Devalue China Blackmail?

"We have the potential for an incoming government. With a prominent member of Congress. And his bosom buddy Nancy Pelosi. Along with the now president elect of the United States. We cannot allow the Chinese government to have a stack this high a cornucopia thanksgiving feast of blackmail material on them. Because ladies and gentlemen the whole essence of black males, you're going to leak information Other people don't have and you're going to embarrass them. Well, you can't blackmail somewhat about leaked information if it's already leaked it out there. You know if producer Jim and I were planning on robbing a bank and emailing each other and the New York Times got a hold of it, said Dan, We're putting these emails out in public unless you do x Y or Z. It's no good. If the emails are already out in public, that's not how blackmail works. So is it possible someone in DOJ bar someone else? I don't know. I can't get in their heads. But is it possible if not likely? Someone in DOJ said. We're going to have a big China blackmail problem from a nuclear powered enemy, the United States. If we let this stand, we better put this out right now, before these guys swear it again. Folks, these dates can't possibly be a coincidence. Read the headlines. Bill Barr is gonna going to leave the administration. December 14th exclusive. Chinese spy Targeted California politicians, notably Democrats, December 8th. Federal criminal investigation. 100 Biden focuses on his business dealings in China. December 10th. There's no way that's a coincidence. No way. These events had to be related bar had to see what was coming that we had people in the government and entering into the government, Joe Biden, who were compromise How do you get rid of the compromise? You put the information out there you reduce its value. I mean, you wipe its

Chinese Government DOJ Nancy Pelosi United States Congress Bill Barr New York Times JIM DAN China Biden California Joe Biden
Powerful US Nuclear Test Reactor Getting Rare Major Overhau

The Savvy Investor Radio

00:19 sec | 4 months ago

Powerful US Nuclear Test Reactor Getting Rare Major Overhau

"Scientists at the Advanced Test reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory here. Removing a £62,000 stainless steel lid on one of the world's most powerful nuclear test reactors. They're doing it so they could get inside to do an overhaul. Reactors. Experiments helped the U. S. Navy's nuclear powered war fleets They had see longer

Idaho National Laboratory U. S. Navy
World Kidlines: Biden Wants to Restart Nuclear Talks With Iran

Little News Ears

00:36 sec | 4 months ago

World Kidlines: Biden Wants to Restart Nuclear Talks With Iran

"The joe biden administration wants to restart nuclear talks with iran. What does that mean exactly. Europe and the us wants to make sure that iran has limited nuclear abilities. So it can't make a lot of nuclear weapons iran once the freedom to use nuclear power which can also be used to heat homes. Joe biden's administration wants to get iran. More feed them to develop nuclear power with the understanding that it will need to be checked by outside agencies

Joe Biden Administration Iran Europe Joe Biden United States
A Look Back at What Caused the Chernobyl Disaster

Mike Broomhead

00:59 sec | 5 months ago

A Look Back at What Caused the Chernobyl Disaster

"1 of the worst disasters in history happened. It was a Saturday in the early morning when reactor number four at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant exploded in what is now Ukraine. Ironically, the incident started during a safety test. It was supposed to be a simulation of an electrical power outage and to test the cooling function to keep the reactor stable. A combination of dangerous conditions and design flaws led to an uncontrolled nuclear chain reaction. It was considered the worst nuclear disaster in history in terms of cost and casualties. It's one of only two nuclear accidents that has been raided a seven, which is the highest disaster level on the rating scale. Today, Chernobyl is a ghost town labeled the Zone of alienation. All because of the major disaster on this day in 1986. You know, I watch all those

Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Ukraine
"nuclear power" Discussed on Malicious Life

Malicious Life

02:39 min | 5 months ago

"nuclear power" Discussed on Malicious Life

"Hi and welcome to cyber reasons militias life. I'm ran levin today. We've got somewhat different episode for you. Instead of talking about ransomware de dos attacks and many other threats that we usually cover militias life will turn our attention to the world of industrial sabir security and potentially much more dangerous threat hacking into the control systems of a nuclear power plant. It is a risk that oddly does not receive its fair share of attention compared to the daily headlines about data breaches to multi-national or perhaps because most of us have no idea about the inner workings of a nuclear facility systems that control its functions and their potential weaknesses so in this episode. We'll hear an interview with andrew. Gator dp of industrial security at waterfall security solutions by nate nelson. Our senior producer. We had andrew in our show several times in the past since he's a fantastic and insightful experts in that relatively unknown branch of cybersecurity as some of you might already know. Andrew and nate are also the host of our Might say sister podcast. The industrial security podcast. Which is a bi weekly show that focuses on sabir security industrial facilities such as power plants petrochemical facilities even mining and airlines if you find industrial cybersecurity.

Japan to Start Releasing Radioactive Water From Fukushima

Memphis Morning News

00:25 sec | 5 months ago

Japan to Start Releasing Radioactive Water From Fukushima

"Government announces plans for water from a wreck. Nuclear power plant 10 years after Japan's Fukushima nuclear plant was destroyed in an earthquake and tsunami, the Japanese government says it's decided to release treated radioactive water from the facility into the Pacific Ocean. Japan says it's not safe to continue storing the water on that similar processes happen elsewhere. China says the plan is irresponsible and South Korea causes unacceptable

Japanese Government Fukushima Japan Earthquake Pacific Ocean China South Korea
Japan to Start Releasing Radioactive Water From Fukushima Into Ocean

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:22 sec | 5 months ago

Japan to Start Releasing Radioactive Water From Fukushima Into Ocean

"In tanks at the wrecked Fukushima nuclear plant. It says the water will be released in about two years after it's been treated. The water has been accumulated and stored at the nuclear power plant since its 2011 meltdown after an earthquake and tsunami caused cooling water to leak from damaged reactors. NASA was hoping to fly It's experimental Mars helicopter this week, but it's going to have to wait a

Fukushima Nuclear Plant Tsunami Earthquake Nasa
Japan to Start Releasing Radioactive Water From Fukushima in 2 Years

Tim Conway Jr.

00:19 sec | 5 months ago

Japan to Start Releasing Radioactive Water From Fukushima in 2 Years

"The government of Japan says it's decided to start releasing massive amounts of radioactive water stored at the badly damaged Fukushima nuclear plant in two years after its treated. The decision had been delayed for two for years because of safety concerns and protest. The water has been stored in tanks at the nuclear power plant since 2011 who's damaged by a massive earthquake and

Fukushima Japan Earthquake
'Chernobyl' and 'Harry Potter' actor Paul Ritter dies at 54

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 5 months ago

'Chernobyl' and 'Harry Potter' actor Paul Ritter dies at 54

"Actor Paul Ritter has died of a brain tumor at the age of fifty four I marches are a letter with a look at his career Paul Ritter was known for his versatility he played an engineer blamed for a mistake at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in the HBO drama Chernobyl he appeared as the wizard Eldred warble in Harry potter and the half blood prince he portrayed a member of a mysterious organization in the James Bond film quantum of solace British audiences knew him for the sitcom Friday night dinner he was nominated for a Tony Award in two thousand eight for his role in the Norman conquests

Paul Ritter Eldred Warble In Harry Potter Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant HBO James Bond Tony Award Norman
Truck carrying radioactive uranium compound crashes, closing North Carolina highway

Sean Hannity

00:26 sec | 6 months ago

Truck carrying radioactive uranium compound crashes, closing North Carolina highway

"A truck carrying a radioactive compound crashed on I 95 Cumberland County late this morning, and as a result, the interstate is expected to be shut down into afternoon Rush hour. ABC 11 reports The involve vehicle was carrying uranium hexafluoride, which can be used to make fuel for nuclear power plants. State highway patrols on the scene and says the compound is not leaking. But due to concerns about wind direction. They've evacuated

Cumberland County ABC
"nuclear power" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

02:13 min | 8 months ago

"nuclear power" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"Too much heat. It can be dangerous but we do have ways to control them. Control rods are rods which control and then made elements that are good at catching neutrons. Leaving fewer around to split uranium slowing the reaction. Now there have been some very high profile. Nuclear disasters like to noble in nineteen eighty six and fukushima in two thousand and eleven but in general when managed correctly nuclear power is safe and renewable energy is not without risk to life hydroelectric dams have burst and people can fold from wind turbines. Although all renewable energies are much safe at human life than fossil fuels. So the debate in the industry is less concerned although not unconcerned with the question of is nuclear power safe and more concerned with is nuclear power. Necessary thank you very much either. So that is how nuclear power works. Really get a grip on where the conflict lies. It is important to understand the state of nuclear power today and how people feel about it. Matt rooney is head of policy at the institution of mechanical engineers. So not what is the exact state of power wise and the break. Open the uk right now. So this is obviously changing quite rapidly to decarbonization but broadly about forty percent of the last couple of has come from renewable sources so that's wind solar hydro and biomass primarily about forty percent. Come from fossil fuels primarily gasp. But also call an oil on just less than twenty percent has been from new jer- fishy that's snapshot of things right now. One of the trends. What's growing what's falling so the two big trends over the last few years that will continue. The first is a massive decline cool and this is obviously been good news for decarbonization because it's the most carbon intensive fuel use and the second is a expansion of over near relief but particularly offshore wind and the reason for the cool decline has been government policy so the government have committed to phasing out cool by twenty twenty-five but also these plants are older on also behalf pat carbon tax on us as the most carbon intensive fuel it pays the.

Matt rooney twenty twenty-five first uk second One two thousand less than twenty percent today two big trends about forty percent last few years fukushima eleven nineteen eighty six
"nuclear power" Discussed on Should This Exist?

Should This Exist?

07:20 min | 9 months ago

"nuclear power" Discussed on Should This Exist?

"Consider but not everybody looks upon nuclear power so kindly even small modular reactors. I don't think we need them. There's so little information on small modular reactors that recant really valley with them mark jacobson. He's a professor of civil and environmental engineering at stanford and he spent his entire career trying to understand air pollution and the problems of global warming. There's nothing he wants. More than defined large skill clean renewable energy solutions and he says no to nuclear even as mars modular reactor. The problem is to build them faster. Because you can automate On a conveyor belt physically and we don't know how long it will take the other problem is it's not even expected to have prototypes of commercialized versions. Until at least twenty. Twenty six than we need to solve eighty percent of the climate problem by twenty thirty. So really we need technology that we can implement today and fast just like ashley find an argued that climate change is too urgent to bree about nuclear downside. Mark jacobson says climate changes to pressing to bet on technology with unproven implementation options and high potential risks. Like the danger of bad actors looking to use it as a weapon both civilian nuclear reactors and test reactors have been used by rogue states to enrich uranium and then when they thought that the international oversight committees looking that enrichment process was diverted into the development of nuclear weapons. This was the case with iran and north korea. And if jacobson's right there could be others you can ship you know. Small ball jewelry actor anywhere in the world so the more countries that would them the more danger. It is in terms of especially weapons. Proliferation fact that the intergovernmental panel on climate change clearly says. There's a significant evidence in high agreement that weapons proliferation is a significant problem associated with nuclear reactors for jacobsen. The real revolution isn't with us. Mars but renewable energy his team at stanford has done detailed modeling on how to get the us energy system off of oil coal natural gas and nuclear altogether. In fact he developed the world's first wind map specifically for use with turbines offshore wind is something that will be able to deploy really quickly now that we have floating offshore wind turbines. Solar photovoltaics are dirt cheap batteries of come down in price. There's really no need for spending money. on nuclear. We can solve the problem with existing technologies that are cheaper faster difficult and much safer. Nuclear power is the safest form of energy. We've got. That's dave poston. A nuclear scientist at los alamos national laboratory in new mexico even windmills. There's people to die falling off windmills During the construction. And there's been nobody killed in the united states by a nuclear power plant. Ever if you're asking yourself wait what that can't be true. It's actually true. The three mile island disaster the worst on. Us soil resulted in zero fatalities. Now that doesn't address any indirect results from nuclear waste contamination which remains an open question according to the nrc. But i had just assumed some nuclear plant fatalities over the years. Dave post says they're not there. We caught up with him during the early days of the covid corentin. So i'm at home in los alamos new mexico. My wife and in three. My kids are at home. And then our two cats one. This named sputnik hosted as a rocket scientist as well as a designer of nuclear reactors. He's got a quirky sense of humor. Likely influenced by one of his favorite. Tv shows an animated sitcom about a safety inspector at a nuclear power plant. He's currently working with the johnson. Space center designing a power source for off world colonies specifically the moon and mars since nasa is such a haven for acronyms posting got to choose one of his own for his reactor test crusty kilowatt reactor using sterling technology after crusty the clown the chain smoking depressive children's television star from the simpsons person figured naming the test crusty publicity. He was after all in competition for a limited pool of funding. In his time at nasa he'd watched other nuclear projects. Run out of money. Billions of dollars would be wasted getting a project. Three quarters of the way done before funding dried up but that gave posted an idea instead of designing a huge expensive nuclear reactor. He designed a small cheap one. How small very very small. Our reactor core is the size of a paper towel roll. It's like four inches across and ten inches. High of course uranium's a very dense material so that paper tolerable ways over sixty pounds when fully assembled the entire reactor is roughly the size of a beach umbrella and about as easy to set up. We actually designed reactor so that it was so easy to assemble that. We assembled it in a hallway out of the test chamber. That's impressive but the government was focused on the bottom line. Traditionally a nuclear reactor built for use in space is expected to cost over a billion dollars. Dave's project came in significantly under budget. Our program to build engineer assemble and test the reactor and up costing seventeen million dollars in the government space. That's a very small number posts umbrella. Nukes are cheap enough that the government can afford lots of them and they're small enough that you could pack several on a rocket in just a few years. These umbrella. nukes could be ready to provide powered outposts on the moon were mars to run the life support systems critical to any off world mission beyond that they could power rovers to you would have electrically charged rovers that would take people around the moon or mars and these reactors could be placed in various locations. As you're charging stations just like tesla does along the interstates in the us. The umbrella nuke more possibilities to an already dizzying number. The potential futures on the one hand. We have an efficient source of carbon. Free power ready to power the world and clean our water for hundreds of years to come. Oh and we might be able to run in on. Its own waste on the other hand. Toxic radioactive waste hundreds of millions of dollars in research that might be better spent elsewhere. In either scenario we know that time is running out to reverse the effects of climate change which brings us back to the question we began with. Would you agree to have a small-scale nuke in your own backyard.

mark jacobson stanford dave poston Dave post new mexico intergovernmental panel on cli jacobson jacobsen Us los alamos national laboratory ashley north korea nasa iran nrc los alamos
"nuclear power" Discussed on Should This Exist?

Should This Exist?

02:56 min | 9 months ago

"nuclear power" Discussed on Should This Exist?

"Million dollars investment. The nuclear regulatory commission issued approval in august of the safety of its design. The paperwork alone speaks volumes about the process. I think it's about two million pages of information regarding the design and include test data. New skill isn't alone. It's part of these. Smaller is better movement dedicated to the idea of miniaturizing. The next generation of nuclear power plants is smaller better or are small reactor still susceptible to the same concerns about meltdowns and radioactive waste that have dogged nuclear energy from the get-go even if it's safe. Nuclear power is one of the priciest forms of energy. Is this where our brain power should be. Focused caterina fake. How is technology impacting our humidity. It's the question of our times. I made a discovery that was literally unimagined by any human beings. There's sort of a creepy s where somebody is really mistaking the tech for being real close. Rosalie that stuff is going on. Penetrating the consciousness the technology spaces and the public. This show where we take a single technology and ask. What's its greatest potential ruby exciting things enormously complex and what could possibly go wrong. We're just looking at each other thinking. Oh my god future is in our hands modestly sort of on the fence are does new technologies can help us flourish human being. It's accelerating absolute or destroy the very thing that makes us human. I don't have any time to become more informed. When i like to say is any technology in human history is neutral. It's how we decide to use it. Failure is not an option. It is.

nuclear regulatory commission Rosalie
"nuclear power" Discussed on Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

02:15 min | 1 year ago

"nuclear power" Discussed on Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

"Nye Exchange thank you so much wasn't let's let's meet our debaters please. I welcome on the team. Arguing for the resolution. Ladies and Gentlemen Kirsty Goggin. You are the CO founder and executive director of energy for humanity. That's an NGO. That is focused on decarbonisation on Energie access. You flew in from London to join us. It's so great to have you here. Thank you thanks for having me. I'm really delighted. Kirsty Gauguin everybody. And let's Meet Your Partner Ladies and gentlemen. Please welcome Dan Pondimin the Dan. You have some government service related to this issue. You are former deputy secretary of energy in the Obama Administration. You're now president and CEO of a global energy not company that is supplying enriched uranium for commercial nuclear power plants. It is called energy. Thank you for joining US tonight. Thank you glad it'd be great to have you go. And of course we have to debaters arguing against the resolution. Please I welcome Gregory Yachts. Go Greg also a person with the government service and this issue you are a former chairman of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission after which you wrote a book the title of which was confessions. Confessions of a rogue nuclear regulator. And you are now. The founder of an energy company called wind future. LLC Greg's great to have you on intelligence squared us. Thank you in your latest gentlemen. Please welcome Arjun Makhijani Arjun longtime expert in this field. The President of the Institute for Energy and Environmental Research and you're author of a book called Carbon free and nuclear free a roadmap for us energy policy you have spent spent decades studying nuclear disarmament and energy efficiency. It's great to have somebody like you. Here thanks so much for joining US later. Debaters arguing on a resolution. It's time to to expand nuclear power onto our debate but start with round one round one. We'll be opening statements by each debater in. Turn up speaking. I four the resolution ocean. It's time to expand nuclear power. Please welcome everyone. Den Pondimin former deputy secretary of.

US US Nuclear Regulatory Commissi deputy secretary of energy president and CEO Institute for Energy and Envir Arjun Makhijani Arjun Kirsty Goggin Dan Pondimin CO founder Kirsty Gauguin Greg Den Pondimin deputy secretary Nye Exchange Gregory Yachts London Obama Administration
"nuclear power" Discussed on Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"nuclear power" Discussed on Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

"Populism unifies brings us all together. The Republican Party is institutionally and demographically stronger than it's been in decades but religion region and belief in God is such a great force. Driving Moral Progress Hachem. It fails so abysmally. Science is very good but it's the equation. You need both the US. It does need to challenge. China's unfair trade practices is not a blessed. It's unstable it's equal. It's undemocratic doc and it's unsustainable ecologically are winning the battle against famine war pestilence and even death that is thanks to capitalism. Our our debate will go in three rounds and then our audience will choose the winner as always if all goes well civil discourse will also win. Hi I'm John. Van Host and moderator of intelligence squared. US here are some names that chill US Three Mile Island Fukushima canabal places where catastrophic accidents at nuclear power plants seem to suggest that nuclear power is just too dangerous and so for many years ears. The son seemed to be setting on nuclear as a way to keep the lights on. But you know what else. Nuclear power is its carbon-free its impact on. Global warming is negligible Anchorage -able which raises the question. If we're looking for ways to mitigate climate change should nuclear beginning new-look would the risk be worth it or or is it riskier not to go more nuclear. Well in all of these questions we think we have the makings of a debate. So we did it. We brought two teams together. Two teams of two who are experts in their fields to argue. Yes or no to the statement. It's time to expand nuclear power. The debate went in three rounds and as has always our live audience in New York. City voted to choose the winner. But I just before that debate began. I sat down with Bill Nye. The science guy himself who explained leaned what nuclear power is and told us about.

US Republican Party Three Mile Island Fukushima Bill Nye Hachem China Van Host New York
"nuclear power" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

Slate's The Gist

09:03 min | 1 year ago

"nuclear power" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

"Site but maybe some North Korean officials who happened to be watching because Kim Jong UN was known to go watch some of these thanks and on two occasions he actually fired ordered the firing of missiles not inside North Korea but out toward the Sea of Japan right in parallel with the North Korean missile South Koreans joint him. And so this is joint show forth like you're testing a missile worth. We're putting the missiles new report because I have a good job and and Yeah I've been doing this for then Also some options in this plan included what some people later described as a bloody nose Punch him in the nose and he bleeds and Kim Jong. I'm going to be so wiped out by this. He'll retreat well. That was an option but most of the military people including those in new something about Korea thought okay but it's actually more likely that he's going to retaliate. And if that happens you know I mean. The sole capital of South Korea's is within range of hundreds of chemical missiles and US personnel. There was thinking that an escalation that began even with this firing of conventional missiles on the test site which Madison authorized to do on his own cognizance. If you wanted that that could lead to you war. And all the way up to nuclear went when Trenton other words when trump made that line about fire and fury this was after we this. That's not what it is typical blustering off the top of his head kinds of remarks. This was there is serious stuff going on in that what you said I would strike listeners. Yes that's true and troubling but actually it's interesting to me that every one of those clauses contains an agenda item. That serious people have thought about for a long long time for instance you you said you know the North Koreans have biological weapons. Well that alone. That's a conundrum. Because we understand what you do or the United States has a doctorate of what to do if you're attacked attack or someone who attacked with a nuclear weapon respond with a nuclear weapon but what about biological weapons and Obama to figure something out on that that's right Obama when he first came in remember he came in. He gave the speech talking about reducing the role of nuclear weapons and National Security Policy. Somewhere down the road eliminating them from the face of the Earth maybe not in his lifetime but we will take concrete steps toward that kind of thing. One of the things he considered was getting rid of the first use policy. Now most most people don't realize this but since the beginning we have an explicit policy and every president has approved it of having the option to use nuclear cler weapons before anybody else does and the reason for this initially was well and the Soviets invade western Europe and our troops can't take them we have nuclear weapons and that is even if they don't do this. This is a deterrent. This is the ultimate to turn and in fact anytime any previous president talked about getting rid of this nuclear weapons during the Cold War. The French and the Germans would go nuts. Yeah Carter wanted to do it. And he was convinced. Because not that the Americans convinced them. The NATO allies terrible terrible. There is a part in the book that got me a little worried. I forgot what it was. You'll remember that Obama was considering a plan. I think they adopted it and it turns out that the Carter Administration had already been through this all and just named it. A very good thing that had to do with The no-first-use idea. Yeah Obama came up with a very interesting spin on this. He goes when Gates told him. Well we we might have to Go first tack by Biological Okay. You know he played law professor at University of Chicago. It said okay. What countries do we really have to worry about here? Well there's Russia there's North Korea there's Iran at the time. Yeah maybe Syria you know. And so he will down he said okay. Well how about we do this. And this became a declaration. We will not use nuclear weapons first against a country that doesn't have nuclear weapons and that has signed the non-proliferation treaty throughout the book. The idea that using nuclear weapons as a deterrent against another nuclear state. But the situation we Sarah ourselves now is using conventional weapons as a deterrent to a state about to acquire nuclear weapons and so far the united it states and its allies. have done some clever surreptitious things to try to thwart states from getting nuclear weapons but never the full scale l. war the fullscale invasion. Do you think that that could happen. Well you know. Trump has stated it as a threat several times and by the way you know even Obama. I said we were not allowed Iran to get a nuclear weapon You know he negotiated his way out of it. Everybody has said that what happens. Yeah what happens you know you. You make all these threats. Why isn't that happening? What I think part of it really is deterrence? I think the existence of nuclear weapons probably has is prevented a few wars from taking even even nuclear disarmament. People believe that it does hey throws a little scaring to you before you start messing around with something and that might escalate all the way. Fred Kaplan is the national security columnist for slate the author of six books now the latest being the bomb the president's generals and the secret history of nuclear war. Thank you fred. You WanNa hear something. Amazing discover matches all the cash. Back you earn at the end of your first year automatically dollar for dollar with no limit on how much you earn amazing. It's it's kind of like being showered with cash from above which would also be pretty amazing. In fact it's so amazing that millions of people year getting their cash back matched. They just just can't get enough so whether it's raining down on your head or raining into your bank account it's your cash back and discover is matching it. Discover ever cash back match. What are you waiting for? Learn more at discover dot com slash cash back match and now the spiel today. The impeachment trial very likely acquittal of Donald J trump trump lawyer Jae Jao took to the Senate floor to address the roiling. Revelations relations offered by John Bolton that would serve to offer a first hand direct account of the president engaging in a quid pro quo on Ukrainian cranium aid. Secular said this is not a game of leaks an unsourced manuscripts thereby bravely and unexpectedly throwing in his weight behind. Hearing from John Bolton under oath I gotta say people surprise you all the time and secular no small cost to his own standing among conservatives and trump sycophants rightly said we must elevate this testimony out of the realm of the rumored and into the coliseum of the confirmed. Good on you so wait what this it turns out. I vastly vastly misunderstood the remark. The president's lawyer was saying since it's unconfirmed. What we need to do is very desperately desperately make no effort to confirm it? That is what we need to do. This needs to be ignored. Even though we have the power to confirm no we must not do that so played a short clip just talking for a couple of seconds because the president's lawyer is only took a short time for their summation a lot of summation rested on the premise fact. Hey aren't you glad we're not taking up all your time here. There are some of you in this chamber right now. That would rather be someplace else. And that's why we'll be brief. Well that's one of the reasons I guess the house managers relying on mounds of evidence and reams of information piles of proof I guess. They weren't briefed because they they must not have been respectful of the senators time. Sometimes the man who says most says little but other times the man who says almost nothing just doesn't say if the epic poem of your people say a limerick maybe your people don't have that Grand Story to tell and this was the closing argument. This was supposed supposed to be the sweeping statement. The president's lawyers didn't even offer a dustbuster. The closing argument is supposed to have themes in scope and calls is to Action Johnny Cochrane saying if the glove doesn't fit you must acquit with secular. Oh and PAT SIPALAWINI quickly rushing. Through their argument I was left. To Wonder Brevity the soul of wit or the ain't got shit here was Patsy Baloney summarizing why and acquittal vote was incumbent upon this body. What what they are asking you to do is to throw out a successful president on the eve of an election with no basis in violation the constitution compelling? Except it's very much constitutional. There is a clear.

president Obama Donald J trump South Korea North Korea US Kim Jong Kim Jong UN Iran John Bolton Madison Japan NATO Fred Kaplan Johnny Cochrane Europe Carter Carter Administration
"nuclear power" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

04:29 min | 3 years ago

"nuclear power" Discussed on TechStuff

"It's really hard to build new nuclear power plants, even though they currently produce about twenty percent of the electricity that the United States uses. So eventually, if those all those power plants go dark, you gotta figure out where that twenty percent is gonna come from because our demand for electricity isn't going down. It's going up every year. So that puts a huge pressure on us to figure out where else are we going to get this electric city. And the easiest answer is fossil fuels, but we already know fossil fuels contribute to climate change. They produce pollutants that are environmental and health hazards. So not a great story. Now it's easier to store. Low level waste that stuff. I was telling you about where it's the equipment or the uniforms as stuff like that stuff that was in the power plant and absorbed radiation over time. But those materials pose much less of a threat than spent nuclear fuel. They will tend to have their radiation completely diminished within three hundred years, which is still a long time, but a heck of a lot shorter than tens of thousands of years. And again, like I said, some of the most hazardous radioactive materials have a half life of around ten years or less, but not all of them do. And that's the problem. So telling someone, hey, within twenty years, most of the stuff won't even be a problem anymore isn't necessarily the biggest winning argument. You can make to someone when you're trying to store nuclear waste there. In addition to all that building nuclear power plants became economically challenging. It's very expensive to build one, not just because the technology is sophisticated and complicated and you've got to have a lot of materials, but also. There's a lot of bureaucracy surrounding the process. Not that the bureaucracy doesn't serve a purpose. They're very strict protections and regulations that are in place to require facilities to be built an operate under safe guidelines. Those are absolutely necessary. There's a history of of facilities that were not operating up to those guidelines and that is not just criminal, but potentially deadly. So those regulations and restrictions end up adding to the cost, obviously. And while nuclear power has compelling positive arguments compared to again, like coal power plants might make more economic sense to look elsewhere if you're getting into the energy biz. And then of course, we have the famous disasters stuff like Three Mile Island, tra-, noble and Cosima. And as I said, I'm going to do an episode soon that explains what happened in each of those three cases and what we learned as a result of those. But they certainly have gone a long way to discourage support for nuclear power. If you can point to a disaster. That's a pretty powerful con argument. And earlier I mentioned thorium reactors as a proposed alternative to the traditional YouTube thirty-five ones. These reactors wouldn't use thorium itself for fuel. Rather a facility would process th Aurium to thirty two and create an isotope called uranium to thirty three uranium to thirty three's unstable. You will not find it out in nature, but it is fissile meaning like you to thirty five. You can create a sustained nuclear reaction using this. Fuel. In addition proponents say, thorium based plants would produce less nuclear waste. There would be more efficient at producing energy and thorium is more plentiful than uranium now have to do a full episode about thorium implants, but that's further in the future. I'm not gonna do more than one week of nuclear power stories at a time. I'll I'll revisit that, but here's one fun, local facts, something that you guys can look forward to. I learned that and. I'm amazed that never heard this before, but I live within an hour of a radiated site that I learned about this in a book titled atomic awakening by James Mahaffy and the radiated site is now known as the Dawson forest wildlife area. That's about fifty miles north of Atlanta, the city where I live and formerly, this was the Georgia nuclear aircraft laboratory, which was a top secret are indeed facility operated by the air force and the story behind it is really interesting. And I think I'm actually going to take a little trip with the guys from us stuff. They don't want you to know and we're all going to visit it with Geiger counters. So stay tuned for that..

United States James Mahaffy YouTube Three Mile Island Dawson forest Atlanta Georgia Cosima twenty percent three hundred years twenty years ten years one week
"nuclear power" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

03:56 min | 3 years ago

"nuclear power" Discussed on TechStuff

"Now the steam continues through the system after passing through the turbine, and it cools down as it does. So typically through exposure to some other part of this system and as it cools down. Down at condenses back into water, and it flows back into the boiler where the whole process can start over again. But again, with nuclear power, you're using a different material and process to create the heat than you would with a coal power plant, and there's a need to make sure the systems in a nuclear power plant are secure and separate from each other to prevent contamination or at least shielded very, very well if you have a full implemented system. So if the water is actually passing through the reactor and that same water is the water that's converted into steam the best with the turbine, we want to make sure that that facility is very well shielded. Most nuclear power plants have to water systems. They have one that's the coolant and then they have a secondary one where there's a heat exchanger that sends the heat from the coolant into this boiler, which then boils off the water and create steam, and the the two systems are separate. They don't. They don't come. Into direct contact with each other. So you don't pass radioactive contaminants from the coolant into the steam that you're using to turn the turbines. Now, the isotope most commonly associated with nuclear power is uranium two, thirty five, but plutonium two thirty. Nine is also used in some reactors, and there are some nuclear power proponents who really advocate a thorium based power plant more on that later in this episode and I've said the word isotope, if you times was that actually, meanwhile isotopes are two or more forms of the same element meaning two or more forms that all have the same number of protons because if you have different number of protons and you have different elements, so you're looking at two different atoms that represent the same element and they had the same number of protons, but they have different numbers of neutrons from each other. Neutrons. Are particles have a neutral charge. You find them in the nuclei of atoms. They don't affect the chemical properties. Of the element, but isotopes do have different atomic masses relative to one another. So they are chemically identical. But from a nuclear process perspective, they are different. So uranium-235 is as you would imagine an isotope of uranium it is not the most commonly found form of uranium in nature. The most common form of uranium is uranium two thirty eight uranium to thirty eight has ninety two protons and one hundred forty, six neutrons. Uranium-235 has ninety two protons and one forty. Three neutrons. Uranium-235 makes up less than one percent of all naturally occurring uranium in the world. And it has a half-life of nearly seven hundred four million years which means if you have a quantity of uranium to thirty-five any given amount. Let's say that you have a pound of uranium-235. That's an enormous amount of Gary name to thirty five. But let's say you have a pound of it. It would take approximately seven hundred four million years for that uranium-235 to reduce in half through radioactive decay. So you would end up with half a pound on average after seven hundred four million years more or less the this is essentially the the rate of radioactive decay. But I think we could actually do a lot better than that if we really put our minds to it, knocks plane how in just a second. But first, let's take a quick break to thank our sponsor. Support for tech stuff comes from our friends at.

half-life Gary seven hundred four million yea one percent
"nuclear power" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

04:56 min | 3 years ago

"nuclear power" Discussed on TechStuff

"And welcome to tech stuff. I'm your host, Jonathan Strickland. I'm an executive producer with how stuff works in a love, all things tech. And recently I got some requests to talk about some subjects related to nuclear power. Specifically, I had a request to talk about cold fusion and whether there is any validity to cold fusion claims and research, and that's a very loaded subject and I will tackle it. But before I can handle that topic, I thought it would be good to do a couple of episodes about nuclear power to lead up to it. And that includes how nuclear power plants work today and how nuclear fusion reactors will work in the future. If we ever suss out how to do them in a way that isn't a net loss on energy and is sustainable. So today's episode is going to be about nuclear fission reactors. That's the kind that we use today to generate electricity, their nuclear power plants all across the world, and. All of the ones that are not just pure research. Facilities are physician based, and then fusion is something that is in a research stage in various places around the world. And then this is actually going to be a nuclear power week because we're going to talk about cold fusion in the third episode. In the fourth episode, I think I'm going to take a really close look at some of the famous nuclear facility disasters things like Three Mile Island Chernobyl, and the Fukushima reactor and talk about what happened in each of those instances and what the consequences were so that we can have a deep understanding. Now, this is not supposed to be a series that is meant to scare you about nuclear power. I actually believe that nuclear power if performed responsibly is a good alternative to fossil fuel based power. But the responsibly part is absent. -olutely of paramount importance and we'll get into why as I talk about this, but this is not an anti nuclear power or even a pro nuclear power episode. It's just to kind of give us the understanding of what it is what's going on, what are the pros and the cons of it? So vision means they use a process to generate energy that involves splitting one, heavy atom into lighter, atoms, and fusion is the opposite. You would take two or more lighter atoms than you squish them together. Real hard to make into a heavier atom and both processes release energy, though a fusion reaction would release far more energy than officiant reaction. I'll explain how that is in the next episode, but first physician. Well, it happens naturally with certain large unstable atoms. Uranium, for example, will spontaneously undergo fission uranium-235 specifically. But it does so at a very slow rate, but you can speed that right up through a process called induced fission. And generally speaking induced, fission happens when you take a heavy and unstable atom and you pelt, it really hard with neutrons. You accelerate the neutrons shoe, these heavy isotopes and those isotopes break up into smaller components. That process generates a lot of energy in the form of heat, and you can use that heat to heat up water, preferably in a separate sealed system, not all nuclear power plants work that way. But about two thirds of the US nuclear power plants do and you convert the water into steam and use that steam to turn turbines conducted two generators to produce electricity. Now, in a way, today's nuclear power plants are really not all that different from coal power plants or thermal plants that use solar power to heat up water. And in all these cases you use. A process to either generate or harness heat, and you know, you can burn cold do that. You can harness solar power to do that. You can use nuclear power to do that. Use that heat to boil water to convert water into high pressure steam, and you direct that steam to move turbines and those turbines are electric generators. Now, to be clear, the generators aren't generating energy because energy can be neither created nor destroyed. You can convert energy from one form to another. You can convert mass into energy, but you can't just create energy of nothing. So electricity generators are converting some form of energy into electricity with steam turbines. We're talking about converting kinetic energy, the energy of movement into electrical energy, and here's how that works. In a nutshell, generators have many parts..

Jonathan Strickland executive producer Three Mile Island Chernobyl US Fukushima
"nuclear power" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

Part-Time Genius

01:34 min | 4 years ago

"nuclear power" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

"So uh by rate uh or your job description when i join the navy out licorice and i went to school for that and then later went to school to learn how to operate and maintain a nuclear power plant with all of our submarine our nuclear powered aircraft carrier girl from nuclear powered now that was that was a job i got to do uh will thank you for doing a good job through cool um and so on how long were you on sovereigns for uh well go navy for thirteen years are both for that i'm a lot more troubling rather a shirt then merit our assure due to command and the training before that so i i will tell you about our aid of those years i was on while what's the most fun thing that happens on submarines the most fun thing well probably halfway night uh outweigh underway has scheduled under way we have our loko abrasion just are getting to that or point and marred knowing that y'all got help from their where you're heading home soon that's awesome yeah well will liam you may have thought it was a tough job to uh to be and electricity and in the navy but but axa we've got something even tougher for you we've got one of our very important quizzes megawatts the name of today's quiz it's called oh captain mike captain all right so every answer is a fictional captain and we're going to see how many of these eight fictional captains you can get right in what are we saying ninety seconds mayo ninety seconds so we're going to set the clock the ninety seconds this is some high pressure staff just like submarines just like submarines are you ready liam.

nuclear power plant navy liam aircraft carrier ninety seconds thirteen years
"nuclear power" Discussed on Target USA Podcast by WTOP

Target USA Podcast by WTOP

02:03 min | 4 years ago

"nuclear power" Discussed on Target USA Podcast by WTOP

"They now fire missiles over japanese airspace they now have icbm capabilities they now claim to have tested a hydrogen bomb and just this morning there are reports that the regime is preparing for yet another icbm launched to the members of the security council i must say enough is enough we have taken an incremental approach and despite the best of intentions it has not worked members of this council will no doubt urge negotiations and a return to talks but as i have just outlined we have engaged in numerous direct and multilateral talks with the north korean regime and time after time they have not worked the time for halfmeasures in the security council is over the time has come to exhaust all of our diplomatic means before it's too late we must now adopt the strongest possible measures kim jong owns action cannot be seen as defensive he wants to be acknowledged as a nuclear power but being a nuclear power is not about using those terrible weapons to threaten others nuclear powers understand their responsibilities kim jong un shows no such understanding his abusive use of missiles and his nuclear threats show that he is begging for war or is never something the united states once we don't want it now but our countries patience is not unlimited we will defend our allies and our territory the idea that some have suggested a socalled frees for freeze is insulting when a rogue regime had a nuclear weapon and an icbm pointed at you you do not take steps to lower your guard no one would do that we certainly won't.

icbm nuclear power united states north korean kim jong kim jong un
"nuclear power" Discussed on Bad Voltage

Bad Voltage

01:36 min | 4 years ago

"nuclear power" Discussed on Bad Voltage

"Right yeah you could you cannot you can take a gun today and go out murder some money you can go amiss use that weapon but but if you have something it's kind of the same thing about like such as nuclear power stations where i am sure that i'm sure that there are a you know there are risks that many risks attached to somebody in russia or china attacking a nuclear power station in about so so your worry here is not actually a bow super high tech ira controllable spike sage soy fight weaponry eggs about the rotc vacation of everything if someone if someone went right are we going to we're a kick this they got the edge that like we do with elaborately lightbulbs everything but they did that to harm grid igb just is unhappy about it yeah i mean i that we'd as a legitimate concern absolute chaos way that's why i say it's a my mind that the shorterterm term word i mean we've had a remotecontrolled drones with weapons highpowered weaponry for many many years so i still problem tilt to today up no two new problem no i agree but but i imagine that right now those instances and i have no idea if this is case inches guessing those instances of that technology is relatively like specific and then highly managed in in some ways i think if the broader military apparatus start's getting hooked up in an it thai way increases the tax it is necessary what alert so but a but that's kind of beside the point i i'm i'm less worried about the you know the the machines taking over thing but i think that that's the thing that's more dangerous right now.

murder russia nuclear power china
"nuclear power" Discussed on The Interchange

The Interchange

01:40 min | 4 years ago

"nuclear power" Discussed on The Interchange

"Has caused is a big challenge to build really anything big m it would be equally difficult to build a large cul planned or large hydro plant on it would be difficult to build a very large renewables plan except there's a lot of support and hope for for specific renewables but for anything that has this large upfront cost at it's difficult and has difficult to finance and it's difficult for utility's to take that that financial risk if you look at the cost of nuclear power plants over the last couple of decades one could conclude that nuclear has a negative learning curve and you have said no that's not actually true it's not necessarily the materials costs or something inherent in nuclear power plant it's you know it's of a licencing problems it's sort of the inconsistent way that people are building plants as a result does nuclear have a negative learning curve and if not why what i will say is that i don't think learning carbs are the appropriate way to think about nuclear across for halida nuclear in the past because that the framing are that the metric of learning curbs is really designed for assembly line products or manufactured products where you have on the same people the same firm building a lot of a single design like aircraft on or automobiles or today learning curbs work well first solar panels from a specific factory or wind turbines that's were learning curves are a good metric for understanding.

nuclear power plant solar panels wind turbines