25 Burst results for "Nuclear Arms Race"

"nuclear arms race" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:47 min | Last month

"nuclear arms race" Discussed on WTOP

"Senate is back in session today and it's hacked agenda includes avoiding a government shutdown more from WTO's Mitchell Miller on Capitol Hill The federal government runs out of money on Friday at midnight Minnesota democratic senator Amy Klobuchar is confident lawmakers will make sure there's not a shutdown and move forward on defense spending Vast majority of senators support that will get that done Which are speaking on ABCs this week Lawmakers will also soon need to address extending the debt ceiling and Democrats want to make progress on the president's build back better Bill But the Senate's number two Republican John thune argues that many Americans don't want another $2 trillion piece of legislation The message that they're sending is do away with this massive reckless tax and spending spree On Capitol Hill Mitchell Miller WTO P news The U.S. is trying to head off a new nuclear arms race with China where there's more at stake than previously with Russia Back during the Cold War and the nuclear arms race with Russia the U.S. had several advantages One of them was aviation and technology and the ability to own the sky And also it had better intelligence collection and technology in that regard With China's cyberattacks and hypersonic weapons and the ability to blind U.S. command and control systems here on earth and in space the U.S. could get surprised and that could lead to mistakes That's a pretty big deal when you think about nuclear weapons That's WTO V national security correspondent JJ green Thousands of American service members are facing disciplinary action even dismissal if they're not fully vaccinated against COVID by today The commandant of the Marine Corps is urging active duty marines to get the shot saying quote we don't have extra marines The marines.

Mitchell Miller WTO Senate Amy Klobuchar Capitol Hill John thune U.S. federal government Minnesota Russia China JJ green Thousands of American Marine Corps marines
"nuclear arms race" Discussed on Cinemavino

Cinemavino

03:38 min | 3 months ago

"nuclear arms race" Discussed on Cinemavino

"To be slated for two. It was going to be a two part and then Richard donner got fired off halfway through of filming the second one. And I don't remember who picked up the slack, but to me. This is almost like kill Bill volume one and two. Superman one and two are essentially the same film or almost count the same. Because it seems to be like a kind of a godfather like an epic, those two films anyway. The other two were a little rough. But when you spend 40 minutes of origin story before you even get to him in the suit, it's like you leave a lot on address. Yeah. And I did I watched a interview with Christopher Reeve about how he wrote some of the dialog for Superman four. And it was about nuclear arms race and all this stuff and about what Superman would how he would factor into that. They're like, how come serran just doesn't throw all the nuclear weapons? And into the sun and then boom, you know, peace on earth and so they deal with that on there. It's still not a great film. But he wrote part of it or some of the dialog, and he was explaining that he was like, well, Superman to me is just a friend. He's somebody you can count on. He's just a friend. When you're feeling down, all that shit. And I definitely don't get that with this subsequent Superman. Like you get Brennan Ralph, who's kind of a weird stalker and Superman returns. Peeping on Lois elevator, like at her house and absente father as well. Sorry, spoiler alert. Yeah. And then you get Henry Cavill. Who is fine?.

Richard donner Christopher Reeve Bill Brennan Ralph Henry Cavill
"nuclear arms race" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:07 min | 1 year ago

"nuclear arms race" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Bill continues. Former presidential candidate Pete Buddha judge now the transportation secretary says struggling Americans could use these funds think it's really important that we are taking care of working families. That's obviously something that is being discussed and in this process. Going back and forth with Congress, and there needs to be robust support. As for the Republican Senator Roger Wicker says the bill is too high. Given the outlook from the Congressional Budget Office, the economic projections From this bipartisan group. Argue against something the size of a $1.9 trillion package. Both Wicker and Buddha Judge appeared on ABC s this week. Shelly Adler Washington Looks, beat the Chiefs 31 9, Sunday night and Super Bowl 55 Tom Brady name The M V P President Reagan's longtime secretary of state. George Shultz, who spent most of the 19 eighties trying to improve relations with the Soviet Union and forging a course for peace in the Middle East, died at the age of 100. Schultz had been the oldest surviving former Cabinet member of any administration. He died Saturday at his home on the campus of Stanford University. According to the Hoover Institution. Ah think tank where he was a distinguished fellow. Schultz was labor secretary and Treasury secretary under President Nixon before spending more than six years As Reagan's secretary of state, Schulz negotiated the first ever treated to reduce the size of the Soviet Union's ground based nuclear arsenals. The 1987 accord was a historic attempt. To begin to reverse the nuclear arms race. I'm Julie Walker Gas up a nickel over the past two weeks, $2.50 a gallon, three cents from less than last year, Highest in San Francisco, with 3 49 Lowest, and Houston a $2.8 a gallon. More news, a town hall dot com. Meanwhile, relief Thank you is so successful in lowering or eliminating pain. I'm often asked that question beaten, said Talbot, the father and son founders of really Factor tell me they believe our bodies were designed to heal..

Schultz secretary President Reagan Soviet Union Bill Senator Roger Wicker Pete Buddha Buddha Judge Congressional Budget Office George Shultz Hoover Institution Shelly Adler Washington President Nixon Congress Talbot Tom Brady Middle East
Reagan and Nixon cabinet member George Shultz dead at 100

Sean Hannity

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

Reagan and Nixon cabinet member George Shultz dead at 100

"Veteran statesman who served in both the Nixon and Reagan administration's has died. George P. Shultz was 100 Schultz had been the oldest surviving former Cabinet member of any administration. He died Saturday at his home on the campus of Stanford University, according to the Hoover Institution. Ah think tank where he was a distinguished fellow. Schultz was labor secretary and Treasury secretary under President Nixon before spending more than six years as Reagan's secretary of state, Schulz negotiated the first ever treated to reduce the size of the Soviet Union's ground based nuclear arsenals. The 1987 accord was a historic attempt to begin to reverse the nuclear arms race.

George P. Shultz Schultz Reagan Administration Nixon Hoover Institution Stanford University Cabinet President Nixon Treasury Schulz Reagan Soviet Union
Reagan's longtime secretary of state George P. Shultz dies

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 1 year ago

Reagan's longtime secretary of state George P. Shultz dies

"I'm Julie Walker president Ronald Reagan's longtime secretary of state George Shultz who spent most of the nineteen eighties trying to improve relations with the Soviet Union and forging a course for peace in the Middle East has died he was one hundred Schultz had been the oldest surviving former cabinet member of any administration he died Saturday at his home on the campus of Stanford University according to the Hoover Institution think tank where he was a distinguished fellow Schultz was labor secretary and treasury secretary under president Nixon before spending more than six years as Reagan's secretary of state Shilts negotiated the first ever treaty to reduce the size of the Soviet union's ground based nuclear arsenals the nineteen eighty seven accord was a historic attempt to begin to reverse the nuclear arms race I'm Julie Walker

Julie Walker George Shultz Schultz Ronald Reagan Soviet Union Hoover Institution Middle East Shilts Stanford University Cabinet President Nixon Treasury Reagan
Persecution Complex

Thank God I'm Atheist

06:02 min | 1 year ago

Persecution Complex

"Hi everybody. Hi guys well from somewhere in Oregon and Salt Lake City Utah. It's thank God I'm atheist the podcast I'm mark and I'm Dan and. Mark Hello pay there now. You're not frank, I'm I'm not anymore. I have emerged like a butterfly from Christmas. From the Frank Shelf Christmas and the Frank. No thanks. That's right Thank you so much for coming on and and help out you you who have helped out here before but are also my co host over on the how do heretic. As much as well as other things I, guess you sure you've in the in the world not that I pay any attention. To the most important stuff Yeah. Unfortunately, I was going out of town and frank was going to have to find a replacement for me. And then, and then frank came down with some horrible apparently non-co vid disease. And and I had to fill in last as far as we know, frank does not have the Rona. Dead. Yeah it seems. It seems as though he is negative though false negatives have occurred in the world. So but anyways, prayers in that seed money coming in. Yes exactly basically, the only way to save him is to is to send us a all of your money. On the television screen, we'll tell you how to do that a later in the program also later in the show you and I are going to have a discussion about persecution privilege. And There's a difference between those two things and points and purpose purpose qwerty. So the four pence perspicacity yeah, which is also Yeah. I anyway, we'll get to all of that later on but in but first, why don't you tell me one of your stories I understand that you've come prepared with with stories to tell the kids you know me I'm already I've got a pocketful of magic for everybody so. This, this will probably relate a little bit to our discussion later in the show. Daniel Okay and this is an older article, but it's been making the rounds again because of reasons. Okay. Yeah. It's an article in the Atlantic by Emma Green and it's about. You know the most most persecuted people in America and those would be. Christians. Of course, they will let me. Let me read a couple of excerpts from the article here in. Many. Many Christians. Believe they are subject to religious discrimination in the United States new report from the Public Religion Research Institute and Brookings. Offers evidence. Almost half of Americans say discrimination against Christians is as big of a problem as discrimination against. Including blacks and minorities. Three quarters of Republicans and trump supporters said this. This article is like a year and a half old. So imagine it's much higher now. And so did nearly eight out of ten White Evangelical Protestants of the latter group six and ten believed that although America wants was a Christian nation, it is no longer a huge jump from twenty twelve. Forty, six percent of those surveyed said immigration from Mexico and Central America has been too high in recent years. Yeah. When asked the same question about immigrants from predominantly Christian countries though only ten percent of people said immigration has been too high. The irony in this is essentially the same question phrase student as Latin American countries are overwhelmingly Christian. Right. All those all those non-catholic Mexicans that are coming over our border. Yeah exactly. Well, who didn't Alex Jones we talk about Alex Jones saying that Mexico was run by a bunch of white shoes at one point but. You know. So Then to kind of conclude. While the US, is still a nation of faith with roughly seventy one percent of adults identifying some kind of Christian. Religious organizations of all kinds are struggling with lower levels of attendance declining participation in ritual practices. More and more people say they're not part of any religion and this is especially true of young people in their twenties and early thirties with you. Guys if religious believable believe their institutions are declining, which demographically speaking they are they may feel more threatened by what they perceive as the growing numbers of people in the country who have a different kind of faith. There's evidence of this in the strongest style. Many people seem to feel for the past and allusive time when Americans felt more of a consensus about their values and beliefs strong majorities. Evangelical Protestants in White Catholics believe America has changed for the worse since the nineteen. Fifties. So off the one, thousand, nine, hundred, Eighty s Jim crow women knowing their place raging cold war nuclear arms race the good old days as Back Yeah back when we could win when everybody's lives were so much better. So this is a lie that just will not die. Like this Christian persecution complex Oh. My God it is amazing and we're GONNA get to more of it. We're going to expound on later in the show like you alluded to but my God it is. It's astounding at what's really funny is. The Christians believe that it is a due to outside influence that everything's getting so bad. Not at not at all acknowledging that, no dude, the calls coming from inside. Right. He's leaving. You are doing this. Yeah. First of all. It's not true that you're being persecuted but part about right believing. You're doing that. Yeah exactly because you're persecuting. They're not leaving because the world outside of Christianity looks. So enticing your leaving because the world inside of Christianity is a an abusive health gape. Maybe work on that you

Frank Mark Hello Daniel Okay Emma Green Public Religion Research Insti United States Salt Lake City Alex Jones Utah Oregon DAN Brookings Mexico Central America Evangelical Protestants
"nuclear arms race" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"nuclear arms race" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The summer issue includes Jessica Matthews on the Nuclear Arms Race, Jonathan Freedland on Disinformation and Adam. Thorough Well on Bojack Horseman at bookstores and in my books dot com. This's WNYC FM HD and AM New York. Pulitzer Prize winning composer Julia Wolf wrote this piece called Fire in My Mouth for the New York Philharmonic, inspired by the 1911 Triangle Shirtwaist factory fire. A tragedy that cost 146 people their lives. They were mostly young immigrant women working in essentially a sweatshop, and this turned out to be a pivotal moment in the history of American labor. It also inspired one of Julia's most colorful and ambitious and at times harrowing works. I'm John Schaefer, and we're going to devote this entire new sounds program to fire in my mouth. And joining me is the composer Julia Wolf. Julie first What gave you the idea to write a piece about this? 1911 fire? So I teach and y you on West Fourth Street and then just a block north. Is the location of the building. Which action now isn't whyyou building at the time? It wasn't it was it was a factory building. I walked by it. It's on my mind. At the same time, I've been writing a serious of pieces that.

John Schaefer Jonathan Freedland New York Philharmonic Jessica Matthews Julia Bojack Horseman New York Pulitzer Prize Julie
On This Day in History: The Kyshtym Disaster

This Day in History Class

04:38 min | 2 years ago

On This Day in History: The Kyshtym Disaster

"The Day was September Twenty Ninth Nineteen fifty seven a waste tank exploded at plutonium processing plant in the Soviet Union. The explosion led to the contamination of nearby towns but the Soviet Oh via government resorted to covering up the custom disaster as it's now known people in the area are still suffering from the effects of the nuclear contamination and in nineteen fifty seven during the Cold War the Soviet Union was embroiled in a nuclear arms race with the United States the custom but nuclear energy complex then known as Chelyabinsk Forty was located in the euro mountains several miles east of the city of Keystone. The nuclear lear reactors and plutonium processing plant were built at the complex in the nineteen forties for the development of nuclear weapons. The city built to house the workers was called Chillier Pinsk sixty five the secret nuclear facility is now called my Yuck and the surrounding city is known as as yours there was such a I pushed develop nuclear weapons that safety and research on the effects of radioactivity on people and the environment was not a priority even before the nineteen fifty fifty seven disaster was the source of many hazards and accidents workers did not wear protective gear nuclear reactors dumped radioactive waste right into the take our river villagers who used the contaminated water faced radiation poisoning and other illnesses though there there have been many accidents at the plant since it opened the one. It's infamous bore happened on September. Twenty Ninth Nineteen fifty seven cooling systems surrounded the buried tanks that contained liquid reactor waste but one of the cooling systems had been malfunctioning the waist grew so hot from atomic decay the system failed the tanks cooling liquid evaporated and the seventy to eighty tons of radioactive waste inside the tank combusted the live live birth in the explosion created an aerosol plume of radioactive fallout that was spread over about eight thousand square miles or twenty thousand square kilometers earth though around two hundred and seventy thousand people lived in the area. Only eleven thousand people were evacuated and evacuations were slow and and left many people behind the Soviet government did not tell evacuees what happened and the people who remained in the area were exposed to radiation as they were tasked with destroying crops livestock in fact the Soviets kept the cause of the disaster a secret even as radiation sickness that many people people to the hospital and people began dying the Western press did receive reports that there had been a nuclear accident in the Soviet Union but those reports were a little more than rumor until the dissident Soviet biologist Zota's a met Beta reported on the disaster in the journal New Scientist in nineteen seventy six you the Soviet government continued to deny the occurrence of the disaster until it began declassifying relevant documents in nineteen eighty nine. It's been posited the US CIA knew about the disaster for years before it was uncovered but kept it a secret and later downplayed the severity of the accident to avoid data sowing doubt about the safety of American nuclear plants. The custom disaster was rated at a level six as a serious accident on the International National Nuclear and radiological event scale making it the third most severe nuclear accident ever the two above it major accidents rated as level seven on the scale are the disasters at Fukushima answer noble the reason the disaster is remembered as the cash disaster. Even though it didn't take place there is because people were told that a boiler explosion the city caused a mess that residents were made to clean up with no protective gear. Russia has claimed claimed that the plant stopped dumping waste into the river though some people have questioned whether the dumps ever really stopped some villagers who lived along the river where relocated but many still live in their contaminated villages cancer birth defects miscarriages and other health issues occur at the higher rates in places along the river. The Mayak plant is still in operation but it no longer processes weapons-grade plutonium it now reprocesses processes spent nuclear fuel.

Soviet Union Soviet Government International National Nuclear United States Chelyabinsk Chillier Pinsk Keystone Russia Zota New Scientist CIA Twenty Thousand Square Kilomet Eight Thousand Square Miles Eighty Tons
"nuclear arms race" Discussed on The Heat

The Heat

09:30 min | 2 years ago

"nuclear arms race" Discussed on The Heat

"Today are both excellent examples. The rewards of patients the importance of this treaty transcends numbers hurts. We have listened to the wisdom of in an old. Russian Maxon does not trust but verify Chania Anthony you repeat that at every meeting in one thousand nine hundred seventy towards the end of the Cold War. US President Ronald Reagan and Soviet General Secretary Mikhail Gorbachev shocked the world when they signed the Intermediate Range Uh Nuclear Forces Treaty also known as I n F the treaty bound the two nations from possessing nuclear and non-nuclear short and medium range missiles it was widely God as a right step in stemming the spread and threat of nuclear weapons worldwide but in February two thousand nineteen the trump administration formally suspended the IMF treaty and Russia immediately followed suit by late August both countries had formally withdrawn and Russia announced it was already resuming production of missiles previously previously banned under the treaty these moves by both the United States and Russia has raised concerns that the world may be heading into a new and perhaps more dangerous nuclear arms race. Hello I'm honored to welcome to the podcast with us to discuss the IMF treaty is Kingston Reef. He's director for disarmament and threat-reduction policy breath the oems Control Association Kingston Welcome to the show. Thanks so much for having me Kingston. What drew you to this kind of work so I I became interested in the subject abject nuclear weapons. When I took a course in college during my junior year titled the Cuban Missile Crisis and weapons of mass destruction in the course was taught by two professors who had pioneered groundbreaking research on the crisis which led to revelations that the crisis was far more dangerous us than any of the participants knew or thought at the time and they thought it was deemed dangerous at the time and that quite frankly it was luck that was the reason a nuclear war did not occur in nineteen sixty two and so I remember sitting in the course being for the first time literally scared in thinking that wow it's it's lucky that that I'm sitting this classroom that that I grew up that you know my parents exist and realizing the danger that that led to the potential use of nuclear weapons then still exists today and there's not enough awareness about that danger with all your years covering the issue. How do you you think the wolves stands right now. With regards to the threat of nuclear warfare we have of course a handful of new and unpredictable actors that have joined the nuclear club mm since the original. IMF Treaty was signed and we look at that clock the nuclear clock as it edges closer and closer to twelve o'clock well. I think the the risk of a intended nuclear use between two states remains low and I still lower than during the height of of the Cold War when the United States and Soviet Union pointed tens of thousands of of nuclear weapons against one another and we're engaged in proxy conflicts throughout the globe but nonetheless I think a case can be made that the risk of unintended nuclear use use by miscalculation or even potentially deliberate deliberate use in a crisis may be going up and I think one of the concerns as we sit here about a month and a half or so removed from the formal collapse flaps of the IMF treaty is that with the end of the IMF treaty there is now only one nuclear arms control agreement regulating the size of the world's world's two largest nuclear forces the world's two largest arsenals being possessed by the United States and Russia and that is the two thousand ten New Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty and that agreement is slated needed to expire in February of Twenty twenty one and if the agreement expires with nothing to replace it for the first time in five decades. It's there will be no limits on the size of the US and Russian nuclear arsenals in that case. I think the risk of unconstrained. US and Russian nuclear competition will go up the risk of even more fraught relations between the United States and Russia while go up think China is likely to react react negatively understandably to a world in which there are no limits on us in Russian nuclear forces and may consider increasing the size of its arsenal is well so we stand in a moment right now where we are looking at the potential collapse of the entire US Russian nuclear arms control architecture we once lived in a world where there were no negotiated limits on on those two arsenals. We know what that world looks like. We know that the danger that it posed and it's one that we should be trying to avoid returning to with much greater sense of urgency. That sounds very ominous snow. It's been more than thirty years since the. IMF Treaty was signed. Are you surprised that President President trump pulled out of ultimately. I'm not surprised I mean this. President is very unpredictable. this was an agreement that he had not expressed particular views on during his his run for office in two thousand sixteen and even during his first year or so in office but but Russia has been deliberately unacceptably and flagrantly violating the agreement since two thousand fourteen according to the to the United States and there has been a growing number of voices inside the US military the attorney in particular who have been expressing concern about the fact that China has never been a party to this agreement China has developed several thousand conventional and nuclear missiles with a range prohibited by the Treaty and defense officials have been arguing that those missiles have been contributing to the erosion of the US military military position in the Asia Pacific so when presented with with evidence I'm not surprised that the president withdrew from the agreement and is now trying to negotiate in true trump trumpian fashion a much bigger more comprehensive deal that includes more parties than just the United Right states and Russia there are some people some experts who say that the reason the Russians adopted on the course of action that they did in two thousand fourteen was this up because the world has changed that this was a treaty that was signed by the Soviet Union which doesn't exist any longer that NATO had expanded eastwards seth Russia face new threats yes Russia has been making that argument for some time. I understand where the Russians are coming from there that doesn't mean I agree that the right course of action and for Russia was to violate the treaty in the way that it did of course the IMF treaty like many agreements had withdrawal clause were Russia concerned about the changing aging global environment. were concerned that the IMF treaty was asymmetrically. I should say restricting Russia then it could have proceeded to withdraw from the agreement using the provisions laid out in the treaty for doing that but he didn't do it. It secretly illegally tried to violate the agreement it. I didn't think it would get caught. It did get caught when you look at a Russia's military forces when you look at the fact that it's modernizing its air and sea launch the cruise missile capabilities both conventional and nuclear of course Air Sea launch missiles were were not limited by the IMF treaty the there it wasn't a convincing military rationale for Russia to seek relief violate the agreement and developed a ground launched cruise missiles would which had tried to do so. I see the argument that the Russians were making but it hardly hardly justifies the decision that Russia made what does Europe think of the demise of the IMF I but if you look at it really for years the tree has helped prevent the threat of nuclear war in Europe. Absolutely I think we've seen several European nations expressed concern about the collapse of the treaty and specifically the potential for the return of a new euro missile race where both the United States and NATO and Russia Russia are deploying unlimited numbers of ground launched cruise and ballistic missile systems formerly prohibited by the treaty so several European appea- nations in organizations expressed concern about the president's decision to to withdraw from the treaty when he first announced in October ultimately NATO what did express support for the United States decision to withdraw but NATO is also emphasize the importance of continuing to seek arms control all measures and options in an attempt to prevent a new Euro missile race but more focus attention and creativity tiffany needs to be put toward what future arms control options might be good this perhaps motivate Europe to seek its own kind of agreement with Russia could we she negotiations between Brussels say Russia. I think that's unlikely so fires that occurring without the participation of the United States. I I think the role Europe ought to be playing here is to encourage the trump administration to well first salvaging what's remaining of the US Russia arms control architecture tamely agreeing to extend new start by another five years beyond.

Russia IMF US Nuclear Forces Treaty President NATO seth Russia Soviet Union China Europe Maxon President trump Chania Anthony Kingston oems Control Association Kingston Reef
First fully contained underground nuclear test - September 19, 1957

This Day in History Class

04:56 min | 2 years ago

First fully contained underground nuclear test - September 19, 1957

"Pillow. Welcome to this day in history class where we flipped through the book of history and bring you a new page every day. Today is September nineteenth twenty nineteen. The day was September nineteenth nineteen fifty seven the first fully contained underground detonation took place at a research center in Nevada. The test which was part of a series of nuclear tests called Operation Plumb Bob did not produce produce any radioactive fallout operation plumb bob stirred up controversy once much of it was declassified. Operation Plumb Bob Up was a series of twenty three nuclear detonations in six safety tests conducted by the US military between May and October of nineteen fifty seven at the Nevada test site the test took place during the Cold War at a time when the US and the Soviet Union were engaged in a nuclear arms race. The two were spending a lot of time and money on developing bigger and better nuclear weapons like the hydrogen bomb. The threat threat of nuclear war was always present. The Nevada test site was an important insight for atmospheric and underground nuclear testing from the nineteen fifties to the nineteen ninety s Operation Plumb Bob was one of many series of nuclear tests conducted during this time but it was a particularly long and comprehensive series series it tested nuclear weapons for potential inclusion in the defense arsenal most of the shots in the series were conducted to test design principles for nuclear nuclear warheads that would be put on intercontinental and intermediate range missiles but Plumb Bob also tested warheads to make advances in air defense. It's and anti-submarine weapons systems. The safety tests were designed to make sure that there would be no nuclear reaction if it's high explosive components components were accidentally detonated in addition to this the operation allowed the military to test the effect of nuclear blasts on structures aircraft and and it allows scientists to study the effects of radiation on living organisms pigs were subjected to experiments to test protective materials and the effects of flying debris. The Rainier test was conducted on September nineteenth. At four fifty nine. PM local time in an underground around tunnel a modified w twenty five warhead was used for the test. It's explosive yield was one point seven kilotons because it wasn't underground tests. It was not easily observable by outsiders and had less potential of causing a massive amount of fallout seismologists around the world could detect the tests which was conducted to evaluate containment and detection of underground nuclear tests the success excessive rainier incited efforts to understand the phenomenology of contained underground explosion those included tunneling into the radioactive zone theoretical article modeling and lab measurements more underground tests were conducted the next year but in late nineteen fifty eight the US Britain and the the Soviet Union agreed to a three year moratorium on nuclear testing after that almost all nuclear testing Nevada was done underground during the nuclear testing phase of Operation Bob. A lot of radiation was released into the air since the other tests were not underground declassified documents documents revealed that the Plumb Bob Tests released about fifty eight thousand three hundred kilo curies of radio iodide into the atmosphere over four months civilians and troops who conducted exercises near detonations were exposed to relatively high levels of radiation nuclear fallout is a hazard to the environment and to biological life and it can cause illness and death in nineteen sixty three the US and a Soviet Union along with other countries signed the partial test ban treaty which banned nuclear weapons tests in the atmosphere in outer space and underwater. I'm eavesdrop coat and hopefully you know a little more about history today than you did. Yesterday you can follow us on twitter instagram and facebook at P. D. H. fee podcast. We'll see you here in the same place tomorrow. for more podcasts from iheartradio visit the iheartradio. APP APPLE PODCASTS or wherever you listen to your favorite

Nevada BOB United States Soviet Union Twitter Detonations Rainier Facebook Britain Fifty Eight Thousand Three Hun Four Months Three Year
"nuclear arms race" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

12:53 min | 2 years ago

"nuclear arms race" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Nuclear arms race the total number of nuclear weapons in the world reached its peak in nineteen eighty six the nuclear threat was very very prestigious my life so my father was a World War two veteran he was deployed on a mine sweeper in the Pacific when the US dropped nuclear bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. and I couldn't get him to talk about the war but he would very readily talk about nuclear weapons and the nuclear threat and the relationship between the United States and the Soviet Union hello I'm John column in the ceilings ABC theater presentation of the band. I play a father in a typical American family who experienced the catastrophic events of a full scale nuclear war. before we begin like a caution parents about the graphic depiction of nuclear explosions and devastating effects there was a film in the U. S. in the early nineteen eighties it was called the day after and it was a fictional film about the Soviet Union dropping nuclear bombs on the United States I was probably eleven years old something like that and I was scared out of my mind and I would often fall asleep at night and go straight into a nightmare about nuclear war the one he wasn't thinking about the total annihilation of the human race Jeff was thinking about space rockets anything to do with space and how to get there really he was an ambitious teenager and his dream was to work for NASA and so I was determined that the best way of doing that would be to build the most amazing laser that could balance beam awful reflector that had been placed on the moon during the Apollo eleven mission and so I was working very hard on building that laser why was it that you wanted to to go into space so much it opened my mind to to the universe it was beyond this world and I actually saw when I was fairly young the potential for collaboration between the United States and the Soviet Union it just never made sense to me that we were pointing nuclear weapons at each other when we could be collaborating to do extraordinary things in space was this also a way for you to bond with your father it was it absolutely once because he was so emotionally distant I didn't know at the time if that was because of the war or something else but my father was separate emotionally from the rest of us and I thought here's the thing we have in common this fascination with science this fascination with space and that's why I pursued it and it was during this pursuit in. the summer of nineteen eighty six the truck was riding his bike ten electronic shop to buy the final part for his super laser I see a van coming in the opposite direction and she doesn't see me and just smashes right into me and I am launched like a rocket ten feet backwards I land on the back of my hand I'm knocked unconscious I was not wearing a helmet and I woke up in the hospital a few hours later he was discharged from the hospital that day within a few weeks Jeff began having seizures so back to the hospital he went this time to have a CT scan of his brain and it reveals a tumor you know you're fifteen years old you're about to start your sophomore year of high school what's going through your mind so I two things going through my mind when I'm not sure it's appropriate to talk about I mean go ahead radio you know we can cut it out so that one was actually a plan to lose my virginity that summer. and let's just say that that did not work out and the second was to complete my laser project right yes so you have to put all those on pause and do you have to very quickly go in for surgery yes the neurologists and if I could get a surge in the following day that's when I should have surgery the surgery took I think five or six hours they removed the tumor in its entirety the test results took more than a week and I was in that hospital just waiting and waiting and agonizing over what we're going to hear. and so yeah about seven days pass and she walks in and I could just tell from the look on her face she was not going to deliver some good news and she told me I'm very sorry to say but. you have brain cancer and it's a very aggressive fast growing type of cancer I said how long do I have and she said maybe two years with those words chefs world was instantly flipped upside down. he was no longer just a regular kid he was a kid with cancer he began radiation and chemotherapy treatments and tried his best to keep up with his school work while his mom fretted over him just dad was growing more and more distant and then Jeff heard about I wish I had gotten involved in eighteen support group for kids with cancer. and I heard some guys talking about their wishes and they tell me all about the things that they've done you know going to Disneyland or meeting a famous athlete. and I say I I thought that wish things for little kids this is will work kids. I just didn't see myself that way so anyway they tell me about the starlight children's foundation my mom gets in touch with them and a couple comes over to our house to talk to me about my wish did you have an idea of what your wish could be I was thinking about. something related to space so I said I just have to ask can you guys possibly get me on the next space shuttle mission. they just look at me like your ridiculousness a. absolutely not. well if they're honest if they they were on us the US and the sea will do you have a few of the second wish as in something more attainable but just rain was already whirling into action I hasn't recently seen that film again the day after about nuclear war and so I went to the library one day and did lots of research and learned about the dimensions of our nuclear arsenals and I was really feeling angry that we were investing so much in nuclear weapons I was thinking maybe be a good idea to and invest in cancer research trying to prevented or treated or something like that so you're asked by this couple you know will what's your backup wish and so what what do you tell them they could tell that something it popped into my head and they said you've got something down she and I I do I I really do. I would like to travel to the Soviet Union and then meet with Mikhail Gorbachev their leader so that we can discuss a plan to bring an end to nuclear weapons in the Cold War. how did they react to that they say do you have maybe a third wish. I said I tone I really don't I totally understand if you can't make this happen but it's my only wish as far fetched as his wish may have sounded the starlight foundation began to formulate a plan. Jeff was excited but his parents not so much my mom was very worried about the Soviet Union she thought that if I went to the Soviet Union that I might never come back and so she could tell I was enthusiastic about going on this trip but at the same time she was worried about the trip what about your father what did he make of the lash my father was unimpressed he he wanted me to do one thing and that was the focus on school and he didn't seem to accept the prospect that I might not be around in a couple of years and so what was the plan of action hello to the foundation plan on making your wish come true how are they going to get you to the Soviet Union for getting me over there they learned of an organization called youth ambassadors of America that ran these trips to foreign countries Soviet Union being one of them that were sort of world peace kinds of things may bring over a number of American teenagers and then meet with local teens and have conferences. so that took care of one angle and then the other angle was the meeting with Gorbachev and they looked at a whole bunch of different approaches to that and we're contacting business people who had connections to Gorbachev and you name it so the starlight leadership said we're doing our best to get that meeting with Mister Gorbachev and we can't insure that it will happen but we'll do our best he completed his treatment and was getting stronger every day though he was still tired and had trouble concentrating but with his doctor's blessing Jeff packed his bags hopped on a flight and made his way to the Soviet Union first stop in and clapped Leningrad was amazing we had this wonderful city tour and then came back to our hotel and I was pulled aside to meet with a journalist so I sat down with him and we spoke for probably an hour I didn't understand what it was for and as soon as that meeting was over we hopped on an overnight train to Moscow before you got to the Soviet Union you know did you have any pre conceptions or notions about what people or or life would be like there so many of my images of the Soviet Union were related to films like red dawn these films that portrayed the Soviets is hardcore militants who were determined to destroy the United States and I must say I went to the Soviet Union with a sort of expectation that I was going to see a militant country with a militant people and I was quite surprised by the people actually met another one of those stereo types he'd seen in the movies was the Soviet secret agent dressed in a long coat hat and glasses Jeff in the other youth ambassadors had there I. eyes peeled when we were touring the city in Leningrad we were looking around to see if we could track down. the spa is and we're kind of disappointed we couldn't find anybody so we went on to Moscow and as we're walking through the city someone in our group notices that there's a guy who's been following us I was like no no no no way. really. and he's not absolutely and totally sure like every time I turn around he turns and looks at whatever's next to him so the movie. it was it was right out of a movie and that he says he's wearing a trench coat which was which for me lists Soviet spy. it was great and so one of the teenagers says okay I've got an idea will count down from three almost spin around and say hello and Russian to the guy. I'm a little hesitant because I don't want that to dissuade any Russian decision makers from canning my meeting with Mister Gorbachev but finally I given and so we do the countdown we also spin around and we yell out yeah and the guy who even would turn around to look into a store whatever turns round is looking into a wall there's nothing to look at. it was it was classic yep of course that was in the only place where they were looking at us or listening to us we could see in the hotel rooms in Moscow there were sections of each wall that had a different covering and one of the kids of course had to check it out and so poked a hole in it and some microphone inside so they were watching us they were listening to us they wanted to know what we were doing there this frees you out or did you just kind of find it funny I guess the only thing they did was in Moscow one of the girls went back to her room and found two guys going through all of our stuff that was a little disturbing I was.

Soviet Union Mikhail Gorbachev United States Moscow Hiroshima Jeff Pacific Nagasaki. fifteen years eleven years seven days six hours two years ten feet one day
How Has the Korean War Changed History?

BrainStuff

08:53 min | 2 years ago

How Has the Korean War Changed History?

"On June twenty-fifth nineteen fifty North Korean tanks rolled across the thirty eighth parallel the line that separated communist North Korea from US-backed South Korea, as a now, declassified US intelligence cable from Tokyo to Washington concluded, the incursion wasn't just a mere raid, quote the size of the North Korean forces employed, the depth of penetration the intensity of the attack and the landings made miles south of the parallel on the east coast indicated that the North Koreans are engaged in all out offensive to subjugate, South Korea. It was the start of a war that is still not ended a full seven decades later. The Korean war, which ultimately would pit the US against China in the first ever, confrontation between the two superpowers would claim the lives of an estimated two point five million military members and civilians including nearly thirty four thousand Americans the fighting would cease with an armistice on July twenty seventh nineteen fifty three but the Geneva conference of nineteen fifty four failed to produce a peace treaty in the north and south remained tense enemies, and that's the way things have pretty much continued, though in twenty eighteen North Korean dictator Kim Jong UN and South Korean president Mundi een announced that they would work together toward a peace treaty. But after the collapse of February summit between US President Donald Trump and North Korean dictator Kim Jong those tensions seemed likely to remain for a while longer. In the US the Korean war is sometimes called the forgotten war, because it's overshadowed by the conflicts that came before, and after it the stirring victory of World War Two, and the lengthy, painful ordeal of the Vietnam war. We spoke with Edward roads. A professor on the faculty of the shar school of policy and government at George Mason University in Fairfax Virginia, who's an expert in American foreign, and national security policy. He said modern Americans don't think about it much. Vietnam was more dramatic. And World War Two is more in victorious. Nevertheless, the overlooked conflict has exerted a powerful influence that still felt today according to roads, the war forever changed the course of US foreign, and national security policy. Compelling the US to accept a permanent military involvement around the globe, even in peacetime. It also helped drive, the creation of a vast US nuclear arsenal to deter possible, communist aggression with the threat of annihilation and a global nuclear arms race. Still continues all this happened, according to roads after career. A nation that had been occupied by the Japanese from nineteen ten to nineteen Forty-five was split into two by the US, and the USSR after World War Two, he explains, it was a practical matter. There were Japanese armies that had retreated into Korea from insurer, and they needed to be disarmed. We split that large task with the Soviet Union the understanding that the Soviets would design the Japanese in the north, and we would do it in the south, but as the Cold War developed between the US and its European allies and the Soviets, the temporary partition turned into a permanent one with the formation of a communist regime headed by Kim Il Sung in the north at an authoritarian pro American government headed by Sigmund, e in the south each regime sought self as the real government of Korea and its rival as illegitimate. Kim Il Sung decided to settle the matter by invading South Korea. And in may nineteen fifty finally obtained reluctant approval from his patron these stallion regime about a month later. Kim launched a surprise attack which initially had devastating result. What's the South Korean forces essentially dissolved the UN Security, Council taking advantage of a Soviet boycott of the body, then passed a measure, calling for member nations to assist the beleaguered South Koreans that mandate enabled US president Harry Truman to respond militarily without having to go to congress for a declaration of war. Up until that point, the US hadn't seen South Korea's having much strategic importance erode said, but when the North Korean tanks rolled across the border, the image that flashed in Truman's mind was that this was a repeat of what the Nazis did his responses to stand up thinking that if we had stood up to Hitler early on the world would have been a better place, an outnumbered contingent of UN forces formed, a desperate line of defense around the only part of South Korea, not yet, captured by the communists and managed to hold off the invaders for two months that gave General Douglas MacArthur, who had been placed in overall command of the UN forces enough time to make an audacious and fibia landing at Inchon near the South Korean capital of Seoul on September fifteenth. Nineteen fifty cutting off the over extended North Koreans MacArthur's forces chased the invaders back north across the thirty eighth parallel and by mid October had captured the North Korean capital of Pyongyang, but MacArthur overconfident kept pushing the North Koreans back to the Yellow River the border with China, China. Responded with a massive counterattack of between thirteen thousand and three hundred thousand troops. This time it was the UN forces who were driven back a bloody stalemate on the ground developed as the US pounded North Korea from the air MacArthur, eventually was relieved of his command by Truman and replaced with general Matthew Ridgway. The US abandoned the idea of total victory and shifted to a holding action against the communist forces road said MacArthur embraced the idea that there's no substitute for victory. You beat the enemy, and they surrender. But Rhodes explained after the Chinese intervention, quote, we're still in a situation where there's got to be a substitute for victory because how are we going to fight the manpower of China? There's a realization that we can't fight this war to victory and it's hard for the American people to accept. The longer. The war stretched on the more popular it became back in the US, many of the soldiers sent to Korea where reservists who had served in World War, Two roads, explained they've got homes and families and jobs, and then they were called up and sent to fight another war. There was a feeling that this wasn't fair. Eventually Truman successor president. Dwight Eisenhower ran on a promise that he would go to Korea and seek an end to the conflict and actually did that a month before his inauguration in nineteen Fifty-three. But though, Eisenhower had ended the fighting the Korean war still shaped his policies road said, Eisenhower looked at this as the wrong war at the wrong time using the wrong weapons, he reaches the conclusion that with the Cold War going on with the Soviets, we have to plan for the long haul. We're going to sustain this kind of military deterrence that led to resources being pumped into the development of a massive nuclear deterrent. The could be used to contain the Soviets. Additionally, Eisenhower began attempting to form licenses with more and more countries in an effort to create a unified front to hold off communist aggression. We also spoke via Email with Charles k Armstrong, the Korea foundation professor of Korean studies in the social sciences at Columbia University. He said, the US was forced to take China more. Seriously as a military power. After fighting twist del mate in the Korean war general MacArthur, had severely underestimated the Chinese military's willingness to confront the US and capacity to fight leading to a bad route for you, enforces, the initial months after China entered the war. China's participation in the Korean war. Also consolidated malls rule and asked the hopes of sub Americans. The communist regime could be rolled back and replaced by Changcai checks nationalists. Armstrong said mouse willingness to support the North Koreans directly as opposed to stallions reluctance helped solidify China North Korean relations, and caused the North Koreans to be more distrustful of the Russians for the US China was seen from the Korean war onward as the primary ally of North Korea. And the primary great power that was an enemy of the US in Korea. Armistice, ended the fighting but North Korea now backed by the Chinese remained as a belligerent enemy to South Korea, the ongoing threatment that US forces couldn't just withdrawn come home Armstrong, notes, the North Korean invasion in the emerging Cold War convinced American policymakers that the US needed a permanent military presence in Asia and Europe in order to contain communist aggression. Additionally, the Korean war helped set the table for another even bloodier, and more painful future conflict, according to Armstrong Korea led directly to the US decision to help the French against communist led insurgency in colonial Vietnam, and then after the French defeat to intervene in support of an anti communist regime in South Vietnam, which blocked an election called for by the nineteen fifty four Geneva conference that helps set the stage for the Vietnam war. Armstrong, said the most lasting legacy of the Korean war for the US was these stablishment of a global military presence over the long term and a commitment to confront communism throughout the world during the Cold War. And for Korea and East Asia ideological and military confrontation that has lasted seven decades that included a US force stationed in South Korea as a deterrent to North Korea, which in turn has a massive array of long range, artillery, and rockets equipped with chemical and biological weapons aimed at Seoul. That's in addition to the nuclear weapons and ballistic missile arsenal. The Trump so far has been unable to persuade the North Korean regime to give up.

United States North Korea South Korea China Douglas Macarthur President Trump Kim Jong Un Armstrong Korea Dwight Eisenhower Harry Truman Charles K Armstrong Kim Jong UN Seoul
"nuclear arms race" Discussed on This Week with George Stephanopoulos

This Week with George Stephanopoulos

02:45 min | 2 years ago

"nuclear arms race" Discussed on This Week with George Stephanopoulos

"That said, Tulsi Gabbard campaign is being boosted by Putin apologists and, you know, in the past few met with a sod, you defended Russian military operations in Syria. You oppose the arrest of Julian Assange, suggested that Russian election meddling is no worse than America's historically. Do you believe that bladder reporting is a threat to US national security? You know, it's unfortunate that you're citing that article George because it's a whole lot of fake news. What I am focused on is, what is in the best interest of the American people. What is in the best interest of our national security, keeping the American people safe and what I'm pointing out consistently time and time again, is that our continued wasteful regime change wars have been counterproductive to the interests of the American people and the approach that this administration has taken in essentially choosing conflict, rather than seeing how we can cooperate and work out our differences with other countries in. The world has been counterproductive to our national many Democrats have been tougher on Vladimir Putin than President Trump. Do you think Democrats are taking too hard line? I think that the esscalation of tensions that we've seen between the United States and nuclear armed countries like Russia and China and you're right. It has come from this administration. Also come from some Democrats and Republicans in congress. It has brought us to this very dangerous point where nuclear strategists point out that we're at a greater risk of nuclear war now than ever before in history. We've got understand what the consequences of that art. It's something that we in Hawaii know all too well with the wakeup call that we had about a year, a little over a year ago when we got a text alert over a million cellphones across our state saying that a ballistic missile was incoming seek shelter immediately. This is not a drill. This was terrifying for people all across our state because there was no shelter and. Even though that turned out to be a false alarm it points to the very real threat. We face if we continue to go down this path of this new Cold War, ever, escalating tensions and a nuclear arms race. And this is what I seek to change to build relationships that are based on cooperation rather than conflict deescalate, these tensions work out the differences that we have the problems that we have with other countries and also recognized that in examples like denuclearizing the Korean peninsula. We've got to be able to work with countries like Russia and China to be able to accomplish that objective to keep the American people. Safe congresswoman, thanks for your time this morning. Thank you joined now by another democrat. Congressman Seth Moulton from Massachusetts congressman thank you for joining us this morning. Let's begin right there, where they come together or Plato..

Vladimir Putin US Congressman Seth Moulton Tulsi Gabbard Julian Assange China congressman congress Syria America Hawaii Russia George President Trump Massachusetts
"nuclear arms race" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"nuclear arms race" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"About the increase in these cases. Mike morning. Hey, good morning. Yeah. The number of people infected with either committee gonorrhea or syphilis the three sexually transmitted diseases track. By the department are up all across the state and in some specific areas. The number is at a record high like in San Francisco county, where people are contracting committee nearly twice the rate at the rest of California. Dr James watch of communicable diseases control at the California Department of public health says there are a number of risk factors that are contributing to the rise. We're seeing increases in a variety of different populations. Definitely in folks. We know the homelessness is a risk factor. We know that drug. Uses a risk factor. We know that age is a risk factor. So young folks on tend to be at increased risk of for TD's and Watson's rural populations are also seeing spikes. And the rate of STI transmission with the link between drug use and a spike and syphilis cases. We saw nine percent increase in committee ah we saw sixteen percent increase in gonorrhea. We saw a similar increase at twenty one percent increase in syphilis suggest in one year. We're seeing those kinds of increases and in the next hour. We'll go more in depth about some of the contributing factors behind the rise. In STD's across the state does the public health department have any idea how to stop it? What kind of education programs are going to do? And we're going to talk about that this morning as well. They've got a bunch of different things that they're trying to get the word out and a lot of it revolves around people getting regularly screened for these things because a lot of people who are infected. They don't know. They're. Effected when they pass it on to someone else. There's a chance that they can also be reinfected, even if they're cleaned. So all right. Thank you very much. My leaders from Russia and North Korea are holding a summit what they have been discussing. And what this could mean for the nuclear arms race. We're getting new word from Russia. We're going to get a live update from Russia. Next voices you.

Russia Mike morning syphilis California Department of publi San Francisco California Dr James Watson North Korea twenty one percent sixteen percent nine percent one year
"nuclear arms race" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"nuclear arms race" Discussed on KTRH

"Joined a small club of countries capable of military action space when it successfully destroyed one of it satellites, but it's the debris field not the country's new capabilities that concern nessa Russian President Vladimir Putin says that he got nuclear weapons that are invincible nuclear arms race is back on forthing to turn tensions with Washington into a new Cold War one way to get. Easy way, quite frankly. Executive order signed by President Trump to protect America's electrical against electro-magnetic says the first establish a comprehensive policy improve resilience to EMP's. Communications. Message your entire world. Now our national power outage. Signal auto at gas stations that are unable to cast without electricity have left on about surprised or stranded on ways across America. The most immediate concern for thirties here in New York City is what's happening in the subways thousands are trapped in the other going that this..

America Vladimir Putin President Trump New York City President EMP national power Washington Executive
"nuclear arms race" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"nuclear arms race" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"May have joined a small club of countries capable of military action space when it successfully destroyed one of its satellites the debris field, not the country's new capabilities that concern NASA bussing President Vladimir Putin says that he got nuclear weapons that are invincible nuclear arms race is back on reading to turn tensions with Washington into a new Cold War way to get at. Easy way, quite frankly. Executive order. President Trump to protect America's electrical against. Says I. Establish a comprehensive policy. EMP's? Career. Communications. The entire world. Now our exports. Power outage. Signal. Gas stations that are unable to up cat without electricity on drivers stranded on ways across America. The most immediate concern here in New York City is what's happening in the subways thousands are trapped in the underground system. This. This..

Vladimir Putin President America New York City NASA Trump Washington Executive
"nuclear arms race" Discussed on UN News

UN News

05:31 min | 3 years ago

"nuclear arms race" Discussed on UN News

"The nuclear arms race is back on the head of the conference on disarmament has warned u n uses Daniel Johnson spoke to Michael Miller who is the secretary general of the conference the only multilateral venue for disarmament discussions in the interview. Mr Miller explained why the forum has been deadlocked for more than two decades. And what this could mean for the future of the world a compliment Izzo which was created for years ago. This year is was and still is supposed to be the single place where Member States, negotiate treaties. It hasn't a ghost thing for the last twenty two years. This is today with fissile treaties. Anything of course, the big item is around nuclear stuff because this has been the order of the day for the past civil decades. This has this changing we can talk about that in a moment. But that was a focus on it still is and there's many reasons for that the will change the geopolitical situation changed the major powers who possess. Nuclear weapons or not particularly interested in doing away with them because there were very central to their defense strategies. But nevertheless, it is a place where we have been talking for a long time. And it is one of the many manifestations of why the United Nations was created in the first place. It's a neutral table around which everybody begin small, rich and poor powerful. And not so powerful can get together and discuss the rules, and the regulations that we are collectively agreeing on on how we manage our planet. It's worth reminding dicey. Maybe don't know. But the UN charter mentioned specifically disarmament it calls for weapons of mass destruction to be removed from this planet the treaty of Asai who were saying before we came on air. Also contains a little known close about not just Germany disarming. All great power source. The first resolution that was ever passed by the journalists MD was on this holiday, and it has done extraordinary things that conferences disarmament. They came up negotiated unsigned the nuclear proliferation treaty, the Biological Weapons Convention that stopped the use. And the production of those weapons that every nasty. It was part of the conversations are on the partial -ticipant treaty the comprehensive nuclear-test-ban entry a whole series of very, very important treaties. That have been the bedrock of the way that we have conducted international relations for the past forty years. So that was part of the bold and pivotal role of the conference on disarmament that you were talking about when you spoke to the sixty five Member States, plus the observer nations a few weeks ago when the first plenary session opened, and that's what you want to get back to where I want to get back to the ability to do. So you know history is a moving target. Sometimes we agree. Sometimes you don't sometimes we have wars sometimes with peace. But throughout all this. We have to continue talking into we have to continue being able to debate and to make sure that we don't blindly walk into situations that are catastrophic which is very much. What solemn it is about? So that's your very specific idea of where we are. But I just wonder how that Mary's with younger generations than apple. But because they want. Immediately abs-. How do we take the conference on disarmament out of this palace of nations? How to explain the value of what is actually, but actually things have been taken out of the conference on disarmament treaties that have been negotiated. The most recent one was the small arms treaty with very important treaty that addressed one of the worst problems on the planet. In fact, more people die from small arms and die from you know, big cannons. And so we the world agreed on how to deal with that to the trade in that. It's not perfect. But it's a lot better than not having any the new generation is quite right in being impatient. Right now, the nuclear arms race is back on in the sense that lots of countries who have nuclear arms are upgrading their stockpiles coming up with new ideas that going exactly the opposite direction of where we have been going for quite a while. And where the majority of the world's population wants to we have a band treaty that was actually agreed on not last year which bans the production the use and the stockpiling of nuclear weapons, but that problem actually pales in. Harrison with what is coming down the pike in terms of new technologies and not official intelligence. The weaponization of new technologies is happening already. It's not being regulated. There is no ethical injection to how we're going to use them is done in the private sector, and we need to seriously sit down and stop discussing how we are going to regulate the use of these weapons that are very very scary. I should say that in addition to being the director general hand, the union engineer am the secretary general on the conference on disarmament. He will also the personal Representative of the UN secretary General Antonio Gutierrez who only last year launched a new agenda for disarmament and he called for. Well, exactly what you're calling for more action to what's your sort of interaction. If you don't mind me asking between yourself, and Mr Gutierrez on that agenda that he so keen and community sets the tone sets the policy and I tried to implement, but what it did more than that. I mean, his agenda for the summer was every important document. The fact is that we cannot look at this moment in isolation disarmament has to be done for a purpose. It has to be done to save lives. As to be done to help countries improve their development level. It has to be used to create peace in general and to create an atmosphere in which the wellbeing of our brothers and sisters around the globe continues to grow, and that changes the conversation it because it's kind of taking it out of his silo and pushing all of these experts and military chaps and all of these other people who have been sitting there doing disarmament not much else to really look at what they're doing a much broader context for the wellbeing of our planet.

United Nations General Antonio Gutierrez Michael Miller Biological Weapons Convention Izzo Daniel Johnson Germany Asai MD director general apple Mary Harrison secretary Representative
"nuclear arms race" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"nuclear arms race" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Uh-huh. Pacific eh, this is democracy. Now, an economic miracle is taking place in the United States. And the only thing that can stop it. Or foolish wars politics or ridiculous partisan investigations. The union address President Trump attacks Democrats and the Mueller investigation, even as he calls for bipartisan unity. Trump also threatened a new nuclear arms race and vowed to build a wall along the southern border. This is a moral issue. The lawless state southern border is a threat to the safety security and financial well being of all Americans. In US history. Trump did not mention the longest government shutdown in US history, which even delayed his speech by a week. But former gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams did she made history as the first African American woman to give the democratic response. The shutdown was a stunt engineered by the president of the United States one that defied every Tenet of fairness and abandoned not just our people, but our values. Will air highlights from the speeches of President Trump and Stacey Abrams, plus speak to democratic congresswoman Ilhan Omar of Minnesota. She recently became one of the first two Muslim congresswoman a Somali American refugee. She also became the first member of congress to wear a hit job will also be joined by Anna Maria are Chila who protested the confirmation of supreme court Justice Brett Cavanaugh, she attended the state of the union address as a guest of congresswoman, Alexandra Cossio Cortez all that and more coming up. Welcome to democracy now democracy now dot org..

President Trump Stacey Abrams United States president Alexandra Cossio Cortez Brett Cavanaugh congress Anna Maria Mueller Ilhan Omar Minnesota
"nuclear arms race" Discussed on Abe Lincoln's Top Hat

Abe Lincoln's Top Hat

02:49 min | 3 years ago

"nuclear arms race" Discussed on Abe Lincoln's Top Hat

"Three hundred to three thousand four hundred miles that are prohibited by the treaty, which applies only to Russia and the United States. So, you know, we'll see again, basically. So you understand right? So basically, the US and Russia played by two different sets of rules in the Chinese are just like screw it. We're not in this treaty. So who knows does this lead to another nuclear arms race? Who knows? Let's go back to the good old days of the Cold War era. All I know is you can't hug your children with nuclear arms. You can't you do untold Russia that no they haven't they have not the Russian government accused the Trump administration of looking for any excuse to get out of the treaty. So this is a court into Dmitry peskov spokesperson for President Vladimir Putin. He says on the whole the reluctance of Americans to listen to reason and to hold any kind of substantive talk with us shows that the wash that Washington decided to crush the treaty along time ago. Oh, so there we go nuclear strategy but nuclear strategy published by the Pentagon last year makes clear that preparations are being made to counter Beijing's deployments, the North Atlantic Treaty organization. A NATO the military alliance that was created to counter the Soviet threat seventy years ago in Dorset the announcement that was made by palm pail. So it looks like we're getting some international support over this again. What does it mean? Who knows is there another arms race looming in the background is passable, I suppose, but yeah, I that's just the way this stuff kind of works. Right. So all right. So there it is. I guess that's basically the news. Now, we have an interview is that the news. That's the news. That's the news for this past week the news, and that's the news as as I see it. Have you ever seen the newsroom the dude who shoots himself in the head? No, the Jeff Daniels Aaron Sorkin did watch that a little bit. Yeah. It was too pretentious for me because he was like a Keith Overman type. And I was like you're just an insufferable. Do the news. Just do the news. Yeah. I like what's the one that I'm thinking of where shoots himself at the end. Thinking of it's great network network that where network is I I'm more of a network guy than a whatever the hell that was I Aaron Sorkin doesn't write like a human being now. No human talking read like a pill addict. Right. And then it's not everyone. If everyone was so like, wims ical and witty all the time, and like the due to network shoe myself in the head you just want whatever happened to just good boring person. I love good boring person. Yeah. It's most of the country. I mean, great. That's what's so great about this country. Is everyone is actually very born is perfect. It. That's that's what should be. That's why this is the best country entered boring. Please do not be sardonic with me. Ate it. All right. Well, now, let's do this interview..

Jeff Daniels Aaron Sorkin Russia North Atlantic Treaty organiza President Vladimir Putin United States Dmitry peskov Beijing Pentagon pill Keith Overman Trump Washington Dorset seventy years
"nuclear arms race" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"nuclear arms race" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"The threes. Taking a look at the weather forecast. Clear and cold tonight, seven in the suburbs. Fourteen in the city tomorrow mix of sun and clouds, a high in the mid thirties Sunday, intervals of clouds and sun, a high around forty and on Monday, believe it or not sun and clouds with a high in the mid fifties. Well, the Trump administration is pulling the United States out of a landmark nuclear arms reduction treaty the served as a major milepost as the Cold War came to an end. We get details from CBS. White house. Correspondent Steven Portnoy as it pulls out of the landmark nineteen eighty-seven treaty banning short and intermediate range nuclear missiles, the US accuses Russia of long violating the agreement. One side has not been adhering to it. We have. But one side has the president calls the treaty old. He also suggests other countries should have been covered by backers of his move note. China never signed the IMF treaty. I hope that we're able to get everybody in a very big and beautiful room and do a new treaty that would be much better. But experts warn the US out could lead to a new global nuclear arms race. Steven Portnoy, CBS news, the White House. White House adviser Kellyanne Conway says the president is ready to get tough on Russia. President who's willing to stand up for America and not stand down to Russia and Putin Conway rebutted critics of the president who say that he is too soft on North Korea. And Russia reiterating that a number of sanctions are in place against both countries along. Advisor to the president. Roger stone was back in a federal court today. ABC? Stephanie Ramos reports from the DC courthouse Roger nothing. Roger stone raised his usual, Nixon victory hand signs as he left the courthouse and his supporters were there to back him. This is his first time appearing before judge for status hearing the judge race the potential of the future. Gag order. Warning, the former Trump adviser that his pre-trial proceedings should not be a public relations campaign. The judge also acknowledged stones I amendment, right? But warned that treating this case like a book tour could taint a potential jury at a future trial at the federal district court in Washington DC. Stephanie Ramos ABC news, another democrat has thrown his hat into the twenty twenty presidential ring. New Jersey Senator Corey Booker, Sara Lee Kessler reports from the Garden State Booker announced this morning at a video posted to social media showing him walking through Newark where he was mayor for seven years before joining the Senate in two thousand thirteen. Eighteen. Only.

president Steven Portnoy Russia Roger stone Stephanie Ramos United States White house Kellyanne Conway Senator Corey Booker CBS Washington DC White House ABC New Jersey Trump China Sara Lee Kessler Senate
"nuclear arms race" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"nuclear arms race" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"On the threes. Take a look at the forecast, clear and cold tonight, the low of seven in the suburbs. Fourteen in the city. It's going to get warmer around here. Some sun and clouds tomorrow high in the mid thirties Sunday, clouds and sun, a high around forty and then on Monday, milder sun and clouds a high in the mid fifties. Three thirty four the US is withdrawing from historic Cold War era, nuclear arms control treaty because of Russia's ongoing violations the intermediate range nuclear forces, or I n f treaty has been central to limiting the kinds of nuclear weapons both countries can deploy without it experts. Fear there will be a new nuclear arms race ABC. Stephanie Ramos has more from Washington Secretary of state, Mike Pompeo, I announced that the US would withdraw from the IMF treaty. India? December giving Russia a sixty day window to come back into compliance after the US I accused it of violating the pact in twenty four t Russia continues to deny that it's missile system is noncompliant violates the treaty starting February second Russia will have six months to get into compliance or the agreement signed by president Ronald Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail. Gorbachev will be scrapped. Stephanie Ramos, ABC news, Washington. White House adviser Kellyanne Conway says President Trump is ready to get tough on Russia. President who is willing to stand up for America and not stand down to Russia and Putin Conrad rebutted critics of Trump who say he is too soft on Russia and North Korea reiterating the number of sanctions are in place for both of those countries. Well, another democrat has thrown his hat into the twenty twenty presidential ring. New Jersey Senator Corey Booker, Sara Lee Kessler has more from the Garden State Booker announced this morning at a video posted to social media showing. Walking through Newark, where he was mayor for seven years before joining the Senate in two thousand thirteen only.

Russia US Stephanie Ramos Senator Corey Booker President Trump President ABC Mike Pompeo Putin Conrad Sara Lee Kessler Gorbachev Newark New Jersey Senate India Ronald Reagan Washington
"nuclear arms race" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"nuclear arms race" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Great. A big brother. We are big brother. That mean? I'm Joe Getty precipice of creepy done. The teenage years I signed off already I'm done. I need to get back to our pre Super Bowl party with more cheese dip than I'm willing to heat up in the microwave on the Armstrong and Getty show. To know AM seven sixteen. Sandiego? This is CBS news on the hour. Sponsored by ZipRecruiter. I'm Steve Kafe in the US is exiting a standing nuclear weapons treaty with Russia accusing Moscow of breaking it White House. Correspondent Steven Portnoy announcing the pull out from the landmark nineteen eighty-seven agreement. Secretary of state Mike Pompeo said Russia has repeatedly violated the IMF treaty. When an agreement is so brazenly disregarded and our security is so openly threatened. We must respond the treaty banned. The short and intermediate range missiles, the US wants deployed throughout Europe. Nato? In a statement says the allies fully support the move some experts worry, the US pull out could lead to a new global nuclear arms race, noting China has never been subject to the treaty's terms. Steven Portnoy, CBS news, the White House. President Trump is given his strongest indication yet that he's prepared to move ahead on a border wall without congress perhaps by declaring a national emergency. He tells the New York Times congressional talks to head off a partial. Government shutdown will likely not give him what he wants set the stage.

Steven Portnoy US President Trump White House Joe Getty Russia Sandiego CBS Getty Mike Pompeo Steve Kafe New York Times Nato Europe Armstrong IMF
"nuclear arms race" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

05:40 min | 3 years ago

"nuclear arms race" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"To say happy new year yet to happy new year Senator cotton. Now, we haven't you happy new year we missed each other last week while you're gallivanting around the Middle East with John Bolton. It was great fun. It was great fun. I want to go on a code, whatever you call you. Call them code L. I wanna go with you one of these time. Hey, I have a very simple question based on the New York Times story on Friday to you Tom cotton believe that Donald Trump is a Russian mole. Now, Hugh, I do not think some of these stories say more about the newspapers that are putting them or the officials in the administration opposed to the press and who are leaking them. I'll say I told you before the Senate intelligence committee has been examining in great detail. What happened in the two thousand sixteen election, and that's incorrect continues. But as many Democrats on that committee. You've said there's been no evidence to demonstrate any kind of collusion between the president or his campaign and the Russian government or their intelligence services further say that if you take a look at what the president has done over the last two years to Russia and its interests. It's kind of a strange claim to make. I mean for years we asked the Obama administration to provide defensive weapons to Ukraine or to get tough on Europe's dependence on energy in Russia or to encourage NATO explicitly designed to stop Russian Coachman Europe to spend more money on their common defenses, spend more money on artifacts. All those things are objectively. Contrary to the interests of the Kremlin. And I would add that when the Russian mercenaries came over the hill in Syria. The American military had standing orders that Mattis ordered executed through Dunford, and they were wiped out, and I would add that the president is opposed to the Russian pipeline to Germany. I it doesn't there is an Ota of evidence of this. But the Manchurian candidate narrative has taken hold when in fact, we ought to be looking at the seven days in may narrative based on another story that the FBI open a counterintelligence investigation into Donald Trump in may of two thousand seventeen were you shocked by that Senator cotton. Well, I won't necessarily credit. A report that appeared in such a anti-trump news source, Hugh, I will simply say that. If it is true. It may say start say more about Andy mccade, a notorious partisan who was fired from his job and is now under investigation for lying to government officials. Then it says about the president, right? Let me ask you about another story. Is it unusual in your view for the national Security Council specifically John Bolton to requested the Pentagon options to deal with Iran after they attacked our embassy in Iraq unsuccessfully? But there were leaks that senior Pentagon and State Department officials, and I believe this for a second about your friend Pompeo, the secretary of state we're upset that John Bolton did this and found that alarming. What do you think not only is it not unusual for national security advisor to ask for such plans? You it would be a dereliction of his duty fell to ask for them. And I've seen those reports as well when the president United States our commander in chief asks for contingency plans after a enemy like Iran has launched attacks on our personnel and our diplomatic facilities. The Pentagon should be ordering up those plans immediately. Maybe the most surprising alarming thing would be at the Pentagon been already have such plans. But no ambassador Bolton did exactly what you would expect the national security advisor to do in that situation, which is to act on the president's wishes and provide the present options simply because you draft plans does not mean that you will execute plans. We learned that the lowest level in the army, and that applies at the highest levels of the Pentagon as well Senator kind of have a new Washington Post column, just hit twenty twenty will be a national security election. And it's what I assessed after traveling as you mentioned what about Bolton to Israel and Ankara that I just think that the country's gotta come to grips as we have a new nuclear arms race. China is they're looking for the new millennium's version of the greater East Asia co prosperity sphere the Middle East right now, it's like the Balkans before World War One. What do you think? Do you think we're going to have a national security election that says you want to go back to a bomb era appeasement or do you wanna forward with Reagan peace through strength doctrine? I think our national security is must fundamental objective of the government. And it's always on the minds of the voters are electing someone to be the commander in chief. And especially at a time when the world is so unstable, and we say, so many enemies some of whom are acting in concert against our interests. And we've been able to restore some of the credible threats of deterrent that we'd lost during the Obama administration. Of course, believe that the American people will be focused on a president who will keep this country safe and not fighting when wars but be tough enough to deter them from happening in the first place who is new on armed services with you Senator cotton. We have a whole host of new freshmen, Hugh, we have Josh Holly, Martha mcsally, Kevin Kramer, Rick Scott on the democratic side. They've added a couple of folks who have been in the Senate for a little while word on the committee previously. Joe Manchin is back on the committee and Tammy Duckworth spec on the committee. So we have a lot of turnover. But a lot of new members looking forward to working with all of them. And I'll talk to you almost weekly Senator Tom cotton. You can follow him on Twitter at San Tom cotton and follow him every week here on the Hugh Hewitt Show. Don't go anywhere America. When I come back next hour, I'll be joined by Margaret talev who made that trip with me to Israel and Turkey along with embassador Bolton and was actually quite a great assistant. Great assistance to me. But.

president embassador Bolton Senator Hugh Hewitt Senator Tom cotton Pentagon Middle East Donald Trump Obama administration Senate intelligence committee Iran advisor New York Times Israel Russian government John Bolton Russia national Security Council Russian Coachman Europe
Donald Trump reveals what Queen Elizabeth said to him about Brexit

BBC World Service

04:30 min | 3 years ago

Donald Trump reveals what Queen Elizabeth said to him about Brexit

"Taliban during the muslim religious festival of aid but heavy fighting resumed since then british newspaper says president trump has revealed part of a private conversation he had with queen elizabeth james landale has the story donald trump has already faced criticism for keeping the queen waiting before he arrived at windsor on friday and then briefly walking in front of her while inspecting the guard of honour now the us president journalists piers morgan that the queen was a fantastic woman and very special person he said she went through the whole list of us president she had met since harry truman and when they discuss britain leaving the eu mr trump claimed the queen said it was a very complex problem with mr morgan asked if the queen expressed an opinion on what she thinks about brexit mr trump realized his mistake saying you just don't talk about a conversation with the queen president trump is spending a final day in britain before flying to finland for his summit with leading putin on monday mr trump is facing continuing criticism at home for agreeing to a one to one meeting with the russian leader especially after twelve russian intelligence officers were indicted for meddling in the two thousand sixteen presidential election lease descent is in helsinki to countries who are actively at war in syria and ukraine and involved in a nuclear arms race are meeting for the first time formally here in helsinki on the baltic sea at a venue that has been used by american and russian presidents in the past there is so much on the agenda but there may be nothing on the agenda that for these two very powerful men men with a great sense of themselves and their place in the world the most important thing may be that they're meeting at all the twelve boys in their football coach who are trapped in a cave complex in northern thailand been told of the death of a diver during the operation to rescue them images released by the authorities show the boys gathering around a large piece of paper to draw a picture of the former navy the navy seal some on conan messages and thanks were added to the drawing to stink to the latest world news from the bbc iraqi police have fired in the air as hundreds of protesters tried to storm the main provincial government building in bouncer city on the seventh day of unrest over poor services in southern iraq police sources said several people were injured by water cannon and tear gas last night the authorities in baghdad imposed a curfew in basel city and across southern iraq while the prime minister announced that be releasing funds for water electricity and health services a woman who had been missing for a week on the coast to california has been rescued from the base of a cliff after having survived drinking water from the radiator of her partially submerged jeep and commanders swerved to avoid hitting an animal and plunged over sixty meter cliff police in the southern indian state of connecticut says software engineer has been beaten to death and two others injured by mob because of suspicions that they were child kidnappers it's the latest attack fueled by rumors being spread on social media in india about child abductions police said the deceased man was traveling with his friends in a car and one of them gave chocolates to children when they stopped for a break in padang district france and croatia meet in the final of football's world cup in moscow today with a population of four million croatia is the smallest nation in decades to go this far in the competition france the favorites are seeking a second title having won on home soil twenty years ago here's cowfield reports from paris a day after day celebrations the french will come together again late this afternoon in their millions to watch the final of the world cup here in paris the weather is superb bars and cafes to be packed and there'll be a giant fan did with nine hundred thousand people but if the eiffel tower the country has perhaps been slow to appreciate this young side but with victories in the knockout phase has come a real sense of excitement particularly around the teenage prodigy kilian mbappe eight in six world cups francis third final a remarkable record therapy from houston cowfield that's the bbc news how how many grigor hi this is a special program on the thailand cave rescue we all have ten days they no light pitch black no salutes food just catching.

Taliban Twenty Years Sixty Meter Ten Days
Iranian president slams Trump for pulling U.S. out of nuclear deal

Howie Carr

01:47 min | 4 years ago

Iranian president slams Trump for pulling U.S. out of nuclear deal

"The iran nuclear deal i'm tim weisburg wb sm new sixty five degrees and sunny your abc six forecast coming up president trump is pulling the us out of the iran nuclear deal despite the objections of western allies speaking at the white house today trump said the iranian regime is the world's leading state sponsor of terrorism the president warned there would soon be quote a nuclear arms race in the middle east at the multination agreement remains in play former president barack obama called the move quote so misguided toronto wants to preserve the nuclear accord even without the us during a speech on state tv iranian president hassan romney said he has ordered his foreign minister to start negotiating with other nations that are part of the two thousand fifteen accord if negotiations fail ronnie warned that iran will start enriching uranium quote more than before new york city mayor bill de blasios reacting to physical assault allegations against fellow democrat eric schneiderman the mayor called the accusations absolutely disgusting schneiderman resigned to state attorney general for women accused him of sexual misconduct in the new yorker three members of a westport family have been indicted by a grand jury following the theft from and death of an eighty year old westport resident bristol county district attorney tom quinn says sixtysixyearold charlotte medeiros faces charges of involuntary manslaughter neglect of an elderly person trustee embezzlement and larceny over two hundred and fifty dollars medeiros was the healthcare proxy and had power of attorney for her longtime friend and neighbor cecile fairhurst the state alleges medeiros stole more than one hundred thousand dollars from fairhurst and failed to provide with adequate medical care and attention also indicted as her forty seven year old son clifford medeiros in his forty three year old wife kristen medeiros the state alleges charlotte maderas withdrew over one hundred thousand dollars from fair house to count and it was deposited into an account opened by clifford and kristen in addition the state claims the maderas did not provide the proper medical care for fairhurst which led to her.

Tom Quinn Kristen Medeiros Cecile Fairhurst Trustee Involuntary Manslaughter Bristol County Westport New York Charlotte Maderas Clifford Medeiros Fairhurst Embezzlement Charlotte Medeiros Donald Trump Theft Attorney Eric Schneiderman