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Deadly Discussions

Deadly Discussions

05:34 min | 2 weeks ago

Deadly Discussions

"Welcome to daily discussions on your heart is a Karasin Today on the show? We have Leandro get her to pronounce his surname light because that's difficult for me, before we get started a liked acknowledge that judicial landowners whose Land Brew Code, which is the wrong people of the Kulin nation so welcome to the shy, Leandra. Thank you. Thanks for having may is act. Now before we started. Can you please pronounce your surname? His name is Leandra in Mycenaean. Is GEICO MONGOL? It's pretty much fanatical, said a gay. Come on up. Yeah well as it sounds. And where is your mom and is that surname related to? Say I am a yellow woman from northeast Omland in my family older around million can be. My sister lives in roaming getting. I'm said Oh my mobile from there. I'm I'm the. Papal so that's my language group and. Yeah my my last name is a human name my. Name is Leandra, Jewelry Gift Mungo. Your right, yeah, bitter mouth! Jeff the rat on old documents for government stuff. Semi Medicare. Cod is like just one like this nice space like it's all just. You old lettuce on kind of. Whenever I've been pulled over. I guess You know random bobby. Tayo at UVA. People who. Look Bank. People always like what is that from from like? I just this country. Regional. Yeah. Young Lou. Famous? Generally people without the mole is will gross young. Yeah, so he's young woman. then a way to put me on the spot and I'm gonNA. Go Blank then of. Beautiful Magnolia. And then there is. one of our swimmers named after Rodway Hicks, Yup, and then there is. David Google. ACT UP. There are. Not Let me. Let me. And so we'll get to your living. Baker play. Banca boys brought. Claiming Baker Boys. Rats! Tonight just. So that's awesome, and so you grew up on country or did you grow of country or where best serve the fast? He is my life. Yes, I was born in Nulla, Mboya Guards, NS. Chris couple years yet I grabbed them country and then moved away. Sydney lived in Cape York for a little while Hammer. Throw a little while, and then yes, settled in woolen garments. White, said Hey. Yeah. Yeah sometimes I am. Did that confused with town? So when people say Cape York I think Capetown for some reason that it sounds like every. Interesting. so you went to Sydney? What I do sort of move across the Sydney again. So I think it was about. Three or four? Then we moved to Willin Gong for a little bit. MOMS wrecking while and then moved up yet. kept lived in Cullen a few years. And then from there to camera for a couple of years and then which was. Unite Complete different last Dosso in Kirkland. Coming home for lodge didn't wish as a school uniform. And then went straight to icy, cold camera and I was like. What is of this? Army went to Campbell Shales like Oh this is camera you know is not what I expected. And so being away from country were able to keep language, tax or young lewd language is yes I'm not I'm not I'm not fluent, but I do understand some language and yet definitely so I'm one of seven I'm the baby of seven kids and. Yes I definitely unit still strong connections to talk time with my family, and from yeah, we just got back from a trip. Thing yet. Backup harm, which is sir, good? it was a bit crazy because everything going on, but it was yeah, it was good. Yeah, was it Rahm while we're talking about on country was any cases. Up In a land that bowl. What was? The response coronavirus. Yeah It was actually. Once, you were said that was all buyers. Security laws say obviously we had to quarantine because we crossed the border, and that was something that new but we will going for family. Reasons was essential traveled

Leandra David Google Sydney Baker Geico Cape York Leandro Mboya Guards Kulin Omland Rodway Hicks Rahm Willin Gong Kirkland Tayo Bobby Jeff LOU Capetown Nulla
Hannah Senesh

Encyclopedia Womannica

03:54 min | Last month

Hannah Senesh

"Today's fearless. Woman is both a maverick and a legend a national heroine in Israel. She parachuted into enemy territory to liberate Jews during the Holocaust looking death in the eye. Let's talk about Hannah said Nash Hanis. Ns was born in nineteen twenty one budapest Hungary the daughter of an author and a journalist. Honecker up in a literary household she routinely kept journals of her own from H. Thirteen right up to her death in the nineteen thirties as antisemitic sentiments were burgeoning and Budapest. Hana was drawn design scientist activities and in nineteen thirty nine. She left Hungary for what was then. Palestine there she. I attended an agricultural school and eventually settled at kibbutz. Yom where she wrote poetry and a play about life on the kibbutz in nineteen forty three at the height of World War Two. Hana enlisted with the British army in volunteered to be a paratrooper. The mission was to help the allied forces establish contact with resistance fighters in Europe. Were also working to help the Jews. Hana trained in Egypt and was one of only thirty three people chosen to parachute behind enemy lines in March of nineteen forty four. Hana parachuted into Yugoslavia and began working with the Yugoslav partisans. A Communist led resistance the access powers. The partisans were considered among Europe's most effective anti Nazi resistance groups Hana's Fervor and passion for the movement or captured in her poem. Last is the match. But she wrote during her time in Yugoslavia. After three months with the partisans on across into hungry in June of nineteen forty four at the height of deportation for Hungary's Jews with the goal of reaching her native Budapest. She didn't make it Hana was quickly picked up by the Hungarian police who were faithful to the Nazi party. Despite being repeatedly torture Hana declined to give up information pertaining to her mission. Even when the police threatened to harm Hana's own mother she held steadfast and her resistance and refused to cooperate during Hana's trial October of nineteen forty four. She didn't appeal for mercy and instead defended her actions at every turn on November seventh nineteen forty four. Hana was ordered to be executed by firing squad in the moments leading up to her that she refused a blindfold that was offered to her. Instead choosing to stare squarely into the eyes of per excecutioner. She was only twenty three years old. After her execution a poem was found in Hana's sell it read one two three eight feet long to strides apart. The rest is dark. Life is fleeting question. Mark one-two-three maybe another week or the next month may still find me here but death I feel is very near. I could have been twenty three next July i Campbell on what mattered. Most the dice were cast. I lost Hana's life was brief but her impact. On the world lasted long pastor untimely death her diary and poems were published posthumously and several of her poems have been set to music in one thousand nine hundred fifty Hamas remains were brought to Jerusalem and reinterred at the military cemetery on Mount Herzl to this day. Hana remains a symbol of self sacrifice idealism in the face of dire circumstance.

Hana Hungary Budapest Europe Yugoslavia Israel Palestine Nash Hanis Nazi Party Hannah British Army NS Hamas Mount Herzl Scientist Campbell YOM Mark One-Two-Three Egypt
Entrepreneurs of intolerance compound COVID-19 racist backlash

UN News

05:20 min | 2 months ago

Entrepreneurs of intolerance compound COVID-19 racist backlash

"I'm Matt Wells and for this special edition of our lives on podcast from you a news. My colleague from our Chinese service see when Sheehan temporarily based back home while Cova nineteen disrupts every aspect of our lives has been talking to these special reporter about how hidden. Prejudices have been exploited by nationalist politicians and others she describes as entrepreneurs of intolerance to create a frightening new social and political dimension to this pandemic suen spoke to Yale educated Professor Tschumi who was appointed by the Human Rights Council to her key job in November. Two thousand seventeen. In mid April as they su-nam even had rippled from Wuhan to Europe then striking the US with New York City home to UN headquarters the epicenter of the world's worst pandemic in a century Sutton nationalities ethnicities have become targets of racism and xenophobia tax. Maybe my question would be. Why did this happen precisely at the time when we should unite? You're right to say that it's counter intuitive that at a time when there is so much risk and uncertainty that they were also algorithm of certain groups and what seems like increases in intolerant and vegetate. But I think it has to do with the fact that in emergency situations like these underlying problems that exist I just exacerbated. Many of these groups are groups that already subject to latent intolerance and xenophobia and prejudice take the example of Asian Americans will people who are perceived to be of Asian descent in the US. Right now have been subject to xenophobic racist attacks in the wake of cove. Nineteen you can think about say Africans who are being subject to various measures in China right now also in response to the covert nineteen pandemic you can think about Roma who have been targeted in different European countries from being accused of spreading the virus and being subject to extreme measures. Benny members of those groups can tell you the long history of Racial Discrimination Xenophobia even prior to there being a pandemic groups that in general of vulnerable to racism xenophobia. So I would say we should understand these attacks. As naming Bay in many places prejudices and biases that are often latent and in this pan-demic they become even more pronounced and that combined with the fact that you actually have actors as you might think of as entrepreneurs of intolerance certain actors whether the politicians whether they media outlets actually took prophet and to exacerbate into enflame intolerance jumping into the fray and ham referring to political leaders who've been willing to come out the knicks statements that are explicitly implicitly phobic in my statement that you reference. I speak to this example here in the west of the president who keeps Lee referred to the virus as China virus. And you see this happening in different parts of the world as well this kind of statement at high levels of political office if you ask me. Signals in acceptability of stigmatization of specific regions of specific groups of people who come from those regions presumably these narratives actions are very harmful absolutely individuals. On the group's fourth subject racism and xenophobia because they all particularly mysterious. Akina race of the national origin. And sometimes it's because they presumed to be the of examples of Vietnamese people who being attacked and they are attacked sharing to them as Chinese. We're seeing examples in the US of bubble attacks of bushel stigmatization. So when you're walking down the street and let's say you are perceived to be of Asian descent people yes the social distancing but this also goes Glasgow and the kind of wide that speaks to something racial is taking place. There's been examples of spitting and then there's also just physical violence people who are being beaten up because they are presumed to be of Ns necessity or racial designation that is associated with having spread disease which we know this is not Hollywood. It's not salutes are more prone to the virus but this is what's happening in Europe. You have examples of people being denied access to goods and services and some of the examples that I've been looking at which published in the European Union's on the Mental Rights Agency. They just had a report out on cove. Nineteen and there's a section in the other talks about discrimination that talks about people of Asian descent to perceive to be of Asian descent. Being refused the right to rent an apartment people being refused access to healthcare. These are just examples. I'm not saying this is everywhere. Near these examples to highlight in the report they will talk about people at agent descend being denied access to best rants access to schools. This is before. Some of the measures were implemented and then in China Africans fleeing victims from their residents in long show people having multiple seized denial of access to restaurants so those are examples of the kinds of Homs that individuals in groups are experiencing also want to highlight the mental and emotional costs and the IAEA that these groups have to carry as a result of these attacks.

United States China Europe Human Rights Council Matt Wells Sheehan Cova Reporter Yale Professor Tschumi Knicks Glasgow Wuhan Benny New York City European Union UN Roma Homs
Postpartum in a Pandemic

Bodies

06:25 min | 2 months ago

Postpartum in a Pandemic

"So I want to start with your pregnancy I'm wondering given your knowledge and your profession as a Dula when you're pregnant with soula. What were some of the things that you're doing to advocate for yourself and prepare for the postpartum time. I think that I was concerned about possibly getting postpartum depression just because I do have a history of depression and I had to get off of my antidepressant when I was pregnant. Because it wasn't safe for the baby and I was just looking for whatever type of body type therapy alternatives that I could find so acupuncture was really helpful for that and then I also Was in therapy with two different therapists by felt like I worked really hard and my pregnancy to ensure that I had the mental health support that I felt like I needed And Not a part of that was going on a second part of that. Was Me heavily planning the postpartum time in order to prevent not that you can prevent postpartum depression but in my brain in order to prevent it from happening? I'm heavy planner and I'm like if I plan everything and organize everything and get support that I need and I'm not like isolated by myself in those early weeks than you know things are GonNa go better and so Yeah I was and so am very concerned about mental health in this postpartum time. And what else did you know about postpartum mood and anxiety disorders going in? I feel like people a little bit like no about postpartum depression but I feel like the broader public doesn't necessarily have all the knowledge about the different ways that that can look. Well I think one thing too is definitely left out of the discussion is postpartum anxiety. I everybody instantly goes for depression. But a lot of people have postpartum anxiety and it presents and like so many different ways that there's not even like one like by the rule book they can look because everybody's anxiety shows up differently and I feel like postpartum anxiety is harder to pinpoint because as a new parent. You're already so anxious. A lot of the things that it says like the book say about postpartum anxiety about like watching the baby when the Baby Sleeps. And like you think the telling bad. It's going to happen to the baby and all that like that's just being a new parent in general so it's really hard to lockdown when that becomes more excessive so feeling that goes under diagnosed and Under reported a lot and a lot of people don't get support around because people don't know what's normal and what's not so. I felt lake as much information as I knew about postpartum depression. I was not prepared for postpartum anxiety as much as I should have been and I feel like that has been what has like cut more into play then. The depression Yeah so and I know you had your own Dula. Ns what were some of the things that Dula was helping you do My postpartum duly came to my baby shower and basically pasta out a notebook to everybody so that they could sign up for jobs for postpartum and at first. I didn't WanNa do it because I just felt like. I didn't WanNa like ask my friends that bluntly to be like hey can you? Guys take my trout and dishes but Actually had several friends after the baby shower. That were like that was so cool that year. Postpartum Dula did that. And they're like I always wanNA like support friends. That have a baby but I never know what to do. I also like this idea of asking people to show up in this time because this is not meant to be done alone and even for people who are single and are people who choose to be single parents or whatever like it's you're never supposed to like parent alone. They're supposed to be a community aspect to all of this. Yeah definitely definitely and so you know you come home from the hospital. It's an February beginning of March. Were still a couple of weeks away from the CDC announcing that there's a pandemic and so what was that first week at home like the first week was like everything that I have planned with my Dulas. It was Me being fed and people bringing me drinks and you know. Stang over to help with the baby and my postpartum do alike. Massaging my body. Because I was so swollen from the birth and it felt amazing that basically like I pulled off Lake. It actually worked. They actually showed up and I'm really grateful for that. Everybody was kind of like on a schedule of like who could do what when and who do overnight and stuff and it was really nice for like a week and a half to have that and to have them coming over in helping me get a break and Just like Lebanon us and everything and then this corona Situation hit and yet kind of all went out the window. She felt prepared to be a single mom. But not like this after about a week of being homeless soula. The governor of New York City put a stay at home order in place and all the people that were supposed to show up. Couldn't come anymore. We're stuck in isolation and that's not something. I would really wish on anybody that was in the immediate stages of postpartum or really just in parenthood in general It sucks. I don't even know how to describe it because it's like the exact opposite of what is needed during this time So many people were ready and willing to show up. It is nice that we have that support system and that when this is over we will still have that to rely on people. Were jumping on soon. Calls like nonstop and like doing like zoom hang outs and all these like zoom events. And I'm just like where was this energy before when you know we were all so busy with our lives constantly and so I like do like that. We've been told to slow down and like forced to talk to each other. I do hope that after this whole thing is over or whatever life looks like when it's over. I hope that like people continue to show up with the same energy and like really show up for each other

Depression Dula Actually New York City CDC Lake Stang Lebanon
Mina Kimes Reporting on eSports

Asian Enough

03:50 min | 3 months ago

Mina Kimes Reporting on eSports

"Done a lot of long form sports journalism which I've read you know Aaron Rodgers Luca Donncha h And then you did these amazing stories about Korean e sports and Korean bad flipping the first eastport story. I wrote for ESPN. The magazine was at believe in two thousand fifteen and it was about a nineteen year old Korean kid named faker. That's his Gamertag. thrilling Who was the Best League of LEGENDS PLAYER IN THE WORLD? Then I WANNA say a couple of years later. I wrote another sports story about a girl named Gay Gurry in Korea who played overwatch plays overwatch. Who was so good. People thought she was treating the final story. Hope final but I also went to Korea And spent some time there to write about Korean baseball in particular to try to understand why Korean baseball players have such glorious and prolific backflips. Y Y Y Korean stories. When did you start doing them? Well they were total boondoggles. Because I got to go to Korea three times and see my family members on. Espn excellent stories. We're bringing them actually so it is a One of them. Yes so the first eastport story I did was in two thousand fifteen we as a company had not been covering sports before then And they by they I mean the editors Kinda came to me and they said well. We would like to do a feature about this. We're doing an issue. Can you tell us who to write about? Whatever you know. It's your choice. So that wasn't my idea to write about any sports so I spent like a week or so just re which I had the luxury to do as a features writer and I know is very luxurious to actually just kind of learned about the space and figure out what would work and video games or an at all. I didn't play a lot. You have to be like such an authority in so many different spaces within sports to add e- sports to that expertise driven it is but it's different because as a features writer it's very different from being an analyst like you're actually don't have to be an expert you just have to do the research right like in the process of doing that story. Nobody would expect me to have theories about Strategy Games Raji or you know. Be opinionated about that. They expect me to talk to people who are smart and trust them and synthesize that information anyways. I there were few American English articles about gaming couple features. Really hasn't been a lot and Every time I would read these articles they'd be about like a North American team whether it was legal legends. Which is the game ended up writing about? And then there'd always be a line in the story where the Koreans would just show up and kick their ass so I went back to ESPN. And I was like I think I should write about Koreans and then from there. I found out this one kid in particular was the best so yeah I kind of just my approach was to just write about it like we would write about a young Lebron or any other prodigy. I suppose in sports. Ns gamers name is gig ARY This is fake story before. Yeah so I learned all about the various tensions because the future's all about finding tensions and and that's what drives the story a good story but all the tensions associated with Gaming and Korea Crean Culture. I mean I was very interested. Not only okay. Who is this kid? Why so good but why are Koreans in particular so good at this? You know. You're not born with gaming gene? So I I think the socio economic and cultural reasons to me were as fascinating as anything else. So that that's how I ended up in Korea. The first time second time was about Giger US another player in that one. The detention and the piece was very obvious because she was a woman and had been through a very kind of interesting. I love that story. I thank you thank

Korea Espn United States Gay Gurry Korea Crean Culture Aaron Rodgers Features Writer Luca Donncha Lebron Analyst
A houseplant tour with Mercy Morris

On The Ledge

08:47 min | 3 months ago

A houseplant tour with Mercy Morris

"Let's officially start by saying hello mercy. Moore's we're here in your front room back room. I didn't know how you describe this room. And I'm the first I mean you haven't had a toy yet your N. G. S. opening of Your House plunk collection so I guess I'm honored to be getting the experience of coming on this tour. I think this is really special. Ngs's agreed to have this as an open house tour which is by arrangement. Only did you able did. How did it come about well? I met one of the local guys last year when I was selling. Houseplants at somebody else's opened and he just said to me in passing wanted has plants and initially though stupid idea and then the idea kept going round round in my head and I actually know that would be really fun. It would be really good for house plants with Nick because people then they'd be almost as important as Garden People Heaven Full Fan. Yeah the case. Yeah so I got them round and they did. They did say I was mad. They didn't say couldn't do it so he we on here. We are and you have a wonderful collection. We've just heard today that you've you've been awarded. The status of National Collection of clarified. Some cultivars tomato cultivars. Hey fantastic you have to have your teeth into say we? Can we get to see as we go round some of your collection which we can talk about fervor? There's loads of big leaves in here. We start with some of these big leaves how I take you to the beginning of the whole thing. Yes you cut. That is a beautiful Swiss cheese. Plunk just say that is a really nice specimen. This is Austin Austin Morris. And he was the first house plant that I had that lived. My mother was deeply into plants and she spent most of my childhood trying to get me into plants as well. Roy didn't work and as a student on why the student I had lost plants that are killed and this was the first one that actually lived so he is the the three years old this year while spence is that Short because I've continually are taken out the pro tournament cartoons and shrink against East. He's nice and short. He's very compact isn't he? And I think that is a really good tip because lots of people get to the stage with Swiss Cheese. Plumber does get out of hand and they kind of very much. Fear doing that hatbox. But you're not really shows that that works brilliantly because it's go beautiful fantasy leaders come which mature leaves. But he's a reasonable size. I'm taking a leaf out of your book. Literally with my own monster is when they get to that stage because that is the way to do it. I love the way you got the black label lesser. Ns Nineteen eighty-seven bats tasked with me many many times. Sometimes of taking on the train last time it moved has had to get French petunias carcass. It's quite heavy. I can imagine it's a bit of a job to report is a fantastic looking plot and Yeah you've you've you've kept looking in great shape and it's very very healthy and I'm sure there's always somebody looking for cutting. Yes yes so you got one. That was yes. That's the scruffy. One from last lauper is due to be done in about eight pro. People want to see it in its full glory. They need to come in okay. Okay and so people can couldn't contact you to make an appointment to come and see your collection here in Hun Hun Bay in Kent of Forget. Murray off for a minute How how busy you expecting to be with this tour? Is it going to be literally going to wait and see? Yeah I would have thought was the first house plant offering from the NGOs that would be an attractive option for people but I guess time will tell exactly I think a lot of the established. Ngs Garden visitors so used to visiting herbaceous borders and shrubberies and so on the there will be a bit hesitant about it. Perhaps but I'm hoping also that bring people who've never been to an end. Gs gardening before perhaps a younger crowd who are into house. Plants on rather than than hanging gardens year savvy unless just turned to this one for stepladder with your some of your floor fights Komo SOM plants on it. Let's waste display plants. I'm always looking. I find those wooden stay. I'm always looking for him. Outside junk shops. It's one of those things to kind of serendipity has to be in place OPA you have to go to your Grandad's garage to for that. Was she unlock all of the ones? I've seen have been about thirty to sixty pounds. I've found that one for a five. Oh good good boy. Good and you've got lots of calm. Glorified Komo some. How many cultivars are there in your national collection? It is about seventeen or eighteen but that may reduce as I find some of them are identical plants but with separate cultivar nine. Roy and what made you choose clarified? Some commotion Cultivars as a subject for national question because it's not too massive and not to. Yes we want to do is quite compact collection so you can have it in a small. How also I think they're so under appreciated as house plants. They are really long suffering. They're the easiest thing in the world to propagate they just propagate themselves while you sit there and do nothing and I think the world really needs to Stephen for the beauties that they are. What's your favorite Cultivar? Ooh That's my but you know why ins oh lovely. She's actually perseus tat. It's more Lime Green and stripes. That's really nice. They set on Powell as well. So that's what you're what some nice one and how easy found pick these up. I mean we always white losses being you know very common but some of these cultivars harder to get. Yes some of them. I've had to get from another collected. This Very Generous Gentleman Joan circuit. Let me have some of the. The grayer cultivars that he's had in his collection years apart from that. The usual thinks nuking around on Ebay. Yes Oh the joy of joys of the Internet for looking for plants that is a great and we turn and look and we've got another enormously plant on the other side and beautiful. Is that one or two fatally figs. Tell me about this. I don't I'm not even sure I can identify. What kind of our dotty inst- that's a philodendron. It's got the the non well. It's an rotating now philodendron green beauty. Which really doesn't tell you. Anything of large Ingraham. I haven't been able to track which species it comes from is it just appeared on market relatively recently beautiful and one of my friends said my see how to have this so I had thought is how it goes. Isn't it is now exactly how it goes on. You've got these two lovely fiddly figs. I mean on often disappointed by fixed. Don't tend to grow very well. You'll look lovely in healthy. Are they challenging to look after or do you find the most again those are in late? Twenty s awhile. So you were in the fiddle I o before our everyone does find them in a florist in Eastbourne when I was leaving and again with those I chop them down because otherwise they they just go. Straight up. Like a skyrocket a night either fool. I wrote hit the ceiling so I chopped them one on the right hand with the smaller. Lisa's chopped last year. The one that's recovered was chopped the year before and you can do cuttings of them relatively easily as well. Yup well the the you have a one fleet leafy living. We've also got more shells with more plants on them. Some little baby spider plants. I can see and some. Is that some Premier Li ads there or some kind. Of course he ever media earth style. They're all out. That's propagating moment. Look at they are in Little Koya. Oh yes Paul Fox. I find them really difficult to route because they they tend to live ever without route. That's about two years to be right to die. That's that's another sponge plant that came from weasley strike which is a pretty one

First House National Collection ROY Your House NGS Hun Hun Bay Moore Plunk Nick Ngs Garden Swiss Cheese Austin Austin Morris Little Koya Plumber Stephen Ebay Lauper Premier Li Murray Paul Fox
Accelerating Innovation

Healthy Thinking

07:14 min | 3 months ago

Accelerating Innovation

"Simple question. Why do we need a program? Accelerate and how pioneering is it Shawn? Okay thanks Keith Unwelcome everybody accelerate to think is Is Important to the the Welsh economy. The WHO he thought of it was kind of speed up the development of innovation within the life science sector but also the sport Deanna Jess and charitable organizations. That they're trying to do things to better health care and to improve wellbeing and in the principality so I think accelerate in that sense is really essential to the future. Wales okay. So let's imagine you'd Entrepreneur I with innovation that you think could benefit the health service and ultimately patients and you're very excited about it but Bit Slack about where to go next for example with get access to clinicians patients. If I wanted to test that perhaps perhaps you can tell us about the options there. Yeah so for Cardiff University. We've got that link between Cardiff unveil health boards answer the clinical innovation partnership where we often hold an MD tea. Which is a multidisciplinary team meeting every Monday? Where people can come along and present such projects so in front of this project board. We've seen people such as clinicians porters nurses academics medical students come present their ideas to us. We've had a number of industries. Come in as well with some project ideas who are required that link our understanding that clinicians and academics can support and provide through this forum. So that's the important part for for us within Cardiff University. As well as that's wash economic development is linked to patients clinicians and academia to see that health economic benefit as well as patient benefit strikes. Me As being really interesting areas. It's not just about established businesses. But you're taking soundings ideas and suggestions frahm individuals students clinicians and even patient troops in some cases. That's the your Europe she based in Swansea in your research. Experience includes things like in vitro bench test in what way through to support clinical investigation the medical devices launching products evaluation etc. I mean how how in your experience how difficult is product onto the market and how can accelerate or htc help in that respect. Y- apparently being based with an SME who went from basic patent on a piece of paper through to launch products. It's not easy. It is difficult. Lots of different challenges for me I think is about having the right expertise around you and expertise early on so that informs all our D. That you do away thought. H D C can help have technology centre and Swansea. University is that we have a team of sixteen people. They're all multi skilled. They've got Fast Array of expertise talk that we also can tap into the the academic staff within the school of Medicine as well on the wider university. So we've got a lot of expertise that to try and help them get. Get people that knowledge on those people around them to help them early on. I think one of the more challenging things is the regulatory pathway. Potentially making sure you've got the right people around you to support you show. Attic is particularly interested in assistive technologies. That's right isn't it? Yeah I mean that's the that's kind of the core of The the attic offering but to be honest We we're finding it working across a wide spectrum of Different sectors so A NASCAR exciting. I mean it could be you know digital products and services through to physical products and so it's I think is important to kind of understand. The science sector is is quite broad. Which means that you know Attic and got involved in You know in terms use a testing and analysis of sort of medical products or things which are a little bit more cutting edge like the Internet of things type sensors that people can then use to monitor elderly people in home for example so so it is quite broad in that sense but also I think Moscow exciting is starting to recognize that there are companies out there. On the periphery of the license actor. That may be astonished to consider moving into it So we can also help them as well with product development and an Kenneth Challenges that they might have in terms of innovation process. And you know it's so it's It's it's beyond just what we can initially considered to be the life science sectors much broader opportunity in an ns be clear. The collaboration element is is clever across the partners but we also collaborate in between the partners and the and the company's not providing direct funding. Were not doing stuff for them exactly. This is kind of a shared activity. Bus Right isn't it absolutely? Yes so everything we do. We we aim to go. We aim for effective. Rnd collaboration so we put in fifty percent. The company's fifty cents on a very much a joy joint venture Anna's Shawn's already mentioned in some of the benefits of that is we can transfer knowledge between the university so the company from the company to the university. So you know. We're all in rural from the experience is really important. And Sean fifty percent is not is not necessarily about money is it. This is about time this is about expertise is about facilities and equipment as well. Yeah it definitely I think One of the crucial things is that the the program allows companies to get access to stuff that they would normally be able to access And they might have a law plans for commercial development But they just simply don't have the capacity so the the accelerate program unlocks the potential by providing additional staff time resources and an inability to research particular challenges and problems that the company needs to overcome. But because they don't have the capacity you know they maybe go so far but then they they hit war base. At Lisa's is the accelerate program is unlocking opportunity than for them. So and another important aspect of this is well is the you know we can. We can do quite small pieces of work with a company that then provide them with inhabitants. Base that can they can then look for additional funding and draw down money from other sources than actual money to develop the product and take it take it to market a bit quicker than so so we kind of You know we provide in a kind of like for like service really if they if they want to develop within in the commitment to do that we can weaken our commitment to that to make sure that it actually can become a tangible output. At the end of the

Cardiff University Swansea Shawn Wales Bit Slack Cardiff Deanna Jess Keith Europe HTC Product Development Lisa Nascar School Of Medicine Moscow Sean Kenneth Anna
Women’s hockey world championships in N.S. cancelled due to coronavirus threat

KCBS Radio Weekend News

00:29 sec | 4 months ago

Women’s hockey world championships in N.S. cancelled due to coronavirus threat

"Women's world hockey championships in Canada have now been canceled because of the corona virus international ice hockey federation president told AP that the decision was made by conference call earlier this morning it was supposed to be a two week tournament that was to start on March thirty first it's the second time in which the world championships have been canceled back in two thousand three the tournament was scheduled for Beijing but it was called off because of the sars outbreak in

Canada President Trump AP Beijing Sars
Creative ways to sell your knowledge without creating a course

Entrepreneur on FIRE

11:45 min | 4 months ago

Creative ways to sell your knowledge without creating a course

"Talking about the creative ways to sell your knowledge without keywords without creating a course because we've seen it. I hope you've seen it. There's a massive shift happening the self education world and if you can identify number one your area of expertise a number to learn how to craft your perfect offer. You are going to be able to go places and I mean we've been watching we've been talking to people. We've been seeing some unbelievably creative ways from our very own students. Joe We're wrapping about this just about fifteen minutes ago. So why don't you share with fire nation? And the screw family a couple of those. Thanks just a quick overview. Because I know we're going to get into it and even deeper way but we're talking online workshops. Virtual workshops in person workshops live events mastermind group. Trainings there really is an abundance of ways to creatively. Sell your knowledge without having to create a course because I've seen it you've seen it. Some people feel really overwhelmed at the idea of creating a course. How do I structure what I wanted to break up my modules? How do I structure my lessons with this process that we're going to be sharing? You don't even have to worry. I'll worry about that at all all you have to do. Is You know. Set An intention to share the knowledge. You do have whether that's your experience. Your Skills Hobby Passion. Something that you're really good at all you have to do is figure out a way to package and sell that and it does not have to be through. A Course Josh. Do WanNA share one that we've seen in our own business. Ns with some of our students. Yeah I would say that sometimes is not always necessary to create a course in fact a lot of people get more value out of luck with Joe. Kind of said. Like more in person workshops like Even like virtual workshops that kind of stuff as opposed to a cost. A lot of people don't end up following through and completing it. And so when you have like these more shorter workshops it's like there's people have committed to show up to a the data that day whatever however long ago spoil and they're gonNA make sure they get older value out of during that time and so one really good example of that is a student allows science. Magnus Magnus is a mandolin. Plays really good Mandolin. Plan by the way you're not on the Mandolin is kind of like A. It's like an either. He's like a cross between a guitar and like a ukulele basically And so when I met Magnus. He started a membership. Saad and the membership side is just people pay monthly. And I think it's about like twenty dollars a month and they paid to like get access to like you know some of these lessons. He does like live car chain within that membership and then I told Magnus I said look. I think it's fantastic. You have this membership. But also I think there's a way you also highest Longa and more indepth virtual workshops. So he's a really good execute and so he went out and he just went out to his audience and he said. Hey WanNa hurt is this virtual workshop. I'M GONNA I'm GonNa teach you guys like these codes on the Mandolin. Over the course of a couple of hours drive and so from that straightaway at eleven people sign up to that virtual workshop and so he's a really good example of someone who's just taken the skill right. He's not he's not like outbid getting paid he's the top Mandolin player in the world. And he's getting paid like millions of dollars. That's not the case Ryan. So we had to create this himself so he took knowledge any. Put it together package it together sci-fi right now in the palm of monthly membership and this incredible virtual workshop. Which he's GonNa he's GonNa do. Rn Arbor again. So I know on a you have some examples to of of some people that you guys have worked with Incisa creating some unique ways of packaging and selling their knowledge to but endo but to button. Quick it's okay you still warthogs is all good. Do you want to build this one thing? That Josh touched on that. I think is so clutch That not a lot of people talk about his with online courses. We all know that course. Completion rates can be pretty abysmal in our space. But what I love about. These virtual workshops and Josh only told the example of Magnus but we also hosted a workshop called ship to six workshop. We just wanted a way to get this content out there and we did not want to create a whole course at this point in our business. We're kind of over creating courses. It's not something that were hell bent on. And but we wanted a way to get this out there and Josh said well I'm just GONNA host virtual workshop and it. Was you know three plus hours but the beauty of that was everyone completed it? Everyone showed her like. We have like ninety. Something percent show operate. Most people stayed to the end which means they consumed the whole thing which means you had the captive attention of people for three hours straight plus and they got the maximum value out of it plus they got replacing all that stuff. They got to ask questions. That just doesn't happen inside an online course. You know what I mean. Most people are like. Oh you know I'll get to it when I have more time or when I have space to actually focus on this and so they shelve it and it sits in their inbox collecting dust. But what I love about these virtual workshops. Is You get real time interaction with these people and you get to teach them your knowledge and you get answered their questions and you get to keep their captive attention ways that you just can't do with that of course. Of course you have to do in your. Pj's as well how you know by the way Joe Button I get to button for a second too because I do want to bring up a point on this topic as we used to have two courses. We used to be running podcasts as parents who flagship course and Webinar on fire and we did webinars fire for a couple of years and then canine looked each other. We're like man. It is so much work running two different courses right now having to updates and all this different stuff we really feel like this is through six and a half years of experience now of running podcasts paradise. If you're GONNA do a course right. You're really capped at once. You're capped at one if you want to do a course right so then even if you do have of course you've got explored different ways. And that's why can't I have been doing things like Porto Palooza having hosting masterminds down here which actually does lead to kate coming in here insurance pretty soon kate. No more buttons are promised. You're up do you even understand the amount of patients that I have. I think we understand it next level. That was okay jinx. You guys can't talk until I'm finished. No I'm just teasing. I'm actually like so anxious to jump any or just because you guys have been saying so many things where I'm like those things like Josh. You made mention of how you know. The the impact on worshiped and stuff. It doesn't have to create like massive millions of dollars right like when you think about the type of business that you want to run and that involves like being in person watching transformations happen within a couple of hours like that is so incredibly powerful and so I mean if you really take a step back and you think like how can I make the biggest impact in the shortest amount of time. We've seen it over and over and over in person. John you mentioned Puerto Palooza. I'm even thinking of like so. We have podcasters paradise rate us. Incredible online courses amazing facebook community. We did a one day workshop on the beginning part of podcast movement. When you're we had a room full of sixty people that signed up for that podcasting workshop and it was so amazing to have people in the room where we're literally walking through stops being able to answer questions lifetime and we were literally just taking the knowledge that we already have around podcasting and getting to share that with people together in a room dot space create so much magic and so much maps of impact for the people who are there. We've seen this with a ton of our students and I'll go back to Porto Palooza again. We've had We've had a couple of repeats. Quarter Palooza the very first year that we hold out mastermind down here in Puerto Rico Travis. Came down and traveled. Travis was talking about S- amazing idea that he had for a podcast about networking how to build your network and he has not only successfully built that podcast and a community around it. But he's now branched out into hosting in-person mastermind. I think it was like a year and a half ago and Travis got a couple of handfuls of people to join him for an IM- person mastermind John in Bali where he created this platform this space for people to come together to talk about different ideas that they want to implement in their business how to up their networking game. How you know what honestly sometimes as just about giving people exactly that space because when you're at home and you're like diving into all these different projects and life is happening. Of course every single day giving people the space where they can kind of disconnect from that in order to really reconnect with their business and their mission and our vision that can be so super powerful too so Chavez is not only not mastermind down in Bali he continues to create new masterminds where he picks different spots around the world to bring people together for these in person events he has other in person masterminds where he does a build your network dynasty mastermind where he helps people learn how to connect with people how to you know get the heroes in the mentors in their lives like into their world in a way that they can then take that and go impact other people. I mean John You talk about the ripple effect all the time and dot is just the beauty of something like this when you take the knowledge that you already have share it with a group of people and either a virtual or impersonal setting. Then you equip those people to go teach that to other people too. Yeah can I jump in here is while I wanNA share another really good example because what I what I really want to get across here? Is that? It's actually really easy to get going with this as well right like you know. Magnus for example. He decided Youtube Channel. I'm playing songs on the Mandolin. And people started following him and they were like teach me how to play and he was like okay. Cool he is how to play and then he is much. It cost to join ride and other good example. That is Caitlin and Jessica There were they were teaches than Ilunga teach anymore because they're earning a lot more from their knowledge business but they were literary teaches and so during the summer break on and if you guys noticed teachers don't really get paid a lot and over the summer break. They don't get paid at all and so they would put on these In person workshops with teaches and they would teach them essentially like how to teach their kids literary class writing like writing and stuff like that and so that was how they first got started and it was great for them like they just bought in like ten fifteen twenty different teaches at a time that would high like one hundred dollars two hundred dollars like bay there and they would teach them and then from there. That will like wow like. I wonder if we can take this on the Internet on if you can take this on the road and really really exploited and like they just launched a program Earlier this year off and they made like a one hundred. Fifteen thousand dollars Where they're selling like a program to teaches online is actually really incredible. What's happening sound lesson plans so lesson plan? Yeah it's just so or another couple that comes to mind yakult Serena from the grape unknown and they host virtual wine tastings like. There's just so much that is a grave

Magnus Magnus Josh Joe Button John Magnus I Porto Palooza Travis Puerto Rico Travis Incisa Puerto Palooza Saad Kate Bali Ryan Serena PJ
An Interview with WWE Legend Kurt Angle

TKO with Carl Frampton

13:15 min | 5 months ago

An Interview with WWE Legend Kurt Angle

"Incredibly pleased society. We've got joining us. Who never quite expected? That's phones on silent everyone. I never expected that we would have on. Tko wwe wrestling legend. Kurt Angle first of all. Thank you so much for for taking the time to join us. Thanks for having me on. And let's see you're over here with them. WWe promoting the new bt sport. Yes exclusively in the UK for the two thousand and twenty busy day few. Yeah we started early morning and we're GONNA go out tonight we just have like a a gathering at bt. Not and. I think it ends at eleven o'clock but we started early morning and this is normal for for sports entertainers. Yeah do a lot of media so going a huge wrestling fan on A. You didn't have sky in your house. Yes so I was like an a young kid by Cole I was Afam. wrassling bottom was on the subway channels and I didn't have sky the watch it as much as other guys. Yeah but I was obviously a world of high beg ables. Did you know when you first joined. Because obviously in these this day and age social media the Internet you know how truly global the companies and how far you're reaches but were you aware in in the late ninety s just how many people were watching worldwide now. I I didn't watch wrestling. I didn't grow up watching it. I start watching it it would. I started so when I saw the company late ninety eight. That's when I started watching I do WanNa come on those days. But he's okay. You got quite like to find Natalie about your amateur wrestling career because as a professional sportsman. That's something that you were known for his part of your. WWe character but actually that was a huge part of your career and your life you were in a family of rest is your brother's arrest sits right yeah had four brothers. They all wrestled. They were all very successful. I was the youngest. Didn't really like wrestling. The START WITH I. I like team sports. I didn't like it depending solely on me but the more I watched my brothers and growing up I start liking wrestling. I started getting better and eventually I got better than they were and then I became came the best of my family by win the Olympic medal. Yeah 'cause wrestling in America's be of a high school institution because we have it starts when you're serve in elementary school visit. Almost every school has a program right so junior high high school college. It's very big over there. So it's it's part of our culture because a lot of people call for boxing to be put into schools as part of the curric- it used to be in the schools and there's a call for it become back and installs obviously a lot of discipline and everything else and you see the the problems that society has these with Nayef Cram and gang culture and everything else. I think. Think that programs like that rather than in the states and boxing programs and the stats are in the UK. Only going to help us. What point did you? What age did you think this could really be serious for me as a career I would say around thirteen fourteen? I started having a lot more success and got to the high school level and I lost success there and it just carried over to college and I didn't really. Oh you think about Olympics. When I was younger I just thought about that season and if I could win the championship that year and every year I continue to win which Olympic I'm big city one nine hundred ninety six Atlanta Atlanta well? Is that your proudest moment. Out of everything you've done in your career. Olympic gold medal surpasses says anything. Yeah it was You know even bigger than anything. I've accomplishing wwe. Yeah Yeah Imagine. That was a kind of Golden Olympics for the US esteem cousteau was the homeland picked. Michael Johnson it like the basketball team is Charles Barkley and Shaquille O'Neal came one. Those guys Gail Devers. Even Andre Agassi won the tennis and we're legends in that team. What was it like to be off in the Olympic Village? Seeing those people it was pretty cool. You know you knew it was special when you went to opening ceremonies and you saw the athletes there and the guys you mentioned they were the guys and girls that were participating that were already professionals professionals and they made it you know viable for pros to end up competing in the Olympics and so you saw basketball and tennis. Ns and now even golf. So the the pros are going and winning medals as well now so those of it because one of the things the Olympics exp boxing is one of the only sports where there is a kind of. There's another trajectory and other policy if you win a medal for of sports certainly minority sports. That aren't necessarily a lot of TV coverage the Olympic medal can often be the kind of end of the road. There isn't anywhere else. I speak to go resting very well. Be One of those is and and so for you that amazing so the question I was going to ask you without. FMA How to beg then as it was Ni- would you have took that pop rather than the wwe without a doubt. Yeah wow it wasn't at that point. UFC struggling they offered me a ten fight. Deal for one hundred fifty grand and that was our biggest contract they ever offered. This was in ninety seven and then sound very good to me so I decided decide to go pro wrestling and by two thousand one two thousand and two you have see was kicking in high gear but I was already drawn in and a pro wrestling scene. So how how did the what was the chain of events that let you to the door of of the W W well in one thousand nine hundred sixty minutes man offer me a contract. I flew up to meet with them and I wasn't interested. I had a lot of people. Tell me you know you grew up. You never watched the Fake what you did was real a lot of my peers. Were telling me don't do it. So my agent through the contract the way and I'd say in one thousand nine hundred star watching Watching stone. Don't go Steve Austin the Rock and however flannel. They weren't how entertaining they were. I thought man I could do this. I think it'd be a lot of fun and you have see at the time. Time wasn't going anywhere so I went with a wwe. What was the the early memories? Because I imagine wrestling's one of the toughest sports there is a is a amateur wrestling but of red. If in a few places that is a pro wrestling were were incredibly tough. What were your first memories of some of the first lessons and training training sessions? You did all the first day. When I started training I quit? I took three bumps and my neck the pain I was getting my neck and back it was like this isn't normal. You don't it's like self abuse and you know we bump on plywood. It's a lot like this and There's no spring underneath It is self mutilation. You're you're basically beating that crap on yourself because you're allowing. I mean people were throwing around and take your head off with a clothesline and the object. You're bumping on his plywood so it was very abusive in the first day. I I didn't like it and I decided to hang in there. I came back the next day and I continued on. I got used to bumping and and used the pain so eventually didn't bother me as much but I'm paying for it. Now see a leg generation before ours. My Dad's generation. They would not really look favorably upon the tablet Ali. But what these guys do is take some serious stick their body. There's some serious injuries and stuff. It's you know your two weight world champion. And you've taken many punches to the head and body is is anyone WanNa taking a lifetime. What is what is pain to you guys? How do you manage pain? Do you ever get used to it as ever become less painful or do you just become used to living in that place. It's something you get used to. And as a young boxer I think Jimmy Moore. My trainer is spoke about this and said that you can tell from a very young age or someone hazard or not and it's normally a kids barn and if they take a punch annoys on they don't cry and they punch back it's like you can't make the Paean it's like I don't know what obviously adrenaline carries you through a lot of it but it's not like a real specific. If you punch me in the arm Ni- I would feel feel more pain than actually punching ahead fate strange sensation. It's not nice but it's very very hard up. Manassas gray but law detainees. I've not been able describe pain amateur wrestling pro wrestling. What are the worst kind of pain that you can describe? And how do you deal with those. I think the worst pain I had and I still have it now as an amateur wrestling right before the Olympics I got thrown on my head and I broke my neck and I didn't know it. I kept wrestling again that day. I ended up winning the US Open and that put me in a good position to make the Olympic team for the Olympic. Trials made me the top guy so I didn't have the Russell the mini tournament Face the winner of the mini tournament. I was the guy that the mini tournament faced. So Oh i I I couldn't get passed by any doctor doctor. Wood Passer would allow me to wrestle so I eventually found a doctor and and he said the only thing you can do. You can't train you just would just stick in a neck with Nova game and you won't feel the pain. And he was right every match. I had at the trials and the Olympics. I got twelve shots. Novacaine the back of my neck couldn't feel it for about an hour and Russell and then an hour later I'd be in a lot of pain. You won the Olympic Games uh-huh with a broken neck that's insane quotes and wwe also. Yeah yeah I broke both my hands. The last vote doesn't ideal and it wasn't wasn't nice but it's hard to imagine when the pinnacle of Your Sport Olympic Games to be competing against the top guys in the world with a broken neck does that. I can't imagine boxing. We're broken hand. We are called you a few weeks ago and you said this is the most pain I think I've ever been in the radon especially she'll have a little bit of bone removed from the right time but there there was a a tendon that had ripped and it needed stitch together without that Han was give me more than than the left hand which has seven unscrews and appropriate and at night. He's but just because it had to have some work done the Tandon It was It wasn't wasn't nice. I WanNa ask you a question. Did you know ahead had a time that you're gonNA be suffering after your career from the injuries. Would you go back and when you do it all over again I we do it all over again because obviously enjoyed every bit of my career. I've been very successful more successful than I probably would have imagined. I've been lucky enough that my injuries alot. My last night I broke Mahan but previous my husband really suffered injuries but I would one hundred percent hop gum heart do it all over again. What about you? I don't know I mean I'm I'm hurting pretty badly my knees my back my neck. Sometimes I think about you know what when I go back my quality of life right now socks so I do have a lot of suffering. I had a painkiller addiction overcame about six years ago and you know stay clean and struggle. In the way I have been very difficult. was there a lot of pressure even when you had injuries week in week out to go and perform Tom. Did you ever feel that. You couldn't say no part of the problem no I I. Nobody ever forced me to do anything. There are a lot of times. I had a a great doctor that you gave me off had three neck surgeries and he was very easy to manipulate. So you know when I broke my neck and I had surgery I would talk him into clear Amina go back early and At the time he didn't have their wellness policy L. A. C. set where they had their doctor clear. You we go to our own doctor and I was able to do that a couple of times where I should have. I've been back and I did so I broke my neck four more times and WWF and It caused me to go into a downward spiral painkiller. Alert addiction in just almost room my life so it was. It was very difficult. Can I just say you have one of the strongest biggest looking knocks. Have you seen as well. Yeah Rick out again. Yeah wow so. How many times are you performing when when you when you arrested him? Mm to twice a week. You'll be performing five days a week. You for forming five

Wrestling Olympics WWE Boxing UK United States Kurt Angle NI Gold Medal Cole I Gail Devers Andre Agassi UFC Afam. Wrassling Bottom Golf Steve Austin America Basketball
Its Been a Good 24 Hours for Bitcoin

The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

02:36 min | 5 months ago

Its Been a Good 24 Hours for Bitcoin

"A pretty good twenty four hours full Top Ten some pretty close. Actually this recent upturn that we've seen on bitcoin continues continues We've pushed back above ten grand and we pushed when you hire a high that high a high the next at ten thousand four hundred nineteen say a county at ten to three nine three point seven four percent I wanna do like about this move is a bitcoin is actually performed inline or Beta. Ah then a number of the top ten in the possibly same bitcoin lagging a little bit And some of the other Coin Tokens having pushed on a little bit harder Hodeida. Now he's saying becoming the northbound side and the good news is that was actually. You know twelve outcry it'll I did take. I stayed up till eleven PM. Despite not wanting to settle at to be honest I did not ask all designed to be awake at that time of not but I did and I try and and I have scaled out and easy profit so Now now of it and now the markets allowed to run because they'll only get bitcoin which is up three point seven three three percent. They're also GONNA theory. I'm all it's well and it's up. Currently six point. Four nine percent once guy pushing on to new highs in that trend in twenty twenty twenty twenty twenty highs on both bitcoin. Ns theorem against two hundred. Thirty seven dollars. Eighty two cents up six point. Four nine percent sign tried sign tried a little cradle twelve hour. And that's why I am and eleven. PM My time. Sydney are the two times. Those candles clause motorways. Always there for eleven pm because they have been doing a lot of training of our focus staring at screens. And it's it's it's a much more intense focus in like when you staring at those charts and you're thinking and debating sort of going through your Brian. What you're going to do you know planning and structuring and rising raising waters in this sort of thing and managing tries? I haven't had it has so much going on trading Wasa quite some time and Yesterday was the first day that it reminded me a very harsh reality to To Blink identity breath work yesterday ended with headache. And it's just because of being staring too hot at the CIA. Sounds strange but trust me you spend enough time in front of the computer show. Evil done this before you do get. Those sort of tied is and then a headache. So it'll early pretty sheltered. I've got my position a pretty happy See what's going on the TA. It was a good good night short.

Headache Sydney CIA TA Wasa
The VW Beetle: An Evil Origin Story

Past Gas

09:09 min | 5 months ago

The VW Beetle: An Evil Origin Story

"Germany was looking for a true people's car literally translated as Volkswagen in one thousand nine hundred. Thirty one. One writer from DOS volks auto basically summed up the struggle for making people's those car perfectly quotes the van and be too heavy into expensive to produce the Hausa ill-suited in traffic an unstable in purpose but is needed is a car. Awed designed for the street offering maximum comfort but a minimum of luxury Ferdinand. Porsche realized this as well and at the age of fifty five decided to open a business himself an attempt to accomplish such a monumental task. He assembled a team of the best German. Speaking designers engineers an opened his own company in Stuttgart Germany while he didn't have much capital. He was globally known as an automotive genius so he was able to accomplish this with clouds alone own. GotTa have that clout. Yeah cloud is basically my number one currency. Yeah I think I can speak for everyone in this room. We wouldn't be where we are today without without our cloud for your appearance on two broke girls channel wouldn't exist. It does get a little though. 'cause I remember last week went to lunch and I covered you you and I was like hey. Can you hear me like thirteen dollars. Like I haven't paid for a meal since one thousand nine Hundred Ninety six on April Twenty Fifth Nineteen thirty one the company. I entered the official registry as the doctor Professor Porsche Company for the Assembly consultation and design of automobiles wheels and engines. We've wanted to call Dr Pepper but that's hardly taken. Ferdinand Porsche had made a name for himself in racing. The creation of a people's car was always a personal passion of his. It wasn't long until Porsche began drawing up designs for the first Volkswagen in nineteen thirty. He Won. He was commissioned by Private Motorcycle Company and began working on the project twelve motorcycle sales are going down and this company wanted to diversify hi there portfolio a little bit product. Twelve was the first project ever for Porsche. That was neither a small luxury wagon or a small racing car designs immediately we took on the familiar beetle-shaped and it was powered by five cylinder. One thousand. CC radial engine. That may twenty five horsepower. Radial engine like like like an airplane. Like an airplane yeah the first prototypes were road. Tested in nineteen thirty two. Despite the cars functionality the company that hired Porsche Chak cancelled the contract. As motorcycle. Sales had begin to pick up again in the entire endeavor just like they broke up with their long-term. Yeah way friend and Porsche was like finally you know we're going to get to be together and they're like. Oh Yeah Yeah. Yeah it's always been you then and turns out Dave's back. Oh cool no good for you guys so happy for you know all right so that whole thing was okay for Porsche the motorcycle manufacturer. Ns you another company immediately. swooped in to take their place at the time. Germany held the largest motorcycle market in the world but people wanted cars and Msu that they begin flirting with the idea of building true through automobiles it's crazy that Nebraska State University started out as a motorcycle manufacturer in Germany. It's incredible and then we can. It makes much more money in academia. This new project was dubbed project. Thirty two as it began in the year. Nineteen thirty two a pattern was beginning to form though and ns you started to stay purely in the motorcycle market and bailed on the project the factor. Ns you pulled out. Didn't hinder porsches spirits. It's though he seemed like a pretty a Kinda Guy Project thirty two had allowed him to alternate innovate his previous designs. Bring him one step closer to the future Volkswagen and he had been dreaming of and just a year and a half working for himself he already. He had already made more progress on designing his dream. People's car then he had made in the previous ten so overall he was pretty stoked meanwhile on February eleventh nineteen thirty three less than two weeks after coming to office Chancellor Adolf off Hitler did something no other German chancellor had ever done he attended the Berlin auto show. It was no accident that the theme of the show that year was the will to motorization cassation which now that read it aloud. Sounds very forboding and evil. Okay so Hitler had a plan quote. The motor vehicle has become come next to the airplane. One of humanity's most ingenious means of transportation the German nation can be proud and knowing is played a major part in the design and development of of this great instrument he immediately punctuated that remark by saying that Germany had fallen behind in the market. And now of course his time to fix it was actually at this auto show that one. Joseph Dan's appeared with his own prototype. Volkswagen the Standard Superior Ganz is especially unique in the story because his designs over the five years before the show helped influence both Ferdinand Porsche. And many others. With their attempted Volkswagen's Hitler himself expressed serious interest tryst in the prototype vehicle during the shell despite providing revolutionary designs contributed to all future. Volkswagen beetles just Ganz's name is almost completely absent from any history books. Due to his Jewish Heritage Ganz was arrested persecuted and forced to flee the country of Germany while his name was scrubbed from basically all records and was forbidden from being associated with the term Volkswagen altogether so porsche basically stole the design at the following auto show one year later. Hitler announced two major policies that would be enacted immediately. He called for the mass construction of roads and and highways as well as for car to be built that can finally be owned and driven by the common man quote. No country can be strong transportation as week to help push forward his dream of a mobilized Germany he promised tax relief for auto companies more money for racing more resources for motoring events less interference from state governments on the ownership ownership and production of cars. Course this was not just for the People's benefit but for militancy. Yes now this this is what kicked are like the. US's highway system into high gear to they're like. Oh we need to get you know missiles across the country chief we need to an arson. Attack on the Reichstag allowed Hitler to make a sweeping power grab. He officially made himself Germany's fuhrer he. Hurried hurried changes and transportation and pass the rash automotive law in the summer of nineteen thirty three removing German states of any responsibilities concerning the ownership and and production of automobiles and soon after the construction of the first autobahn began. So he's the site. I'm a dictator. Yeah Yeah it's like turns out. Yeah I'm king to again public support. The idea of national progress was tied directly to the innovation in transportation. It's hard to understand. Just how big the Autobahn project was. But the pure scale of road. Construction was unprecedented unprecedented at the time. Four thousand thirty four miles of road was planned for construction over the next seven years but like so many characteristics characteristics of the Nazi party it was the idea that mattered. Most the Nazi spoke with these roads. As M- court monuments in fact one announcement titled Not Roads But Works Works of art read quote. Nothing is to cramp or delay you in your swing from one horizon. To the other the highways will spark like stone an artfully rot. Ring ring the construction of these roads was essential for Nazis to gain the power. They wanted but they needed the public support behind. We'll be right back with more of this story. Okay but I learned from our sponsors. It should be obvious that the roads were really intended for an advantage during wartime but people were too busy Z.. To really think about that for a while Germany was actually looking really nice as long as he didn't look any deeper than the surface level. Surprisingly of all Hitler's rhetoric. The Volkswagen was the one that carmakers feared the most they all loved the idea of mass producing a car that literally everyone will want to buy or even better working with the governments to enforce the necessity to buy them after all who doesn't love being both supply and demand but they wanted the cars they mass-produced to be cheap like a three wheeled covered in motorcycle or something. Truly cheap manufacturers hated the idea of building a car just as good as the upper level cars for the price of an entry level car they wanted to make money and Hitler's Volkswagen plan left no room for people to even need to purchase high end models. Not only did they think selling a good car. So cheap was texting technologically logically impossible. They also feared the long term impact of direct government involvement in the automotive

Porsche Volkswagen Hitler Germany Ferdinand Porsche Private Motorcycle Company Stuttgart Doctor Professor Porsche Compa Writer Joseph Dan Dr Pepper United States Jewish Heritage Ganz Dave Arson MSU Ganz
Jonathan Pryce, 'The Two Popes'

Popcorn with Peter Travers

12:55 min | 5 months ago

Jonathan Pryce, 'The Two Popes'

"There's a movie now that you can see a Netflix. It's called the two popes and it stars my guest today. Jonathan Pryce and Anthony Living Hopkins. Playing guess what the title characters doing doing it brilliantly. So Jonathan Welcome Creek Pope Francis there. You are the big news now. About Pope Francis is his encounter with this woman in the crap out there where he sort of slapped her hand. Yeah Yeah have you been being asked this question now would I please slap really. Okay do I WANNA be grant. At the Golden Globes. There was a lot of Grabbing and pushing polling I was tempted to slap but I feel really sorry for him because people aren't seeing the whole whole sequence video where that particular woman grabbed him very yanked him yanked him and he's He's an Obama scientists bound to hurt. Well let's talk about the two popes in terms of the whole concept of you being offered this to play the The Argentinian Paul. Because we don't see him in the movie being the pope really walk up to that while Anthony Hopkins is playing Pope Benedict German. is you're an Argentinian to Welshman playing these. Yeah somebody must've said. That's that's what we need is to Welshman to do this time for Welsh. Pope was watching and watching. You play this. I kept thinking this other. Argentinian you play. which was one there? You are the dictator in a way. Pope can be a dictator but Pope Francis Go. You is the liberal reform. The one that wants to give them more compassionate look at the church. Did you have any trepidation about pilots. Just just just the usual about whether I wanted to do any of. Is that how you approach them. All Walk Negative. Say No no I thought uh I thought I'd be on a hiding to nothing representing this particular pope. But that didn't last very long. I read the script and won ten. You that Fernando Morella Morella was gonNA be directing it. I definitely wanted to do it and I think it was mainly to do with the fact that I'm not religious logistics. I was brought up in the Christian faith. I went to church until I was a teenager. but I found that this pope was the first pope who I thought was speaking to me and millions like me about issues that what. Mrs Narrowly to do the Church or organized religion but to do with politics and to do with speaking out up folding environment and about the economy about the injustice is the during the world so I he was someone for great empathy towards towards and help. That looked like him a bit and I walk like came definitely Even though you've got ten years on me you could sneak into the the Vatican may be busy and just an take over there and do what you would need to do there. Does that give you a feeling when your plane that that this was what I would do if I win. The pope shoes. I wouldn't be so presumptious to fix that but I'm glad he's doing what he's doing And obviously he's got. There's the whole church and Vatican side of things which he doesn't seem to be able to deal with those conquer but when you're constantly reading lots of stories about how he's disliked within the Vatican because he's a reformer and people don't want that change and I think that's that's why he became pope. He was be made pope in order to make these changes. Otherwise so why choose him because he was in the never been an odd uh-huh latin-american Pope and the film implies of that we don't necessarily know the truth. That benedict wanted Bagogwe uglier to be the next pope because he saw in him things that he could not even he couldn't do he saw in many ways his opposite didn't they and this is it. I didn't mention this in the introduction but benedict was a pope who retired. WHO said I'm not going to do it anymore? And so we have to popes who Are Alive in this world today and they're the clips at the end of the real popes in seeming tab. Having a really terrific time when I sold the first Kata film I was bit disturbed. They were showing the real popes at the end of the phone. Because I thought it would invalidate everything. We've been doing for the previous to house. But what you see in these two men is a is a the committee this just a welcoming the way they they greet each other with great affection and you can see the respect. They have for each other and far from taking away from our performances it they it enhances. It gives an element of truth to what we were doing. It's a really terrific script. Ns Two popes one of these two guys talking to each other which sometimes scares people when they go to the movies. I want that but yet a mirage as a director makes this movie move. You've so beautiful to gorgeous thing to look at. It's also sometimes. Polaris that's going on. Did you all know that that was what was going to happen before he did it. No no what's what's wonderful about. The film is that it It's such a surprise for audiences once don't you don't you. You gotta get them in there and then once they're in that It's a surprise Because it's it's much funnier than I ever expected. And and the audience expect and I think the way we made the film there was no. We didn't have many preconceptions. I don't remember ever talking onto Tony. I'm going to be like this. And he said I'm going to be like this and finance and I want you to do this. That and the whole process was really organic bound because we have the the strength of that script bit underneath his you know holding us up and when I saw it and the way Fernando put it together other because he says his work starts in the editing room he lets us do what we want and encourages us to go certain ways but when I they do what they want to that yeah good directors do that they let you think your your your coming up with the Serving quietly feed and things in your ear they let you think it's your idea So when I saw it I didn't know it was going to be so funny. Rondo humorous. I mean that first scene of your character trying to book his own plane reservations on the fault. Yeah probably apparently did that. That's what he did but it's the post game I saw with a big audience was telluride. And because you I don't know what to expect and that moment the right at the beginning of the phone web the audience laughs as one. The huge wave of laughter. You can feel the audiences sir. I sent me sat by a few. And they're going to enjoy this and the you can feel the audience sitting back and saying this. This is going to be okay you can. It's like Yep okay you know bring it on make happen and yet it also doesn't avoid the controversies that exist within the church. Now the whole thing with the problem priests they're predators that are there and also their histories. Can you talk a little about his history. Go Yeah it back in the seventies in terms of Argentina. It's all mostly. It's all in the film and we didn't shy away from it. The way were applauded and thanked thanked by the people people in Bonus Iris. When they sold the film we had a screening because they that fear was this is going to be a whitewash elma? Crossover Haggi Auger fear Goglia. Because he is still seen as a divisive character in Argentina because of his perceived involvement involvement with the cardinals. I've found on Youtube footage of him being interrogated by or question by his peers fellow cardinals about his involvement with the colonels. And you see a very different man the man you see smiling on the balcony. And he's made pope he's he's he's very doer he's quite angry. I think he's impatient. He's drumming his fingers on the table. And I put that image together with talking to a Jesuit priest and bonus. Who worked with him? I who said they didn't like him. He was Very always stays. Ah Stay by himself. He didn't mix I he was he never smiled. I'm when they saw him on the balcony. This smiling pope. They didn't recognize him because he was smiling. Didn't person yeah. But then you do get the other side of him where he is in the film you see him Saying mass and the kind of the slum township areas and and the other side's members very popular so it's not a a a bio-pic it's not a huggy overview of this man. It's a it's a Watson Study of him and I think we've been fair to him because we all respect him and admire him And we had a screening in Rome three or four weeks ago were members of the Vatican Cambridge theory and They said they liked liked. That enjoyed it And a particular Cardinal WHO's a friend? WHO's a friend of Love Benedict and of Francis He'd liked the phone very much. Fernando the director said. Do you think we were too hard on the church. And he said you went hot enough woo but he also said that he thought France would like the film and he wanted the DVD to take them to show him the film. I love so That review see that. Yeah well what do starts right. Yeah that'd be good and also from France's family in Argentina. Fernando got an email to say that they'd seen it. They enjoyed the film and they liked. What we've done Representing their uncle. That was that was really nice. Colon uncle Uncle Horace to two years. How were you and Anthony Hopkins together? You know. You haven't made anything or done anything before. Really WE'VE BEEN ON A. We're both on the recording of under milk. Wood the Dylan Thomas Poem that was produced by George Martin. Twenty seven years ago the Beatles producer and Tony was first voice. I was second voice and you come twenty seven years later. We're in Rome and the coal sheet has You know you're rated as the importance in the film. The number and I was number one and Tony was number two so it was my revenge after twenty seven audit your greet each other even morning with morning number one number two. It went on from there but we. It's interesting the what happens to the two men in the film is reflected. Did what happened to Tony. And I because you know in the film you see two men sort of sniffing around each other like a pair of dogs like where each other Eh Wary of Tony but I was. I was I I'm an aura of Tony Hopkins. I'm a great admirer of his. So I'm not played late into those early scenes and as you see the pope's relationship growing so my friendship with Tony grew and It is the equivalent of both of us. All of US tangoing together by the end of it. That's a good way to put out.

Pope Francis Tony Hopkins Fernando Morella Morella Benedict Anthony Living Hopkins Argentina Netflix Rome Jonathan Pryce Barack Obama Director Golden Globes Cardinals Dylan Thomas United States MRS Youtube George Martin Polaris Rondo
How to Find Work-Life Balance in the Creative Industry

The Futur

08:04 min | 5 months ago

How to Find Work-Life Balance in the Creative Industry

"My name is Robert Kennedy and I work as is a freelance creative running my own design studio in Munich. Germany and I specialize in focus on motion design but also do traditional graphic graphic design and do a lot of public speaking and teaching here and there You're also a model from what I can see from welcomes ads. So that's part of your credentials now and fans of the show fans of the show know who you are because they've seen you on youtube so if your new lesson and you find this conversation to be super interesting and I highly encourage you to go back and watch those two episodes but for everybody else. That's new welcome aboard and on today's episode. We're going to talk a lot about work life balance and how to family family men you and I or people who have families how you manage active career so the way we're GonNa talk about this is we're going to I jump into like what was life like for you. You prior to having kids and having a family like just the the work you the young person who's really driven ambitious. What was that like? What was that life like for you well life before kids was certainly massively different in many ways I was doing the traditional hustle all day every day as much as I can I have I have the fortunate position position to to love my work? You know like just as you in any hopefully most of of creative people love love their work and I don't take this for granted I always thought it's it's it's a privilege to just go in and be excited to create something you and always be challenged to learn a new tool or new technique or try this. Try by that so I was. I was working a lot and I didn't really consider it as work although I found it to be strenuous at times especially during my internship in Hamburg where I essentially went from for example from doing five times a week sports to once in six months and also having to fridge with things not looking so well after a few days or weeks. You know so This was a time of of Late shifts and working really long hours hours than this was during studies. So this carried over after even after I finish my studies and moved to Munich so I was working super late nights. I was always a Late late night person. You know I still have trouble getting off getting getting up in the morning and really get the engine going so was more like okay. Yeah let's let's start work from ten eleven something like this way into the night and and this is where thrived really was no email. No no phone nothing Two and three and the best ideas pop up on this. Try this technique so Yeah I was. I was working really long hours and learned lots doing. I'm doing that and Really appreciate that time a lot. How old how is your way before? Yeah I WANNA share share licenses but how what years is just so everybody. Everybody gets a sense of where we are in history so right now I'm forty I was hang on was fifty. It was twenty five during my internship. I graduated I think I was twenty six or twenty seven graduated from from university so But I started work in free ninety even before studied so I think right after doing my what would the equivalent of high school I think at twenty I started basically To freelance before studying. So this this been on from I'm twenty to thirty five I would say so I will. Oldest is no five years. I was thirty five when he was born so Think for about and now for about fifteen years. The Hustle was pretty intense. I and and a lot of fun too but so different to rain a lot of long nights all right so when you say you're working and being inspired to in the morning what does a typical day like when when you get up when you go to sleep and did you do this five days a week or seven Sunday's week back in the days back in the day back in the day it was it was much more structured. It was was it was. It's funny actually. Because you know when I was younger it was basically like you say the dream of freelancer. You know you know just you know not not giving a damn you know still of course being disciplined and getting getting stuff done and finishing projects on time. Of course this was. This was obvious is an absolute necessity but still Going onto the basketball court playing basketball Coming back late in the afternoon working so it was not really. It was not really a schedule was like going with the flow. And just doing whenever inspiration hits me and So it was mostly flair tried to work five five days a week but for me weekends weren't as holy as they are right now. You know it was. Yeah you know what it was Saturday. Hey someone has a cool idea we can. We can do something with UV lights and fluorescent colors and we can film it enclosed oven ns through that under Saturday. No one's GonNa Bother and it was just you know whenever whenever you want and whenever inspiration in the Mus- hit you when I would at was it sounded like you were just is living in the moment and just leaving to whatever your heart and passion took you and I think that's a really cool and special period in your life and of course all things exchange but before we get there so I'm getting this now. Whatever you felt inspired to do you did if you wanted to play basketball you would if you wanted to stay up to four in the morning working on some new technique make you would do that? And you didn't have to feel guilty or anything else because it was just about you and your personal and professional development right correct now okay super all right how how how was it for you. Not that different so okay. When I got out of school in Nineteen ninety-five? I started my the company just a few months after graduation. And you know when you start a company. There's a lot of responsibilities and the kind of company has started. I almost had a staff almost from from the jump when I got one and there was more work to do than I could do. Admittedly just reached out to people and started to bring them in. It wasn't fulltime but it was fulltime freelance people working for me kind of early on that meant that the hustle game was really strong. I do want to tell you this because eventually couple of years after I did get married and I was working With my friend and my girlfriend and she became my wife but for those I think five of years I didn't take any holidays. There was no vacation it was just work all the time. If I wasn't working on a project I was either reading or developing myself itself as a person so there was a lot of things I needed to learn about. Motion Design about titled Design About Even Hotter Structure a company and the technical aspects suspects like back in the day because it's a nineteen ninety five when we were able to connect to computers together and share a printer and my mind was blown. All talk doesn't and even either net or just up and so that was my life just spending time reading macworld magazine just thumbing through things and seeing all I need router. That's that's what a router does so our own. It person delivery boy. I was the designer the art director every role that had to be fulfilled. I did them all all. So we're talking about some serious nights. And just like ECO. You said there were nights when I was literally tending the rendering because it took so long to render back in the day computers were not fast enough and I would just wake up a couple hours. Check the rendering and fall asleep on the floor next to my computer it was pretty rough and that that was the hustle grind

Basketball Munich Youtube Robert Kennedy Germany Macworld Magazine Hamburg Director
Mickey Drexler's Formula for Turning Retail Around

The Business of Fashion Podcast

11:46 min | 5 months ago

Mickey Drexler's Formula for Turning Retail Around

"Welcome to inside fashion on the podcast. This week. We have a very special conversation with someone who has come to be known as merchant Prince of fashion. Mickey Drexler grew up in the Bronx working at his dad's company in the garment district and then carved out a legendary career working at Bloomingdale's Bloomingdale's and Taylor the gap and J. Crew. These days Mickey is working with his son on a new brand called Alex melon in his conversation with B.. JIO FS chief correspondent in New York. Lauren Sherman he shares his advice for young executives working with creative partners. Here's Mickey Drexler inside fashion. So Mickey thank you for being here happy to be here. Let's start from the beginning. Are Your parents or your parents in retailer apparel or anything that I My Dad worked worked in the garment business. New York City We grew I grew up in the Bronx and he had like a lot of other First Generation Jewish families whatever he worked in the garment business. He worked By buttons and piece goods for coat manufacturer named Jill Junior and my mom always worked. She was ill From Twenty eight years old she had cancer and passed away. Wait fifteen years later from a Being a chain smoker in those days no one really knew that cigarettes actually killed you so So she but she always worked as a secretary at the Y. M. Ha So they both worked hard. I had no siblings but I had seven cousins. Who Live down the St and three of my mom's sisters so as an extended family well it was the y m h a a young men's Hebrew Association? WHO's in the South Bronx Bronx? I went to overnight camp where she was a secretary for the summers At the camp camp because she worked it was affiliated with ym Ha and growing up. Did you think you would go into the same business. Your Dad was well I I didn't think anything as a kid I I only worried about. I worried about a lot of stuff. 'cause I was a worrying kid but I didn't really think about what I do who I always dreamt that my dad would be a successful. Because that's what he talked and dream about he talked about always Wanting wanting to kind of de successful he never was by any measurement Successful at what. He did He worked for a kind of a boss who you know. I heard about all the time who didn't treat him as kindly maybe As he might. That's true a lot of bosses and he wanted to be. I'll use the word big shot. Now this is in the sixties in the Bronx and So I didn't really know what I wanted to do. I had no idea it would be the garment business But I always worked starting at a young age my teenage years going because he kind of forced me to go into work with him on holidays on Saturdays Saturdays so I went to work for the coat. Company ticketing coats a Aaron's the shipping carrying samples to the other people in stores etc.. Did you know Ralph Lauren. Growing up because he grew up in the Bronx right. He was on Masha Loop Parkway. I was Barnes Avenue He I went to high school at Bronx sites across much Lou Parkway did you do you remember when he hemas coming up in the late sixties. I remember him exactly. 'cause I always followed people who did things that I admired. I was at Bloomingdale's started Sixty nine working at bloomingdale's and I remember Ralph. I didn't know him personally. But he came in selling selling wide ties to the men's department and it was like revolutionary and so I didn't know him but you know because I worked at Bloomingdale's I A new people who bought ties from him. So I always looked at. Ralph is someone. I admired immensely. What he did and at Bloomingdale's did you do the retail program? I know a lot of the department stores used to have these great training programs. Very lucky. In the sense first day was in housewares. I couldn't stand it I was trying to look for pots and pans. I knew nothing about it and I was Kinda lost. And the second day They moved me and this is my second day of my right official career. They put me into a department of junior department was called the Lexington shops. I was the buyer I actually went to the market every day. A No supervision really knows days and I. It's changed so dramatically you didn't have someone breathing down your neck. Tell you what to do so there I was twenty three years resolve. Whatever and I had a department Lexington Juniors whose only in fifty nine th street and I was in charge of buying all the merchandise. I had a really nice boss Stanley Stern. He left me alone. I had two or three really hot items and you make a lot of money on hot items Elephant Pant by Arthur Arthur. Bell was my hottest pant. The world's a cuffed big elastic waist pants every day. I was rewarding like crazy so I did that for six months because Barbara on jr was on maternity leave. Unfortunately she comes back and there. I go to the branches so I did that for a while and then I was promoted back In to fifty ninth street Iran. A woman's swimwear our T shirts and sweaters. My first buying job I they say I was like. I did it really quickly and again there. I was pretty much on my own as most of us were learning the business. I was very fortunate. I had a woman that he katy Murphy who passed away a young age. She was a fashion Shen director and knew more about the business than anyone I knew but because she was a woman She wasn't the seal. She could have positioned set set. She just got it and I was very lucky to have her as I kind of her pet. They treated me like oh go out with Katie went to Europe together. We bought together and only in hindsight that I realize that the fundamentals of what I even do today I think was set in place by Katie. And I going on these trips and we've been buddies so if I had an issue in work I ran to Katie. Not My boss. What do you think of this Katie? Anyway think of that and you know you don't realize you're learning so much everyday idle huge learning curve and so I did that job for a year and a half then. I was promoted moded into the boys area and then maybe it went up to the branches again. Then I quit and you said you had a couple of hot items. What what what does that mean? And how did you identify them. Especially back then when you were just starting out. How did you know that something was gonna hit? I think a lot of what people do. Who is kind of a DNA? Instinctive nature not nurturance much. I'm not sure but I always like I used to sell When Wilkinson Sword Blades came out I was in eighth grade? I was working in the garment center. I was young I was as a kid and I used to get a supply of them. They were really hard to find. They were the best razor blade. Hello in the sixties and I bought supply and I told them to when I made deliveries. I Have Wilkinson Sword Razor Blades. I didn't think I was an entrepreneur. I didn't think anything I could. Maybe maybe make some money and as a young child I money. My father's will obsessed about money because he never really made it. And I think I picked picked up some of the habits of wanting to have some safety and security so that was a little safety and security to keep handle drawer with my cash in it. I saved it. I never spent. It was not much to spend on very impressive. I wish I had a drawer with cash while it was like ten dollars dollars wasn't like a lot. So why did you quit bloomingdale's and what did you do after that. You know it's interesting just to step back end up working at Bloomingdale's I had a summer job at a NS. Now macy's and I fixed them up with a friend of mine I loved. I summer there so I was ready to be hired and I fixed them up with someone. I went to school with and they offered him five hundred dollars more in salary I did now. I didn't think about I was furious. I fix them up. They offered me eleven the offer him eleven five and I am crazy. Furious and You know I didn't have mentors like everyone has a mentor today. I couldn't talk talk to my parents about that but I was pissed off and I interviewed at Bloomingdale's and decide it and it was huge important decision in my life if the second most to that date businesswise and So I decided to work at Bloomingdale's they offered me eleven five. I wasn't negotiating a lot of great negotiator gator salaries and all that stuff and I went to work at Bloomingdale's. Ns would have taught me a whole different way of doing business. Sale Promotion They they were very successful But you know it's funny. So that kind of infuriated me any. Why'd I leave Bloomingdale's I got to the point where and you don't have to make a living and I said this is and once I moved up a little not a lot. I start to think about two things one. I don't love it as much now. I had the boys area and I was supervising but more importantly I always wanted to have really important in regard for people. I worked for Maybe it was my expectation and I realized that you know forgetting what titles are that. At at some point you know people get promoted without earning. The promotion and big corporations was like a huge corporation was big bloomingdale's relative to what I thought of his big back in those days and start to realize put your time in to a degree if you're older than me or whoever you may get promoted moded and I looked at the surroundings and who was moving up and I I I wanted to change someone. One recruit someone at macy's recruited me add Finkelstein who was then the chairman very charismatic guy. Recruited me I left and I stayed at macy's year and a half why because I was obviously looking for something I wasn't getting in a department store business. My last last movie in a Department Store Business was bloomingdale's was owned also a NS federated department stores. They recruited. It'd me back and I went back the stake but again I didn't have the freedom of I'll just do whatever it wasn't like everyone to start up. I you know. In those days who did startups who can raise money to pay the rent and I went to Ns for four years. And I said that was

Bloomingdale Bronx Mickey Drexler Macy Ralph Lauren Lauren Sherman Katie Jill Junior Department Store Business New York Chief Correspondent Secretary Alex Melon Masha Loop Parkway Katy Murphy Lou Parkway Wilkinson Sword Blades Hebrew Association Arthur Arthur Lexington Juniors
Carlos Beltran Out as Mets Manager After Astros' Cheating Scandal

Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

08:55 min | 6 months ago

Carlos Beltran Out as Mets Manager After Astros' Cheating Scandal

"We got the news about one o'clock today that yet. Another person untied to the Houston Astros. Cheating scandal has lost his job. Carlos Beltran recently hired by the mets to be there next managers out of his job before even having having a meeting in spring training. That's because he was named in. The Commissioner's report released the other day for his role in the Astros signed stealing scandal of two thousand seventeen eighteen Beltran and the mets both indicated. Today that this was a mutual decision but I suspect that a week or two weeks ago even those with knowledge of the science dealing details from two thousand in seventeen believed that Houston. GM Jeff Luneau Astros Manager Aj. Hinch Red Sox manager Alex Cora now Carlos Beltran would still have have their jobs and they're all out and that's where we are probably Vera covers baseball for ESPN. She knows. Carlos Beltran now score very well Marley. How you doing? It's been a crazy week. I think crazy is a very good adjective buster special like no that totally can managers. Were highly touted. I don't have a job today. Unbelievable let's let's start with Carlos Beltran. That is the the most recent news. I'm going to also ask you about Alex. Corsie is we go forward but but I about Carlos. I thought that when the mets didn't put out a statement immediately on Monday evening after the Commissioner's report came out out the fact that the mets didn't come out right away and have a statement from Jeff Wilpon from Brody Bandwagon. And saying this is our guy. Carlos Beltran is our manager edger. And that's what we're going to do moving forward because what was in the report involved the Houston Astros in two thousand seventeen. The commissioners made it clear that Carlos this is not going to be disciplined for his role in that because he's the player at that time but the fact that they didn't put out that statement on Monday and then dragged out into Tuesday day and then Wednesday. You could see that the mets they were weighing their options and just as someone who covered the mets back in one thousand nine hundred seven having worked in New York market for a long. I've never seen an organization that is more affected by public opinion than the mets. And I thought Yep that he at some point. They're going to let him go. What what did you think absolutely couldn't agree more with what you said? And not only that the fact that you know one of the reasons why they hired Beltran was because it was excellent in publicity. Ns S you. And I know spending so much time covering baseball in New York. The mets have failed many times on the PR department. And this would hiring hiring Carlos Beltran. They bought themselves all this goodwill right the return of the prodigal son with everything that had happened when he had left the comments of the Wilpon when he used to be a you know. Oh a mets player. Everything gets kind of water under the bridge. There's just you know one of the most impressive press conferences that I have attended you know at city field so it was just as big. Pr Moment and then all of a sudden I agree with you. They got swayed by public opinion. And one of the things that Carlos Beltran and as you mentioned before which is important you state. The aren't family our friends of mine. So my activity here Sometimes can be a little bit swayed but the point is that can handle the media. He's been you know he was a player for twenty a years worked on a capacity assistant with the Yankees and so on and I feel that this was in my opinion. Definitely a wilpon decision muster. Oh No no question. The way this was described I think Carlos but at a statement they talked about a mutual decision. No way like this like Carlos I think absolutely was set on going forward but they say as all the conversation was taking place in New York to columnists were were taking aim at this and they are asking questions. Well what. What did the mets ask Carlos about? After the first athletic story came out about the signed stealing. And how would the mets feel about Carlos not having credibility with the media and it became a real hot topic on talk radio here and one stat ball started rolling downhill and then Aj hinch losses job and Jeff Luna lost his job and Alex. Cora lost his job. There was no way the mets leadership was going to stand in the way of that momentum and stand up and say in the past it was in the past which by the way is what Brody van wagon and said back in November. He kind of indicated like well. That's not really a mets problem. That's an astros throws problem. But their their their words their tone definitely changes week the only aspect that I can you know Ah have gone in this process. One of the things were Carlos may have had some input. Devil's advocate here. Is that one of the things that Carlos Beltran they'll turn and and you and I have covered a great deal of is the fact that he does not like off. The field distractions buster. And I think at that is the part or they'll go. You know what this is the right decision. He is one of those guys that likes to talk baseball. I remember what it was like the whole scandal with Iran in the Yankees Yankees Carlos Beltran was part of the Yankees Organization at the time as a player and he refused to engage in sort of those conversations so there is an aspect of how much he doesn't like the distraction and then that part certainly you know he could have had any input on but I I agree with you. This isn't you know the mets founded selves in an island. Having to make a decision and they got swayed by Jim Crane did and obviously you know what the Boston Red Sox decided to do. After the imposition of a penalty suspension to Alex Score. So let's breakdown go by the way. Yeah exactly breakout some other elements of this What do you think the mets miss out on? Not Having Carlos Beltran altron their manager. Carlos Beltran is an excellent leader. And I think that's one of those things that has been a little bit missing the New York Mets Organization. He drives arrives you. He's one of those guys that inspires others other players and he also galvanizes clubhouses right. He he was the player for the day when he was with the Yankees. Hanky along with Andrew Miller he always has always been so well spoken and he crosses that kind of you know barrier quote Unquote Latino players. And you know the players that are not Latino and I felt that he could galvanize that clubhouse very very well and I think that's the number one thing that the mets are going to miss out on and this is a man who obviously has left the game for a long time doesn't need the money this isn't right and it was honestly doing this job because he truly wanted to make an impact in organization that really has lost their way a little bit in the last couple of years so I think it's a huge loss. So they mess. We're GONNA do not have Carlos Beltran but I do understand the decision. In terms of the whole quote in quote distractions off the field now. I'm not as close to him as you are if I was I think and he asked me my advice in this situation. Now that he's lost the job of the mets would. I think I would tell them was Carlos you need to hold a press conference in New York have rent out a room at a hotel or restaurant invite all the reporters to come and basically say I'm here to answer all your questions about what went on with Houston with me back in two thousand seventeen eighteen. Because I think that's the only way he's going to be able to manage at some point down the road and all I heard for the last decade is this is someone who absolutely terrific manager in the future future. He has to be great at this job but I think that would allow him to and let's face he's never going to move past this. It's already cost him his job but at least to get past those questions would be to tell the writers. I'm here to answer every question you people have about what take place and I'll tell you exactly really what happened. What do you think about that? I don't know that I mean I. I would love for that to happen. Let's be very clear. I don't know that the benefit for for Carlos it's worth it If if one of the drugs and he said this in an introductory press conference specifically said I didn't want any job I don't need need a job. I wanted to stay in New York. Carl has very very young children. They're all right like very yes. Three kids are all very young during school in your this is where they reside the kids go to school will. So there's only two baseball jobs that he would apply for the New York Yankees and the New York mets and he's not gonna get either one of those jobs so I just don't think that at this point point it benefits the family anyway and I do think that Carlos will do what's best for his family especially having young children Buster and I know you know that you had young children at one time. It's the point that these kids have to see the paper tomorrow. They're going to be in school. They're old enough. You know and I feel like it would rehash a lot of topics. Is that right now. Maybe people are going to move on you know and and just gone from that now if he later on when the kids are a little bit older he wants to do something else. Maybe at that point but but at this point I just don't see the benefit.

Carlos Beltran New York Mets New York Yankees New York Houston Astros New York Mets Organization Baseball Jeff Wilpon Alex Cora Boston Red Sox Houston Commissioner Alex Espn Jeff Luneau GM Marley Corsie Brody Bandwagon Vera
Qualcomm is at the center of 5G. Were still, almost, there.

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

07:47 min | 6 months ago

Qualcomm is at the center of 5G. Were still, almost, there.

"When it comes to rolling out five G.. There are a lot of moving parts at the heart hearts of the stories. It's qualcomm the company makes wireless chips for your phone and develops and licenses other technology in the wireless industry and it's been pushing five Gerard like future of the business hard but there are aspects of the five G. Rollout qualcomm can't control like how long it takes infrastructure to make it into you every neighborhood in the country. The company is also the subject of an F. T. C. investigation over whether it abused its monopoly. Position in four G.. Technology to charge too much for licensing. It actually settled a long-running lawsuit with apple over the same thing. Last April Cristiano Amman is the president of QUALCOMM. And we spoke about all of this at in Las Vegas starting with the promise of five G.. Basically as you bring the computational power of the cloud cloud all of the data that exists in the cloud to any device and one of the things we said in the very beginning of this transition in the five era era will develop side by side with five G.. Just because you're connected to Clo- you have a lot of data you can apply machine learning tool the data five days also technology that I think we've I've been waiting for right. We've been talking about the promise for a long time consumers. Being consumers people are getting impatient. At what point do you think people are getting frustrated. Or they're gonNA. I say this is all hype and no reality. I agree those things. Take time for you to have all of those benefits technology you have to have coverage infrastructure instructor needs to be built. There is no free lunch unless you have covers. You Not GonNa get there. We have a couple of things that would dealing with as an industry. I I if you look at United States one of the number one obstacles when you talk to operators its ability to get new sites up and they are working working with municipalities one at a time China for example have identified one million sites for five G. until the end of two thousand twenty. It also sounds like five day deployment is really important to your long term business success. I mean is there any world I can just hear the open source community city saying like listen you could potentially make some of this available for everybody to build on to accelerate the ecosystem. Well that's what we do if you were an automaker or if you're an industrial company and let's say you're Bausch and you're making manufacturing robots and you want to add five g you have to build. Put An engineering capability of a Samsung or apple. To be able to deal with this and what qualcomm offers is will provide you a license. Essence would provide you a chipset would provide a reference design. We provide your software. You can easily add seller to your robots industrial machine to your car and if you we don't have a model that is horizontal in creates eco-system. You actually prevent all of those other industries to get access to sell it. They have to build a cellular or phone company to be able to do it. And that is why we think five G. we're going to see an expansion of the licensing model not the other the other direction. Yeah this is a little bit of a left turn but we've been doing a lot of coverage on climate and how technology in the tech industry can help us adapt be more. Resilient may maybe maintain emergency communications. How do you see welcomes role in sustainability and resilience and climate conversation overall? Look I I feel I feel. It's a IT'S A. It's an interesting I agree with you. It's I didn't expect that question but The way the way we think about is I at the very basic. We're a company that developed technology for a battery powered device like we don't have the luxury extre- in into technology that we do to assume that we're going to be plugged into wall so we're probably being br building a lot of efficiency. That's no no Secret why we've been so successful in automotive because as an industry like any all of the industry really try to address How they can be more efficient consume laugh? You will consume less electricity and I think as a general. I think that's one of the things that we contribute. The other thing is by making everything connected it. There is a significant increase in productivity. Even when you think I'm trying to provide more of a vision but we always said that that every year that goes by you do more of your work and your phone And I think that's going to change over time with everything connected enact productivity people will be able to Damore to work at home. They won't be able to connect with other people without having to be there and I think there's a lot of in direct benefits of basically providing technology that allow everything to be connected. I do as long as we're in our awkward questions phase WanNa talk about licensing Because parts of that business model of come under scrutiny qualcomm Ben in a long legal battle with the Federal Federal Trade Commission over whether some of those this licensing agreements have reached monopoly status. Do Plan to approach five licensing any differently in light of those disputes. Look there's so much I can tell you about. You know the dispute. I think other than the public statements were made. Were very pleased and was the right decision. You know for us to be granted at stay and I. I think we're waiting for the appeal. But we can tell you is we. We actually have a very vibrant Licensed business more though. That equi enables competition competition. We're very pleased that we have many companies that sign a five t license with qualcomm independent of the dispute in even post the ruling and That validation that you know we have a competitive business model and actually won the provides growth in competition industry. All right last question because you first joined qualcomm. Welcome in Nineteen Ninety five when the company was just ten years old. And you've left income back since then but I just. I wonder what that journey has been like in this entire ecosystem system. It's an. It's an incredible company. Actually I was fortunate enough to join before the first. CDMA network was able to see. Every single transition of wireless ARLEDGE LENDS EIGHTY FIVE THIRTY ONE G two G to three G. to four G. Five G. so I've been to all of those it's really fascinating to see how seller changed the society. It's one of those few opportunities dead and I think all of our employees feel that you can work on something that you actually no that changed the society and It's also interesting to see that we. We may bet that everybody. In each one of those bats knowing exception told us that's That's not gonNA work or there's no need for this and And we'll we'll be able to see as we state with their vision to transformation and I don't WanNa go back all the way to CMA. But I'll tell you an example when when when we first talk about four g you know it was fascinating to see. All of the analysts on their blackberrys sending emails to each other saying a WHO needs a hundred megabits per phone. Nobody needs it. I have living I need to have my email I have all of the. DSM is good enough for email and blackberrys now and Ns US and now we see people say hi. Paul needs to be connected with the cloud and you know multiple gigabits of Speed Woolsey. Cristiano Amman is the president of QUALCOMM. All Com we spoke at. CAS in Las

Qualcomm Cristiano Amman Apple President Trump Las Vegas F. T. C. LAS United States Samsung Gerard Bausch Instructor Federal Federal Trade Commissi Damore Paul China
Get More Clients Using Content, with Jessica Lawlor

How I Built It

05:31 min | 6 months ago

Get More Clients Using Content, with Jessica Lawlor

"Hey everybody in welcome. Welcome to another episode of how I built it. The podcast that asks. How did you build that today? My guest is Jessica lawler. She is the founder and CEO of Jessica lawler in company a content management business. Jessica how are you today. I'm doing great Joe. Thanks so much for having me. Thanks for being on the show. I'm excited to talk about about this because while I This producing content is a kind of primary business now between courses on the podcast. I feel like I just. I recently started to be intentional about my messaging and kind of the flow of a podcast season. So I'm excited to talk to you. Talk to you as well. And that's great to hear awesome awesome. So why don't we start off with a little bit about who you are and what you do absolutely so we name is Jessica. I my background's uh-huh actually in public relations. So I graduated from College in Twenty Ten temple university here in Philadelphia. I study PR. That was what my career was in for a while all. But I've always loved to write in communicating. The writing is something that I've always been super passionate about very excited about and over the years I've had various blogs jobs. I had a book review blog at one time. I had a personal blog at one time and I have more of a business blog but while I was in college and then as I started my career in public relations I was creating content online. BMI blog and via social media. And actually it was through my blog that I landed my first professional freelance writing opportunity. I actually met someone on twitter. who asked me if I'd be interested in helping to create some blog content and I realize the kind of open up this whole world to me that you you can really build a career and developed a passion through content and so ever since then I've kind of built a side hustle doing freelance writing and then in three years? I took my side Hustle fulltime and I started Jessica Lowering Company which I call Jalen Co for short and it's all about content management in helping people to to tell better stories. That's fantastic for a couple of reasons first of all This is this is going to be telling of You know I didn't. I didn't do a lot of deep research but I like to be surprised and I was surprised to hear that you are in Philly. I am in the West Chester area. Oh my gosh what a small world I know so we are relatively close and That's it's it's really cool to hear how you ended your first Kind of professional content professional rating gig. I feel the same thing happened to me with with websites websites. Basically somebody. WHO's like you're good with computers? Can you make a website and I said no I said I'll pay you And that like you said opened up a whole world to me so That's a really great story which is good because that's kind of what we're going to talk about I kind of started the top of the show that I've been trying to be more intentional about my content and and and putting out the right messages. Maybe we can start with a when you get a new client or customer. What's the first thing? Can you do to make sure they are telling the right story such a good question. It all starts with a lot of research when I when I land a new client. I mean I want to really get to know them. I WANNA learn about their business. Ns I WANNA do as much research as possible. So I really like to ask them if I can take a look at past materials labor. It may be. They already have a blog. Maybe they're just getting started so I do. You have kind of on boarding questionnaire where I asked him questions about who their audience. Who are they trying to reach? What problems are they helping to solve kind of some of those typical marketing questions? Russian that you've probably heard before but really the biggest issue That I hear from clients or potential clients is they just don't really know where where to begin when it comes to content and a lot of them also are wondering is it still worth it to create content when there's so much noise out there right now and obviously my answer to that is yes. It's definitely worth it but really what I love to do to help. People kind of rain in all of their ideas has and create a strategic content calendar. That will actually help the bottom line and help them reach their goals. Whatever that may be Gotcha and do I find that? A lot of people Well let me. I'll give you some context. I last year I interviewed Josh Garoppolo. And we kinda talked about how a a lot of people in their messaging want to just reach. Everybody like my target audience is anybody who wants to buy stuff from me Do you do you find that. A lot of people are not sure what problems they're trying to solve our. Do they say that right. Have people identified the problem that they're trying to solve by the time they get to. You sometimes no oh I mean sometimes yes sometimes no a great example here is I work with the right life dot com so it's a website for writers and one question that were always asking ourselves is who is our audience because writer is a very broad term. Could be a freelance writer. It could be a technical writer. It could be someone who wants to publish a book Doc. Be a nonfiction author ghostwriter. There's so many types of writing so even within you know the right life knows who is trying to reach we wanNA reach writers and then even from there. It's kind kind of do. We need to niche down asking those hard questions so I find that sometimes people do have an idea. They have a broader audience that they're trying to reach an and and you know we try to figure out what are the different Types of content we create Tarija various audiences kind of within their larger audience. If that makes sense

Jessica Jessica Lawler Writer Founder And Ceo Jessica Lowering Company JOE Twenty Ten Temple University Philadelphia BMI Philly Jalen Co Twitter. Josh Garoppolo
"ns" Discussed on My Seven Chakras

My Seven Chakras

11:59 min | 9 months ago

"ns" Discussed on My Seven Chakras

"Eh you sort of captured that in a wonderful way the fact that he are the student went into the laboratory and did the experiment the last experiment not knowing whether Not Possible or not knowing that the other people felt that it was extremely difficult and the outcome was achieved and so you've proven is that the observer really does affect the outcome of the experiment it really makes a difference whether you believe or not deep down whether it is possible for you are not now you know let's Talk About Enlightenment for a bit now you're right about the enlightened brain the fact that mistakes have been experiencing DIS Johnson dental states of being where the expedience intense joy intense bliss and oneness among exceedances so what's happening in the brain for these people and what the studies found there is a brainwave pattern cold away in mind in any late by the trees by German Dr Coles Hans Berger and it was originally a diagnostic tool that impact sixty s some enterprising researchers say head let's not using easies heels what's going on inside the brains op mystics able having mystical experiences they hoped Lamis they hooked up at it they hooked up Yoga Masters at a bound after a while studying evoke rob many traditions with is that even though their brainwaves were all over the place in waiting no commonality in their in their waking state when they were in at the state of flow their brainwaves look the same the ratio of the various brainwaves Delta's slows way fate I showed diagrams from as in the book of every understandable most need grams understandable by the average person so I make all this instead like three diagrams the LANSAC you'll see right away those those beltway in ways elk waves fadeaway and Galloway start to change and so these monsters and have this this brainwave pattern with the British researcher Maxwell cade cold the mind they were older than mine stage when they were tailing state when they were in meditation when they were in trance they all move if the awakened mind off grain ways is assessor a woman who at a wise that has a lot of people brilliant yet us scientists artists he balloon flow as she found same thing and it is in flow wakened mind state whether they're a mistake or not all in that mystical state win were the awakened mind brain pattern so I read looking now at the wait in line state and the recruitment office again one of those insights detained me offer meditation one day and I was looking at the research on what frequencies dude cells have these various vacancies race slow waves Delta is one four cycles per second so one that's like two cycles per second cycles per second that's the rate of which on fire in our brains with each other and so what we found was that I was doing a lot of reading about studies showing which frequencies effect which sells at certain frequencies effect sells baked time stimulate production stem cells and stem cells are your main at aging and several pair of stem cells they ill tissue they they can turn into nerve cells of themselves or bone cells also started stem cells be healthy and so so frequencies affect stem cells frequencies affect the repair of DNA MRIs affect the repair of neurons and neural channels singling in your brain but I just one day had this epiphany yup look at frequencies and their effects on cells but look only at the frequencies that your brain generates when you're in that awakened mind state at a turns out your brain is generating frequencies the very famous he is they have the most heated possible effects on your cells as you're using stem cell proliferation nor stem cells stem cell migration to sign average annual body stem cell adhesion third wave that great cell adhesion the dish you that's damaged and then helps repair that tissue -til Amir legs I'll enzymes that are really good view positively gene being turned off things that for example help you have more of a substances if you know how to do it you teach anyone else to acquire it and then you're having your triggering oldies beneficial effects the frequencies of the cells of your body Oh that's that's really fascinating I mean the fact that there had been these studies have been conducted like you mentioned with the you know worked with the Swami's yoga or the meditators or people mistakes even but not just Dan but also performers like penis or a musicians and north they've noted is that all of them have a similar brainwave frequency where they attain the state of flow and like you've wonderfully explained this allows for your the body to experience a deep rooted healing which is wonderful and I'm sure many of our listeners are interested in north just healing browse accessing the stitch so that they can create wonderful are in rent new ideas or bring out something to fruition and I'm sure that somebody might be having this question on their mind and what top performers we spoke about Musicians Swami's in Yoga's but what about somebody who is at home somebody who's raising a household can they experience he's a portion of this state of being so that they can have their own benefits I'm gonNA review on email off book came out so the book really spied a lot of people medico a lot of people who did not meditate before love people who had tried and failed that it before people who were vail let's who had had attempted to do it the other is their mind was full of thoughts they couldn't do it ned dugout so many people it's just one of them over here and is that person say her name is Toni troublesome she used her vote and here it is all I can say is wow I have been meditating often for the last year and I have never experienced but I just did the following the audio for your e communication method for the very first time I spend probably ninety nine hundred days full of anxiety frustration fear and anger just over will burn out with parenthood and with life I was doubtful that I'd have any kind of enlightened experience and even kept hearing in my head both you're just wasting your time Tony you've got the pace inside of you you've tried a million times before unfold but when I this is step three of meditation process when I said that beam of love from my heart I instantly started laughing and tear pure bliss him out of my eyes it was absolutely amazing and I will be doing eka meditation every single day a feeling that love and bliss is my dream thank you again and then there are five exclamation points yes what what was difficult is but I I love the meditate I was fifteen years old spiritual community and the the spiritual teacher there says had to us meditations easy close your eyes and still mine when you close your eyes hardly anyone instill their minds because of the brain the default mode network extend and the networks to jobs is to first of all remember all the bad things happen to you the boss doc project those future that's what happens when you close your eyes usually you constantly remind you have monkey mind jumping all over the place we'll try to do that and they fail like Tony will he could tell us to do it didn't work for me if it works for hardly anybody does does does work well but with either Meditation People simple physical stamps to do one of those examples trying out on the floor of your mouth that sends a signal through vagus nerve which governs your harrison pathetic relaxation response over your body any relax if you have your time relax I get upset you can't annoyed you can't get angry got get resentful sell the simple things have stavridis like that and he do all these together in the Elbe brainwave state your deep heart coherence you're using neuropathy backed by the Communist cell and they like Tony You just do this once and okay there so I had the book is full of thirty exercises like that that I recommend people do the con- themselves and really started enjoy ought he to there the jungle running away from hijras all the time you know and they're living in a nice apartment in Bombay or the living in beautiful onto minium in Miami Florida the living in in a in a retirement home with nothing bad's happening and we over the cortisol profile of their brain way as high Beta waves these waves are our frustration at anxiety low amounts of Theta Delta waves as to healing way mean they are just huge biological costs cortisol produces tightened levels of in wrinkling love muscle mass loss of bone density loss of learning and memory neurons in the though centers of the brain a whole bunch of bad things and the result is humility mists on average eight years earlier but optimists about that even be a pessimist but lost twenty thirty forty coach you are different and much healthier if you use these kinds of approaches so you might not think that can hurt you and in it table know that they can reverse all of this they change they can affect gene expression one study I talk about in the book doing emt acupuncture acupressure.

one day ninety nine hundred days fifteen years eight years
"ns" Discussed on The Herd with Colin Cowherd

The Herd with Colin Cowherd

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"ns" Discussed on The Herd with Colin Cowherd

"The iheartradio app apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts. Welcome back. Good to have you NS kanter's. But in the NBA for eight years, most famously with the thunder and the Knicks, but at the trading deadline, Portland decided to roll the dice and bringing NS Kanner heavy he has been incredibly valuable. He was huge in this series had to go up against Stephen Adams and via the cower global satellite network NS Canada, one of the good dudes in the NBA. Okay. So you played with Ross and you play you played with Dame you played with both of them. How are they different to play with? Let's start with that. May well, I'll see Ross for a with Russ. It's so what you could be tough. Sometimes because when you are like, I said be before your show when you are in his when you on his team made you can now talk to nobody you cannot look nobody all you know, just focus on your game. You can't tell the whoever after but I think playing with Dame is so much different. Because I mean, he always keeps his coolness always keep his communist. And I I mean, they're both amazing players really really good leaders. But man Dame is just in an another level, man. I cannot say enough about this about that guy. What did you make the shot? What are you surprised? He took that shot last night. Well, actually, he was working on that shot in a memorial a shootaround practice, and then he took those shots. All like, what is he doing? You know, 'cause I 'cause I never see anybody takes shots before. And he was working on this morning. And then when he shot that boy, oh my God. This is crazy. And then when he made it on like, it's unbelievable. You know, he made the same shot five years ago against Houston. And L wasn't Turkey watching that game. With my dad. I'm like this is something so special and now here five years later. I miss St. made and witness that shot is just it's unbelievable moment when the shot went in. What was it like being in that arena is that the greatest moment of your basketball life in America the excitement the arena? What was it? Like, I will say I've been playing this NBA basketball this might eighth year. And I never see is probably the one of the greatest play have ever seen..

NBA NS kanter Dame Russ Ross NS Canada Knicks basketball apple Portland Stephen Adams Turkey Houston America five years eight years
"ns" Discussed on KNSS

KNSS

12:16 min | 1 year ago

"ns" Discussed on KNSS

"NS s. And welcome back, Dr James heart with us and your calls as we talk about the brain. And you really can condition the brain to do just incredible things James can't we truly and if you study spiritual masters masters or yogis have been to India several times, you can learn what brainwave patterns, it's useful to train. Now when we start training, the brain how young can we go? The question we only work with children seven and above at bios ever non between seven and twelve they must come with at least one parent who's in the training with them. Okay. And part of the reason for that is the French developmental psychologist studied the four stages of the development of intelligence for stage. Formal operations does not occur until eight seven. If you keep crayons and paper to a child six or five and you ask them to draw. What you were seeing you're sitting across the table from them. They will draw what they're saying. It's impossible for them to take to realize that somebody else sees the world differently has a different perspective. So at seven they develop that consciousness, I remember shortly after turning seven I was walking through the woods in Menominee. Wisconsin thinking, I wonder if other people see read the same way, I do that question could not occur to child under seven and besides which what count of alpha waves in terms of coming and going with high closure facials ation, those brainwaves don't have the adult frequency without parade. Orange and adult is eight to thirteen seconds per second. The things that are passed for alpha waves in a younger child slower frequency, so you actually need different filters to work with them. Since you've been doing this one has been the most remarkable story. You can recall that we haven't even talked about tonight. Will I have some trouble with superlative? I can I can talk about people who have mastered relationship. Okay. Here's one. It was a man came to do a two day sample of the training and everybody was ever paid for their sample has at the end of the second day said I wanna do the rest of the seven this man was going through a messy divorce a lot of assets and his wife was very hostile. And he said I need to drop out of this training because I need to go bring my wife to this training took about a month. But he brought her to the training and for the first three days. I had the interview them separately. Because one of them would say something and the other would say that's not true, and it started. So I would take each one separately into one of the soundproof training chambers. And interview at the end of the third. Day for the first time they walked out hand in hand it saved their marriage. They did forgiveness each of them. I have a long list of non negotiable demands and the lawyers were sharpening their knives. Well, at the end of the training, they didn't need the lawyers. The long list of negotiable demands, you know, had vapid. And so I actually wrote a scientific paper called reuniting lovers. A new use of the bio Sabir not training. Well, you created something else than you. Well, and if I may finish up on the halo question. Yeah. Yeah. People might wonder why did this end master when he died. Give transmission to this advanced, then master and and not to somebody else. Well, I learned from studying the brainwaves with power and coherent spectral analysis that there are big differences between beginners then usually one to six years intermediates, then usually six to twenty one years, and nobody was rated advanced with less than twenty one years of training. And they went up to forty years of practice. Well, one week of the alpha one bio Sabir alpha training allows people doing solve the same brainwaves as advanced zen. That's why you know, we have seven days to then. That's why training. Well, but there's something else beyond the brainwaves of advance in because then master and one other monk events had a pattern that I call. By modal, coherence, he had simultaneous coherence in his alpha. And in his state, and it was in the back of the head kind of like where you would wear a yarmulke, for example, right there. That's what. And so that was very interesting. The other advance monk. I had I thirty monks. One of them had a little bit of the same pattern as master the by Motoko here. I made a scientific report on it. But I didn't have a clue what it went what it meant. So in twenty years later after the original, you know, discovery of these patterns I was at a conference in nineteen Ninety-one on chaos theory is applied to analysis of brain waves. And there was a a one of most of the papers were very mathematical Delvin, curls. And I understood it, but it was like not too interesting. But then this guy Arnold Mandel got up, and he started talking about brainwaves follow fibber not. Scaling. Well, I thought well that's not true because the center of delta, and if they don't get the center frequency velva, but very quickly disabused me of that. Ignorance by saying delta is really not a monolith. There's low delta, and there's high delta, and so the scaling works then working with a transparency and grease pencil which was being projected onto a big screen for an audience about fifteen hundred people a lot of where you know, intelligence agency kinds of people he drew a little picture of a monkey brain. And then he took two frequencies five hurts, which is stayed a and ten Hertz, which is also and he took the five hurts line short half. Like any made a circle out of it? Then he took the ten hurts like the ten inch line, and he moved the circle. So that it's wept out of him. But we would call a bagel or doughnut the mathematical name is Taurus. And he said when you can fall to coherent frequencies, you get a. Torres in face base. Any peach electrical engineer would know this you can to frequency if you get a Taurus in face baseball. I did something I've never done before since in my science speaker. I'm in the next last row, I jump up, and I scream at the top of my lungs to you know, way down fifteen hundred people in the audience, and I say, I've got two people in my database show that pattern was then master and the other one got transmission, the master died because what I had seen with a halo. I seen hail. A halo is a cross culturally recognized symbol of spiritual advancement and ethical purity Jesus, and they Postles and Mary and Joseph and the angel are typically shown with lows the Buddha is often shown with a halo. Is often shown with a halo, and I know the brainwave pattern that gives rise to that. Now up to now, I haven't been able to train it. It's a very complex pattern. But we're just about to bring out of our indeed I o system it has seven circuit boards. We're working on the largest most complex board in the second Rev is coming out and this will allow me for the first time once its operational to do training on halos. All right. Let's go to the calls as promised. Let's pick it up by going to Stephen Connecticut. Get things started. Hey, Steven, go ahead. Good anything or good morning. Yeah. Exactly. Incoherent. Early out there. I have a brother who since the nineties has been doing the same exact thing with neuro feedback. And he got me to go to Westchester, New York and go through this training session. And when I was in the chair, and this woman, did my baseline, she noticed that my brain map or brainwaves were that of like, a straight hall, and I didn't have much going out in any direction. Everything was pretty much flat. And it's funny because it was in two thousand four when I did that and then fast forward to two thousand fifteen I started to get really sick. And I went to. Hospital and I had some tests done, and I found out that I had cancer in my cheekbone, my entire left, sinus cavity. So that it was it was at a point where I wasn't getting any air. And I was finding that I was having difficulty with just thinking and communicating and every everything and suddenly after I had my surgery, my brain went through this immediate shift with getting all that oxygen to the frontal cortex area. And I just found it so interesting in how it all ties into what you were saying. What do you think of that, doc? Well, it's really exciting because we know that increased oxygen to the brain will increase alpha waves in nineteen fifty three Rothenberg Corday and putting study where they took monkeys put brainwave electrodes on them. And then they clamped one of their carotid artery shutting off blood flow to one hemisphere, except for the circle of Willis is very little inter hemispheric circulation and the alpha waves went away, and they were replaced by the senile brainwave pattern of mixed fada and beta waves, then when they unclamps the blood flow came back the waves came back now in the same way that hint temperature warming teaches people how dilate the blood vessels at Florida their fingers or toes cure, raynaud's disease with this in the same way, the bios alpha training teaches people how to dilate the blood vessels that feed their brain. So the brain gets more blood glucose moxie, Jen, and it loves it. Have you found that in brain study that you can, you know, also get people to increase their telepathy and intuitive nece and stuff like that. Very interesting question. Well, two answers at one point I had two army intelligence officers, James McLaughlin, and John Alexander. They were both Lieutenant colonels, and they came to bios overnight, and they did two weeks of training the first week. They were in separate chambers. Doing the alpha one, and then the second week they were in the same chamber doing what we call shared feedback. That's also trademarked shared feedback where they shot right next to each other. They heard each other's brainwave sounds they saw each other scores. And I told them that they would have secrets slip between them. Now offered to shared feedback with them. Always boost people to higher levels when I do feedback with them, but they should know because they both had high security clearances, and I had no security clearance, and they did have in fact, John Alexander rose to the rank of Colonel army intelligence wrote a book called the warriors edge. It's a cult classic. You can sometimes get it on Amazon for, you know, five or six hundred dollars USD, and in that he dedicated a whole chapter to their two weeks at bio cyber non and he confirmed that in bioflavonoids shared feedback training. They had secrets slip between them about that. So that was pretty cool imprimatur of us army intelligence at this works, then also at one point one summer, I hired professional psychics and brought them into the lab paint them their daily rates measured their brainwaves under rape, baseline conditions is open is closed light noise..

James McLaughlin delta John Alexander Dr James Wisconsin India Menominee us Rothenberg Corday Motoko Arnold Mandel engineer Torres Amazon Westchester rape Stephen Connecticut
"ns" Discussed on WEEI

WEEI

04:42 min | 1 year ago

"ns" Discussed on WEEI

"Team. He is on the you wanna talk sports now just feel like all right NS Kanter has picked the Portland trailblazers NS Kanter is no longer of the member of the New York Knicks. He doesn't want to be part of this taking process, by the way, the Knicks succeeded once again, and they're tanking. They went about yet. Eighteen. Eighteen straight losses now for the New York. Knicks Isiah Thomas, the master of tanking would be very very proud. Although he didn't take on purpose. Former New York Knicks executive inex- Innes Kanter signed with the Portland trailblazers. Now, these story reads that cantor was pondering between the trailblazers at a couple of other teams, including the Los Angeles Lakers. Now, it doesn't surprise me that he picked the Portland trailblazers because the trailblazers obviously have a better record them Awasa Angeles Lakers. They said at thirty four and twenty three the Lakers did at twenty eight and twenty nine. But I don't know. I just I love that the media. It says like this story says chooses Kanter, this is not really what am I point out towards Kanter out towards the story is on ESPN. And I just want to read the sentence, which I just gives you an idea of the pressure. Magic Johnson is under the pressure. Lebron James is under okay, the blazers this sentence. The blazers were kanter's choice over several serious suitors several serious suitors in same time span several series, including the Los Angeles, Lakers sources said several serious suitors sources said so including the Los Angeles Lakers. Now, why is that included in the sentence? If they're several serious suitors, according to several sources what the Los Angeles Lakers are obviously this article is making it seem like the Lakers paled in their attempts. To go getting this candidate gonna pick. I don't know who else was interested, the Milwaukee Bucks. The Los Angeles Clippers it's just a are failing this. This is going to be a narrative that is going to follow the Los Angeles Lakers unless they get Anthony Davis. There is no positive press. Just understand this. Okay. About the Lakers. There is no positive press nationally, and I don't really have. I'm just pointing this out. There's no positive press nationally that's going to go the Lakers way, unless they get Anthony Davis that is the only free agent if Jimmy Butler goes to LA, which I don't think it's going to happen. The the story is going to be well, he's not Anthony Davis that is the pressure. Magic johnson. And LeBron James are human targets their opinion is right now for the media. Can they get this thing done? They couldn't get it done at the deadline. I have set a lot on the show that I don't believe that that's a failure. I don't believe the pelicans were ever going to deal into the Lakers. But just this sentence. This is. I'm just going to be what the light for magic. And the Brian really magic for the next year. The blazers were kanter's twice over several serious suitors, including the Lakers. No, obviously, he didn't want to go to the Lakers in his canter buyout. Okay. He wants to be on a contender. The players are by far better contender. But I told you you could go to from a from a thirty four to eight thirty four and twenty three team or a twenty eight and twenty nine team. Clearly, you want to go to the thirty four and twenty three right? If you're doing like the blind taste test. Right. And you're just looking at numbers standings. Of course, he would pick the blazers. But then you pull the cover off and one of them's in Los Angeles. It's one of the most the most glamorous franchise in NBA history. It is with the greatest player of all time and one of the all time greats in Magic Johnson as the general manager. The Lakers aren't supposed to lose these battles with right? You're right. No. You're a hundred. Ten percent, right. But they are they are an and it makes sense. Why maybe some people don't want that kind of pressure. Maybe they don't wanna be enough. Kanter, you know, he it's not like you'd be the second or third option to LeBron. But I am the the the point of this is not to say, wow, he picked the blazers over the Lakers. I don't wanna be that guy in the media. I'm just gonna say other guys. That's what this is going to be for the next year year and a half several suitors, but the Lakers the Lakers the Lakers the Lakers. Yeah. The lights on your Magic Johnson. The pressure is on when we come back, Oklahoma City. I want to give a lot of credit to your point guard over the night calling.

Los Angeles Lakers NS Kanter Los Angeles blazers New York Knicks Innes Kanter Lebron James Magic Johnson Los Angeles Clippers Portland Anthony Davis New York Isiah Thomas Milwaukee Bucks cantor executive NBA Oklahoma City ESPN
"ns" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

Newsradio 950 WWJ

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"ns" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

"Start date February ninth. A study in contrast is on display in the western sky, the next few evenings as to planet slide past each other, although their siblings, everything about them is different their size, composition and even their color. Tonight Mars urine are separated by about twice the width of your finger held at arm's length over the next few nights Mars will move past year. So they'll be even closer Mars is the second smallest planet in the solar system. It's a bit more than half the diameter of earth. It's made of rock, and it has a series of layers like those that make up our own planet a craft that landed on Mars last year is probing the details of those layers Mars is topped by dark rock and rusty orange dirt. They give the planet and overall orange color. You're in us by contrast looks blue-green methane and its upper atmosphere absorbs red light. So only bluer wavelengths shine through your in. This is the third largest planet in the solar system about four times the diameter of earth. It probably has a dense rocky core surrounded by layers of ice and gas a major contrast with it sibling planet Mars is well up in the south west at nightfall and looks like an orange star tonight is directly above the moon. Uranus is a little to the upper left of Mars Mars will move closer to your NS tomorrow. Stand almost side by side with it on Monday then began pulling away on Tuesday more.

NS
"ns" Discussed on KNSS

KNSS

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"ns" Discussed on KNSS

"NS. The John Whitmer show with us on the line right now is Kansas attorney general Eric Schmidt. I'm curious what your thoughts were on the circuit court ruling that found Aaron? And how you think that may progress, and certainly how that affects the possibility of Medicaid expansion. Accurate to current challenges. Two different aspects of ObamaCare, the ACA, whatever you wanna call one that's gotten most of the attention, and essentially argument this when the US supreme court upheld the individual mandate is constitutional back between twelve it said, the only constitutional basis for the mandate, the only forty but congress has to order people to go out in the marketplace in product in this case an insurance. Acting quality the constitution, and he says because essentially the mandate of with the way federal government collecting money. It's permissible under the tax. Although we disagreed. John Whitmer Sunday evenings from seven until nine on K. NS have you ever thought? Where have I heard that before the answer is Rush Limbaugh? I have said so much. There isn't. Anybody out there who says Moore produces more content than this program? Fifteen hours a week is the origin of all brilliant. Even I can't remember every item brilliance that I have uttered horse's mouth open your left until two you heard a string horses now. Ninety eight seven and thirteen thirty K N s s this is Mark Levin. Joining weekdays at five right here on an s s..

John Whitmer Eric Schmidt Aaron Limbaugh Mark Levin K. NS Kansas attorney US ACA congress ObamaCare Moore thirteen thirty K Fifteen hours
"ns" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

02:20 min | 1 year ago

"ns" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Allow eight weeks for rebate. KCBS news time ten forty three breaking news out of southern California. According to sheriff there, the deputy who was responding to a mass shooting at the borderline bar and grill about a month ago was apparently killed by a bullet fired by a highway patrolman. So it's a tragic case of what they call friendly fire. The again, this this deputy was responding to this mass shooting that left twelve people dead. He was killed by a bullet was fired by a highway patrol, and we'll have more on this later on today here on KCBS the forty Niners deny the latest claim by the ex girlfriend of four linebacker Ruben foster that they interfered when she called police for on him last month KCBS reported duck sovereign says Elissa NS. Now says she lied on the stand last spring when she recanted her earlier allegations against the troubled football player two weeks ago. Elissa NS called nine one one to report an assault by her former boyfriend the forty Niners Reuben foster at the team hotel in Tampa. Broke it me and my face exclusive interview and has told ABC's good Morning America. The forty Niners may have released foster after that latest arrest, but they took his side at the time. The police the forty Niners came up there. I have pitcher for the forty Niners coming up there. Trying to talk to the police say, I'm the same ex-girlfriend. Listen, Dan, live NS accused foster of domestic violence last February. But those charges were dismissed when NS recanted on the stand saying she'd made it all up now Anna says she was lying under oath then and is telling the truth now recanting her recantation why lie to protect foster tests. I love him and love doing things is not in your best interest spokesman for the forty Niners says NS his account is not true insisting the team fully cooperated with the police and in no way impeded their investigation. Santa Clara county DA. Jeff Rosen says NS will not be prosecuted for perjury foster is now a Washington Redskin. Although he's not allowed to practice or play pending an investigation, Doug sovereign KCBS coming up on KCBS, mental health workers at Kaiser hospitals. Get ready to hit the bricks. They save for the good of their patients. KCBS news time ten forty five in here. Steve bicker. It was only ten months ago that.

Elissa NS Niners KCBS Ruben foster Reuben foster Dan Steve bicker ABC California Santa Clara county Jeff Rosen Kaiser hospitals Tampa football assault perjury Doug Anna
"ns" Discussed on Izzy and Spain

Izzy and Spain

03:45 min | 1 year ago

"ns" Discussed on Izzy and Spain

"And girls Twitter feed at Spain fits at sarahspain at Jason Fitz, especially if you agree with us, that's really the main reason to to hit a straight ahead. Ruben fosters Xs spoken out, what did we learn about the incident that led him to be released by the Niners breaking down next Spain and Fitz on ESPN radio. Spain and Fitz and the Reuben foster saga continues as we get more details and more information, and and this is such a difficult part of where we are now in this particular process, Sarah because we're we're trying to make good informed takes on what's going on here. But we don't have all the information. So we're continually get the information. And as we get the information. It only continues to open is about what it appears has happened here and Elissa NS Reuben foster accuser, we use her name because her name is become public. So do qualify that. She was on good Morning, America this morning and. It was it was a stunning interview Sarah to here and really hear her accounts of what happened, you know. When the first initial allegation was made. And it felt like what she told the police and her friends and family was very much in accordance with the injuries. She had a ruptured eardrum. And seem to fit with the story that she told then she recanted. And a lot of people warned that that's a very common thing to happen in domestic violence, particularly in cases, where it's public like this, and you may be concerned about the person that you're in a relationship with that you may love losing a job or retaliating, we know in instances with Greg hardy in the past that his accuser got death threats and eventually refused to cooperate in any way because she was just trying to escape what had become this overwhelming attacks on her. And so now, and it says that not only did she only recant because she was trying to protect him. And she still love him. She thought he could change. But that she lied in that her original reporting to police into friends and family was accurate. And that this time it happened again, he invited her even though they were on a break to visit Tampa when she was there to play she told them she was going to tell his new girlfriend that he'd paid for her flight. And that's where they got into another. Scuffle whatever they stay got heated with words, and he allegedly abused her again, I think when listening to this fits it's reminds everybody when you're covering these things how important it is to understand the patterns and the nuances in domestic violence. Why someone might lie why it is so difficult when it's he said, she said in these instances to follow along and know what really happened. But also what really stood out to me was the reporter of good Morning, America. Asking her after she said, I love him. I did all these things because that's what you do for someone you love whether she still was in love with them. And this is what she said, they're still love him. I've been getting health and stuff like that. This is not love. No, there's no I mean getting help. But. I mean, just listening to her voice there and to understand like just how difficult it is to walk away. When you think you have something real or to understand that, you know, the abuse means that it's not a relationship, isn't right? So let me get some straight talk here about to you. By straight talk wireless. Best phones, best networks, no contracts, in my mind, as we look at all of this happen, Sarah, it feels like more important than ever. And how often have I called for this already in our time working together. But more important than ever is some level of transparency from the NFL because we've been told as he's on the exempt list that the NFL is gonna do an investigation. What happens so often is they do an investigation..

Jason Fitz Sarah Spain America Twitter NFL Elissa NS ruptured Ruben ESPN Greg hardy Tampa reporter
"ns" Discussed on KNSS

KNSS

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"ns" Discussed on KNSS

"NS asked us now, Steve we have a partly cloudy sky, fifty nine degrees a plane carrying German Chancellor Angela Merkel to the group of twenty meeting and Argentina was forced to make an unscheduled landing in western Germany, reportedly due to technical problems the government Airbus which was in root Wayne Azeris turned around Thursday night over the Netherlands about an hour. Into the flight. Several firefighting vehicles are on standby as the eighth three forty three hundred VIP plane landed safely in Cologne at nine pm because it had a large amount of fuel on board. A former Kansas City. Paramedic admits to stealing fit and all and morphine from ambulances Thirty-seven-year-old. Michael faucets. Pleaded guilty in federal court today to illegally obtaining a controlled substance while working for the Kansas City fire department, he had access to fit Noland morphine locked in safes in city ambulances it has guilty plea. He admitted that he stole fit and older morphine for his own use. A Kansas man will pay a five thousand dollar fine for unlawfully. Importing endangered leopard cats. US attorney Stephen McAllister announced today, the thirty four year old Lawrence pain of olathe was fined after pleading guilty to one count of violating the Endangered Species Act. The investigation began when pain apply to the US department of agriculture for a breeding license for Asian leopard cats. Partly cloudy and a chance of fog overnight. We'll look for an overnight low of thirty four degrees right now. It's partly cloudy and fifty nine degrees. K NS asked news now, I'm Steve Boyer..

morphine Steve Boyer Kansas City fire department Kansas City Angela Merkel US department of agriculture Kansas Cologne Wayne Azeris Argentina Chancellor Germany Stephen McAllister US attorney Netherlands Noland olathe Michael Lawrence
"ns" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"ns" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Are anti semitic tropes that the president is trafficking in has been trafficking in for at least three years since he started running. And it's not a coincidence that these people pick up on this presence, obviously racist, obviously demagogue he obviously could does Stokes up nationalist. This is NS NBC and CNN. I thought for a minute there were talking about Barack Obama. If Trump's all these things, why does he have massive support in the state of Israel, the Jewish state can somebody explain that to me? And he hates his own daughter and son-in-law in his grandchildren. These are lies. I remember the anti-semites use to lie. A lot to ladies and gentlemen, the nationalists in Europe used to Lila used to peddle stuff like this. Jennifer rubin. Joe Scarborough and joy Reed, joy Reid. There's a laugh to mazing. She's tells her job somebody name. Julia I off from G Q magazine on CNN, John Heilmann MSNBC all of these people should be banished from the media. See they support the free press as long as it doesn't include FOX as long as it doesn't include conservative talk radio as long as it doesn't include the Washington Times, the Washington Examiner and investor's business daily and a handful of others. Sure, they're for free press as long as it's them. They're really not for free press. They're not even for a constitutional Republic you and I wore for free.

Barack Obama CNN joy Reid joy Reed Trump Stokes president Jennifer rubin Joe Scarborough NBC Washington Examiner Europe Israel John Heilmann Lila Washington Times FOX Julia G Q three years
"ns" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"ns" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"But. NS Kanter of the New York knickerbockers has the quote of the day the quote of the night, and maybe the quote of the week that is just getting started. He was asked about the thought of the knickebocker is making the postseason and to say, the least he made it very clear that if the knickerbockers were to make the postseason that he Mr. double double because he would score with the with the points and get the double digits with the rebounds. He and Trey Burke, two of the highlights maybe the only two highlights of the New York knickebocker some land season. He'll be back this year, you know. And at the moment, they're in the process of getting rid of. Joke team. No. And that's a good thing. A wonderful assigning by the master, Phil Jackson, Noah, nothing, but a headache. And of course, the seventy two million dollar headache who can play has the bad attitude now, they're trying to work it out where he just goes Bye-bye altogether. But getting back to cantor who did have a very good season again with the rebounds. And with the points in a dreadful what else is new losing season for the New York knickerbockers. Anyway. In the last day or so yesterday, as it turned out to be somebody was asking him about the postseason, and he made it clear, listen carefully to his response. He made it clear that he would be very excited if the New York knickerbockers were to make the postseason before.

New York NS Kanter Noah Trey Burke headache Phil Jackson cantor seventy two million dollar
"ns" Discussed on GSMC Weird News Podcast

GSMC Weird News Podcast

02:19 min | 1 year ago

"ns" Discussed on GSMC Weird News Podcast

"They were found by a pass. By and brought to the wildlife rehabilitation center at the Wisconsin humane society in Milwaukee, and it took them. I think about forty, five minutes. They had to NS anesthetize. Thank you, Sarah problem. All that's what she's here for. They had to that to the squirrel so that they wouldn't freak out because they were already sort of freaking out because it's like, hey, can't get away from my brother and I'm really sick of him right now. And then they had a hard time at first telling whose tail was who, and they didn't want to. You know, obviously nip somebody's tail or they were worried about blood flow with the tails as well. So they took about forty five minutes and they did manage to separate them. Although some of them have bus your tails than others. And I could see that being a problem, sibling jealousy. Wasn't for the way we have that's working. I would have had the tail. I was first born, I deserved it, but yet. So they will be held at the center for a few days to make sure that you know, there are no long term damage and they're all doing well. But just my first thought when I saw that of like five squirrels tied together by their tails would have been like some sort of strange apocalypse. Happen. That's not natural snuggling and they get things just tangle in also comes from the material. The their nest is made out of that helps thing as well. But my first thought would have been like these strange Newton, squirrel, and I'm going nowhere. To find a find a Wrigley nest, the awful. It's gonna be terrifying from the squirrel to like, oh yeah. Oh, yeah, brothers and sisters. You wake up and you can't get away and you're trying to all run into for direction. Thinking about myself. Harry run be like I might call it in and be like, there's a immune squirrel park. I, I don't know if it's still there. I ran away as fast as Paul. It was in this area and you can go. And if you do find it and get rid of it, please put out a public bulletin so that I know I can actually leave my house and go back to the park. But thankfully this story does seem to have ended pretty well and hopefully all the squirrels do survive even if some of them will have less Harry tails and others. So on that note, we're going to infant today. Thank you for listening to the GMC weird news podcast..

wildlife rehabilitation center Harry NS anesthetize Wisconsin humane society Milwaukee GMC Sarah Paul forty five minutes five minutes
"ns" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

03:11 min | 2 years ago

"ns" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Bill Bill out you've got to set. Yourself apart from CNN FOX shoes from NS NBC because the Bill Cunningham is the. Only, broadcaster out there. It's really holding down a talk. Show that understands how. To argue to, a jury now here's the problem Carter page is a sacrificial lamb no question. About that they're playing games but I don't blame them for playing this game and. I'll tell you why and. This is where Bill Cunningham has got, to take the lead, in, this discussion We were to put Donald Trump in twenty fifteen twenty fifteen In a background check Floors at the FBI do you think he could have possibly past knowing what we know now from Seth, Hefner's look Trump Russia two hundred. And sixty some pages knowing what we, know in that book he could never have passed a background. Check to mop floors let. Me ask you this? How about Bill Clinton couldn't have. Passed a background check Hillary Clinton and bleach bit specialists wouldn't have. Passed one Barack Hussein Obama would. Not have passed it most of our presidents couldn't pass a. Background check security guard that's why we need Bill Cunningham. To change the discussion we have got to get this congress talking about. The kind of crisis we're in now for the very lack of a, a, sensible vetting process Michael. I appreciate your compliments I I don't, think I live in. Cincinnati you live in Virginia Beach there's. No one I know in, a. Crisis now the words the media says run a? Crisis constitutional crisis where we got someone is treasonous we've got someone who's a traitor in the White House, I hear these charges on CNN. I watch on a regular basis almost, everyone knows doing well the economy's going on quite well jobs. Are being created with lows. Unemployment rate ever the? Lowest black or Hispanic ever the. Lowest female unemployment rate ever America is things much more respected around. The globe in war under Obama. You may say we're in a crisis I don't think we're. In a crisis at all the media wants you to. Believe we're in a crisis I don't think those junior you're in a. Crisis let's go to John in San Diego maybe he's in a crisis, John, are you in a. Crisis Yeah Was by crisis is called work at four. AM I had to go to WalMart today and get ready for work on. Monday that's my cry. Crisis James Carville it's the economy. Stupid and to do a background check, come Donald Trump is the most vetted ever ever. Ever he's. Been he's been in the news and on the team for the last thirty..

Bill Cunningham Bill Bill Donald Trump Bill Clinton Michael Barack Hussein Obama Hillary Clinton Hefner James Carville CNN FOX FBI John CNN NS NBC Carter White House Cincinnati WalMart
"ns" Discussed on Sports Radio 610

Sports Radio 610

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"ns" Discussed on Sports Radio 610

"Was was looking at and if he is more focused about bringing players into houston than his deal he knows that his deal will get done that's pretty encouraging the lakers will probably be recruiting lebron james you have players around the league that won him we saw joel embiid tweet adam and things like that the newest player recruiting lebron james as ns cantor of the new york knicks kanter i don't wanna say it's possible whatever but i'm trying kanter said over the weekend let's give them a shot why not just get him never know cantered kanter do you know who kanter place for listeners seven one three five seven two four six ten only the who does kanter play for only the worst franchise in the nba that'd be the new york knicks and he thinks he can bring lebron to new york i'm working man kanter said i need some help i'm working on it i think just because it's new york if he wins here he is the go no question he's the goat i think we have a good chance to get them i guess i think we have a good chance to get them i guess i guess i that's i mean any any pitch that ends with i guess is a pretty good pitch i do i am intrigued by the idea of lebron and kristaps porzingis playing together that does sound like a lot i'm more interested in lebron james and inish kanter playing together why it's hilarious this is a story who would you so as soon as i saw this i immediately thought about how easily how quickly and easily you dispatched my idea of a certain somebody being a part of the pitch team lebron to houston you may maybe somebody i don't know we'll get to that in a second so i wanted to be on it luneau should be on the agenda i would i would do anything to get jeff luneau on that but if you had to choose between cantor or me to be on your pitch team to get lebron come to your team who your who would you have.

houston lakers adam lebron james nba knicks new york inish kanter jeff luneau cantor joel embiid kanter cantered kanter
"ns" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"ns" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Died on october fourth of twenty seventeen serving during the us africa command operations he was twenty five years old of miami gardens florida and he died in southwest niger as a result of enemy fire he was assigned to the third special forces group airborne at fort bragg north carolina air force staff sergeant karl ns he died on march fifteenth of two thousand eighteen during operation inherent resolve he was thirty one years old from tallahassee florida and he died on march fifteenth when at h h sixty hawk helicopter crashed in western iraq and this was assigned to the air force reserves three hundred and eighth rescue squadron out of patrick air force base in florida and also air force master sergeant william posh he thought on march fifteenth of two thousand eighteen serving during operation inherent resolve he was thirty six years old originally of india india lactic florida he died on march fifteenth when h h sixty heavy hawk helicopter crashed the same accident that took the life of staff sergeant karl ns we remember these brave fool arabians this memorial day and unfortunately their names are added to the list of the brave who have given their all the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom freedom eight free all you know somebody has to be willing to to give their lives in order to preserve freedom you know something that i saw going on yesterday that was really disturbing me was the the rhetoric that came out of whatever you call them the schmos the harpies on network television show stations including the cable news stations that literally were trashing the president the commander in chief because of his decision to not go to north korea or to go to singapore and meet with north korea and it was absolutely bizarre to me their rationale i just i was confused and i was annoyed and i was even kind of angry about the whole thing because he did the right thing it's like when reagan walked away at rajkovic you don't give in to get a deal that's the that's the obama method is that you you give in and you hope for the best.

reagan obama singapore tallahassee air force north carolina southwest miami gardens africa us north korea president karl ns william posh iraq fort bragg niger florida twenty five years
"ns" Discussed on Channel 955

Channel 955

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"ns" Discussed on Channel 955

"And i needed to take a shower beforehand because i had some smelly ns on me from being at work all day and stuff like that well i drank so much on friday that was definitely the day that i drink the most oh my god i was hurting so bad so i asked you guys would time it was and you guys were like oh it's you know it's like ten dollars seven like holy crap i gotta be across town to go and meet norm there's no anti get there so i ran upstairs i'm like you know what screw it i'm just going to still take shower they didn't want to be i knew we were going to be hanging out took the shower i was more than forty minutes late for norm so i called him up in told him that i was in the back of the uber and we got stuck in atlanta traffic in that's believable because atlanta traffic is so bad well he doesn't believe me because i'm so bad so i asked the uber driver i said hey if i gave you an extra tip would you come in with me and live and live from did not show the uber driver pulls up in front of this restaurant leaves his car they're running and comes in and he is i don't even know where he's from so i'm not going to make an assumption but he was foreign guy and he comes in there and he's like hello mr norm i'm mojo uber driver and we we were stuck in massive traffic and you know how norma's norm looked at him and goes lion you can leave now and then just left it but listen this uber's changing their their with they do the services they're set to.

norma atlanta forty minutes ten dollars
"ns" Discussed on Power 105.1 FM

Power 105.1 FM

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"ns" Discussed on Power 105.1 FM

"Ns a simple cold own okay maker god so life bellsa owns but uhhuh that was bossie from kiki palmer morning everybody is dj envy a angela ye shall i mean the guy we are the breakfast club kiki is into building chaumet do you show that with everything that's going on with the times up metoo movement you think positive steps are being taken towards ginny quality.

kiki palmer ginny