35 Burst results for "Npr White House"

"npr white house" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:11 min | 3 months ago

"npr white house" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The election, Democrats are addressing an issue that is endangered their majorities in Congress. We've heard it the last two mornings from voters on this program. My labor is up 30, 40% versus four years ago. But the cost of everything. Utilities, electric gas. Every vendor is tacking on fuel charges onto the build. I'll take example a bucket of chitlins used to be 8, 99. Okay? Nobody eats chickens, but black people. Okay. Now they're 24, 99. The same bucket that was 8, 99, two years ago. Democrats might prefer that voters focused on something else, but here we are. So today, President Biden is expected to give a speech, arguing that Republican policies would make inflation worse. NPR White House correspondent espoli has been following The White House approach to inflation over time. Good morning. Good morning, Steve. What are you hearing from voters? Well, a lot of voters I meet Republicans and Democrats agree they are frustrated with rising prices, but they differ on who is to blame. The key question I have been trying to answer is a political reporter is how if at all people's inflation frustrations actually translate to votes. And so Steve, I went to an early voting site in Georgia. It's about an hour's drive north of Atlanta. That's where I met smesh and moshi Mika grandi. They're feeling inflation on everything from bread and eggs to home renovations, but they voted to keep their democratic senator in Congress. Economy, I don't think has direct relationship with politics. It's if economy is bad here, it's globally bad. And the previous two years has been a very important factor. The COVID situation supply chain situation that I don't think politics has anything to do with it. It has its ups and downs And so they voted for the Democrat and their election, but what do you hear from Republican voters? So a little while later, I met velvet and Daryl's sheets. They told me their number one concern is inflation, and they voted for Republicans up and down the ballot. We never run out of milk, right? We always keep milk in the refrigerator. And it just seems like it just keeps getting higher and higher and higher. Eggs, same thing

President Biden espoli White House Congress smesh Mika grandi Steve NPR Georgia Atlanta Daryl velvet
"npr white house" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:20 min | 3 months ago

"npr white house" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Edition from NPR news. I'm Rachel Martin. And I'm Steve inskeep. Less than two weeks before election day, President Biden is addressing an issue that has endangered his party's control of Congress. We've talked about this recently how focused voters are on inflation, regardless of party, voters are feeling it in their daily lives. Republicans blame spending by Democrats. So today, President Biden speaks in Syracuse, New York, and he's going to argue that Republican economic policies would make inflation worse. NPR White House correspondent as Macaulay joins us now good morning. Good morning, Steve. So having come to grips or tried to come to grips with this issue, how is the president trying to draw contrast with Republicans? Well, you're going to see the president and we have been seeing the president try to turn this inflation story on its head. The White House says that the GOP would try to cut social security extend tax cuts for the rich and repeal the inflation reduction act, which I'm sure you recall is that massive bill Democrats passed this summer to curb climate change and lower healthcare costs. This message is something I will say the president has been campaigning on in recent weeks. Democrats are lowering your everyday costs like prescription drugs, healthcare, premiums, energy bills, and gas prices. In Biden is trying to cast this election now as a choice rather than a referendum on his economic performance, Republicans have been hammering The White House for being the party in power as inflation reached a four deck at high, and now we're seeing Democrats respond very bluntly to that message. When you talk with voters, what do you hear from them about these competing arguments? Well, frankly, Steve, it depends which voter to ask. Republicans and Democrats that I've interviewed agree, they are frustrated with rising prices, but they differ on who is to blame. I was in Georgia last week, and I went to an early voting site just north of Atlanta. And that's where I met Richard Johnson. He's trying to buy a new house, but mortgage rates have spiked because the fed raised interest rates to curb inflation. Johnson has been feeling the effects of inflation, but he does not fault Biden. Our economy is cyclical. This is just one of those things. This is beyond any one individual's control or one particular party. And we just have to live through it. Johnson voted for all Democrats this year. He's more concerned with other issues like threats to democracy. But in Georgia, I also met Daryl sheets. He's a Republican who blames Democrats for his economic woes. Our four-o-one-ks are down by 25 to 35%. So you can only draw some correlation between what's going on today to what's happened politically over the last 18, 20 months. I'm interested that you noted that one of those people has already voted at least one of them has already voted millions of people at this point probably have already voted as Democrats make their closing arguments. So it becomes relevant. How have they addressed this issue over the past couple of years? You know, Steve, there was a sense last year, especially as prices began rising that The White House was slow to acknowledge people's pain. But is the problem persisted The White House has tried to show that it has done everything in its power to help curb costs, whether that's on snarling supply chains or releasing an unprecedented amount of oil from emergency reserves. I spoke with one of Biden's top economic advisers, Jared Bernstein, and he acknowledged that some people want to see change faster, but he says the economy is moving in the right direction. And so what we're seeing now, I would say in this final phase of campaigning is a moment where both parties are trying to use fears about what the other party will do to the economy to drive voter turnout. It's just a matter of whose fears are actually more convincing to people. NPR White House correspondent esmeralda is a pleasure talking with you, thanks. My pleasure. Just how far can Russia push a disinformation campaign about Ukraine? President Vladimir Putin is picking up a theme previously brought up by lower ranking Russians. He is making an evidence free claim about Ukraine that the U.S. says is false. Putin spoke at a meeting of intelligence chiefs from former Soviet republics. What he said there, we are aware of plans by Ukraine to use a dirty bomb as a provocation. Now Russia gave no evidence of Ukraine planning to use a bomb that would spread radiation on its own territory. The U.S. has warned Russia has warned that Russia may be setting a pretext for its own future actions. And pierce Charles maines is covering the story from Moscow either Charles. Hi there in the morning. How has Russia injected this claim into the global discourse? You know, it all started over the weekend when members of Russia's defense ministry held calls with U.S. officials and started talking about dirty bombs. Then we heard from Russia's ambassador to the United Nations, then the foreign ministry, and of course state media. So it's been a steady drum beat here. And the Russian argument basically amounts to this. Ukraine's civilian nuclear facilities are being used to create a dirty bomb to detonate in Ukraine to then blame on Russia. And yesterday, as you said, Putin himself made the same charge in a video address, and that's raised concerns over what Putin might do next. Okay, so you have this claim being made again and again without any evidence given. Although the United States has already warned that it would be an incredibly serious mistake for Russia to detonate some kind of explosive device and blame it on Ukraine. How has this how does this fit into Moscow's broader efforts to use nuclear threats in the war? Well, you know, from the beginning, Putin has issued not particularly veiled threats to keep the west from getting too involved in Ukraine. For example, he raised Russia's nuclear alert level in the early days of the conflict. Although U.S. officials said, and this is important, they saw no actual change in Russia's nuclear posture. Now more recently, Putin said Russia would use any means necessary to defend what Moscow claims are these newly annexed Russian territories in Ukraine with Putin warning it was no bluff. And there's some in the west that are worried that this latest Russian charge concerning the dirty bomb reflects Putin's dwindling options on the battlefield. As Russia has struggled in part because of western arms, support to Ukraine, there are even voices here in Moscow that argue only a massive strike or the threat of one could shift Russia's fortunes. And so Russia's dirty bomb allegations true or not could in some in the west say provide Moscow with a pretext to take more drastic measures. Russia also did something else that could be seen as saber wrecking nuclear saber rattling if we can mix metaphors there. A test of its nuclear defenses, yesterday here's some of the sound of that sent by their defense ministry. Someone ominous sounds there. What do we make of that? Well, you know, let's be clear. The Russians do these drills around this time every year and Russian officials did warn the U.S. of these maneuvers in advance as they're supposed to, so it wasn't a surprise, and the U.S. has its own version of this. Putin oversaw test of intercontinental ballistic missiles fired by land air and sea in what was a simulation of Russia's response to an enemy nuclear attack. So it's a drill, but it's also a message given the timing, and one that leaves the west with the same question. It's had throughout the conflict in Ukraine. How far is Russia willing to go

President Biden White House Russia Ukraine NPR news Rachel Martin Steve inskeep Biden Macaulay joins Putin Steve Daryl sheets NPR U.S. Georgia Johnson Richard Johnson President Vladimir Putin Moscow
"npr white house" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:27 min | 7 months ago

"npr white house" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The Senate appears close to passing a compromise package of very narrow gun safety measures, but as that is happening, the Supreme Court is poised to hand down a ruling that could stop 6 states from limiting who gets to carry weapons outside their home. The decision in New York State rifle and pistol association versus Bruin will be the first major ruling on the Second Amendment by the high court in over a decade. New Jersey has some of the strictest firearm restrictions in the country, and it's one of the states that would be affected by this ruling, with us now is Matthew platkin acting attorney general for New Jersey. Welcome to the program and good morning. Good morning, Lila. So let's start with what's at stake for your state in the courts ruling here. Look, I think none of us have a crystal ball, but the writing's on the wall. The current majority of the Supreme Court is likely to issue a decision that significantly reduces our ability to protect our state from the epidemic of gun violence. And this has been a movement in this country to hamstring state firearm safety policies, and there's no question that any decision that restricts our concealed carry regulations, which I believe are entirely consistent with Second Amendment in New York's case. It's been around for over a hundred years. This decision would undermine public safety. Now, if the Supreme Court strikes down these may carry restrictions, what exactly changes in New Jersey? Well, I think first and foremost, you would still need a permit to carry a firearm. And I hope everybody realizes that. But the justifiable need requirement, which is the strictest part of our concealed carry permeable. That could potentially be struck down by this decision. And so what that would mean is in New Jersey, more people would be able to have a concealed carry permit. You know, what works in Wyoming. Does it necessarily work in the densest state in the country at particularly in our urban centers, places where people take mass transit, places where people live and work in very close proximity. And confrontations with concealed carry when conceal carries much more available those confrontations become more violent and potentially more deadly. So you're worried about public safety. What is your office plan to do if the law is struck down? Well, obviously we have to review what the court says, but we have teams preparing for any policy changes or litigation once we get the Bruin decision. And we'll advise officials accordingly. And I have to thank governor Murphy, who is been a leader on gun safety efforts since his time in office. And he has a package of legislative reforms that are currently being considered by the legislature. But I just have to be clear again. This is a decision and this case is considering a law that's been around for over a century. The court has said, and it's other gun cases that it cares about the history of these laws. And this is a law in our laws similar that has been around for a very long time without constitutional challenge. And it would tremendously impact our ability to keep New Jersey and safe if we lose the justifiable needs required. In the few seconds, we have left, what do you say to gun activists who say, why shouldn't trained law abiding New Jersey gun owners have the right to conceal carry? I would say that sensible regulations on firearms have been entirely consistent with the Second Amendment for a very long time. And they are part of a constellation of laws that we have that keep people safe. We have one of the lowest rates of gun violence in the country and that's a result of our strong gun safety laws. And the court should defer to law enforcement experts. Matthew platkin acting attorney general for the state of New Jersey. Thank you so much. Thank you. Russia's blockade of Ukrainian seaports is endangering the food supply in other countries. President Biden and other leaders discuss how to respond to the summit this weekend. Here's NPR White House correspondent Frank ordonez. Speaking about rising food prices last week in Philadelphia, President Biden attacked Russian leader Vladimir Putin for weaponizing food and leveraging world hunger. He's also prevented the grain, thousands of tons of grain that are locked up in those silos ready to be exported. But they can't get out to the Black Sea because it could blow out of the water. Biden says he's working on a plan with European allies to build new temporary silos on the borders of Ukraine, including in Poland, where grains can be stored until they can be safely exported through the west by rail. But building these silos while desperately needed to accommodate the summer and fall harvest seasons is not seen as a lasting solution. We can't just build these ports by itself. It will not be enough. Elaine and aroma is a key base analyst with the grain trading for maxi green. There's about 20 million tons of grain already trapped in Ukraine. And she says, if the west is going to be a viable alternative to the southern ports, much larger investments are needed, especially to Ukrainian and European rails, which have different track gauges. We need to build a railway with European type railway to Ukrainian territory or Ukrainian type to European territory. The war is grinding into its fourth month, driving fears that tens of millions of people, particularly in Africa, will likely face severe hunger, or even possibly famine. Ukraine and Russia account for over a quarter of the world's weed exports, Putin has denied responsibility and work to divide international support by blaming the food shortage on western sanctions. So they're aware of the political influence that they wield through this. And I'll say it seems like it's been effective. Caitlin wells is a former top adviser in the Obama White House. And now runs the global food security program at the center for strategic and international studies. She sees the silos as a positive stopgap to the problem, but says the long-term solution is reopening Ukraine's southern courts. She likens efforts to get Ukrainian grain out of the country by using the railways to U.S. drivers trying to get across America without using their cars. So imagine in the United States, all of a sudden we couldn't use roads and we had to transport everybody by planes and rails. We could do it. It would happen. But it would be slow and it would be really costly. Putin has said he could open a channel to allow more grain exports, but on the condition that some western sanctions are lifted. The United States and its allies have resisted that. Ukrainians don't like it either. Well, from the Ukrainian side, it's a definite no. Maria bogus is the head of the center for food and land use research at the Kyiv school of economics. She says they've learned over the years ever since the first Russian invasion of Ukraine in 2014 that any assurances from the Kremlin are worthless. Trust in any kind of papers signed documents or agreements. Signed with Russia. And especially there is no trust in such kind of things for the long term. That's just one reason why she says, as Ukraine builds its ties with the European Union, that it needs to expand its methods of trade, including via the west

New Jersey Matthew platkin Supreme Court State rifle and pistol associa President Biden governor Murphy Bruin New York Lila NPR White House Frank ordonez Senate Wyoming Russia legislature Vladimir Putin Caitlin wells Black Sea Biden
"npr white house" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:28 min | 7 months ago

"npr white house" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Overlapping summits in the coming days, bring together the U.S. and some of its closest allies. One summit is the G 7, the group of 7 leading industrial democracies, a NATO summit includes several of the same nations, they want to increase pressure on Russia. But President Biden also wants to steer the conversation back to China. At a summit, a year ago, Biden said he wanted to compete against China's investments around the world. The point is that what's happening is that China has its belt and road initiative and we think that there's a much more equitable way to provide for the needs of countries around the world. One year later NPR White House correspondent Tamara Keith will be traveling with the president and joins us now Tam good morning. Good morning. What was Biden's plan one year ago to counter Chinese investments and influence? Well, they called it build back better world to play on Biden's domestic plan for overhauling the economy. And the idea was to give low and middle income countries an alternative to signing up with China for funding big infrastructure projects or softer infrastructure projects than the bridges and roads that China offers through its belt and road initiative. China also often offers coercive debt along with that. There hasn't been much news about this G 7 initiative since it was first announced, though work has been happening behind the scenes. Meanwhile, here at home, the build back better plan domestically just failed in Congress. The domestic brand is dead, so now the global brand as a problem. Go on, go on. And it's getting a formal launch, the global project at the G 7 this year. And there will be some rebranding going on in addition to announcing a new name Biden and the other leaders are set to unveil the first projects that are meant to demonstrate how this will actually work. Does that mean that this project could actually have some traction? China has put up a lot of money around the world. And so these leading democracies are behind they're at the starting gate in many respects. And experts I've spoken to told me that there is a lot of skepticism out there from low and middle income countries. Here's Ian bremmer, the president of Eurasia group, which is a consultancy. Whenever they talk to American officials, they say, well, if you don't want us investing in China, give us an alternative. If you don't want to tying up with Beijing and all this money they're offering, well, where else are we supposed to go? You don't have anything else. So this is meant to be that. And there's only one problem. Which is that we don't actually have the money to fund it. Now, the idea of this partnership is that it won't rely too heavy on government funding because they will cede it, use it to seed money from private equity and hedge funds and pension funds insurance funds global public private partnership. But this is all happening at a precarious time in the global economy, and it's not clear that Congress or other western governments will be able to put all that money in. So the focus on China is about 5 years from now, ten years from now, 20 years from now, there are more immediate concerns as these world leaders be. Yes, Ukraine is the big one as well as the global economy and inflation. So that will likely get much more focused than

China Biden President Biden Tamara Keith NATO Tam NPR Ian bremmer Eurasia group Russia White House U.S. Congress Beijing Ukraine
"npr white house" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

02:04 min | 8 months ago

"npr white house" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Kelly in Washington And I Mel said Cheng and Culver City California President Biden has traveled recently to the sites of two mass shootings in Buffalo New York and uvalde Texas Last night there was another in Tulsa Oklahoma That was the 233rd mass shooting in the U.S. this year according to the gun violence archive And tonight Biden will address the nation and once again call on Congress to act despite years of inaction on this issue NPR White House correspondent Tamara Keith joins us now with a preview hi Tam Hi Elsa So what do you expect the president will be saying tonight Like what is the purpose of tonight's speech So this is an evening address after multiple high profile mass shootings coming week after week And he will be speaking directly to the American people about those tragedies and what he thinks should be done to prevent gun violence But White House press secretary karine Jean Pierre made it pretty clear in the press briefing today that we shouldn't expect to see any major new announcements for instance on executive actions And we're constantly constantly looking for what else we can do but again tonight's speech is going to focus on what Congress needs to do and Congress action because the president can not do this alone As she said Biden just wants to get his voice out there to contribute to this conversation and use his presidential bully pulpit to press for action And I have to say he has been under a lot of pressure from gun safety advocates to do just that to be more vocal tighten the screws on Congress And not let these terrible shootings fall from the headlines without something coming from it Right But what specifically is he calling on Congress to do Well what he's asking for isn't new And isn't specific to the events of recent weeks In fact you can go back to his State of the Union address in March which I did And here a message quite similar to what I expect that we will hear tonight I asked Congress to pass proven measures to reduce gun violence Past universal background checks Why.

Culver City California President Biden Tamara Keith Tam Hi Elsa Congress uvalde Biden karine Jean Pierre White House Cheng Mel Tulsa Kelly Buffalo NPR Oklahoma Washington Texas New York U.S.
"npr white house" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:44 min | 9 months ago

"npr white house" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Of Kyiv Frank thank you Good to talk hey All right President Biden is urging lawmakers to send more money to Ukraine He'd like the United States to send $33 billion on top of billions already sent So we need to contribute arms funding ammunition and the economic support to make their courage and sacrifice have purpose So they can continue this fight and do what they're doing It's critical this funding gets approved and approved as quickly as possible Just by way of comparison the entire annual Russian military budget the budget for all of Russia is thought to be around $65 billion If Biden's request is approved the United States will have sent a total of 47 billion to Ukraine in just a few months NPR White House correspondent Osmo holiday has been following this development The president has asked for $33 billion what does that include Well a bulk of it roughly $20 billion is security assistance that includes things like ammunition armored vehicles and unmanned aircraft systems some of the money is also geared toward helping clear landmines and other explosive remnants that Russians have left behind Most of the remaining $13 billion is going to be divided up between economic assistance and humanitarian assistance Things like medical equipment and safe drinking water All right so President Biden has now settled on what he thinks is needed what's been the response so far You know we'll ultimately Congress has to agree to these funds Our colleague Kelsey Snell who covers Congress says her initial read from Senate Republicans is that they are not in theory opposed to the dollar amount but they do have some questions Senator Joni Ernst from Iowa is one of those Republicans General top line is important but I want to know the.

President Biden Kyiv Frank Ukraine Osmo holiday United States Biden Russia White House Kelsey Snell Congress Senator Joni Ernst Senate Iowa
"npr white house" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:05 min | 9 months ago

"npr white house" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's morning edition from NPR news I'm Leila faldon and I'm Rachel Martin good morning There's a lifesaving antiviral drug from Pfizer out there called pax lovid It's been shown to reduce the risk of hospitalization from COVID by up to 90% and yet hundreds of thousands of doses of this drug are just sitting on pharmacy shelves unused Today The White House plans to reveal a new push to make sure people know about it and to encourage doctors to prescribe it NPR White House correspondent Tamara Keith has details and she joins us this morning hey Tam Good morning If pax lovit is something that could save your life why aren't people taking it There are several reasons but it all comes down to this Actually getting the drug is as one healthcare expert put it to me a bit of a rigmarole You have to start taking it within 5 days of the onset of symptoms So it is a race to get a COVID test get someone to prescribe it find a pharmacy that actually carries it And then start taking it it is currently authorized for people 12 and up who have risk factors for severe COVID But it turns out that's a lot of people because that could include being overweight or having asthma or diabetes or high blood pressure But many doctors have been reluctant to prescribe it One administration official on a call with reporters last night explained that a lot of docs are still operating from a scarcity mindset because back in December and January it really was scarce but now there are plenty of pills to go around So what's The White House plan to do something about this Education and outreach and not just a potential patients but also to doctors and others who could prescribe it A lot of patients simply do not know that paxlovid exists or their doctors tell them they don't qualify when they really do Pax Slovak is a bit complicated to prescribe There are some drug drug interactions which means that doctors have to puzzle through their patient's medications list And decide for instance that they need to go off their cholesterol medication while they're taking the pax lovid The White House COVID team is providing doctors with information to make it easier to decide whether their patients are a good fit for the drug They're also announcing a new program with pharmacies to get these pills into even more retail pharmacies 10,000 additional locations this week with more to follow And the administration is also working to expand its test to treat program working with fema and the states to set up these one stop shops where you can get tested and get packed lovid with less of the rigmarole But health professionals I've spoken to say the fact that people don't know about it and they aren't taking it when it could keep them out of the hospital is simply a failure Today's announcement is an acknowledgment from The White House that getting the pills wasn't enough They have to do more So meanwhile Congress is back this week and The White House still doesn't have the $22 billion in additional COVID funding that they asked for last month Any movement there Not much you might remember just before the spring recess there was a bipartisan deal to fund less than half of what The White House had asked for and it blew up Senate majority leader Chuck Schumer now says both parties must come back to the table and find an agreement but the timeline he gave was weeks rather than days The White House says that this lack of funding won't affect pax Loeb and supplies today this is about the next generation of antiviral pills or a variant specific booster that might be needed this fall NPR White House correspondent Tamara Keith extra points for using the word rigamarole Tam this morning Twice so much You're welcome Everyone of the 88 cities in Los Angeles County is affected by unhoused populations But they don't all deal with the crisis in the same way Anna Scott from member station KCRW reports on one plan in an exclusive Southern California beach community that doesn't sit well with its neighbors Malibu is.

White House NPR news Tamara Keith Leila faldon Rachel Martin Pfizer asthma COVID diabetes fema Chuck Schumer NPR White House Congress Senate Anna Scott Los Angeles County KCRW
"npr white house" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:41 min | 9 months ago

"npr white house" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Today The White House is announcing a new push to inform people about Pfizer's lifesaving antiviral drug Yeah the drug is called paxlovid and it has been shown to reduce the risk of COVID-19 hospitalization by up to 90% so very effective Yet hundreds of thousands of doses of this drug are just sitting on pharmacy shelves unused The administration wants to make sure that people know about it and also to encourage doctors to prescribe it NPR White House correspondent Tamara Keith has the details and joins us now Hi Tamara Hi Okay damn so if this pill could save lives why is it sitting on shelves Several reasons but it all comes down to this actually getting the drug is as one healthcare expert put it to me a bit of a rigor moral You have to start taking it within 5 days of the onset of symptoms So it is a race to get a COVID test get someone to prescribe it and then find a pharmacy that carries it It is currently authorized for people 12 and up who have high risk for severe COVID But that could include being overweight or having asthma or diabetes or high blood pressure Those are all risk factors and a large share of the U.S. population has one of those but they may not realize it Many doctors have been reluctant to prescribe it one administration official on the call with reporters last night explained that a lot of doctors are operating from a scarcity mindset because back in December and January it was scarce But now there are plenty of pills to go around Okay so then what is The White House saying it's doing to address this disconnect Education and outreach not just to potential patients but also to doctors and other providers who could prescribe it A lot of patients simply don't know pax lovat exists or their doctors tell them that they don't qualify when they really do Pax lova does have quite a few drug drug interactions which means that to prescribe it a doctor sometimes has to puzzle through their patient's medication list So for instance they might have to pull their patient off of their cholesterol medication for 5 days while they're taking paxlovid The White House COVID team is providing doctors with information to make it easier to decide whether their patients are a good fit for the drug And they're also The White House announcing a new pharmacy program to get these pills into even more retail pharmacies 10,000 additional locations this week with more to follow And one more thing they're working to expand the test to treat program getting help from fema and working with states to set up one stop shops where people can get tested and get packed a little bit with less of the rigmarole Health professionals I've spoken to say the fact that people don't know about pax lovit and aren't taking it when it could keep them out of the hospital is a failure And today's announcement is an acknowledgment from The White House that just procuring the pills isn't enough Now Congress is back this week and The White House still hasn't gotten a $22 billion in additional COVID funding It requested last month Has there been any movement on that Not much you might remember just before the spring recess there was a bipartisan deal to fund less than half of what The White House wanted and it blew up Senate majority leader Chuck Schumer says both parties must come back to the table and find an agreement but the timeline he gave was weeks rather than days NPR White House correspondent Tamara Keith thanks Tim You're welcome A.

White House Tamara Keith NPR White House pax lovat Pfizer high blood pressure asthma diabetes U.S. fema Congress Chuck Schumer Senate NPR Tim
"npr white house" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:23 min | 11 months ago

"npr white house" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"COVID prevention and treatment running out You know let it a Congress leaders warn the U.S. risks being blindsided by another variant As NPR White House correspondent Tamara Keith reports it's far from certain Congress will be able to pass the funds the Biden administration insists our badly needed When The White House asked Congress for money the consequences of failing to get it aren't always so clear But deputy COVID response coordinator Natalie quillon says the administration was set to put in an order for more monoclonal antibody treatments next week And now they can't We have used any flexibility we had which was limited And now we actually need more funding as we've warned and we needed as soon as possible We are foregoing contracts we plan to do this month because we don't have the funding to lock them in She says the government is cutting back shipments to state and could still run out of those treatments as soon as May Funds to provide COVID care for the uninsured are almost all gone Vaccine supplies are in question two And while COVID cases are relatively low now there's a very real chance another variant could hit quillion says we need to remember the dark days and how quickly a variant can come if it comes And by the time it's coming by the time cases are increasing by the time if we had a new variant it's too late to secure the tools we need The White House had asked Congress to include $22.5 billion for COVID preparedness and the big government funding bill President Biden signed yesterday The bill got bipartisan support but agreement on the COVID funding proved elusive Republican senator Mitt Romney from Utah says he agrees more money is needed to pay for treatments and to prepare for whatever COVID brings next But he and his fellow Republicans argue Congress has already set aside trillions of dollars for the COVID response And that hasn't all been spent yet We had agreed Republicans and Democrats for $15 billion to go in the last bill that would pay for all these things The White House says so needed Some of the 15 billion would have come from clawing back money states hadn't used yet but governors balked and too many Democrats in the House said they couldn't support it It was stripped out at the last minute now House Democrats say they plan to vote on a stand-alone funding measure But Senate Republicans won't go for it Here's Romney again This is up to the president to deal with his own party and get them to provide the funding which was agreed to And if they don't want to use that funding find additional sources The White House objects to the idea that emergency COVID funds should be treated like any other budgetary question Here's press secretary Jen Psaki in the briefing yesterday We believe that this should be provided on an emergency basis Not something where we're require offsets It shouldn't have to require taking money from states who are using it But while this debate rages on there's no obvious path for a funding bill to get to the president's desk And no obvious way to avoid the dire consequences The White House warns will begin next week Tamara Keith NPR news The White House Spring is just around the corner which means we're in for longer days warmer weather and.

COVID Congress White House Tamara Keith Biden administration Natalie quillon bill President Biden NPR U.S. Mitt Romney Utah government Jen Psaki House Romney Senate
"npr white house" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

03:12 min | 1 year ago

"npr white house" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"But Republicans and some Democrats in the Senate are impeding those efforts The president has also been unsuccessful in what he said what his was his number one job and that is bringing this pandemic under control And while we wait to hear from the president we're joined now by a number of NPR correspondents who will be listening along with us We have NPR White House correspondent Tamara Keith and Pierre congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell and NPR senior political editor and correspondent domenico martino hate all three of you Hello hello Thanks for having us All right Tim I want to start with you because as we've mentioned it is not been the greatest stretch here for President Biden Can you just catch us up Where would you say things stand right now for The White House Well his approval ratings are completely underwater even on his handling of the pandemic which has been an area of strength for him an average of polls finds that in recent days that has crossed over two So he is in the negative in that realm as well There is a generalized anxiety in the country about COVID Some people worried about more shutdowns Others worried about their kids schools or preschools closing Others worried about getting the virus His build back better legislation is I'm starting to interrupt It's like the president is stepping up to the podium and the press conference is said to begin Oh folks I should be here Well good afternoon everyone Tomorrow will mark one year since I took office It's been a year of challenges but it's also been a year of enormous progress We went from 2 million people being vaccinated at the moment I was sworn in to 210 million Americans being fully vaccinated today We created 6 million new jobs More jobs in one year than any time before Unemployment dropped the unemployment rate dropped to 3.9% Child poverty dropped by nearly 40% The biggest drop ever in American history New business applications grew by 30% the biggest increase ever And for the first time in a long time this country's working people actually got to raise Actually got erased People the bottom 40% saw their income go up The most of all the cataracts We cut health insurance premiums for millions of American families And we just made surprise medical bills illegal in this country You know those bills you get that you don't expect them to two to 5000 dollars from the hospital beyond what you thought you were going to have to owe because of the consultation you weren't told was going to cost that much No more They're now illegal Thanks to the American rescue plan and other actions we've taken We've seen record job creation record economic growth in the past year Now thanks to the bipartisan infrastructure Bill we're about to make a record investment in rebuilding America to take us to be the number one best infrastructure in the world Now we're way below.

NPR Tamara Keith Pierre congressional Kelsey Snell domenico martino President Biden Senate White House Tim America
"npr white house" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

03:54 min | 1 year ago

"npr white house" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Millions of Americans and entire states out of the business of governing The operations of this body will change Oh yes That much Is true Ayesha Moscow how could this come back to haunt Democrats Well if you change the rules to make it easier for your party to pass legislation then when the other party comes into power they can it would be easier for them to pass certain legislation And that is the risk right One of the options for changing the filibuster would be to do a carve out for voting rights rules A similar carve out has been done for judicial for judicial nominees And obviously Democrats did that And then Republicans have used that to get you know Supreme Court nominees through on party line votes So there is a risk right When you make changes of that nature Ayesha rosco is NPR White House correspondent Aisha is always thank you Thank you And you can hear President Biden and vice president Harris speaking from Atlanta this afternoon on many MPR new stations Cases of the highly contagious omicron variant continued to skyrocket across the country And that's putting a lot of strain on travel schools and our healthcare systems Casey ellingson of Texas tech public media reports on how the spike is affecting medical staffing and resources across Texas It's been a week since 35 year old Tyler wood got out of quarantine I had some sniffles I didn't think it was COVID I'm fully vaccinated had the booster and then lo and behold it was COVID Would return to his job as a clinical pharmacy supervisor for covenant health The same day the city of Lubbock's COVID case count hit an all time high Lubbock reported 633 new infections Friday This week is when we saw the biggest eye opening here we go again movement And it's taking a toll on the hospital We've got less staff So we actually had travel and agency nurses come in and then we lost a bunch of them because they sent them home and now we're having to bring them back because we don't have enough nurses to staff our beds Cities and counties across Texas are in the same boat Bill McCann is CEO of Texas medical center in Houston Many of our employees are getting sick Many of our nurses can tell you it went from tens to a couple hundred to several thousand It is the largest amount of poise we've ever seen out And it's happening as more people are showing up at the hospital At the beginning of the year Texas medical centers average daily COVID-19 hospitalizations nearly doubled From around 200 people a day to 400 By January 4th officials in Austin said hospital admissions increased a 135% In Dallas's Parkland hospital just opened a third ward for COVID patients It's been the largest search ever So far Omar seems to be less severe than previous COVID strains making explains it's hitting people differently It actually attacks the upper airways The throat the nose mouth the lower respiratory system seems to be the more resistant to a crime than it was for Delta So we're seeing far fewer patients for example having pneumonia eating to be put on respirators Which translates into fewer patients filling the ICUs for long periods of time Now the difficult thing about amaran is because it's in your upper airway system It's much more transmissible More transmission means oh Macron related staffing shortages in hospitals and beyond could be a problem for weeks.

Ayesha rosco COVID President Biden Casey ellingson Tyler wood Lubbock Texas Aisha Moscow Bill McCann Supreme Court White House Texas medical centers Harris Atlanta Texas medical center Parkland hospital Houston Omar
"npr white house" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

03:40 min | 1 year ago

"npr white house" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"From NPR and WBUR I'm Jane clayson in Boston And I'm Tanya Mosley in Los Angeles This is here and now President Biden is taking his pitch for new voting rights legislation on the road this week He's planning a speech tomorrow in Atlanta the visit follows an impassioned address marking the anniversary of January 6th when a pro Trump mob stormed the capitol and an attempt to stop Congress from certifying Biden's victory in the 2020 election We have to be firm Resolute and unyielding and our defense of the right to vote to have that vote counted For more we're joined by NPR White House correspondent Scott detro And Scott the 2020 election result is still a contentious one in Georgia the GOP is backing more voting restrictions there So what's Biden hoping to accomplish tomorrow in Atlanta I think he's trying to make it clear that voting rights voting protections are a top priority for his administration that something a lot of advocates on those fronts have doubted over the past year when they've seen Biden talk about it occasionally but not really make it a central organizing focus of The White House Look there are a lot of challenges to passing any voting legislation in Congress I think we're probably going to talk about that So part of this is just trying to highlight the issue maybe get voters to think more about it be motivated by it especially in a state like Georgia where as you mentioned new restrictions have been put in place and this continues to be the main battlefield for presidential politics for Senate politics for voting rights I think that's going to be case for the next two elections and beyond So forbidden just the location itself really draws attention to this speech There are two boating bills held up in the Senate right now Neither have Republican support What are these bills trying to do Yeah the first one has gone by a few different names based on different iterations but it's really by and large a sweeping bill that would set national standards for early voting voting by mail voter registration It would try to limit partisan drawing of legislative lines That is something that is an entirely democratic bill and in fact it's pretty clear no Republicans would support it which gets to the issue of it not being able to pass the Senate because of filibuster laws There's another one called the John Lewis Voting Rights Act That's a little more limited It would essentially strengthen the Voting Rights Act rewrite the parts of that landmark law that was weakened by the Supreme Court about a decade ago and that would really be a way for the federal government to respond to this wave of voting restrictions that have been passed in Republican states But again even though that Bill is a little more limited in scope it's the same issue I think there's maybe one Republican in the Senate who said they might vote for it So it just doesn't have the votes to pass right now I have less than a minute with you but I want to get to the filibuster issue Democrats have discussed making an exception to filibuster rules to get these bills passed How would that work and are any lawmakers concerned about the president that that could set Less than a minute of filibuster don't really go together I know 30 seconds Quickly very quickly It's an ongoing conversation about Democrats There are a lot of precedents for carving out one exception or another The idea is some sort of exemption for just voting rights laws but again you need Joe Manchin you need kyrsten sinema They have given zero indication that they would be on board with a change like that That's NPR White House correspondent Scott detro will be talking about this more tomorrow as always Thank you so much Scott Talk to you soon The number of kids hospitalized with COVID has hit a record high according to new CDC data On average about 800 people under the age of 18 are hospitalized with COVID-19 every day That includes.

Biden WBUR Jane clayson Tanya Mosley President Biden Scott detro NPR Senate White House Atlanta Congress Georgia GOP Boston Los Angeles Scott John Lewis Supreme Court federal government kyrsten sinema
Afghanistan Updates: Bidens Attend Dignified Transfer of Troops at Dover

Weekend Edition Sunday

01:55 min | 1 year ago

Afghanistan Updates: Bidens Attend Dignified Transfer of Troops at Dover

"People ahead of a self imposed deadline to leave Afghanistan by Tuesday. They're continuing this operation after a terrorist attack last week that killed at least 170 Afghans and 13 American service members outside the Kabul airport. The US responded to that attack with a drone strike on Friday, targeting the terrorist group behind the attack and as president Biden was at Dover Air Force Base this morning to witness the dignified transfer of U. S Service members killed in Thursday's attack. Another U. S drone strike in Afghanistan struck another target, a vehicle seen as an imminent threat to the operation at the airport. So clearly, it has been a challenging week for President Biden. He had already been receiving criticism for how the evacuation was being handled. And that was before these latest events. We're joined now by NPR. White House correspondent Scott Detroit. Good morning, Scott. Hey, ask my good to be with you. Scott president, Biden said after the attack that the US withdrawal would continue. And that has indeed been the case. Yeah, that the attack has not changed the effort, and President Biden has repeatedly vowed that United States work evacuating Americans and Afghan partners will keep going. Look Missions there they performed is dangerous. Is, uh, now Come with a significant loss of American personnel. And it's a worthy mission because they continue to evacuate. Uh, folks out of that region out of the airport. The number evacuated now is now north of 113,000. There has been a lot of domestic and international pressure to continue operations past Tuesday's deadline for the US to withdraw from Afghanistan. Biden has insisted the operation is on pace to finish by then. And up. Until now, he has given no indication that that would continue into September. Scott what more can you tell us about the

President Biden Kabul Airport Afghanistan U. Dover Air Force Base Scott Detroit United States Scott Biden NPR White House
The Senate Passes a $3.5 Trillion Budget Blueprint

NPR's Business Story of the Day

01:38 min | 1 year ago

The Senate Passes a $3.5 Trillion Budget Blueprint

"Senate is moving ahead with one of president. Biden's top economic priorities early. this morning. It took the first step in passing a three and a half trillion dollar budget. Reggie resolution that could lead to major reforms in social programs. The vote came just hours after the senate passed a trillion dollar infrastructure. Package with bipartisan support. This is all a win. For the president who promised to invest in the nation's economy and also proved the democrats and republicans can still work together. So what might this mean for the president politically. Npr white house correspondent us. Mukalla joins us now. Good morning. Good morning debbie. So what now has to happen for these two bills. Well this three point five trillion dollar spending package. That is chock full of democratic priorities for things like climate change and childcare is actually just starting to get worked out so it's just really the first step and frankly it's not going to get any republican votes. Democrats have been insisting that this bill the three point five trillion. Dollar one. Along with the bipartisan infrastructure. Bill must be passed in tandem. The problem for democrats is that they have such small majorities in both chambers. That it could be difficult to keep all their members in line Now president biden seems competent. That he is going to win passage of the two spending bills. That would come on top of the big kovic relief bill from earlier this year. Will voters take note perhaps but it is not clear that voters have thus far been connecting the dots back to president biden. And even if they have been personally benefiting from something he's done

Senate Mukalla Biden Reggie President Biden Debbie White House Bill
"npr white house" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

02:13 min | 1 year ago

"npr white house" Discussed on NPR News Now

"The foreign relations committee could send legislation to the senate floor to repeal several presidential war powers. In the coming days clottey ellis. Npr news washington managed to move past a lackluster open and the session on a high note the dow was up two hundred seventy eight points. This is npr white house. Press secretary jen. Psaki criticized policies in states like texas and florida that moved a block employers and proprietors from implementing mask or vaccine requirements to curb the corona virus. Those two states are among several facing surging cases from the delta variant by president bind today spoke about the us strategy to slow the spread of the coronavirus at home and abroad noting. We're all in this together earlier. The white house announced the chip more than one hundred and ten million doses of covered nineteen vaccine to more than sixty countries. Federal wildlife officials are proposing protections for emperor penguins under the endangered species act and bureau's nathan reports. The much celebrated bird is losing its habitat as the climate warms and sea. Ice melts polar. Bears have long been the unofficial poster species of the climate crisis. But they're not the only polar species being threatened by shrinking ceus emperor penguins. The largest living penguin species form breeding colonies feed and seek protection from predators on floating around antarctica. Currently their populations are still robust but the us fish and wildlife service warns that with global temperatures increasing and carbon emissions continuing worldwide. This species is in danger of extinction across much of its range in the foreseeable future. It's recommending the species be listed as threatened which we give them some protections but not slow global warming nathan rot. Npr news futures prices moved lower down just under one percent today to settle at seventy fifty six a barrel in new york. I'm jack speer. Npr news in washington. The pandemic has changed the way we work socialize and bring life into the world on. Npr's consider this we're looking at pregnancy. During the pandemic we'll talk about vaccine confusion how to parent in isolation and so much more listened to the consider. This podcast from npr..

foreign relations committee clottey ellis secretary jen Psaki npr white house senate Npr news washington penguins texas florida nathan us fish and wildlife service Bears antarctica jack speer us new york
"npr white house" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:17 min | 1 year ago

"npr white house" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Ailsa Chang in Los Angeles. And I'm Audie Cornish in Washington. The White House acknowledged today that the U. S. Will not meet President Biden's goal of 70% of U. S adults getting at least their first covid 19 vaccine dose by July 4th. In fact, it's going to take an extra couple of weeks to get there, and we're joined now by NPR. White House correspondent Tamara Keith. And Tara. Let's just start with the data. How close is the country to meet? Meeting this goal? How worried is the White House about all this Well, moving at the current pace and NPR analysis finds that the U. S should get to about 67% of adults with at least one shot by July 4th, but Rather than admit that in a straightforward way, the White House is doing some mathematical gymnastics today. Here's covid coordinator Jeff Science on a briefing call with reporters. So as to our goal of 70% for all adults. Going to hit it for adults. 27 older, This is amazing progress and has our country returning to normal much sooner. Anyone could have predicted. White House officials have taken to calling that goal aspirational, even arguing that the 70% number was sort of arbitrary like Jen Jen Psaki, the press secretary, argued today in the briefing room. There is nothing ever magical through science about 70% 70% was a bold, ambitious goal we set to continue to drive to get more people vaccinated across the country. The White House has from the start set goals that they could where they could under promise and over deliver. But in this case, the pace of vaccinations just really slowed down after that initial rush of people who were eager to get vaccinated. Dr. Anthony Fauci, who advises the White House said that when the goal was said it was seen as achievable, and ultimately it will be achieved just not by that deadline that the White House itself had said. But as White House officials events have emphasized, it was about more than just a number. It was about America being a place where people could return to normal and their pre pandemic lives and cases are down. Deaths are down. Baseball stadiums are full, You know, by the metric of life returning to normal America is largely there. So for some context, What are some of the reasons why they missed this 70% target? It's a demand issue. At this point. Vaccines are readily available everywhere, but many people are still choosing not to get vaccinated. Some people fear the vaccine more than they fear the virus, the administration says. This is Particularly a challenge among 18 to 26 year olds who just aren't as afraid of covid and are therefore less motivated to get the vaccine. CDC director Rachelle Wolinski says that vaccines are now available for everyone 12 in up, they have been proven to be wildly effective at preventing severe disease and death. Nearly every death due to cover 19 is particularly tragic because nearly every death, especially among adults, due to covid 19 is at this point entirely preventable. There's also a significant disparity among states in the Northeast. They have, you know, blown past the goal and in souther in several southern states and a couple of Western ones. Vexing rates are still quite low around 50% or less. What does it mean in the areas of country where there are these low vaccination rates? Well, it means that there are pockets of risk pockets where there could be virus surges, especially with this new Delta variant, which is rapidly taking hold. It's much more contagious and potentially more dangerous. But Dr Fauci says he doesn't think the U. S is going to get to a place like we were before where there were 1000 people a day dying, he says. We're unlikely to see another frightening peak like we did in January, but there could be locally significant outbreaks. That's NPR's White House correspondent. Tamara Keith. Thank you. You're welcome. The crackdown on opponents of Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega continues. Yesterday, a reporter was arrested and charged with aiding foreign intervention in the country. These are similar accusations that have led to the arrest of nearly 20 opposition figures, including former government officials and key business leaders. This crackdown, which began late last month, has virtually wiped out opposition to President Ortega, who is set to run for 1/4 consecutive term in November. New York Times reporter and a totally Corman EV was recently denied entry into Nicaragua to cover all of this. He covers Mexico and South America for the Times and joins us now from Mexico City. Welcome. Thank you for having me so I understand the airline actually canceled your ticket to Managua shortly before you were even boarding. What happened? Exactly. Nicaraguan afford just didn't approve. My entry into the country. I asked him if there was anything wrong, said No, it's and you can even blacklisted and you're also claimed. And did they tell you the grounds for quote unquote blacklisting you at that point I have tried contacting the um, vice president of the country and I only received a One sentence reply. Thank you for your interest. Well, it's not just you who's gotten targeted. Journalists in Nicaragua have also been targeted as well. Yesterday there was a raid on a prominent journalists home I understand and another journalist was arrested yesterday as well. Do you have a sense of How widespread this targeting of journalists is. This was always always quite a restrictive environment for journalists to operate, and and this leaders wave of repression, But you've seen this month. It's just went into the orbit drive. And why. Why is this way of happening now? In particular, what's behind it? It's very hard to speculate. There has been some Hopes that the government will use all the advantages it has as an incumbent to divide their positions and you know, to use advantage to basically when, when the election I saw one of your tweets earlier where you write Every day. Someone you spoke with is arrested. You start writing someone and realize they've just been charged. I mean, we're talking not just about journalists were talking about prominent opposition figures..

Ailsa Chang Tamara Keith Los Angeles Mexico City Jeff Science Jen Jen Psaki Washington Managua Anthony Fauci January Tara 18 yesterday 1000 people July 4th Audie Cornish 27 70% South America CDC
Biden to unveil ambitious $2 trillion infrastructure plan

Morning Edition

01:26 min | 1 year ago

Biden to unveil ambitious $2 trillion infrastructure plan

"Later today, President Biden will unveil his ambitious $2 trillion infrastructure plan. Make his pitch at a Pittsburgh facility where aspiring carpenters take on apprenticeships that often turn into union jobs. The plan is going to focus on physical infrastructure, bridges, roads, sewer systems and expanding broadband. Among other things, Biden characterizes it. As a jobs plan that he hopes will transform the economy. NPR White House correspondent Tamara Keith is here with some details. Hate him. Good morning. So what's in this plan? What do we know? They're calling it. The American jobs plan is you guys said about $2? Trillion, You know the transit bridges, roads broadband into rural areas. Also big spinning on the electric grid and sewer and water systems. You know, think about what happened in Texas earlier this year or what happened in Flint, Michigan, trying to avoid those types of things. Upgrading housing, schools, hospitals, Ah, lot of focus on union jobs and helping underserved communities, both rural and urban. You know, it's specifically talks about trying to entice manufacturers to areas affected by a loss of coal jobs on Del Ping address racial inequities by reconnecting neighborhoods that were cut off by previous highway building. This sweeping proposal is only part one, though next month Biden is set to propose investments in health care, child care and

President Biden Tamara Keith Biden Pittsburgh NPR White House Flint Del Ping Michigan Texas
Gun Control Legislation May Have to Wait

Morning Edition

01:29 min | 2 years ago

Gun Control Legislation May Have to Wait

"Biden's first official news conference, He made clear what his top priorities are the pandemic and infrastructure. And he said gun control legislation may have to wait despite Biden's outspoken history on the issue. NPR. White House correspondent Tamara Keith joins us now. Good morning, Tom. Good morning. What did the president say? And perhaps more significantly, What did he not say about gun control legislation yesterday? Yes. So this came about 45 minutes into the press conference when a reporter asked Biden about specific done related measures that he could pursue, So this was his chance to lay out what he wanted to do what he planned to do, but He didn't really do that. All the above. It's a matter of timing. He went on to say that sequencing is a key to a president's success. And he said his next major initiative is infrastructure, broadband roads, bridges. I imagine that caught some people off guard because it wasn't just a couple days ago he was talking about wanting to push new gun control measures. Yeah, I mean, I thought I had missed something in his remarks. It was such a contrast to what he had said just three days ago when he was delivering this passionate speech, saying Action on gun violence is needed now. Don't need to wait another minute. Alone an hour. To take common sense steps. Oh, save the lives in the future and the urge my colleagues in the House and Senate to act. We can't ban assault weapons and high capacity magazines in this country once again, But

Biden Tamara Keith NPR White House TOM Senate House
On International Women's Day, Biden Signs Gender Equity Measures

Here & Now

02:28 min | 2 years ago

On International Women's Day, Biden Signs Gender Equity Measures

"Is marking the occasion as only a president can with more executive orders. His signature will set up a new White House counsel on gender policy. And roll back a controversial Trump administration rule that protected students accused of sexual assault. We're joined now by NPR, White House correspondent Aisha Roscoe and I shall want we start with this order on sexual violence in schools when we need to know. This order basically directs the Department of Education to look at our into conduct a review of all of its policies and regulations to make sure that an educational environment is free from discrimination on the basis of sex and also free from discrimination in the form of sexual harassment, including sexual violence. On discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity. So basically, it's a review to make sure that all of his policies are aligned with this order. And as I understand it, it goes back to the former education secretary Betsy the boss. She and the Trump administration believed that people who were accused of sexual violence deserve more rights in an academic setting. And Democrats, of course, opposed that from the beginning. Does this order just revert the legal standard back to what it was during the Obama administration. So this executive order clearly seems aimed at undoing that policy from the Trump administration. But what it basically does is it directs Education Secretary McGill Cardona to suspend or revise any agency actions that are at odds with the new order from the White House. So it basically puts it in The education Secretaries court for him to look at the policies and to decide what to do. But it seems clearly aimed at eventually getting rid of that order from the Trump administration. Okay, more to come on that issue, I'm sure now another bite in order is establishing a White House Gender Policy Council. What will that do? Exactly? So this council will focus on ensuring equity for women and girls on diverticular Lee women and girls of color. This is a revamped version of former President Obama's White House counsel on women and girls. The name was changed to reflect that all genders can face discrimination, but it's basically a way of looking at equity when it comes to women. Well. President Biden, on

Trump Administration White House Aisha Roscoe Obama Administration NPR Mcgill Cardona Department Of Education Education Secretaries Court Betsy White House Gender Policy Coun President Obama President Biden
The Senate Considers Covid-19 Relief This Week

Up First

02:48 min | 2 years ago

The Senate Considers Covid-19 Relief This Week

"Senate considers covert relief this week. That's right accounts is the first big legislation of joe biden's presidency. It passed the house this weekend although with no republican support. We have no time to waste if we act now decisively quickly emboli we can finally get ahead of this virus. Democrats want it signed before the latest round unemployment benefits expires in two weeks so now moves to the senate under procedure that would allow it to pass their if necessary with zero republican votes but that procedure does not allow passage of the entire bill which is a higher minimum. Wage is out of it. Npr white house correspondent. Isha roscoe joins us this morning. Hey good morning good morning. What happened to the minimum wage increase. So the bill has been labeled as a budget bill And the reason why democrats went with that is so that they don't need sixty votes to get it passed And so they don't have to worry about a filibuster But the senate parliamentarian says. The minimum wage doesn't count as part of a budget bill. A biden did say. He was disappointed at the parliamentarians ruling. But the white house signalled that it didn't want to go against that ruling of vermont. Vermont senator bernie. Sanders had proposed imposing tax penalties on big companies. That don't raise their minimum wage but our colleague. Susan davis is reporting that senate democrats are abandoning that effort after facing some resistance a stripping out that fifteen dollars minimum wage may actually make the rescue package easier to pass. Given how slim the majority is because some more conservative. Democrats have voiced opposition to that level of hike in the minimum wage of course up progressive democrats have said that raising the minimum wage should be a top priority and that arcane senate rules should not stand in the way okay in any case they are going to stand in the way but the rest of the measure is there one point nine trillion dollars in aid to americans help with covert. How important is this to the president. It's totally an important. Be has really centered. His whole first one hundred days around it. The white house has been pushing hard to get something done What they're stressing that even though it doesn't have republican support in congress polling has found it to be very popular including among republicans. You know biden celebrated the house passage on sunday and urged the senate to act quickly saying if we act quickly and boldly we can finally get ahead of this virus. There is a deadline extended. Federal unemployment benefits expire mid march and senate democrats have pledged to get this done before that so they have two weeks

Senate Isha Roscoe White House Senator Bernie Joe Biden Biden Susan Davis Sanders Vermont Congress
House to vote on $1.9 trillion COVID relief bill this week

Morning Edition

03:29 min | 2 years ago

House to vote on $1.9 trillion COVID relief bill this week

"Trillion coronavirus Relief bill will go to a vote this week. Republicans in Congress say it is too much money. Here's Congressman James Comber from Kentucky. Congress already appropriated $150 billion in the cares act for state and local governments. And not all this money's been spent. So the Biden administration is looking outside of Washington, D. C to build their case. Here's NPR White House correspondent Tamara Keith. When Mesa Arizona Mayor John Giles looks out his window at City Hall, he can see the convention center. It's become a hub for those seeking help in the pandemic. And on alternating days it is people that are there too. Up there drunk and get £50 of food, putting their trump or its people. They're waiting in line to get the vaccine. So it's a pretty sobering view from the mayor's office. His city got $90 million in relief funds last spring spent it all and Giles says they easily could have filed receipts for double that. Sobering view from his office window explains why this Republican mayor is pushing hard for the $350 billion in funding for state and local governments in the bill. You know this is it's just too important to engage in silly partisan debates. Most cities and towns didn't get direct help, like Mesa did. They had to wait for it to trickle down through their states and counties. The deadline to spend it isn't until the end of this year, so some are trying to make it last as they manage strapped budgets. For months now, a bipartisan group of mayors has been pushing for more. In July. We called ourselves July or bust. That's Dayton, Ohio Mayor Nan Whaley, a Democrat. Her city's budget has been slammed by the pandemic so much so that she isn't sure they'll be able to train a new class of police officers or firefighters. This year. We're not like the federal government, we have to have a balanced budget. So if we don't get a federal money, no fire class Dayton is recruiting new firefighters and police officers but may not be able to bring them on board without more money. When it comes to the schools. It's a similar story. Congress has approved about $68 billion so far for K 12 schools. Well, not all of the funds have been spent. Education officials say the money is spoken for, and they need more. In Pennsylvania Palisades School District Superintendent Bridget O'Connell says they were able to reopen in the fall. And that meant hiring more teachers to reduce class sizes and to teach online So it is a staff intensive endeavor to educate kids during a pandemic Staff aren't paid up front, which is one reason why it may look like funds or unspent. And the bulk of the money Congress approved for schools last year is just now going out. Superintendent Sean Record from Pema, Arizona on Lee found out last week how much his district can expect to get. I have a list of all you know of things that we need in order to be able to You know, provide better social distancing more safety for teachers, more safety for students. They've been open nearly full time since the fall making do with the money. They have his message to critics who point to unspent funds and say schools don't need more. It isn't a light switch. The money doesn't get approved one day and spent the next And that's why President Biden and Democrats are pushing ahead with new funding and say they can't wait for Republicans in Congress to come around tomorrow. Keith NPR news

Congressman James Comber Biden Administration Tamara Keith Mayor John Giles Congress Mesa Mayor Nan Whaley Dayton NPR City Hall Arizona Kentucky White House Giles Pennsylvania Palisades School
Biden addresses the Munich Security Conference, Rescinds Trump's Sanctions on Iran

Up First

03:01 min | 2 years ago

Biden addresses the Munich Security Conference, Rescinds Trump's Sanctions on Iran

"The biden administration wants to talk to iranian leaders about rejoining the twenty fifteen nuclear agreement. Let's recall here. Donald trump withdrew the us from that deal and restored sanctions on iran. That put the us at odds with us. Allies who remain part of the agreement along with other world powers today in his first speech to world leaders. President biden lays out his plan. Npr white house correspondent gordonia as is following this story. Good morning frank. Oh good morning. Well what do we expect to hear. President biden say about iran. Well senior officials told us yesterday that the united states is ready to accept an invitation from the european union to hold talks with iran about its nuclear program. Of course obviously the former president donald trump had quit the deal that was aimed at curbing. Iran's nuclear program biden said during the campaign that he was ready to take steps to rejoin the international pack but his team has repeatedly said that iran. I needed come. Back into compliance officials said yesterday that biden will not get into specifics about timetables but added that. He's keen to hear what iran has to say. And it's still really unclear if the run would even accept such an offer. They had demanded that sanctions be lifted. I but regardless. This is a big step toward diplomacy with iran which we have not seen in four years. I'm struck by the language that the us is ready to accept an invitation from the european union and it makes me wonder does biden have to convince us allies that we are prepared to work with them again. We will work with them again. I mean short. Yes i mean. We expect that biden today is really going to dig into his. America is back message. A senior official told us last night that the speech would be a quote confident. Clarion call for european allies to work together on global challenges. He'll talk about working together on the pandemic as well as other issues like arms control cyber hacking and climate change and to prove that commitment he plans to announce a four billion dollar contribution to kovacs. That's the international fund to help get covert vaccines to the poorest countries. The president will be making this speech to the munich. Security conference virtually. He won't be there in person. Of course who is going to be speaking to today you know. He is a very familiar face at this conference which is kind of who's who of people involved in national security around the world the leaders of germany france and the united kingdom will also be there. But you know as we've noted. There's a lot of uncertainty about the united states commitment to trans atlantic affairs. Here's actually charles corruption. Who was a senior adviser in the obama administration talking about that. The biggest change is that by will be speaking to europeans after a period in which electorates on both sides of the atlantic have looked into the abyss. And what that means is that americans and europeans remain in shock about the growth of global populism which has raised questions about the stability of liberal democracies as we

Iran President Biden Biden Biden Administration Donald Trump United States European Union White House Frank Kovacs Munich Obama Administration Atlantic United Kingdom Germany France Charles
"npr white house" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:26 min | 2 years ago

"npr white house" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"You're listening to a live special coverage from NPR news of the impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump. I'm Susan Davis and I'm Scott time and we're listening. Torto were recounting the arguments we heard earlier today, and here is part of the message that was from Eric Swalwell. He's a Democrat from California, one of the nine impeachment managers throughout this presentation. We have been very careful to not share Where members of Congress were taken on the paths. They followed. Get out and off the floors. But that very issue was under discussion by the insurrectionists themselves. One example comes from an FBI affidavit. Which stated that a leader of a militia group known as the Oath Keepers received messages while he was at the Capitol. Leader was given directions to where representatives were thought to be sheltering and instructions to quote turn on gas. A message that the impeachment managers continue to drive home to these lawmakers is how their own lives were very much at threat that day. We're going to be joined now by another round table of our NPR colleague's legal legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg. Ron Elving, editor and correspondent and NPR White House correspondent. Tamara Keith. Nina, Let's start with you. You've been listening to these arguments all day. Very emotional arguments we've heard in the past hour, so your thoughts We'll have a few thoughts. One is that when you see all of this put together superimposed with the tweets in the set in the appropriate time line. You have a better idea of how long? How bloody long? This went on How many hours this pitched battle was going on and at the same time? What Then President Trump was tweeting in a times when The mob had already breached part of the capital. In addition to the fact we had some new information, so what we now know, according to the managers, Is that The First permit for this rally was on Lee for the rally where it took place. And that on Lee afterwards after White House officials intervened. Did they get a permit to go up to the capital to march to the capital? Given what transpired on that day that intervention turns out to be rather important, not to mention that The allegation at least, is that people at the White House were monitoring what was going on for weeks, even months before, but especially in the weeks leading up to this rally. So that It would be very hard to believe that anybody who was looking Did not see That there was trouble brewing, especially when novices if you went online and you looked you saw That this was a pretty dangerous Alchemy that was being made here. This is obviously not a criminal trial. We've said that repeatedly. The standards for impeachment are very different there. It's a political standard. But I wonder what you make of the case that the House impeachment managers have outlined which, in many ways you know, just relies on the public domain public things. The president has said things he's tweeted the video shot by the riders themselves. Well, as as you said, this is not a criminal trial. Even if Trump were convicted. There's no prison sentence here. The standard here is one of political accountability. And Have to say that I keep getting ass is by people who are not reporters and it strikes me. They say to me, how do you think the Senate would vote if it were a secret ballot? And in some ways, so I would defer to you. How do you think they'd vote? If this were a secret ballot? That's a great question. You know, I would think I would point to something like the secret ballot vote they had in the house over Liz Cheney, who's the top three Republican who was challenged for her leadership role because of her support for impeachment and vote in favor of it, and when it came to a secret ballot She over resoundingly won that the conference sided with her. Now I can't say exactly what a secret ballot be in the Senate. But it does. You know, there is a lot of indication that Senate Republicans and Republicans in the House have privately had much bigger issues and concerns with the behavior of the president than they were ever willing to acknowledge publicly during during the four years of the Trump administration. His tweets have been they've been in Supreme Court briefs We in the press. People who cover the capital are always running up to members of Congress and saying, Look what the president tweeted today. Do you associate yourself with that, and increasingly, senators would just walk and House members, which is walk past Reporters asking tweeting questions. But in the case of this Impeachment trial. Those tweets are being used to incredible effect when paired up with the timeline of what's going on leading up to this rally, and At the rally and after the rally Those tweets air pretty damning thing. Left her now to NPR. White House correspondent Tamara Keith Tam. Thanks so much for joining us. Mike Pence. His name was mentioned, Um more than I've heard Nathan Hale's on on the floor of Congress recently, and then he was acclaimed as a hero by by Democrats. Um, per certifying the vote for following through for not being intimidated. Um, does Does he provide a bridge? At this point? Can Republicans possibly change their votes, saying that now we understand How close it came to losing Mike Pence, and he's the one who Really stood the line and upholds our party They knew on the day they knew on January 6 that Pence was choosing loyalty to the Constitution over loyalty to President Trump, and that that was a Both very difficult choice but also one that Really? There was no choice. President Trump was asking vice President Pence to do something that he simply couldn't do to make it so the votes weren't counted and send it back to the states..

President Trump president NPR President Pence White House correspondent Congress Senate Lee White House Nina Totenberg Tamara Keith California Torto FBI Eric Swalwell Susan Davis Oath Keepers House
Immigration Under Biden Administration: Reversing Trump's Policies

Morning Edition

03:05 min | 2 years ago

Immigration Under Biden Administration: Reversing Trump's Policies

"Inskeep. Today, President Biden moves to reverse one of his predecessors. Signature acts, one that separated many Children from their parents. Donald Trump, you will remember ran on promises to build a giant border wall. He never finished, but he did impose a policy of deliberately separating parents and Children at the border. When that policy drew outrage. Officials blamed it on the Obama administration. But an investigation found, Trump's attorney general insisted on arresting migrants in a way that would separate families and didn't pay enough attention to the effects that had on Children. Now violence administration plans executive orders to change that and other policies. Which NPR White House correspondent Franco or Dhoni asses covering Franco. Good morning. Good morning, Steve. What's biting going to do differently? Well, One of the things that he's going to do is revoked Trump's actions that sought to justify this separation and the order will create this task force that will work across agencies and interest groups to help track down the missing parents of hundreds of Children. Task force will then work on the best way to reunite the kids with their parents. I guess we should mention some families were reunited. But in many other cases, federal authorities just kind of threw up their hands is gosh, we don't know how to do this or where these people are. Do they know what they're going to do now? Yeah, it's a challenging job because so many of the records aren't all there. And officials don't even know how many kids there are or who all their parents are. And there has been a lot of questions about whether the Biden administration will help bring the parents back to the United States, which the Trump administration would not do. A senior administration told me that reuniting in the United States was one of the options but that it will be a decision up to the task for us. What else is Biden announcing on immigration today? Well. One directive calls for a top to bottom review of Trump's changes to the legal immigration system, and that would include getting rid of Trump's public charge rule which prevented immigrants from getting permanent residents basically green cards if they were likely to require public benefits. And another takes a close look at border policies that includes ending requirements that migrants seeking asylum in the United States before STO wait in Mexico or another third country in Central America. That doesn't mean they can come back. The team needs to put together a new system to process asylum cases. But that's gonna take some time. So reversing Trump's executive actions is one thing. But Biden himself will face pressure from immigration advocates to do something about immigration reform, which he's already proposed to Congress. Is this going far enough for people? Yeah, There's gonna be a lot of pressure. I mean, you know, a lot of people are a lot of activists are concerned he won't fulfill his promises. And these activists frankly want Biden to do a lot more to counter all the things that Trump did to make life increasingly difficult for the 11 million undocumented people in the country. Obviously, there are a lot of pressing issues right now Cove it climate, racial equity, and these activists want to make sure immigration is not lost in the shuffle. But the Biden team says these executive actions or

Inskeep President Biden Obama Administration Donald Trump Franco Biden Administration Trump Administration Dhoni NPR Biden United States White House Steve Central America Mexico Congress
Trump officially leaves office

All Things Considered

02:28 min | 2 years ago

Trump officially leaves office

"And then Donald Trump took one last ride in Air Force one to Florida, where at noon he became former president Trump NPR. White House correspondent I You sure Roscoe's here now? Hey, Aisha. Hello. Walk us through what Trump is doing this week to get ready for this moment, his final moment in office. We didn't see how much we've talked for weeks now about how he didn't accept the fact that he lost the election to Joe Biden on today. He did not attend Inauguration day to be a part of a symbolic peaceful transfer of power on and obviously the transfer wasn't peaceful because of the insurrection by hundreds of his supporters two weeks ago at the Capitol. And the House impeached him, charging that he incited that insurrection. Trump did spend some of his final hours on pardons and commutations about 70 of each. He commuted the sentences of a bunch of people who had who had drug offenses, more normal people. Someone were serving life sentences, but he also pardoned his former aide, Steve Bannon. Rapper Little Wayne, and you know a raft of other people with political connections and his last 35 minutes before he landed in Florida. He did one last part and from the plane, and that was of the former husband of Fox News personality Judge Janine Pierre. Who is a very strong supporter of hiss. Ok, now he has spoken a couple of times We heard the end of his speech there from Andrews earlier and then he did that recorded video farewell address yesterday. What stood out to you? I You sure from what he had to say. He did finally start to acknowledge more that he was actually leaving that a new administration was coming in. He did go so far today is to wish them well to wish them success on to say that he did think that they be successful. But, you know, we have to point that out that he did this in the context of You know, not showing up for inauguration, and he also never said Joe Biden's name, which seems to be a sign of at least some disrespect. But he never mentioned Joe Biden's named publicly saying that he would be president. But we do know that he left a note for now. President Biden and President Biden said that it was very

Donald Trump Steve Bannon Little Wayne Joe Biden Aisha Roscoe Florida NPR Judge Janine Pierre Air Force White House Fox News House Andrews President Biden
Biden to focus on nation's "crises" during first 10 days in office

Here & Now

03:08 min | 2 years ago

Biden to focus on nation's "crises" during first 10 days in office

"And now President Trump is said to be preparing a slew of pardons in his last days in office. It's not clear if you'll pardon himself, which would mean he can't be investigated and prosecuted for any federal crimes. Much of Washington, D. C is unlocked down for Wednesday's inauguration of Joe Biden and Camel Harris. Joining us is NPR. White House correspondent Tamara Keith. I town high Voice hands so chilling Thousands of National Guard troops stationed around D C. Streets and bridges near the capital in the White House closed. Tell us more about the security concerns right now. Certainly an inauguration is always a high security event. This is only amplified by the fact that there was an insurrection two weeks ago, you know, two weeks to the day before Joe Biden will take the oath of office on that west front of the Capitol, The West Front was swarmed with a pro trump mob that ultimately took the capital. For for several hours and and a zoo say there there is concern that they aren't done. Well, President Trump won't be there for the swearing and remind us where he'll be he. He is getting an early start on his trip to Florida. What we know is that in the morning he will have a send off ceremony at joint base. Andrews, where where Air Force one is based, and It is not unheard of to have a send off of some kind. We don't know how big it will be or what it will include. On Of American tradition of honoring a a peaceful transfer of power. But this transfer of power hasn't been peaceful or particularly cooperative. Yeah, And what have we learned about what President elect Joe Biden will do On his first day as President Biden in terms of policy, he has plans to sign a bunch of executive orders. Ron claim his incoming chief of staff, laid out in a memo 10 days of executive actions aimed at in part, reversing Ah lot of what President Trump did through executive action. And also going further than that. He cites four key crises facing the Biden administration, the economic crisis, the covert 19 crisis, the climate crisis and a racial equity crisis, as he puts it. On the first day, Biden will rejoin the Paris climate agreement, he will ask the Department of Education to extend the paws on student loan repayments. He will also reverse what's known as the Muslim ban that President Trump signed early on in his presidency that caused so much chaos and was thrown out in court multiple times and had to be signed multiple times on. Bees also going to issue a challenge asking people to wear masks and also mandating them on federal property and

President Trump Camel Harris Tamara Keith Joe Biden NPR National Guard President Elect Joe Biden President Biden White House Washington Biden Administration Andrews Air Force Florida RON Biden Department Of Education Paris
"npr white house" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:51 min | 2 years ago

"npr white house" Discussed on KCRW

"Hateful and so hurtful. All right now, a lot of questions that we will be looking for answers, too. As we try. There will be investigating exactly what happened, Mr. Gaynor. Thank you for your time. Thank you. All right, that is Terry Gainer. He was chief of the Capitol Police from 2002 to 2006. He was Senate sergeant at arms from 2007 to 2014. And I wanted just inject a couple of new developments that we are learning just to keep everybody up to speed. We have learned that congressional leaders were evacuated to Fort McNair today. That as per our NPR's Carrie Johnson, who coverage justice for us She has got a law enforcement source who is familiar with situation. Fort McNair, of course, being the U. S. Army post south of the capital. It's home to the National Defense University, Other army agencies. One other note, the same source tells Carrie Johnson. It is not clear yet, who shot the victim at the capital. We have been reporting that there was one gunshot Victim. We don't know whether the shooter was one of the insurrectionists Attackers or a law enforcement officer. We're under We understand that lots more details will be coming on that also All right. We're going to turn now to wear President Trump has been throughout all of this. You know, hours after pro Trump extremists violently stormed the capital trying to force a reversal of the election results. President Trump Tweeted a one minute video where he told them to go home. But he also complained falsely that the election had been stolen from him. NPR's White House correspondent Tamara Keith has been following all of this. All day and joins us now. Hi, Tam. Hi. All right. So this was a day that Congress was supposed to just tally the electoral college vote and formalize Joe Biden's election as the new president of the United States and President Trump's loss in this last election. Let's just start from the beginning. President Trump earlier today held a rally near the White House. Tell us what did he tell his supporters? Can you just draw perhaps a direct line? If you can to what happened during his remarks and what happened at the Capitol later, I think you can safely draw that line. Trump spoke for more than an hour, spreading falsehoods and conspiracy theories about the election, demanding that his vice president throw out electors from some states. And telling his supporters that as soon as that rally was over, they should head to the capital. We're gonna walk down to the Capitol. And we're gonna cheer on Our brave senators and congressmen and women. And we're probably not gonna be cheering so much for some of them. Because you'll never take back our country with weakness. You have to show strength and you have to be strong. Not to be clear. President Trump didn't walk down to the Capitol, but his supporters did, breaking past barriers breaking windows storming into the building going into the Senate chamber and speaker Pelosi's office. This was not a peaceful protest. This was a violent insurrection. Vice president Pence who had just said of little bit before that, that he was bound by the Constitution that would not reverse the election results as president. Trump had wished he was evacuated early, and before long, all lawmakers were evacuated to safe locations, right Okay, So we said that President Trump did put out a short video. But that came hours after this chaos has already been unfolding all across the Capitol building and throughout parts of the city. How did President Trump react in the initial minutes of surrender violence? Yeah, yes. Oh, right around the time that the vice president was being evacuated President Trump tweeted That pence quote didn't have the courage to do what should have been done to protect our country and the Constitution so and we should know this is like the most direct confrontation between President Trump and Vice President Mike Pence for the last four years. Yeah, absolutely. Pence has been completely and totally loyal to trump. But in this moment, Pence chose loyalty to The constitution, and as a result, President Trump is unleashing his wrath on him. And at least initially, as this insurrection was happening, the president seemed preoccupied with that perceived betrayal by his vice president. So a bit after that initial tweet Trump tweeted again calling for peace, saying that Republicans are the party of law and Order. Pence issued a much stronger tweet, saying that the quote attack on our capital will not be tolerated and those involved will be prosecuted former aides to trump We're on Twitter, begging him to make a statement saying that he is The only person who could get those rioters toe listen, and President elect Joe Biden, who was supposed to speak about the economy. He ended up addressing the violence in in an address to the nation. Words of a president matter. No matter how good or bad that president is. At their best. Words of a president can inspire. At their worst. You can insight. At the end of his remarks, he called on Trump to step up, all right, and then President Trump did eventually say something. It was in a video released online and you know this has chosen means of communication. Twitter immediately flagged it, saying his message about the election was disputed. Could incite violence. Tell us exactly what did he say? This was a classic trump statement. He's not someone who has ever done or said what everyone tells him he needs to do. Um, and he has always had a very hard time criticizing people who support him. So in this video, he immediately started by falsely claiming the the election had been stolen and told supporters that he was upset about it, too, but that they should go home now. So go home. We love you. You're very special. You've seen what happens. You see the way others air treated that are So bad and so evil. I know how you feel. Go home and go home in peace. You are very special, but is not even close to a comment. Condemnation? Yes. So after that video came out his recently former communications director Elissa Farah tweeted. The election was not stolen. We lost But you know, this comes after two months of the president, insisting it was all rigged, and that he won in a landslide, and polls show that many of his supporters Believed him, and today was the result of that. It is NPR White House correspondent Tamara Keith Going over today's pretty remarkable Very, very disturbing events. Thank you so much..

President Trump president vice president Mike Pence Trump NPR Tamara Keith Capitol Police Joe Biden Terry Gainer Senate Twitter Fort McNair Carrie Johnson Mr. Gaynor National Defense University NPR White House U. S. Army
"npr white house" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:50 min | 2 years ago

"npr white house" Discussed on KCRW

"The false rumor that somehow the election was stolen. Look, I lost in 2012. I know what it's like to lose. And there were people that said there are irregularities. I have people today we say, Hey, you know what you really want. But I didn't. I lost fair and square. Romney said that with a president who is refusing to concede Congress going through these motions that they know will lead nowhere. But raising doubts about the legitimacy of the election. Along the way is quote. Dangerous for democracy here and abroad. NPR White House correspondent Tamara Keith, Thanks so much you're welcome. Within 20 million people have now been confirmed to be infected with the Corona virus in the United States. About 350,000 Americans have died of covert 19. Health officials have detected the new variant of the virus, first seen in the UK in California, Colorado and Florida because it is believed to be more contagious than previous versions. There are concerns This could mean even more infections across the country. NPR Global health correspondent Michael in Duke left joins us Now Thanks so much for being with us. Thank you. Scott. I understand this version of the virus has a set of mutations in its genes. Try and understand it. Where did those mutations come from? Yes. So this version has actually 17 mutations and mutations in viruses crop up all the time when the virus grows inside a person. Specifically when it reproduces and makes a bunch of copies of itself. I talked to Betty Steinberg. She's a virologist at the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research on Long Island. She says that to grow inside a person, the virus has to make copies of its genes. It's just like copying. Manuscript. Sometimes there's typos. The virus just makes random the stakes When it gets copied. In the vast majority of cases, these mistakes are harmless, or they even weaken the virus. But in rare instances, mutations can help the virus. They can give it this little boost or advantage over the other versions. So so what happened with this new variant? Have the mutations Can they tell so far given the virus? What amounts to an infectious advantage over the previous version? Yes. So scientists first detected this new variant like you said in the UK back in September. By December, it had become The dominant one in London, and it is responsible for the huge surge in cases there. Now, this variant has also spread to at least 32 other countries. And right now, here in the U. S. Scientists think it's still pretty uncommon, but they believe that could change pretty fast like in the next month or two. Because they estimate the variant is about 50% more transmissible than the previous ones. And how does that happen? Why would mutations make a virus more contagious? Yeah, so they're not quite sure yet, but they have some data that is pointing to two main hypotheses. Steven Goldstein studies virus evolution at the University of Utah. He says that there's some evidence that the new variant generates more virus particles inside a person's nose or respiratory track. Possibly a lot more when you expel virus When you talk or breathe. You're going to get more virus out than somebody who doesn't have this variant simply because you have more virus in you to begin with. The other hypothesis is that the new variant Binds to human cells more easily so people can get infected with lower doses of the virus. In this variant be stopped. Well, the good news here, Goldstein says, Is that all the measures that we've been doing so far to stop? The previous variants will stop this new one. It's not a new variant that can go through masks. Those things will work, but it requires a greater level of rigor in the adherence to those things, For example, right now, if say only 80% of people in a community are following these guidelines Then to stop this new variant. You would need something like 90 or 95% of people to follow the guidelines and all the scientists I've spoke to say the vaccine needs to roll out as quickly as possible. Because so far, scientists do believe that the vaccine will still be effective against this new version of the virus. MPR's global health correspondent Michael Ian, do, Cliff. Thanks so much for being with us. Thank you, Scott. A couple of years ago, the price of bread doubled in Sudan. This led to mass protests in the ouster of the longtime leader, Omar al Bashir. Sudan's now in the middle of a fragile transition. Is it navigates towards a civilian government of democratic elections and once again People are looking at the price of bread as NPR's ater Peralta reports. This'll neighborhood in her tomb was the epicenter of protests during the uprising in 2019 on a recent weekday. It's mostly quiet, but there are a couple dozen.

NPR Betty Steinberg Steven Goldstein Scott Sudan UK Michael Ian Omar al Bashir NPR Global health White House correspondent Tamara Keith United States London Feinstein Institute for Medica Congress Long Island Romney ater Peralta president California
Biden Names His Picks For Key Players On His Pandemic Advisory Team

All Things Considered

04:28 min | 2 years ago

Biden Names His Picks For Key Players On His Pandemic Advisory Team

"Joe Biden takes office next month, one of his first priorities will be responding to the pandemic, and today he named his picks for key players who will advise him on how to contain it and how to get people vaccinated. His picks include some very familiar faces and some new faces to joining us now from Wilmington, Delaware. To talk about all of this is NPR. White House correspondent Tamara Keith. Hey, Tam. Hey, Elsa. All right, so let's just start off with perhaps the most familiar face on this team, Dr Anthony Fauci. What, exactly Well, his will be one bite and becomes president. Dr. Fauci will continue to lead the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases where he's been involved in vaccine development. And he will also be an adviser to the president. The president elect now On covert 19. He said on CNN that he thought his role would be similar, though What he didn't say is that Biden is a lot more likely to listen to him on a regular basis than President Trump has been certainly of late. Fauci will bring continuity between the administration's and he knows all the new players, including Biden's pick for the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Rachelle Wolinsky, as well as his pick for surgeon general Vivek Murthy. Here's what he said on CNN today. I know both Rochelle Walensky and Vivek Murthy very well. I mean, I've been working with the back for years when he was the surgeon general during the Obama administration and Rochelle Wolinsky has been a colleague of mine. She's an infectious disease expert. From Harvard Medical School in Massachusetts General Hospital. Now the CDC director job doesn't require Senate confirmation, but surgeon General will and Murthy had a difficult time getting confirmed last time because of his work on gun safety issues, Right. Okay, there's another doctor on this list. Marcella newness, Smith. Of Yale School of Medicine. What is her role going to be? She's going to lead something that Biden is creating called the Cove it 19 Equity Task Force. As we all know. By now, the burden of covert 19 has been disproportionately felt by people of color, and Nunez Smith is the founding director. Of Yale's Equity Research and Innovation Center. She's been working on this issue extensively and building trust in communities that don't necessarily trust the medical community or vaccines. Let's Turn now to the pick for health and human services secretary. The person who will be getting that job is state Attorney general of California, Javi Airbus era. He's also former congressman. Why do you think the Sarah was selected for this particular job? You know, he's been actively involved in defending the Affordable Care act, leading a coalition of states fighting to save it all the way to the Supreme Court. He spoke about that effort last year on all things considered, Americans are fed up with uncertainty. When it comes to whether or not they can send their child to a doctor or the hospital. We deserve to have certainty. Health care is not some widget that you play with its life and death. But beyond that, while attorney general in California he went after a major hospital system in the state for anti competitive practices. He backed legislation aimed at preventing drug companies from keeping generic drugs off the market. And the thought is that he may be able to bring some of that experience and energy to bringing down health care costs. He would also be the first Latino to lead the department. He grew up in Sacramento with working class immigrant parents. He got into Stanford, according to his official bio after fishing and application out of the trash that his friend and thrown away his personal story is something that you can expect to see Biden and his team highlight, especially since Biden's been under pressure to make good on his promise to have a diverse cabinet, right. Lastly, there is a White House position. Jeff Science will be the coordinator of the pandemic response. He's also gonna be a counselor to the president. There has been some pushback right to this particular selection from progressives right? He was a top economic official in the Obama White House. He famously was brought in to help after that disastrous rollout of healthcare dot Gove and save the launch of the Affordable Care Act. There has been pushed back as you say, from progressives to his appointment. He comes from the business world since leaving government he's Leading investment firm, and he also served on the Facebook board of directors for a time. The reality, though, is that this doesn't require Senate confirmation. And even those who object to some of his connections concede he is good at managing systems and solving problems in a crisis that is NPR. White House correspondent Tamara Keith. Thank you, Tam. You're welcome, Elsa.

Vivek Murthy Biden Tamara Keith Dr Anthony Fauci Dr. Fauci President Trump Rachelle Wolinsky Rochelle Walensky Obama Administration Rochelle Wolinsky Centers For Disease Control An CNN Equity Task Force Nunez Smith Equity Research And Innovation National Institute Of Allergy Joe Biden Fauci White House Elsa
Trump Takes Questions From Reporters For 1st Time Since Election Day

All Things Considered

00:19 sec | 2 years ago

Trump Takes Questions From Reporters For 1st Time Since Election Day

"Today for the first time since he lost the presidential election to Joe Biden. Some spoke to troops around the world, one of his Thanksgiving traditions, and then he held forth, making it clear he is still not prepared to concede even as more states certify the results for Biden and Trump's court challenges keep getting thrown out. Joining us now is NPR. White House correspondent

Joe Biden Biden Donald Trump NPR White House
Trump returns to Oval Office, says it's a "blessing from God" that he got COVID-19

All Things Considered

03:21 min | 2 years ago

Trump returns to Oval Office, says it's a "blessing from God" that he got COVID-19

"President. Trump has been back at the White House for a couple days now, after being hospitalized for the Corona virus, And today he released a new video aimed at showing everyone he is doing. Okay. I think this was a blessing from God that I caught it. This was a blessing in disguise. Of course, His doctors have said that he is not out of the woods yet, and they are monitoring his condition. Very closely Here to talk about the latest are NPR. White House correspondent Tamara Keith and science correspondent Richard Harris hated both of you. Hello. They also a OK Tam. Let's start with you tell us a little more about this video. So it came after Trump spent 48 hours out of public view. Once he returned to the White House. This was recorded in the Rose Garden. He emphasized that it was outside of the Oval Office and in terms of spreading it to someone else outdoors would be a safer place to film it, certainly for the staff. The message was essentially, I'm back. I feel great. He recorded it a few hours before it hit Twitter on DH just in time for the evening news. Fox News aired the whole message and White House chief of staff Marks met Mark Meadows, who was also on Fox emphasized that the president was hard at work. And I understand that President Trump talked a lot about therapeutic drugs in this video. Richard. What did you make of what he said about those drugs? Right? Well, the president's video is clearly a rush job. He talked about an experimental drug he called Regeneron. But you know, that's actually the name of the company that makes the product. Trump said he got it in the hospital, but his doctor earlier had said that he got the infusion on Friday before he went to the hospital. The president has decided without evidence that it made a big difference for him, even though he received other medications. Here's just a little bit of the video. It really did a fantastic job. I want to get for you what I got. And I'm going to make it free. You're not gonna pay for it, huh? Okay, So what exactly are these drugs like? How do they work? Well, these are antibodies that are designed to block the virus. There monoclonal antibodies they're called. It's a very promising idea. Kind of like a shortcut to temporary immunity. At least that's the concept. But the data aren't yet strong enough to get full FDA approval and indecision, too. Regeneron. Eli Lilly has a couple of products in the works, and they see most promising. For people who are just getting sick. It's not a miracle drug, but it seemed to keep people out of the hospital. Eli Lilly applied for Emergency Youth Oscar with authorization today for one of those two products that it has in the works, but FDA approval process takes time. The lowly executives were not expecting a snap decision, as the president suggested was coming in is right and we also just heard the president say he's gonna make these drugs free. I mean, what are the chances of that? Will regular Americans be able to get them? Well, that's a good question. Presumably, the federal government will subsidize this there. They've already subsidized Regeneron project to the tune of like half a billion dollars. Lily is doing it on its own dime, but but they also expect that the government will subsidize it, Lily, by the way, his eyes expecting to produce a million doses of this first product by the end of the year, so so there could be at least reasonable supply. Although it would have to stretch globally, so right, Yes. So that's sort of the butt. But, yeah, it seems as though if it could get emergency youth authorization, it could be available and potentially if the government feels like it at little or

President Trump White House Regeneron White House Correspondent Eli Lilly FDA Federal Government Richard Harris NPR Twitter Fox News Oscar Tamara Keith Lily Rose Garden President. Oval Office Chief Of Staff FOX
Trump mounts bizarre and misleading White House return despite warnings

Morning Edition

03:53 min | 2 years ago

Trump mounts bizarre and misleading White House return despite warnings

"Hopkins University shows more than 210,000 people have died from the Corona virus in the United States alone, but one very high profile patient has returned home from the hospital. The infected president of the United States, wrote a helicopter from the hospital back to the White House. He stood on the balcony, took off his mask and turn toward nearby AIDS. To help him make a video. I learned so much about Corona virus. And one thing that's for certain. Don't let it dominate you. Don't be afraid of it. You're gonna be it. It is not clear if the president has beaten the illness. He is back in a building where many people work and others have tested positive. In a moment. We question in I C u Dr who watched that spectacle from Texas We begin with NPR. White House correspondent Franco Ordonez. Franco. Good morning. Good morning, Steve. What did this staged event show about the president's approach to the pandemic. Yeah, It was a really dramatic moment. He you know, it was like he knew this was going to be something that was captured by cameras could be part of history. You know how they set up the flags in front of the White House how he pulled off his mask and stood there to salute Marine one. And even how he turned to walk into the White House has cameras clicked away, not wearing his mask. By the way it was, it was really a dramatic made for TV moment did all of the showmanship actually illustrate the president's strategy against the pandemic? You know it does. I mean it's it's It's less about masks and distancing than than having a positive attitude. You know, he he told Americans in that video that they should get out there and not be afraid of the Corona virus. We have the best medical equipment. We have the best medicines all developed recently. But it was a message that you noted that left out the 210,000 people who have died from the virus and the more than seven million people who have contracting the virus, and, you know, but but it does fit with that overall strategy to focus on beating this and reopening the country and not on the people who have gotten sicker have died. Well, let's focus on the people have gotten sick or who've died and focus on the public health aspect of this is opposed to the attitude side of it. Has the public health strategy changed it all? Yeah. You know those daily Corona virus briefings with Dr Bergs and Dr Fauci. Those ended a long time ago. And there really hasn't been much change recently. Except now, Trump Khun claim this firsthand experience. The strategy really appears to be doubling down on getting therapeutics and vaccines and portraying things as getting better that the that the best is just around the corner. You know, he's really trying to make this case for reelection and and this is on an issue where Americans judge him very harshly, So the goal for him is to convince people otherwise. We saw that last night. And I expect we'll hear a lot more about that in the weeks going forward. I guess it's possible that the president could even resume a public schedule but hasn't his doctor said it's going to be at least a week before we know if the president is better? Yeah, I mean, it's it's very interesting because President Trump even suggested that he may be immune. And it's kind of startling, considering he's on ly a few days into his treatment. He's taking very strong medications. And a big question remains about the White House and President Trump. There's a lot of questions that they are not answering about the timeline details about his health, and frankly, this imagery that they put out last night doesn't even reflect the reality surrounding him at the White House. His press secretary, is just the latest in a growing number of his inner circle to test positive. You know all that kind of interferes with this kind of heroic message. Franco. Thanks for your insights Always appreciated. Thank you. That's NPR. White House correspondent Franco ordering us Now. How does all

President Trump White House Franco Ordonez White House Correspondent United States Dr Fauci Hopkins University NPR Texas Dr Bergs Steve Press Secretary
Trump says "don't be afraid of COVID" as U.S. death toll tops 210,000

Morning Edition

06:21 min | 2 years ago

Trump says "don't be afraid of COVID" as U.S. death toll tops 210,000

"A tally kept by Johns Hopkins University shows more than 210,000 people have died from the Corona virus in the United States alone. But one very high profile patient has returned home from the hospital. The infected president of the United States wrote a helicopter from the hospital back to the White House. He stood on the balcony, took off his mask and turn toward nearby AIDS. To help him make a video. I learned so much about Corona virus. And one thing that's for certain. Don't let it dominate you. Don't be afraid of it. You got to be it. It is not clear if the president has beaten the illness. He is back in the building where many people work and others have tested positive. In a moment. We question in I C u Dr who watched that spectacle from Texas We begin with NPR. White House correspondent Franco Ordonez. Franco. Good morning. Good morning, Steve. What did this staged event show about the president's approach to the pandemic? Yeah, it was a really dramatic moment. He you know, it was like he knew this was going to be something that was captured by cameras could A part of history. You know how they set up the flags in front of the White House, how he pulled off his mask and stood there to salute Marine one, and even how he turned to walk into the White House has cameras clicked away, not wearing his mask, by the way. It was. It was really a dramatic made for TV moment did all of the showmanship actually illustrate the president's strategy against the pandemic? You know it does. I mean it's it's It's less about masks and distancing than than having a positive attitude. You know, he he told Americans in that video that they should get out there and not be afraid of the Corona virus. We have the best medical equipment. We have the best medicines all developed recently. But it was a message that you noted that left out the 210,000 people who have died from the virus and the more than seven million people who have contracting the virus, and, you know, but but it does fit with that overall strategy to focus on beating this and reopening the country and not on the people who have gotten sicker have died. Well, let's focus on the people who've gotten sick or who've died and focus on the public health aspect of this is opposed to the attitude side of it. Has the public health strategy changed it all? Yeah, You know those daily Corona virus briefings with Dr Burke's and Dr Fauci Those ended a long time ago. And there really hasn't been much change recently. Except now, Trump Khun Claim this firsthand experience. The strategy really appears to be doubling down on getting therapeutics and vaccines and portraying things as getting better that the that the best is just around the corner. You know, he's really trying to make this case for re election. And on and this is on an issue where Americans judge him very harshly. So the the goal for him is to convince people otherwise. We saw that last night and I expect we'll hear a lot more about that in the weeks going forward. I guess it's possible that the president could even resume a public schedule but hasn't his doctor said it's going to be at least a week before we know if the president is better? Yeah, I mean, it's it's very interesting because President Trump even suggested that he may be immune, and it's kind of startling, considering he's on Ly a few days into his treatment. He's taking very strong medications. And a big question remains about the White House and President Trump They. There's a lot of questions that they are not answering about the timeline details about his health, and frankly, this imagery that they put out last night doesn't even reflect the reality surrounding him at the White House. His press secretary, is just the latest in a growing number of his inner circle to test positive. You know all that kind of interferes with this kind of heroic message. Franco. Thanks for your insights Always appreciated. Thank you. That's NPR. White House correspondent Franco ordering us Now. How does all this look if you're a doctor treating Corona virus patients? Dr. Jameel Madi is the chief of critical care medicine at Valley Baptist Medical Center in Harlingen, Texas. In July. He came on this program and described the virus hitting his community like a quote tsunami. Now he's back. Doctor. Doctor, Monty. Good morning. Good morning. Thank you for having me When you hear the president say to people Don't be afraid of it. Don't be afraid of the corona virus. Don't let it dominate your life. What do you think? Well, the Corona bar is still around it still with us, it might not be as fears. In terms ofthe surge as it wass for from a few months ago, But we still are having cases in the hospitals. We are imagine much but better place right now than we were a few months ago. Are we still getting cases were still are getting infected people on people being admitted to the hospital. The virus is still here on DH. It's not going away on Daz long as we don't have the exact Republics for it, including the vaccines. We need to continue to be vigilant about, you know, doing the right things, including social distancing and and washing and And face masks. Well, don't be afraid. Sounds like a positive message. You wouldn't want anybody to be afraid. But should we actually be afraid still of the virus or at least respect it. We definitely need to respected. We definitely need to be cautious. I would probably understand where the president's coming from in terms ofthe, you know, portraying an image off resilience and strength. After he himself has gone through this eye. I would also understand, you know, at the same time that although you want to talk about being strong and moving forward, and we all have to, we cannot keep on, you know. Being locked up in our houses and shut down and I understand that fully but at the same time, we also have to sympathize with the tragedies that have occurred in the palace, including the deaths. Off over 200,000 people and the people that have been impacted by that. Remember that, for every person that has succumbed to the disease, there might be another 50 or 100. People who know that person who have been traumatized, have been affected by the disease. So we're talking about millions of people have been affected in one way or the other from this disease.

President Trump White House Franco Ordonez White House Correspondent Texas Johns Hopkins University United States NPR Steve Dr Burke Harlingen Press Secretary Dr. Jameel Madi Monty LY Dr Fauci
US president has mild Coronavirus symptoms

Morning Edition

04:47 min | 2 years ago

US president has mild Coronavirus symptoms

"Has repeatedly tried to convince Americans that the worst of the pandemic is behind us. The president himself and the first lady have now tested positive for the Corona virus. They're staying at the White House with an election on Ly a month away to talk about how this all unfolded overnight and where we stand at this point. We have NPR White House correspondent Tamara Keith with a site. Um, Good morning. I guess the first question how the president first lady doing Do we know the White House position? Put out a memo saying they are both well at this time, and that he and others on the medical team will maintain a vigilant watch, he added. Quote. Rest, rest assured, I expect the president to continue carrying out his duties without disruption. And that is important because that means vice president Pence doesn't have to step in at this point. A spokesman tells us that both the vice president and second lady Karen Pence were tested this morning and were negative. As for the president and the first lady, they are staying at home at the White House, and an official tells me that the president was in good spirits and that the doctor is optimistic. Corona virus. So is an unpredictable disease. For some people, it can be terrible and deadly. For others. There are no symptoms at all. And we have no way of knowing how it will affect the first lady or president Trump. But at 74 years old, he is in a high risk group and certainly not out of the woods. I mean, as we've seen, people can develop symptoms, you know, days after getting a positive test, so we'll have to be watching. Of course, do it. You have any idea what happened here? I mean, how how the president First lady might have been exposed to a virus. We don't know the chain there. But we did learn last night that a close aide to the President hope Hicks had tested positive. She has been traveling with the president a lot, including flying with him on Air Force one to his campaign rally in Minnesota on Wednesday at around 9 30. Last night, Trump called into Sean Hannity show on Fox News and said that he had been tested and was awaiting results. Then About 1 A.m. president Trump tweeted that he and the first lady had gotten those results and that they both tested positive. A White House official tells me that they're working to figure out how to keep conducting the business of the presidency, with the president having to stay at home. And the person said that the president is going to want to be engaged. He told me quote. He's not one to sit still, that is something we know. I mean, he has not been sitting. Still, he has been out on the campaign trail very active and as many people have noted at rallies So many of them outdoors airplane hangars, But you know a lot of people without mass. It's going to lead a lot of people to wonder. Was he taking enough precautions? Was the White House doing enough to prevent this? President? Trump has been taking risks every single day. People who are in his close proximity do get tested regularly. He is tested regularly. But the White House leaned heavily on those tests and arguably let their guard down. Trump has been holding as you say these big rallies a couple of them indoors. Just yesterday, he held a fundraiser at his Bedminster Golf Club in New Jersey. And you know Trump and those around him don't regularly wear masks in public or in private at the White House or on Air Force One and it Tuesday night's debate. President Trump even mocked his opponent, Joe Biden, for his frequent mask wearing one needed. I wear mess, OK, let me ask. I don't have. I don't wear mess like him. Every time you see him, he's got a mess. He could be speaking. 200 ft away from him. He shows up with the biggest mask I've ever seen, and we have now heard from Joe Biden. He sent a tweet, saying that he and his wife, Jill, are praying for the health and safety of the president and his family and hoping for a swift recovery. We don't know. Yet if Biden's campaign will be changing anything as a result of this, it's just stunning to think about this moment. We have a presidential election four weeks away. We're still in the middle of a pandemic and now the president of the United States in the midst of running for re election. Has tested positive for a very dangerous virus. I mean, what does this totally changed The entire last phases campaign? Yes, absolutely. President. Trump has staked his reelection on the idea that the worst of the pandemic is behind us. For months, He has created a bubble around himself where there was this image that cove. It wasn't a concern that everything was back to normal. The chairs were close together. There were no masks. But this development completely undermines that. I mean, the president of the United States has the virus. This is going to bring the danger home to people and underscores That anyone can get it even if you're the leader of the free world. All right. NPR White House correspondent Tamara Keith, We're going to keep following this story, obviously very closely as the hours and days. Go on. Thank you. So much for sharing reporting town.

President Trump White House Vice President Npr White House Joe Biden Tamara Keith White House Correspondent United States Karen Pence Official LY NPR Fox News Minnesota Bedminster Golf Club Air Force Sean Hannity
What to expect from the first Biden-Trump debate

Morning Edition

03:48 min | 2 years ago

What to expect from the first Biden-Trump debate

"Between President Trump and his Democratic challenger, former vice president Joe Biden. Yesterday. We look back at how Biden has approached his many debates over the years. And today we examine Donald Trump's particular style on the debate stage. NPR White House correspondent Tamara Keith reports. When it comes to President Trump's preparation for debating Joe Biden. The message being telegraphed is that he isn't trying too hard. Here's Trump campaign spokesman Hogan Gidley on Fox News. I'm not going to get into the specifics of how this president prepares for these debates. But he's pressure tested every single day by the American people when they ask questions about the mainstream media. So press briefings are debate Prep, Trump's campaign manager told reporters trumps best preparation is really just being president. That was Trump's argument when he dialed into Fox and friends. How are you preparing for this debate? By working very hard. You know what? By working very hard, not own debates. But on running the country with Trump. It's hard to tell whether this is an effort to lower expectations or whether he really isn't doing anything special to prepare for the debates in 2016 Trump prepared, But his most memorable moments came in this seemingly unwra first interruptions from everything I see has no respect. For this person? Well, that's because he'd rather have a puppet as president and opens today, and it's pretty clear it's pretty clear that year, Trump had a few themes. Hillary Clinton's emails, immigration, trade and the economy. He came back to them on repeat, no matter the questions. He had scrappy comebacks and a total disregard for debate rules or being presidential. Which gave him a certain freedom. It's just awfully good that someone with the temperament of Donald Trump is not in charge of the law in our country because you'd be in jail. Secretary Clinton Thistle makes President Trump Hard to debate says Sleep Rinus who stood in for Trump during Hillary Clinton's debate preparation sessions four years ago. It's like trying to perform a piano. Solo. When the other guys got a grog grog ER is a Yiddish term for a noisemaker and just spinning it the whole time, Rinus says. It's not that Trump was a great debater in any traditional sense, but he was fun to watch and really hard to pin down. Now, though, Trump is president. There's a pandemic and a recession, Rinus says. Watching Trump respond to questions about Cove it you can see he's not the same guy he was four years ago, Donald Trump is facing a different circumstance. He's facing different consequences than he ever has in this life. And if sparring with the media really is Trump's debate Prep, then his July interview with tonight's debate, moderator Chris Wallace might offer a hint and where Trump could trip up. When you talk about mortality rate, I think it's the opposite. I think we have one of the lowest mortality rate way had 900. Deaths in a single day. We will take this week ready. You get me the mortality rate. Trump also faces a different opponent than he did in 2016. For months. Trump has been portraying Biden is not having all his faculties. But now Trump and his aides are suddenly talking up Biden's debate skills. We have a debate coming up, and who knows, you know he's been doing You know what he's been doing it for 47 years. I've been doing it for 3.5 years so he should be able to beat me. I would like as you can hear. Trump loves a crowd, But tonight the hall will be largely empty due to Cove it another new factor. Trump will have to deal with Tamara Keith NPR news. news.

President Trump Joe Biden Vice President Sleep Rinus Hillary Clinton Hogan Gidley Tamara Keith NPR Tamara Keith Npr Fox News White House Correspondent Clinton Thistle Chris Wallace Secretary FOX