23 Burst results for "Novick"

"novick" Discussed on Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

03:28 min | 8 months ago

"novick" Discussed on Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

"That ladies francis hogan yeah and that came out and what she was saying and how they manipulate their product to impact people and they were well aware of the very negative impacts particularly on young girls. that This entire deal is having. They were totally aware of it once again as she said. I think the sums it up and quite well that facebook prioritized prophets over public. Good facebook was being used for a sex trafficking and exploitation and they just turned a blind eye to all of it. Hate speech proliferating. Yeah well we're going to hear more about it but long run. I think facebook's going anywhere. No i seriously seriously doubt it. Yeah but i had laughed. Because i actually posted that question. Do you think that outage was a diversion. I actually posted that question on. Yes my facebook page. So i'm going to check in and see if i've been canceled. Asked him the question. There you go. You're talking about your facebook with all of this and i have to say. Facebook is of the thirty five stocks that i'm recommending for long term investors instill. Yeah yeah long term. Is there yesterday j. P. morgan's chief. Global strategist i. Follow these guys that worked for the giants you know. Mark novick is his name he said and this is a quote he said. We don't believe the recent bout in the markets will lead to a sustained fall and we will keep buying into any weakness and there was ample weakness to buy into yesterday. The dow dropped one percent but the the big weakness was in the nasdaq. Were with the big tech stocks. It was down two point. One percent to a mark that was seven and a half percent below. Its record high. The snp dropped one point three percent to five and a half percent below. Its record high now. Just something for you to remember. History defines a correction in an upward moving market beginning at ten percent below the most recent record high and a reversal or a bear market beginning at twenty percents below the most recent record high and that mark for the nasdaq yesterday again. was seven was seven percent and the snp was five and a half percent below the record high so they're not even at correction level yet and i say yet. I'm not saying that going there. But i don't know they might and keep in mind. A correction is is healthy. So what's going on this morning. The investors are beginning to cautiously by the weakness down. Industrial average is up ninety points. One quarter of a percentage point at thirty four thousand ninety. Two s&p five hundred is up twelve points. That's again a little bit over a quarter of a percent to four thousand three hundred twelve. The nasdaq at fourteen three. Oh eight is up fifty four..

facebook francis hogan P. morgan Mark novick giants
"novick" Discussed on Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

03:46 min | 1 year ago

"novick" Discussed on Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

"Already so big. It seems ridiculous to add some other layer of mythology to it. Like the whole thing seemed absurd. The government favors that allow him to just. You guys are dropping as an aside. I think that he was. I don't even understand that. He was dealing with. Russia is getting all sorts of government access to things just because he was the famous hemingway. And and you haven't one point just in a war voluntarily sort of running and screaming across some sort of jungle landscape. What was that. He's living plane. Crashes on the surviving. Two plane crashes on one african trip. His life was plenty interesting and big without the mythology. Ising it. yeah well. He outed himself and a lot of his public life and he put himself into situations. I think he had these. Just you know what we now call grandiosity. So he knew he was important. He thought he belonged to these certain places. He had a lot to say people should listen to him. And so he put himself into all kinds of situations running with the bulls in pamplona which has become such an iconic thing in world war two. He was a correspondent but he so dedicated to the cause and he was so excited to be there ultimately. Even though we didn't want to go in the first place that he ended up actually becoming a combatant and shooting guns and trying to kill people. Germans the enemy obviously but and thinking that was okay really wasn't and he got away with it which she didn't love things of his life. You can't make this stuff up. You can't anything that you regard that you would put number one on sort of most shocking like in terms of revelations because it it was replete with them every. It seemed like there was a whole lot of. You've gotta be shitting me. How many times is this dude gonna get hit in the head. Like what like are you kidding me that he's going to continue to have that the the greatest american writer of our time..

world war two one point first place Two plane crashes Russia one african trip number one pamplona american Germans
"novick" Discussed on Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

05:49 min | 1 year ago

"novick" Discussed on Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

"Fall where they may not going to tell you what to say. When i'm sure there'd be parts of this movement like and i'm sure there are so we had to kind of carry. That did you talk to him afterward. Do you know how he felt about the phone. Yes they love the film and they've gotten a ton of great responses from friends and people they know and don't know so the family as far as we know very happy with the film which i think says a lot about them because as you said. It's tough on hemingway. Well you are so exhaustive though and you're trying to be fair and the detail you're clearly you're bending over backwards trying to just tell the story and not be judgmental about it. Has there been a criticism that you have seen. That has been fair. I haven't seen much criticism because you guys you guys. I don't know. I don't wanna say that you're immune to criticism but you tackled subject matter so thoroughly that it is hard to criticize. We'll we welcome criticism. Frankly i always appreciate really thoughtful critiques of our work. Because i learned something and often a writer or critic is looking at something from a different perspective than the way we chose to look at it. I haven't seen too much criticism of hemingway and frankly i expected that there would be more because of his very nature of who he is. He's a white man of privilege who occupies or had occupied a very high position in the fall of literature. And we're in a moment where were questioning and challenging that privilege and that right to be considered a great writer given who was and given his misogyny given the racism of his work and anti semitism. I think i'm not surprised. But i'm i'm glad that we were able to present a portrait of him as nuanced and complicated and doesn't shy away from holding him accountable for these things so that criticism out there but hasn't been as much as i thought it might be. I don't know how long you have to work on something like this year's seems obvious. So how much did the story change with. Just the way. America changed over the last thirty six months. Yeah that's a really hard question because we did start working on this film six years ago and we were well into editing. You're almost done with the film last summer but the questions of me too and systemic racism and reckoning with our history have been around for a while so an hemingway. Scholarship has certainly been engaging these questions for the last generation. So it's impossible to really answer that i'm sure that the moment were and or have been in the last five years effects who interviewed what we asked them what we put him the film what questions we want to know about hemingway why he matters today or does it. We see the world as we are now through the lens of the world. We live in a possible not to. And how do you imagine for the people who have not seen the film and are just listening this with a curiosity. What will you say to them. They will probably find most problematic. Because there's a lot of ground you're covering here object matter it's all very nuance but to the people on have a familiarity with the subject matter would say they're gonna find what to be the most egregious stuff here to say. I have people watching up their own mind. I you know. He's a human being struggling to make sense of the world and he sees a lot of aspects of life. That aren't pretty as he wants to. Put it in the big and the bad and the ugly as well as what is beautiful and otherwise his work must be true. So i think the most one of the most fascinating is this whole question of nasty levy and how it became kind of a straightjacket for him We haven't talked about this. But you know as scholars have known this for a while..

six years ago last summer today last five years year last thirty six months one America ton of
"novick" Discussed on Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

03:51 min | 1 year ago

"novick" Discussed on Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

"Vietnam war is that the most fulfilling project that you have done because of the terror- and because of that or would you regard something else as the most fulfilling just something that when you're done with it you were like man that was just really rewarding work and i'm a little extra proud of it for whatever your reasons. Yeah the vietnam. War was a profound experience and i think getting to know so many vietnamese people who lived through an american veterans and keep who protested the war in knowing that it was such a traumatic experience for so many people in so many different ways figure out ways for them to share that story with us and to kind of absorb it was often very painful and completely devastating but also it felt like this really matters. People need to hear this story and people are going to be grateful for the way we've told hopefully and we were grateful to be present when the people that we got to talk to. You told us their stories. And i liked to hope that it helped them to so i interviewed a woman jeanmarie crocker. Who's a gold star. Mother of the vietnam war her son moby had died in the mid sixties when the war was still kind of the beginning of the big escalations. And you know forty years later. She was still remembering the day. She got the news that he died like it was yesterday and asked her to tell. That story was well just hard. And i worried afterwards that you know. Maybe that wasn't the right thing to do to ask someone to relive a trauma like that up but after the film came out and speaking with her. She said it really helped her. Just tell the story and she found that help other people who'd been through that and she heard from people who also had lost children in vietnam and other wars and that somehow her generosity of going through that pain again. It helped her to heal. So that's not always true. And i don't wanna be overly simplistic about it. But i hope that sometimes you though we're asking people to share extremely painful experiences. It is for the greater good. Was there anything in. Hemingway not hard like that but that was a moral challenge or something. Yeah should we be doing this. Is this the right thing. Like how many of those crossroads when you're when you're exposing so much of a man's life and this is a public man but and he's gone and and you're you're trying to be fair at every turn but did you find yourself in any moral crossroads there not to the same degree i would say because hemingway's gone like you said. And he made his own bed so to speak. I was very acutely aware. And i know cannon seren jeff were shoe of just how the film land for. Let's say his family. I mean he's a real person. His son patrick is still alive. I interviewed him. I know him pretty well..

patrick cannon seren jeff forty years later Hemingway yesterday vietnam war Vietnam war jeanmarie crocker vietnamese hemingway vietnam american mid sixties so many people
"novick" Discussed on Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

04:29 min | 1 year ago

"novick" Discussed on Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

"These are great short stories. The people who he sort of represents could not have thought anything about her. I would imagine you feel any loss of respect in going through everything in his life for the work or are you able to. You know separate yourself. Be non judgmental as a documentarian and the work is the work and it stands alone so great question. I don't know that i can really fully answer it. I don't think there's an easy answer for that one. you know. We were interested in his life and who he was and how his life affected his work and vice versa. So it's hard to separate. I'm not of the school of thought that just leaves art and isolation than the person doesn't matter and i don't think there's a way to reconcile it so i guess i hope we can kind of hold in our heads our hearts this is a complicated problematic person and he heard a lot of people and he took what he wanted and he ended his life tragically and he also left us with some timeless works of art. That are worth reading. Can you explain to me your process with ken on what you choose as subject matter because it seems like you guys are going to degree of difficulty dry places told over longtime that requires the viewer to be discerning and committed to. This is gonna be something that is slow and heavy. but you're going to immerse yourself in it. I'm just curious about your process because you guys choose things that are so ohlinger impossible. They must be making difficult choices on purpose. Every topic every subject where every film we've made has its own particular reason why we chose it and not for the degree of difficulty but i guess news for myself feeling the more you do this and the more you feel you understand how to make these kind of stories come alive onstream the more you might aspire to something that's going to be hard so for me. The hardest thing wasn't hemingway but was the vietnam war. That was an unbelievably difficult project. Because of how unsettled the history was and how divisive it isn't how people don't agree on what happened. Let alone why or whose fault it was or anything and then on top of that kind of grasping really trying to understand the vietnamese perspectives on the war and what their experiences were and how. We didn't know that as americans trying to pull all that together was enormously hard. And i think for myself i'll say was excited. Provoking doesn't begin to cover it. Just you know. Terrifying is actually what the word i would say. It's terrifying at the beginning. But having some degree of confidence in the process we go through. The collaboration with jeff ward writer sarah thoughts on our producer or vietnamese producer. Jianghua and just feeling like we're going to figure it out as we go along we will keep our minds out ben. We will try things out. We'll just see where it takes us and hope it works out. Philosophically one is your relationship with terror. Is terror where you have to go because you cannot choose things like the war. Baseball prohibition the vietnam war college behind bars are not things that you can choose. Unless you're deciding..

sarah jeff ward vietnam war college Jianghua vietnamese every subject every film ken one americans
"novick" Discussed on Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

05:14 min | 1 year ago

"novick" Discussed on Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

"And then when you do that are you gonna likes guy or not. And all those things just as storyteller and biographers trying to make sense of the person was also hugely challenging are you. Are you going to like the person well. I hope the audience for the film will make up their own minds and we will tell you what to think and probably i would imagine people come away with mixed feelings you know maybe some compassion for him because he really did suffer from some very challenging things mental illness head injury repeated had injury and potentially cte as a result of that alcoholism loss grief war trauma..

"novick" Discussed on Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

05:23 min | 1 year ago

"novick" Discussed on Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

"Hello and welcome to south beach sessions. You know we are growing around here at meadow lark media. We are adding a lot of voices and people and talents and expertise is that are someone and people that. I think that you're are going to really grow to admire and love their work. If you don't already and lynn novick has been someone who has been making great documentaries with. Ken burns for a long time. The latest is hemingway. It is exhaustive. It is profound. It is humanizing his complicated and i want to talk to her about that because it like much of what she makes is artful on subject matter where the degree of difficulty. I don't believe people understand how hard it is to go through archives and keep that visually stimulating when you're going through such dense and complicated subject matters so anyways i'm thrilled to have lynn. Novick doing advisory stuff and consulting stuff for metal arc. Median thrilled to have her on with us now to talk about her latest work which is as i said as all of them seem to be len and thank you for joining us exhaustive. Did you enjoy this process. Are you someone who enjoys the meticulous thoroughness of having to go through every piece of dust and particle in. Someone's past and bring it to life. Thank you for having me. And i'm really excited to be working with all of you and you know just to say that i don't think enjoys probably the right word. It's totally absorbing and captivating and just lose yourself in a story in the material and that's a wonderful feeling i. I think it's almost ken to what i've heard described as flow. Where you sort of lose track.

Novick lynn novick lynn meadow lark media Ken Median south beach
New Documentary Examines Ernest Hemingway's Complicated Life

Kickass News

00:58 sec | 1 year ago

New Documentary Examines Ernest Hemingway's Complicated Life

"If you've never picked up a hemingway book in your life you probably have no trouble conjuring an image of the man himself. The fighter the lover the hunter the fishermen the living breathing punching shooting cursing drinking bundle of tropes about manhood but the myth that ernest hemingway created was both a blessing into curse. It turned him into a global celebrity. And it certainly didn't hurt his book sales but it also became an avatar of sorts. That master far more complex man and became more and more exhausting. Live up to as age. Alcoholism and countless injuries took a physical and emotional toll on him now revealing new three part documentary from award winning filmmakers. Ken burns and lynn novick attempts to separate the myth from the man. Hemingway airs on. Pbs tonight april fifth through seventh from eight to ten pm

Ernest Hemingway Lynn Novick Ken Burns PBS
Microsoft plans cloud push with foreign governments

CNBC's Fast Money

03:21 min | 1 year ago

Microsoft plans cloud push with foreign governments

"Do have some news here on Microsoft's CNBC's Jordan novick report that Microsoft is signing deals with foreign governments to offer cloud packages. This would be sort of like the bundle. Remember it simple for the dod the Pentagon remember there's that Djeddai contract with up to ten billion dollars over ten years that's being contested by Amazon Microsoft. Already has relationships with foreign governments. We don't know which ones yet here this could evolve joins understanding is this is going to be formally announced later this year, of course, we know in that cloud infrastructure intrastructure market Amazon. Go head to head in two thousand, nine, hundred Amazon control about fifty percent of that market and Microsoft and told about fifteen percent of it. Microsoft shares no ticket high here in the after hours Brian Back to you. Right up one point, four percent just thank you very much. All right. By the way for more than Microsoft's cloud feelings, you can head over to CBC Dot Com read more about that story that Joshua's talked about from our crack team. They're more yet another stock not as not not as superlative as apple, but certainly has been a monster of a moneymaker. Well. If you look at a five year charter Microsoft. Better chart so. The turnaround there that started a few years ago under such Adela has been all about the cloud has been all about enterprise like Microsoft teams is going to be taking market share. There's there's a major argument that you. You'd be buying that selling zoom as you look to to even just where I think some of the big tech giants will probably push around companies like zoom. So Microsoft is is as far as I'm concerned. They are the other company to be talking about in in this world of of Mega Cap Tech. This is the multiple that is you know depending on what you think you should be paying. Thirty two to thirty five times is that cheap? Well, they are taking market share in the cloud. There's no question that they are beginning to to really dominate but as your. Gaming is a billion dollar business and Microsoft clearly is is navigated the the regulatory environment. The irony is, of course you know. Back, in one, thousand, nine, hundred, Ninety, eight, they were the ones that really started this. I think this focus on big cap tech and they're the ones that seem to be navigating best right now. Care Certainly. So be cared quickly go back to you talked about Apple Peter Lynch model like I love my phone. So I'm GonNa Buy Apple you don't hear a lot of people say man I really love that outlook. Oh, I couldn't live without excel. Zoom player I'm kidding on that one there an enterprise everybody deserve. The same kind of a French in that a consumer is going to or maybe more. Well, I. Think your point's well taken that in this environment where a lot is driven by narrative and. Just getting that attention of the so-called robinhood traders Microsoft isn't necessarily that exciting, right but look at the business that had has it's got great contracts coming up in contrast to Amazon. It appears that it's got kind of the tap on the shoulder from the government to go out there and get these contracts. I mean the government talked about them buying TIKTOK. That's a that's an acknowledgement that Microsoft has got a bit of a regulatory governmental tailwind to it. I agree ten listen it's it's over maybe it's over valued it. It was my pick few weeks ago when I did the fast pitch or whatever that thing is we did and I one and I'm still riding high from that and I would still apply Microsoft.

Microsoft Amazon Apple Pentagon Jordan Novick Brian Back Adela Cnbc Peter Lynch CBC Joshua
Changing our formulation of AI to avoid runaway risks: Interview with Prof. Stuart Russell

Linear Digressions

08:21 min | 2 years ago

Changing our formulation of AI to avoid runaway risks: Interview with Prof. Stuart Russell

"Hey everybody so instead of having myself and Ben. Your usual hosts and here with special guest professor Stuart Russell of Berkeley Who's written a really fascinating book about Ai in the future of AI? And we're GONNA talk about it Professor Russell. Thank you for joining me. It's a pleasure. You're listening to linear digressions so Professor Brussel I know your name might be familiar to a lot of folks who are listening to this podcast. But for those who don't know your work as much or they may be recognized the name but aren't quite sure how to place it. You might giving a brief introduction. Sure so I've been a Berkeley Longer than I can't remember about thirty four years and I've been doing a I actually since I was in high school. I wrote a chess program. background nine hundred. Seventy five In high school so I've been doing a along time You might know my name if you've taken. Ai Costs you possibly used a book by Russell Ovik So Peter Novick and I wrote that starting in Nineteen ninety-two. We just sent the fourth edition off to the printer last week and So my research has covered Pretty much every area of artificial intelligence reasoning learning problem solving game playing planning robotics language. Vision these days I'm concerned about the following simple question which we had actually in the First Edition Textbook What if we succeed? There's a new book that you have out now human compatible artificial intelligence in the problem of control as you mentioned this. It sounds like this is something. You've at least been aware of for a long time. WanNa ask what motivated you to write this book now? So the book Sort of has two parts. One is the part that says okay. This is how we currently think they I And this is why it's extremely wrong And if we assume the current standard model they I As I systems. Get better and better We face the prospect of losing control over them. And losing control to machines altogether Second part of the book says okay. Here's how to fix it Here's a way of doing I on a completely different kind of general theoretical foundation and conceptual framework And in this new framework it seems that At least that failure mode of losing control Two machines Seems to go away. The why now is because Sometime around twenty thirteen. Two Thousand Fourteen I figured out what the second half of the book should be namely is a way of dealing with the problem I didn't just want to write a book saying okay. We're all dude right. Alan Turing actually. Nine hundred fifty one said World Dude. So there's not I wouldn't be a new point so without asking you to cannibalize your book sales too much here. You know in in a snapshot what what is the Fundamental Way. That we've gotten it wrong for a long time and where. Where is the ray of hope that you found in that second half the book so this down model of AI? involves building machinery that optimizes a fixed known objective So if you remember if you've read the first few chapters of the book the textbook We talk about for example problem solving systems that Find a sequence of actions that's guaranteed to achieve a goal with minimum cost. So there you have to specify the goal you have to specify the cost function in Moctezuma processes you have to specify the reward function in machine learning algorithms. You have to specify the function In control theory you have to specify a cost function so in fact it's not just A. It's a good fraction of twentieth century. Technology is based on this model and the model is wrong because me do not know how to objectives correctly particularly when you have systems at start to operate in the real world is easy on the chessboard to say okay. You're supposed to win the game But in the real world you might say okay. I'd like you to restore carbon dioxide levels to Pre industrial concentration so that we can get the climate back and balance. That sounds great. What a wonderful objective. What could go wrong wrong? Well you'd get rid of all the people because they're the ones who are producing the carbon dioxide and then you might say okay well. Let's not do that. Let's Restore Carbon Dioxide and not kill anybody And then of course. The system has Subtle and complex social media campaign. That convinces everyone to have fewer and fewer children Until there are no people left and then carbon dioxide is restored. And that's much easier than trying to do all the politics of convincing people to stop consuming and producing and all that kind of stuff so So actually we've known this for a long time where we have the story of King Midas you know. He gave his is objective specification. Everything he touches asa to gold and of course it was the wrong objective died because his food and drink and his family to MD gold And the genie. You get three. Your third wish always please undo the first two issues because I messed everything up. So we know this And yet we assist with a model with the more effective the better the I the worse the outcome is going to be the human beings And if that isn't a bad engineering model I don't know what is right so I think we should abandon that. We have doing things In brief solution is to say that The machines objective is still to satisfy human preferences about the future. But the machine knows that it doesn't know what those preferences are so as explicitly uncertain Just to give you a simple analogy When you go to restaurant the restaurant doesn't know what you want to eat. They know that they don't know they. You what would you like to eat? What MENU CHOICES? And if you pick something off the menu That isn't their life. Subjected will cost to to give you that thing you know if they're out of that item they're not gonNa you know traipse all over the city trying to find more of it. They'll say well. Sorry so you know. We're out of the duck tonight or you know the chickens not so great but maybe I could recommend the polk medallions instead whatever. It might be so. This is perfectly normal and understandable human beings that we don't know what Other humans want and we asked them and or they tell us and we we have an interactive process and we can do the same thing with machines. The machine knows that it doesn't know what you want but it has to somehow act in a way that is beneficial to us so it's naturally motivated so it's trying to solve that problem. The solution to that problem is to do things like US questions off Commission before before you kill everyone the restore carbon dioxide levels you ask you know. I understand about the carbon dioxide is it okay if I kill everyone and then you can say no. That's not why we added more sure that you're not right. Yeah so that's the basic oil and We can formulate this. Mathematically if you're interested you problem in Game Theory And the solutions to those games have the property that the better the I the better the outcome the human beings

AI Professor Russell Professor Brussel Professor Berkeley MD Russell Ovik King Midas Moctezuma Peter Novick
Lane Selman on the Culinary Breeding Network

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

09:18 min | 2 years ago

Lane Selman on the Culinary Breeding Network

"Breeding network. Tell us about it sort of genesis and I think I in its creation story. There were peppers involved right. Yeah tell us about sore. Yeah so I worked for Oregon. State University Here in Oregon and I work on a project recalled novick which is the northern organic vegetable improvement collaborative and that is a project that's led by Oregon State University but also includes the organic Steve Alliance. That's up in Washington but works nationally University of Wisconsin at Madison and Cornell University so at each of those institutions there are breeders that breed at least part-time specifically for organic farmers. which have very different needs? A lot of the same needs a lot of gardeners I believe and and also and so so what we've done in this project project as Taking a lot of the breeding lines that all these different plant breeders are working on their specific organic systems and trial them on a lot. A lot of different firms all over the country to see how they perform On organic farms. And we compare them to varieties that we no are gonNA perform really well on farms. We also test out new varieties that come out. You know you open up your seats. How like right now? At this time of year we opened the seed catalogs catalogs and as farmers it's like. Oh Wow. There's always new varieties. Are They GonNa do well for me are not everyone's thinking that right So we trial all those And this one year we were trailing these sweet peppers so kind of like a roasting pepper. The ones that Corner Detoro they call them That are pointed me too. That are really nice for for have stick wall for roasting and we're trying to find a variety that would perform really well here in Oregon where we have You know we have short season. We have Also we have evenings at get really cool. Where a lot of times on the east coast like they say well but warmer so so we never really know a variety to perform really well? So we're looking for that And so we knew exactly what the farmers wanted out of a variety but And we're finding that out. We're doing all this work on the farms. But then I had the question like well. What about what they taste like grow great? They don't taste great then. That really isn't that helpful to the supermarket and gotten a really nasty. Exactly what do they really taste. Like and You know uh-huh as researchers we get stuck in this thing where we're like okay. Well let's just bite into it and give it a one two nine rating but I didn't really want to do that because mostly I didn't trust myself I know like I'm one person. And what do I know about what you know. How great a peppers when the taste or not and also to be honest? It's hard for me to be unbiased because I'm out there in the field. I'm looking at all of these and I really want to choose varieties That perform really well for farmers so I wanted to remove myself for the from the question. Right and so I asked a lot of chefs that I knew. I work at a farmers market in Portland Oregon at that time also and I asked a bunch of chefs to get together and taste them with me and they tasted them and they basically started identifying the different things that they liked about does peppers that went beyond just the flavor but actually the shape and the size right because practicalities of structure that make something in the same way that a piece of meat or fish or whatever is or isn't appropriate for a particular recipe or or you know a method of cooking that's right it's like exactly yeah. Yeah and he's thinking about waste to like hijacked and seeing the kitchen all these things that are very important and we I and I thought. Oh my gosh are the parameters that are actually creating these new varieties of tomatoes peppers of everything. Do they know. So what this was wealth of information that the shafts and other value added You know if someone's making hot sauce or something or just the end user. Do they a spend enough time interacting with them to understand what the knees are right right so you wanted to plug these these participants who were working around these same vegetables but not together yet. You plugged them together and made culinary breeding network exactly. Yeah started You know organizing these events wants to bring individual these individuals all these different stakeholders and Arthur system together which has extended into the public? Because we all are you know stakeholders orders and the food system. Yeah so so you have this interesting perspective because you're working with all these leaders. Many of whom we gardner types hypes don't necessarily hear about one of their writers who may not even know who breaded or developed it but you're you're interacting with all of these people as all the stakeholders and you have the chefs and produce managers managers and all these other approach fires and and farmers and seed growers and breeders and so forth So you get to see and hear about a lot of things that are kind of coming down the pike or or that are getting their starting to trend even before we gardner see them in a catalog may be so like from your instagram. which is at culinary breeding network? I know some of the crops that you especially love and I mentioned the Ridichio the intro so tell us about that one for instance and is that something that you all ever talked about among this group this these steak steak. Oh Yeah Yeah Yes well I could go on forever. So you're going to have to cut me off. I'll just say shush me. I I think at all well so I am Sicilian and I grew up With a lot of food and a lot of Italian food so this is something that has just been something thing that we consumed but it is not a crop or a vegetable that has consumed much in the United States but working with chefs There is an appreciation for different flavors. Other than sweet. I mean this is something that we see all the time. Plant breeding is the trend keeps going toward breeding sweeter and sweeter things but there there you know there are earthy masses in earthy nece and their bitterness and all these things that actually should be appreciated. I feel like in vegetables. So there's that kind of culture food culture kind of side that I really like about radio but additionally it is something that is very important and the Pacific northwest as well as where where you are in the North East to be Consuming for individuals. You know the public to be consuming. Because that's what we grow in these areas in the winter. We cannot grow lettuce. This is what I see a lot of times like in the farmers market setting is all these people come out and support farmers and the height of the season. When of course everything is so wonderful fola tasty why would you go to the grocery store And farmers markets and a lot of areas very plentiful. So it's convenient. You can go there but as soon as it starts here. Are you know it starts raining. And it's cold. It's not so nice to go to the farmer's market people go back to the grocery store and they're buying lettuce and cucumbers from places that are very far away. Yeah so I really want people to eat things that are grown here all year round so we have a campaign called winter vegetables. There's a website you wanNA restful dot dot com ridiculous part of that so With the Ridichio then one of the flavors that you get from it is the bitter. Not Sweet you were just talking about Sweden vegetables being something that a lot of people breed for and so forth and it's more cold tolerant so it can grow at a time when say lettuce can't even in northern areas And I would say from the pictures picture on your instagram. The even though it's the leaves of their the they look like flowers so beautiful and they're all these sort of lavender and Mauve move shades and modeled and just beautiful beautiful. Do grow it in your Home Garden. Yes I do actually Yes it's very rewarding. It's exciting exciting. It's it's kind of like I think I've always loved growing garlic because you plant. Yeah and it's like you don't see it and then all of a sudden you have this wonderful thing that you pull out the ground well ridichio you grow and you can harvest the leaves and eat the leaves but it heads up and it can get a lot of frost damage on the outside and get really slimy and you think Oh God you know. I've lost it. It's it's done and then you get out there and you start pulling off. These slimy lease and you get down to just a hidden jewel rally little head. That is beautiful and perfect. Yeah do you have any favorite variety seat one. Tell us about real quick. Oh sure Well I so one thing I wanNA wanted to mention this one of the reasons. Also that hasn't been grown a lot is that it hasn't been a lot of resources for a seed So uprising seeds does have have They have several They they love radio yeah they do have several and this year. I think it's the first time that they have released. The is so Tina we now and that is one. That is a pink until people are really drawn to the beauty salon called. Yeah roasted over Netto. And there's several varieties of those but that's a really beautiful

Oregon Oregon State University Washington Cornell University Madison Corner Detoro State University Portland Novick Netto University Of Wisconsin Steve Alliance United States Pacific Northwest Gardner Tina Arthur
"novick" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:53 min | 2 years ago

"novick" Discussed on KQED Radio

"With encouraging results students accepted to the program take classes in prison taught by Bard College faculty using the same materials and meeting the same standards as students on the college's main campus our guests today are Lynn Novick who directed the documentary and to graduates of the program Sebastian noon and I won T. trail they spoke with fresh ears Dave Davies Novak is a Peabody Award winning filmmaker and long time collaborator of Ken burns she spent four years in prisons taping material for the documentary which is her solo directorial debut Yun and Pedro both entered prison as teenagers and both earned bachelor's degrees in the bard prison initiative the documentary college behind bars airs tonight and tomorrow night on PBS stations and will also be available for streaming Lynn Novick Sebastian noon and die one tape for welcome to fresh air great to have all of you let's start with a clip from the documentary this is a scene where there's a group of brand new students at the eastern correctional facility which is a maximum security facility in New York just been admitted to the program after a competitive admissions process and what we see is a not terribly large classroom in a group of fifteen to twenty men in blue jumpsuit seated a typical classroom desks and Max Kenner who is the founder and executive director of the program is welcoming the new students let's listen welcome to bar college congratulations we're gonna start course work Monday morning and I think we should just start being really clear about the scale of the commitment first of all that we're making to you and secondly that we expect of you this is a full time and the long term and total commitment when that door closes your bar college faculty are going to be evaluating what you do as a student exclusively that is to say the college has no interest in the nature of your criminal conviction the length of your sentence how much time you have left in prison not our business where in the business of education this is the thing we know how to do and we happen to do it here and when you leave this room tonight there is now something that can be taken away from you that's completely different than when you walked in and that's from the documentary college behind bars directed by our guest Lynn Novick also with us or die one take throat and Sebastian noon graduates of the program.

Lynn Novick Dave Davies Novak Peabody Award Yun New York Max Kenner founder and executive director Bard College Ken Pedro Lynn Novick Sebastian four years
"novick" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:54 min | 2 years ago

"novick" Discussed on KQED Radio

"With encouraging results students accepted to the program take classes in prison taught by Bard College faculty using the same materials and meeting the same standards as students on the college's main campus our guests today are Lynn Novick who directed the documentary and to graduates of the program Sebastian noon and I won T. trail they spoke with fresh ears Dave Davies Novak is a Peabody Award winning filmmaker and long time collaborator of Ken burns she spent four years in prisons taping material for the documentary which is her solo directorial debut Yun and Pedro both entered prison as teenagers and both earned bachelor's degrees in the bard prison initiative the documentary college behind bars airs tonight and tomorrow night on PBS stations and will also be available for streaming Lynn Novick Sebastian noon and die one Teatro welcome to fresh air great to have all of you let's start with a clip from the documentary this is a scene where there's a group of brand new students at the eastern correctional facility which is a maximum security facility in New York just been admitted to the program after a competitive admissions process and what we see is a not terribly large classroom in a group of fifteen to twenty men in blue jumpsuit seated a typical classroom desks and Max Kenner who is the founder and executive director of the program is welcoming the new students let's listen welcome to bar college congratulations we're gonna start course work Monday morning and I think we should just start being really clean about the scale of the commitment first of all they we're making to you and secondly that we expect of you this is a full time and a long term and total commitment when that door closes your mark college faculty are gonna be evaluating what you do as a student exclusively that is to say the college has no interest in the nature of your criminal conviction the length of your sentence how much time you have left in prison not our business where in the business of education this is the thing we know how to do and we happen to do it here and when you leave this room tonight there is now something that can be taken away from me that's completely different than when you walked in and that's from the documentary college behind bars directed by our guest Lynn Novick also with us or die one tape throat and Sebastian noon graduates of the program.

Lynn Novick Dave Davies Novak Peabody Award Yun New York Max Kenner founder and executive director Bard College Ken Pedro Lynn Novick Sebastian four years
"novick" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"novick" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Would get a motion of number they are like congratulations good job and then they're like strip and then you know you approach in the search area you're in this liminal place and you know they like stripped and they trust you right back in the press a new browser member not a whole lot I'm a college student your normal brother I'm an uncle on the sun but that's why in this is not me this is not my identity I'm not going to wear you know I'm not taking it back to my so I'm going to sleep with that said I want to draw and Sebastian Yun from the PBS documentary college behind bars which premieres tonight on PBS also with us is the director of the documentary and flick Sebastian you how long after your graduation did you have to Sir before you got released our two more years after my bachelor's degree in two thousand seventeen what was that have what was that time like for you I never stopped being a student even after you graduate all as long as you are in a prison in which part prison initiative operates you're allowed to take courses and was incredible is that you can also serve as tutors so you're constantly working with other students who are trying to obtain their associate's degrees or bachelor's and if people stayed in touch with folks you know from the program and help people you helped I would say that all my friends right now or my peers from the B. P. R. program and our network is really growing when they come home now I'll be off to help each other get jobs that's how I got my job at open society foundations and read just a really is tied court and we see each other as family because we've been to the same struggles it was not the same education we're talking about the new PBS documentary college behind bars with Lynn Novick who directed the series and also with us our Sebastian Yun and die one Teatro two formerly incarcerated graduates of the bard prison initiative that both are in college degrees and are now employed we will continue our conversation after the short break this is fresh AIR WNYC is supported by the vision zero initiative in New York City one in three pedestrian deaths or serious injuries involve a turning vehicle vision zero encourages drivers to turn slowly and always watch for pedestrians and cyclists.

Sebastian Yun director Lynn Novick WNYC B. P. New York City
"novick" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:41 min | 2 years ago

"novick" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"With encouraging results students accepted to the program take classes in prison taught by Bard College faculty using the same materials and meeting the same standards as students on the college's main campus our guests today are Lynn Novick who directed the documentary and to graduates of the program Sebastian noon and I won T. trail they spoke with fresh ears Dave Davies Novak is a Peabody Award winning filmmaker and long time collaborator of Ken burns she spent four years in prisons taping material for the documentary which is her solo directorial debut Yun and Pedro both entered prison as teenagers and both earned bachelor's degrees in the bard prison initiative the documentary college behind bars airs tonight and tomorrow night on PBS stations and will also be available for streaming Lynn Novick Sebastian noon and die one Teatro welcome to fresh air great to have all of you let's start with a clip from the documentary this is a scene where there's a group of brand new students at the eastern correctional facility which is a maximum security facility in New York just been admitted to the program after a competitive admissions process and what we see is a not terribly large classroom in a group of fifteen to twenty men in blue jumpsuit seated a typical classroom desks and Max Kenner who is the founder and executive director of the program is welcoming the new students let's listen welcome to bar college congratulations we're gonna start course work Monday morning and I think we should just start being really clear about the scale of the commitment first of all that we're making to you and secondly that we expect of you this is a full time and the long term and total commitment when that door closes your bar college faculty are going to be evaluating what you do as a student exclusively that is to say the college has no interest in the nature of your criminal conviction the length of your sentence how much time you have left in prison not our business where in the business of education this is the thing we know how to do and we happen to do it here and when you leave this room tonight there is now something that can be taken away from you that's completely different.

Lynn Novick Dave Davies Novak Peabody Award Yun New York Max Kenner founder and executive director Bard College Ken Pedro Lynn Novick Sebastian four years
"novick" Discussed on The Documentary Life

The Documentary Life

10:58 min | 2 years ago

"novick" Discussed on The Documentary Life

"Of how one goes out even setting up production to go into a prison. What how did the security access work? What was the overall process? who were the sort of the key individuals that you had to begin contacting with in order to make this happen? It took took us. It took us a while to get permission. Both from the state and the Department of Corrections but once we had gotten that permission we have an extraordinary producer Mariah durant who took the lion's share of the just call sheet organization which I if you are a documentary filmmaker. This would make anybody's heads spin. We became a very lean very compact crew. We brought in as little gear as we possibly could and small footprint as as we possibly good both for the complexity of this space and the complexity of security and we have an really talented team. Amen we got permission to come in and out and we were extremely organized and tried to be very very efficient and we shot really really long days. We would make the most of our time there because the students the students and incarcerated individuals time is so carefully choreographed and manage that figuring out how we it could maximize how much time I could spend with the students and also in the facility at a time that we were allowed to be there was not simple. Can you give us a snapshot of what of what a day looks like so when you enter in the morning the other crew assembling outside together and then everyone's walking in together do they have. Have you SORTA handlers that you're working with give us a snapshot of what that looks like going through the security and getting into the building to begin the day we both talked about because we usually went in very early. Always as T- we processed in together we cleared our gear together. We went through the gates together. We got to the part of the prison. We were shooting in usually as a group. You have a number of subjects of course in this in this doc series talk about initially any meeting people what that process was like. And then how you decided who you're subjects would be and I'll take a savannah monitor cerebral jump and cheer this essential to the whole project. We appreciate the opportunity to do the film for this. Very reason we recognize you know immediately that this it's GonNa be difficult because we couldn't pick up the phone and call people or send an email or just hang out. Everything was very carefully controlled so we started before we even started added filming or really planning our project. We met with a number of alums of the Barker's initiative who had already entered the program and at least from prison were out in the world and we just for background this month. Ask them what was it like for them. And what did they think. Felt like this should be about and what should or the pitfalls to avoid and they were extremely generous is with us to just help us get a little bit Ranjin before we sort of went into prisons and started talking to the students without really knowing anything about their lodger their experiences. That was his background research homework so to speak. But then we just we got permission or we ask for the opportunity to just go inside inside and watch the classes for a while and not really talked to anyone too much and then we kind of noticed certain for people that may be seem particularly animated or interesting or a a particular aspect to their personality that we thought was interesting and maybe their academic life and we just started sort of noticing. Different people in wanting talk to them and spent time with them without a camera there and then in addition there were when we started filming there was a cohort of women that were starting the program of women's president and a cohort of men that were starting parting so we knew we were going to choose people from those two groups who were just beginning the programme and so we spent time with them kind of as a large group and broke down. You know little little bit individually each meet with different people just kind of take notes in and again a sense of where they were at and then there was a group of men that had already finished their sensitive degree that we're starting with bachelors degrees through the last two years of the program and so we were thirty seven of them. We couldn't get to know all of them what we try to get as many as we could and overtime probably a few months kind of zeroed in few people that we thought would be should focus on in evolved over time as well okay and were you filming that entire time early on when you are you know. I know you're you're in and out of the prison doing the research. You're spending time with potential subjects. Did you have a camera there during that time or was it. Once you had decided who you're subjects would be that you actually started to roll little votes. We shot early on. Lynn was just saying these two cohorts of students who were or just starting the program and the students who were just starting the BA. We didn't want to lose time tracking that process so we filmed early on before we knew some of the subjects as well as we obviously got to know them very well over time but we wasn't one size fits all. We spent a lot of time without the cameras but we also did some very surgical surgical shooting that felt like it would be the launch for the film it was about. We started building in the summer of twenty fourteen finished in the summer twenty seventeenth so it was four years. Okay Okay Finan. That was you know that was kind of big into the whole idea of the project was that we believed absolutely that. FM about this subject needed to show the transformation that happens when people have access to education and that happens over time even if we had wanted to stop working on Vietnam just spend six months working on this. It wouldn't have worked for the concept of what the film could do is just one of my favorite documentaries stories of all time is twenty eight up and the magic of that of seeing people change so extraordinary can say that. We aspire to be Michael APP ted. But I think that's the power of development away too you know and so we wanted that to be part of this project and so we had to start when we started in basically had to get all the way to graduation. intuitions was four years later. That series is a huge inspiration series. The seven up series in fact as a side note we had You may remember. You may remember one of the subjects Nick Nick Kitchen who has lived in the US now for a long time we actually had him on the program because we wanted to talk about what it what. It's like like for the documentary subject on the other side of the cameras. And if there's one thing that I have learned to fear in this. Is Mike A to that because we think about that a lot you know. That's really what. Yeah I will send you a link to that. It's a wonderful conversation nation. You will recognize the voice immediately and you your heart will open immediately. It was he was. He was a conversation to have. And and DOC as consumers members of that film and then as doc filmmakers yourself you will appreciate the conversation four years. Four hundred hours of footage. How do you even begin an editorial sense to start? Whittling this footage down Alice Dongting credit to are really extraordinary editor for Sharabia. Take her assistant chased. Horton helping US inexpensive all this material but you know in a way we kind of approached it to some degree at least start the way we work with material historical films and that we had a lot of interviews and sort of group conversations. We just pulled select so we watched that the transcription picked out the sections that we thought were interesting. Jiang and then we kind of build Lucon assembly just really more the the interview in the conversation the talking what people had to say sort. What was the stories? We put all the best material together in this. I think it was eight hours long or something. And that didn't include any there taper to actually just the The content talking shame that we got to be in the film were being considered and then we start to break that down into episodes. And you know we're gonNA boil it down and let me start to add the cheik scenes and that net. We could move some of the sort of talking. That was explaining things that we were actually gonNA show instead so it's It was a very organic process and none of us has made it sound like just before that narration and without you know a building instructor so we'll along those lines. What's what's an approach that you brought to this that you would have taken? We're GONNA WE'RE GONNA WE'RE GONNA answer this into his. I'm I'm GONNA ask you. What's an approach that you brought to this that you would have taken from all of your years doing films with Ken? And then what's something that you may be consciously did differently gently in your approach from the years working with Ken. No you should answer. That was a very dramatic pause. Talk about that. A lot was what's similar and what's different so I think what similar was that. The approached the the people in the film with interests and an open mind and open heart alone. Speak Present and hear what they had to stay and understand them. You know who they were and just be be open to that so that the film could reflect what we think people should do but they actually are. And that's changing over time. And that's been true nicer that we hope when integrity of that process that is consistent and everything that we do and then there's the dynamics of just pure storytelling you know. I think stories can always says a beginning middle and end you have to edit out but extraneous material that you have to keep the audience engaged and how you do that. It doesn't matter whether you have a nation or not on whether using old photographs or not just a pure kind of craft of storytelling. You know how you use your characters. How do you set up? What's at stake? How do you you know? Reveal what you're going to reveal as you're going along those kinds of just peer narrative devices. I guess are really more or less the same. It's just here. We didn't know what they were going to be when we started right. Yeah I think another piece of this that we've been talking about. Is You know we were also. Oh nervous when we started that how you know the visual landscape is pretty the same pretty much the same it is the same. The school flora doesn't change much. The clothes lows they wear are pretty much the same. They're in the same location and how we were GONNA make that visually interesting repetitive. But end up being you. You know both beautiful. And I think ultimately a strength of the film that both are cinematographers are amazing and Tricia 's Lynn was saying but just just to sort of lean into where we were and what we were doing and follow it both visually and from storytelling perspective in some various simple ways. Isn't that much more complicated ways..

US Lynn Ken Department of Corrections Mariah durant producer Nick Nick Kitchen Barker president Vietnam Alice Dongting Michael Jiang Mike A Horton Sharabia Tricia instructor editor four years
The Dark History of the Pill

Retropod

04:00 min | 2 years ago

The Dark History of the Pill

"Nineteen sixty. The birth control pill was first approved by the f._d._a. Is a contraceptive method. In the united states within four years. Were than four million women had used what it was then marketed under the name and novick now more than a half century later. The pill is the most common birth control method used by women but before any of that the people behind birth control pills needed to prove they were effective and to do that. They needed to test them on humans. Where are they chose to conduct. Those tests marks one of the most controversial and really discuss chapters in the history of drug that has come to symbolize women's men's liberation in the mid nineteen fifties. The first large-scale human trial of the pill was launched in puerto rico in a public housing project. There are multiple theories. Why puerto rico was chosen as a testing ground despite its heavy catholic population it. It was an easy flight from the u._s. Mainland there were no laws against birth control and the locations overcrowding and poverty made it especially attractive to a biologist named gregory agree pinkus who was concerned about global population control little was known about the drug's effects human trials began it had been tested on rats and rabbits in a small sampling of women in puerto rico. It was given to as many as fifteen hundred women over several years. The trial raised controversy at the time in continues to inspire to be three women the trials die but no autopsies were conducted and it remains unclear if their deaths were linked to the drugs at the time it was given in much higher doses than it is today the the choice of testing on poor people of color race comparisons to early instances of experimentation forced upon unknowing african americans and a study that involve deliberately liberally infecting hundreds of guatemalans with sexually transmitted diseases after all the puerto rican women were being given a drug whose side effects in humans were almost completely sweetly unknown but unlike in those cases the women in the trial largely understood why they were taking the pill and descriptions of the women. I'm in the study showed that they were eager to have control over their family. Planning one woman in the study was thirty years old and had ten children another had five children and a husband who was hospitalized frequently for mental illness before the pill their main option for preventing pregnancy with sterilization in the trial deter up some side effects in the first year about about twenty five percent of the women quit because they either lost interest or didn't want to take medication dizziness nausea were frequent complaints but the drug affective among women who didn't miss the dose in that effectiveness with key to its approved demand was clear when the f._d._a. fifty eight commissioner appeared on a radio show in nineteen fifty nine to discuss a cranberry recall callers instead questions about the pill it was approved the next gear and in the ensuing debates the pill has become a symbol of women's freedom the women puerto rico meanwhile we're left grappling with what happened to them and for decades they remain part of the trial until nineteen sixty four receiving the drug. Even as women across the united states complained about side effects including including an increased risk of blood clots and lawsuits were launched against the pills manufacturer to this day. Whether these puerto rican women women will go down in history as unwitting getting pigs or pioneers of women's liberation is still unclear.

Puerto Rico United States Puerto Rican Novick Commissioner Pinkus Gregory Twenty Five Percent Thirty Years Four Years
"novick" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"novick" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Oh, these was my fault. We never imagined that the movement would grow this big. We are in eighty countries now in that moment, our only intention was to help our friends. See that failure is something we must talk about. It is not a cost of humiliation affiliates to being the past or echoes of celebration as some people say. In fact, I want to confess something every time I listen to Silicon Valley types, or a student's bragging about failing fast and often like it's Novick veal I grant because I think that there is a dark side on the mantra fail fast. Of course. Failing fast is a great way to accelerate learning and avoid wasting time. But I fear that when we present rapid failure to entrepreneurs as their one another option we might be promoting lifing. If we might be promoting that interpreters, give up tweet feeling. I also feared that the culture of rep. Failure could be minimizing the devastating consequences of the failure of obeys Innis when my social enterprise died, the worst part was that I have to go back to the indigenous community until the women that the business had failed and it was my fault. For some people. This could be seen like a great learning opportunity for me, but the truth is that the closure of these business represented much more than that. If meant that the women with a stop receiving an income that they really need it for this reason I want to propose something I want to propose that we must put a five diarrhea that failing fast. It's always. And I want to propose a new mantra fail.

rep. Failure Innis diarrhea Novick
"novick" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"novick" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Like this was my fault. We never imagined that the movement with grow this. We are in eighty countries. Now in that moment, our only intention was to help our friend see that failure is something we must talk about it is not a cost of humiliation of it used to be in the past, or echoes of celebration, as some people say, in fact, I want to confess something, every time I listen to Silicon Valley types, or a students, bragging about failing fast and often like it's Novick veal I grant because I think that there is a dark side on the mantra fail fast. Of course. Failing fast is a great way to excel at learning and avoid wasting time. But I fear that when we present rapid failure to interpreters as their one and only option we might be promoting life. If we might be promoting that entrepreneurs give up tweet Sealy. I also fear that the culture of. Of rapid failure could be minimizing that were stating consequences of the failure of obeys nece when my social enterprise died, the worst part was that I have to go back to the indigenous community until they women that the business have failed, and it was my fault for some people. This could be seen like a great learning opportunity for me, but the truth is that the closure of this business represented, much more than that. It meant that the women would stop receiving an income that they really needed for this reason. I want to propose something I want to propose that we must put aside the idea that failing fast is always the best, and I want to propose a new mantra fail. Mindfully. So what, what does it look like to fail? Mindfully for me. Failing might fully means being.

Novick
"novick" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

WINT 1330 AM

04:02 min | 3 years ago

"novick" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

"With Alaska. The last bit of antibiotic. So so you just aren't a three hands said forget it. I'm gonna try to do this on my own. Yeah. Well, there wasn't that. This didn't seem to be that concerned with me. I was just fed up. Yeah. I get that. And they're just saying, you know, there comes a point to with with some physicians, and there's there's what's called standard of treatment are standard of care. And it's in literally some physicians convey dislike robots, it's their. Here's the book. Here's what the physician's desk. Reference says here's what the treatment is. Or it is what it is. And when you ask ten different questions to think outside the box, you just get back. You get there in the headlights. Exactly. Well, I mean, I was taken three different powerful antibiotics in on the on the third. Try. You know, you think you'd hear from like how how are you doing with that? Right. You know, but I didn't hear from. So I know I probably should have called. I can't take this either. With all day, you always want. No matter how frustrated you get they'll they'll do the solid treatment. Just I guess I kind of felt like that was the last. That was the last thing we could try as far as he was concerned. And so I guess I just figured well. The next step was. You know, pursuing some sort of natural. Treatment. There's some things you can do. I'll throw them at you. But I'll tell you this. There's you definitely need to work with the doctor has down. Even if you just say, hey, look, I'm gonna take some time. See if I can work out some things on my own. I'll check back in with the other couple months Novick deal to do that. It's really not. It's it's fine to go that route. So, and that's what I would encourage you to do just so there, you know, she or he so they're in the loop a little bit. But 'cause max. It's a really challenging lung condition. You don't wanna play around with it for sure. But we got to focus on building system. Right now, you want to do something to kill the organism. I mean, even if you could get away with. One of the antibiotics. Through that process. There a short period of time any law eighteen months a long time. It is let me throw some things that you you make the decision on what you wanna do check with your doctor or any guys come up with with a with a protocol. And I'm telling you that clinically when we've seen that we have done the we say the antibiotics work. Well, but we've also say some natural frame, it's work. Well, so so end of the day you want to strengthen the body, and you want to get it to work and fight get the immune system to wear it can fight and you can stay strong. That's gonna cut down the fatigue. It's gonna cut down a lot of the symptoms at your having. I like I onic silver of a big fan. It works. Very well. It's easy for the body to absorb it's one of the best anti antivirals and antibacterial that we have you can combine that with the stragglers stragglers works, very well strong for the immune system. It's great as an antibacterial both of those work well together, and then simple things like vitamin C. Hi. Vitamin C between five and eight thousand milligrams per day. You wanna do a buffer ph as they call it? Vitamin c slot easier on your system, but those were that's a good place to start right there. And then when you're eating every single day even with the bacterial infection because remember it's pushing down your immune system is stretched out your body stretch out your system, you want to do things to build up your immune system in eating the right kind of foods every single day, avoiding inflammation, and that's all in my book empower your health pick that up at any bookstore. I encourage you get started on a couple of those things, and it will it'll start strengthened in the body building up your immune system. And that really is what the goal for you is right now. And I would I would still talk to your doctor. Now, here's another key. You can start using probiotics prebiotics constricting the immune system in a major way and allow your body..

Alaska Novick eighteen months three hands
"novick" Discussed on Don't Blame Me!

Don't Blame Me!

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"novick" Discussed on Don't Blame Me!

"So if she really wants you today, and you say, okay, we last time like I'm really not into that right now. Like, I'm really focusing on me. The next time brings it up change the subject letter Novick. I'm not gonna talk about this more like a good point good with this. And if you're good with this. I think also you keep trying to prove or otherwise, she's probably gonna just read into that. Being like, see she's not happy with that. She's trying to convince me she's just channeling all of that sexual frustration. Like, you don't tell her. Don't worry. Mom. I'm getting like, which sounds like you. Yes. Yes. Get it hit it or just like fucking yourself. Take care yourself. I think you can just like just ignore it. And then she'll get over it. But I think the more that you talk about it, even if it's trying to your life choices, she's going to think that she has the option to talk to you about it. But if you tell her like, no, this is my personal life. Like, you don't have to say in it. I'm just going to do it. And then ignore her. If she keeps calling you and saying that stuff just totally ignore her as it used to. It's a really good point. Like, don't don't spend so much energy convincing someone of something. They they're they're not going to believe or whatever has live your life. And she's ultimately, you're I mean, obviously, she's your mom, and you like relationship, and I want to be good. But she always right about your own life. Yeah. You know, what's good for you? And if it's not being lazy right now, then I mean, I'm reading to relationship. Okay. Okay. No. I think it just kind of dated perspective that she has. And I think that the best way to show that you're saying the best way to show that you don't need a relationship. Let her see you flourish and see that happen. And then even if she doesn't like settle down or stop with that. Like, maybe you've siblings who are gonna start dating someone. She's barred laying a Netflix subscription older sister. My older sister getting engaged with a huge relief. We're like the attending on her. And we're happy for them. And I'm taking their engagement photos. Like, I have have a place in the family behind the camera. What happens when they get married? Going to prolong this as much as possible that there's still both in medical fellowships at least two years a little bit of time..

Novick Netflix two years
"novick" Discussed on Beautiful Stories From Anonymous People

Beautiful Stories From Anonymous People

03:56 min | 3 years ago

"novick" Discussed on Beautiful Stories From Anonymous People

"Four seven care, and but my parents, don't like we don't want a nurse in our house like all the hours a day that will have an nursery comes in from eleven PM to seven AM the night shift ner, and then we have one who works from seven to three. And then my mom takes like, the the evening shift so tech. So like in my eyes, she's a stay at home, but technically she's working through this nursing agency. So she works like basically full fulltime job. And we've had so many problems in the past with like nurses, calling off at the last minute. And so my mom won't have to like pick up more shifts so stuff like that. So she technically has been trained and is compensated as a nurse through the company that is contracting to do that. Wow. Yeah. She's like fragrance if you have any did go to college or anything, but it's more like home care aide like that type of thing. Wow. So that's my mom. That's a that's one hell of a story. That is one hell of a store you can it is rare at this point in doing this show that I get stopped in my tracks. But I thought we were just talking about a job interview for spring, internship, and you have managed you have managed to. Throw me a loop in a way that has blown away. Yeah. It's like, I'm really casual about it. Because like I said I've grown up with it. My whole life in school like in all our religion. Classes was one thing. You're great before. Or what something that seems negative but you can play in positive lights. I've been talking about this forever. And so Novick deal to me, but I can see how it might be a little bit of a shock. Well, let me. Took two to loop this background. I will say something, very heartfelt and honest, which is that at least in my experience and granted I work in an industry where by definition, you just gotta go and figure it out for yourself and improve that you can do. But I think I've gotten blustery on the show before about like oh school is for the birds, and that's just all rooted in my own bed experiences. But I will say I think I think in any industry I'd have to imagine down to engineering where everything you do have to have an immense amount of technical knowledge and book smarts in training. I still think there's something said for any. Any job in the world. The one thing that they can't ever teach. You is how to be a real human being in the world and deal with real life. And I gotta say. That you've dealt with more real life than probably anyone else of your. I would have to anybody else going on. These interviews. And. I think anybody worth their salt who's interviewing you is going to sense that would be really lucky to have you. Because the fact that you're like, no, I'm used to my family takes care of each other. It's thing we've dealt with just shows that you have a great head on your shoulders, and that you really. Really raised right in the face of stuff. That anyone's definition is is really tough. And I think anybody would be lucky to have you. I hope that you go into it with that confidence. Thank you. My mom heard that she would be like. She'd be so like grinning ear to ear and be like, yeah. See on pretty good mom. She she likes to brag like that. She has for someone like you say. Yeah..

Novick
The origins of Ryan 'Darth' Bader's nickname

Five Rounds with Brett Okamoto

04:43 min | 3 years ago

The origins of Ryan 'Darth' Bader's nickname

"Heavyweight, grand prix fish announced last week that he will meet Fyodor only Netco on January twenty six at the forum in Inglewood California, and be final to see who will become the Bill, our heavyweight champion. If he wins that fight, he will then become Bill tours. I ever double champion, light heavyweight champion in built or he is Ryan Darth Vader Ryan. How're you doing great. What about you? I'm doing really well. Thanks for doing this Ryan. By the way, when you had your intro before the Mitchell fight, two Fridays ago, they had a little like Star Wars thing in there. Was that the first time that you've done that before? They, they kind of like a little something gonna be account down show. I didn't get to see also getting. Yet. Remember you doing that, so you didn't. You don't even hear the music when you're about to walk out. Well, like they've always in the music. I hear the music. I like the the dog in the beginning, China children that song between the back, whatever, but other, no, they get. We shine a little something. We're in Andhra with the head kind of I dunno. TV behind me when I'm walking out at all. What's fascinating is the fact that you're like the complete antithesis of of Darth Vader rarely, just such like happy guy, you know, kind of nice guy. You know what I mean? Is that why you got the nickname to begin with. Thing. You know, it was kinda from Brooklyn breslin days on this guy called me, and I went to went to another. I went to this call mcgarth also kinda stopped on down there. So what was when you signed up for this tournament? And I hate to to use the word easy, but it does feel like it has been relatively easy for you. Did you think it would go this way like that it would be such a walk in the park for you? I fight, you know, obviously you never go into any fifteen seconds. This punch three and knocking out more than spied Novick. Yet. Heavyweight date day can't towns which putting given to turn the hat winning. The whole thing was a favorite and they're the best, you know, heck weights. And right now you don't go out there and in kicking on, grinding them out. You'll be out of the. I saw myself walk through so many different matchups in the kitchen, not in in day the different styles. Really that I was going to have to fight finish investigator hands. You can, you know, update for big heavy, you heavyweight news in the, I always thought I was going to turn in of Trinite. But yeah, I mean, nobody predicted knockout. I. I was gonna handle that differently on the ground, and that's what I did. And you know, I'm, I'm join us so far considering how well it's going for you indicate, and I'm sure not having to wait cut for the first time in a very long time is a pleasure as well. Is there any chance that you just stay at heavyweight pass the tournament? You know, I don't know. Originally. When is two bucks and drop down the same. They lie. Heavyweight and descend the heavyweight on. You know. But who knows when that actually happens? I go out there and win this. I win this fight. There might be more intriguing matchup at heavyweight or Bill tour might want me to say or miss more sense to take a heavyweight title five. So right now I I want to, I want to different bowl 'cause they fire to me is not that really difficult. At the same time. We'll see when we get there. Like, what do you walk around at. About thirty five right now. Okay. Well, so I mean probably dating back to when you were a kid like the last time you probably didn't have to cut weight, so to speak quote unquote, probably like a decade or two decades ago, right? I mean, even, you know? Yeah. I was in high speed, Tony, Jimmy page, always walking around two twenty down to one ninety. One ninety seven. Get down to the lower than that.

Ryan Darth Vader Ryan Bill Darth Vader Inglewood California Fyodor Andhra Mitchell China Investigator Trinite Novick Brooklyn Tony Jimmy Fifteen Seconds Two Decades