35 Burst results for "Novartis"

PharmaLedger the Pharmaceutical Blockchain ConsortiumThe Pharmaceutical Blockchain Consortium

Insureblocks

02:21 min | 2 months ago

PharmaLedger the Pharmaceutical Blockchain ConsortiumThe Pharmaceutical Blockchain Consortium

"Our listeners. Who haven't yet you or heard you on insure blocks. Could you please give democratic deduction on yourselves perhaps Donna i thanks. Thanks for having us back for another edition. This is great My name's stanford same the domain architect for supply chain at novartis Looking at technology Evaluation and selection also on emerging technologies. That's where it goes to the block chain. And and i have another role. Which is the industry project leader of the farmer. Ledger project which focused on blockchain adoption in the healthcare industry. Excellent marco. yeah hi. This is margaret cuomo. I'm working to same group as dan but the with a little bit different focus. I'm part of what we call the plight. Technology innovation this team trying to bring in new technology into the into novartis in this case. I am focused on blockchain's responsible blockchain in new artists. And my second or other role in familiarize is be co lead architect for the blocker in cloud. Thank you both in his great. Avi bosa back on the show. So as he recalled the first question we all ask. Our guest is to define what is blockchain. But here's i'm curious to know how your definition may or may not have changed since our first podcast back in august two thousand nineteen. Dan do you wanna have a go at it. Yeah actually a. I've i've refined my blockchain definition a little bit and and and what i usually know or how i introduced. Blockchain is with the five days and mark just loves this definition but the five as stand for asset. We're talking about not. Just cryptocurrencies is assets but also add data or or or medicine products. Which can be exchanged on you. Know district distributed ledger technology. So blockchain's good for asset. It's good for audit. This is the immutability aspect that we can't change anything after it's been written to the blockchain very relevant for for our industry Automation so use of smart contracts to eliminate non value adding steps

Novartis Ledger Project Blockchain Margaret Cuomo Avi Bosa Donna Stanford Marco DAN
'Next Big Wave': Radiation Drugs Track and Kill Cancer Cells

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 3 months ago

'Next Big Wave': Radiation Drugs Track and Kill Cancer Cells

"Doctors reported promising results from an experimental cancer drug that delivers radiation directly to tumor cells an emerging class of medicine called radio pharmaceuticals may become a new way to treat patients with hard to reach inoperable cancers in a study involving over eight hundred men with advanced prostate cancer released by the American society of clinical oncology a tumor targeting radiation therapy from drug maker Novartis kept cancer at bay for nearly nine months compared to three months for people receiving standard treatment and survival was better to fifteen months versus eleven months the drug is administered through an IV in each dose contains trillions of engineered molecules a tractor portion of the molecule hunts down cancer cells the payload portion is the radiation experts say radio pharmaceuticals maybe the next big wave of therapeutic development I'm Jennifer king

Experimental Cancer Inoperable Cancers American Society Of Clinical O Prostate Cancer Novartis Cancer Jennifer King
Covid vaccine: PM to have AstraZeneca jab as he urges public to do the same

FT Politics

08:50 min | 6 months ago

Covid vaccine: PM to have AstraZeneca jab as he urges public to do the same

"When johnson talks about the uk's world-beating response to covid nineteen vaccine pogrom passes muster. It's been an unqualified success or one of the reasons. His conservative party are so far ahead in the polls over twenty five million brits have received their job so fall but the government unexpectedly announced show fall in the number of vaccines delivered in april juice. Supply issues and the debate has a geopolitical angle. To given the you struggling with its own vaccine rollout slovan the line. The european commission president on the block might even consider export controls. All options are on the table. We are in the crisis of the century. And i'm not ruling out any anything for now because we have to make sure that europeans are vaccinated as soon as possible so sarah. Let's begin with the overall state of the uk's vaccine pogrom based on what was set out in december. It's pretty much all going to plan fairly high levels of takeover ninety four percent i believe and the government is insisting that all over fifty will have had their first job by the middle of april. So what's the problem. Well a week ago we would have said. This was indeed the most Astonishingly amyloid success and a sign of vessel. Buoyant moved around it. Was that the with some very clear briefing to a couple of the saturday newspapers suggesting that we were actually going to move to the over forty's much sooner than expected so it was a bit of a jolt to find out on wednesday that in fact. Nhs people involved in the program had been told that they must hold booking any new appointments throughout april because the been a sudden very significant reduction in the supplies available so that really has put the first serious dent in the narrative which right from december the eight. I think it was the day. That william shakespeare became one of the first two vaccine as now suddenly. The government is in the unaccustomed position of having to explain what's happening and explain why some of the public expectations that they'd raised so hard may not be met to be fair to the government. They still absolutely insisting they're on track with the two big dates that they've set for this program that all over fifty should be vaccinated by the middle of april. And all adult britons. Who wants a job will have had it at the end of july. But there's no question that it's been a difficult political management problem for them this week and very much not the position that they'd hoped to be in the club. Let's have a look at why this might be happening and seven. I spent a lot of this week speaking to people. Whitehall trying to figure out exactly what was going on behind the scenes with matt. Hancock gave us a of clarity in the house of commons and the government is pinning own production issues. The first one is this batch of one point seven million jobs that we sent back for testing and the second thing is the supply from the soham institute of india which again the governor's put down to supply issues but others are saying that actions being blocked by modi's government from shipping out to the uk. Exactly it is pretty opaque what's happening. There are two elements. Here that can hold up. Supplies one is the genuinely technical difficulties in producing a complex biological process. I mean it's not straightforward zanu vaccine and a lot of the manufacturing sites haven't made this sort of marin a vaccine before it scale factor. You could say none of them have because this is the first one. That's the fiso won. The astra zeneca at novartis vaccine is also level to a complicated process. So there are technical supply issues and then there at the political ones. You alluded to and i don't know whether the serum institute of india supply has been blocked for political reasons because india was having rather a good downturn in covert cases. But that's turning up again. Unfortunately and there are feelings. That indian government wanted to have it at home. This is so. I think if we look at the context of this a lot of it is actually not that much of a serious problem that we were crunching the numbers this week and april is a significant moment in the vaccine program for the uk. Because yes they were vaccinated all over fifty which according to people like christie chief medical officer of england which uses ninety nine percents of deaths on messages the pressure on the nhc s. But eneko you have to install the second jobs. Really the po- gum began to scale up towards the end of january and eleven week window. The nhl is set between the first and second doses. That really kicks in april and but hancock said this week that really still going to be delivering about fourteen million jobs throughout april which is low though. It's been in march but it's still a pretty high number so it's probably good to keep it in context with feels really what's gone wrong. Here is expectations that the rogue briefing about forty s really feels like delivers come off the bush tourism bush. Johnson's tried to restrain for much of twenty twenty. One yes and i think some. Nhs officials were less than delighted about that huge raising expectations last weekend. In a way. I think this was always going to be a difficult point for the program. It was absolutely predictable that at the point at which second doses to scale up there was going to be a deep in first doses. So it's perhaps unfortunate that there wasn't more subtle public preparation. You're absolutely right international standards even in april. We're still going to be doing more. Vaccinations than many of our counterparts. So it's particularly unfortunate wasn't better preparation. Because i think in the minds of a lot of britain's the will now be a sense of this program isn't doing well it's stumbled. It didn't have to be this way that it could have been very differently presented. And after all as i said the government is still on track to meet those two deadlines that it says now clive. We need to put this in the context of europe as well and we heard from s. the von d'alene at the top. That and you still really struggling with its vaccine vo loud but the most baffling things. She's seen this week. Is the story about the astra zeneca job and how effective or side effects. That may have in this concern. Over blood clots we heard from the ama from the nhra in the uk from the world health organization. All saying there are no concerns about blood. Clots and ashes annika vaccine yet at didn't stop lawson countries from halting giving out the doses. It's a very complicated picture on side effects. At least the spotlight turned away from efficacy. Before countries in continental europe were worrying that the astrazeneca vaccine wouldn't work well enough to older people. I think the efficacy questions have more or less be answered now. The spotlight is on whether they're adverse side effects and a few of those have been discovered there. These two different sorts of blood disorders do with abnormal clotting thrombosis that have been detected in people who just been vaccinated in norway in germany elsewhere on continental europe. The numbers are tiny. I would say fewer than twenty around the continent. Investigation is still continuing. There's no proven link with the vaccine. But a lot of vaccine knowledge ists the might be a link. But that is no reason to stop the vaccination program when it's saving tens of thousands of lives probably and people have said that just by halting for a few days the astrazeneca vaccination and continental europe. This week until the european medicines agency said it was okay that would have cost lives. It loves cost lives directly because people weren't getting vaccinated and it also probably unfortunately of cost lives indirectly because all the publicity about ad side effects will just undermined confidence in the vaccine

UK Government Soham Institute Of India Astra Zeneca Serum Institute Of India Eneko European Commission William Shakespeare Whitehall Johnson Modi House Of Commons Sarah Hancock Novartis NHC Bush Matt
What's HIV got to do with a coronavirus vaccine?

Coronacast

09:25 min | 9 months ago

What's HIV got to do with a coronavirus vaccine?

"And norman. We had on friday that the vaccine which we talked a couple of times about on this podcast saying that it was a really promising candidate has been canned over the fact that people who received it could have a false positive to an hiv test or particular antibody associated with hiv. And we've had a lot of questions from the audience about this. So let's see if we can demystify. These are really felt like a bolt from the blue. We got kenton asking. Can you please explain how a why false positive hiv tests stopped. The queensland trial doesn't this reflect poorly on the hiv test rather than the vaccination. So that's a great question. Canton anita back up and just do a bit of an explanation. Here you listened to colonel cast regular you know that the vaccines and some of the treatments but the vaccines are targeted against the spike. On the surface of crohn's now the problem with the spike is that it changes shape. And you want it to be exactly the right shape for the lock and key mechanism and therefore it's going to be fixed. It changes shape of. It's not attached to the virus itself. Is that what you meant. That's right kind of swings in the breeze a bit now. How the are ours is the no one in the pfizer vaccines novartis's but vaccines do. This is that they've got a genetic variant of which programs a fixed version of the spike protein. So that's how they do it. How the university of queensland vaccine does it is that they've got something called a molecular clamp. So they kind of clamp into position so that it stays in the right shape for the immune system to recognize as a bona feed your at accurate version of the spike protein. So the immune response that you generate is exactly the immune response you want to be able to control the corona virus. Now you gotta be a clamp clampett. So what is what. What's the clamp. You can't do it for the client in the shade. You go to find some way of doing it. And the way the clamp they use in part is the is part of the human immunodeficiency virus. So it's an envelope protein. I think quite crudely although it's called nimble protein that's how they use it in his co. gp forty one and it clamps down the spike and holds in place so that you've got a stable spike for the immune system to respond to. So that's what they use. Hiv's being studied endlessly and they know exactly how these things work. It wasn't as if they didn't expect some antibodies to this part of the human immunodeficiency virus. I'm told that as part of the informed consent people told they might get a transient rise to to hiv antibodies. So that's what's happened here. Is that more people. Got an antibody response an immune response to this part of the human immunodeficiency virus. And that's what killed the vaccine. Not your had issues but we had the antibody response. Here's the problem when you actually do an hiv test you test. A couple of different parts of the virus that the check for the body response to hiv in different parts of different parts of the virus gp forty one is one of the parts. And there's a couple of others now you've got to get more than one of those to have an absolutely definite positive hiv test if all you come up with is gp forty-one then that's you know that's an equivocal test and they've got a taste you further so the problem is that the communist hiv tests include gp forty one in the suite of antibodies. They pick up when the testing for hiv. So the problem is donate blocks you come kneecap positive and they reject your sample or go to do other other ids tests to nil it. It's not as if it's impossible to get over. But it creates a lot of confusion and difficulty out there and and i suppose they just took a risk benefit equation. There was no harm to individuals. And i think you listen to the press conference. Teagan and some of these antibody rises. Were actually tempering. That that's right. So they said that. All of the vaccine as the older people that receive them. Had some level of positivity to hiv even though before the trials they really thought that it was theoretical risk in quite a lawyer one but they did say that even now at least one of the paypal has gone back to zero and the other seem to be declining so it could be a transient thing and they said that they did actually talk. They've had conversations with the government with health bodies about maybe whether the hiv tests should be changed to give people access to the coronavirus vaccine but they decided that i that would be really hard and be in addition to a public health issue around hiv. There's also a really important public perception issue around the vaccines and they wouldn't want people to be put off using the vaccine because of these perceived link with hiv even though there's absolutely no health risk associated with it at all because it's just a tiny little part of the virus that can't suddenly become the virus it's just literally apar- you're molecular part of the virus which is entirely independent says a huge shame and pamela asks. Why did they try using hiv. In the first place. I think the they at the press conference. That's right and one of the big reason is because hiv is just so well studied. And so this this clamp that was talking about before it was crystallized in hiv. I and so because even though. Hiv's are really scary bars or perhaps because it seems like scary virus. We know a lot about it. We started in a lot of detail and so with something. That's a really nine quantity being able to clip these thing out and put it into the vaccine. Seemed like a really sensible choice and because this was the first human trials of this vaccine. They didn't have an opportunity before now to know that this was going to be a risk the issue that we have only working human so they couldn't use them in the animal bottles and it wasn't really a high priority when the outcome that they're looking for is covid not really itchy. Europe was the last question from lou. Lou is asking the the stories seem to suggest that it was abandoned due to a concern about possible public perceptions rather than any real problem with the vaccine is this right is partly right of. Csl was party to that. They're the commercial partner and they've got a marketing issue to explain why this has the while you get a positive. Hiv test. even though it's false positive is enough of an issue reducing vaccine hesitancy. When you've rush through some of these vaccines and then you add hiv on top of it but there are practical issues. Liu and the pro the probably mostly relate to the blood supply you go into give a blood donation they will do a routine. Hiv test on it. And if it comes up positive and you either rejects the blood donation if let's say for example that fifty percent of the australian population got immunized against the with the vaccine and some of them didn't disappear quickly then. They've got to do further testing on the on the blood supply to make sure that it's just. It is truly a false positives. It creates a practical problem. They it also creates a problem for perhaps life insurance. So these things are solvable. I mean if this was the only vaccine available in the world they probably would continue with it but because it's not they've gone for just saying we're just gonna use the overseas vaccines which kind of brings us to some other news. That came out over the weekend so we heard that the yuki vaccine has been canceled. Which is a real blardone scientists but in addition to that glasgow smithkline vaccine has also been paused or cancelled canceled as been paused. So what they had was. They had a problem measuring the virus or the virus particles you know. Basically the corona vars to the vaccine in the in in their samples and they got that wrong and therefore the shoe or the wrong does in the in the samples and they had to had to go back to the drawing board workout test for the the elements of the corona virus in their vaccine and then reinstitute trials in a few months time. So they haven't candid is just the technical problem early on and often dosage does become a problem in vaccine trials. It's not unknown for vaccines to fall over at the dosage stage. And it's worth remembering here. The in the rush to get these vaccines the bit. That's been compressed. Is what's called the phase two trial. So what's happened here with the q. Vaccine it was the phase one trial which is a safety trial which find out this problem with hiv that it was more common than they thought. Normally then you would go to if it was okay in the phase one to phase two trial which is often largely about finding the right does the best fate whether it's a drug over vaccine and that's what's been compressed and they've tried to do phase one phase two trials together or face to face three trials together and the dosage that s- being not very well sorted i in some of the trials so for example. That's one of the problems with the astros trial in a small subs- subset of the trial. They gave half a does again partly because they weren't they weren't formulating in the way that we thought they wear and also a group that was largely under fifty five and they just didn't have time to sort of that element before they got to phase three and then they're probably going to have to double back and recheck all that well.

Hiv's Canton Anita Kenton University Of Queensland Crohn Novartis Norman Pfizer Queensland HIV Teagan Confusion Paypal Pamela CSL LOU LIU
"novartis" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

01:54 min | 11 months ago

"novartis" Discussed on Today, Explained

"We're all born with a unique genome. Our own personal blueprint. Unfortunately a mutation in just one gene can lead to a debilitating disease often with limited treatment. Options enter novartis a global health. Care company. that's reimagining medicine. Sometimes massive challenges require microscopic solutions. Novartis is exploring the boundaries of science with cell and gene therapies. That address disease at added source in other words personalized medicine. So it's really one of the mind one of the most promising advances in medicine to me. It's like a new era almost. This revolutionary approach has the potential to transform life for patients with a variety of diseases. Some cell gene therapies might even be curious. Medicine is changing to learn more checkout novartis dot com today. did you know that simply being online releases. Carbon the internet like so many parts of modern society runs on electricity and today the electric grid creeds carbon emissions. Google is trying to stop those emissions from your online activity before they start. The company aims to run on twenty four seven carbon free energy by two thousand thirty everywhere. They operate by moving beyond carbon based sources of energy and focusing on solar wind and other clean energy technologies. Google is working to create a model for how tech companies in industries at large can reduce emissions and make a real impact on climate change. Learn more about goose. Most ambitious decade yet at jean dot com slash carbon free..

novartis Google
"novartis" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

01:57 min | 11 months ago

"novartis" Discussed on Today, Explained

"Did you know that simply being online releases. Carbon the internet like so many parts of modern society runs on electricity and today the electric grid creeds carbon emissions. Google is trying to stop those emissions from your online activity before they start. The company aims to run on twenty four seven carbon free energy by two thousand thirty everywhere. They operated by moving beyond carbon sources of energy and focusing on solar wind and other clean energy technologies. Google is working to create a model for how companies in industries at large can reduce emissions and make a real impact on climate change. Learn more about google's most ambitious decade yet at g. dot com slash carbon free. We're all born with a unique genome. Our own personal blueprint. Unfortunately a mutation in just one gene can lead to a debilitating disease often with limited treatment. Options enter novartis a global health. Care company. that's reimagining medicine. Sometimes massive challenges require microscopic solutions. Novartis is exploring the boundaries of science with cell and gene therapies that address disease at its source in other words personalized medicine. So it's really one of the mind one of the most promising advances in medicine to me. It's like a new era almost. This revolutionary approach has the potential to transform life for patients with a variety of diseases. Some cell and gene therapies might even be curious. Medicine is changing to learn more checkout novartis dot com today..

Google novartis
What happens if we don't get a vaccine? This is what 'COVID normal' looks like

Coronacast

03:52 min | 11 months ago

What happens if we don't get a vaccine? This is what 'COVID normal' looks like

"Now no minute pretty much every press conference and in lots of news coverage, keep hearing this term covert normal as if as if we all know what that even means, but it's not normal right? It's not abnormal that we used to know how meant to understand what's meant by the term covid normal covered normal at the moment depends on where you live in Australia. So covered normal in Victoria as we speak is really quite a severe lockdown even with restrictions lifted covered normal in New South Wales is You know it's not quite normal life but the you know indoor activities restricted there's no compulsory mask-wearing, but there are outbreaks. State is on a bit of age. Covered normal everywhere else in Australia is getting back to almost normal life which actually puts them at risk of covid nineteen should be. Deposited into their state for some reason. Well, that's not really normal. Though is it because normal life included overseas travel and that's something that seems to be off the table indefinitely and we've had a question for one about audience members about this. What is the endgame? For Ustralia not just the states? What does the next year look like if we don't get vaccine or the vaccine that does come isn't isn't effective enough at first well, in states like new. South. Wales and Victoria covered normal if you like the end game. Assuming that the virus continues to circulate is that we don't circuit quite as much. So it's not locked on. It's just that we don't get into circumstances where a lot of people are mixing indoors, consp-, read the virus. So we're GONNA fewer contacts on a daily basis to reduce the chances of picking up the virus or spreading the virus. Covered normal, but it's not a lockdown. It's just that you to be careful. Now the question you raise a good one, but let's talk about internal borders. So what happens if you lift the border restrictions across? Australia, when the still virus in New South Wales Victoria, well, there's not much virus. So the risk of spread to those states is low but shoot actually it sprayed. Does that mean that automatically West trillions and south Australians queenslanders means etc.. Territories that they have to change their behavior and they've got to restrict how they do things by going indoors and live in a different way. and Professor James McCall, University of Melbourne argues that they don't that in fact, they're covered normal in states with Novartis circulating with Borders Darn is actually the way people are living at the moment, but there's gotta be a heightened alert to the possibility that the virus could come in. So people have got to be aware of symptoms get tested and that the public health systems go onto it in terms of getting on top of testing and contact tracing and that the if you like the protection so that you can reach retain the behavior in those states that you've got at the moment. So news wasn't Toria a degree of social distancing but not. Too drastic but in other states, you can continue the way you're going as long as you're prepared to come forward for testing in large numbers and the systems prepared to pick that up and the an example James quoted was the spread from Melbourne to kill more. So Regional Victoria said, very little corona virus people are getting back to normal much faster. But in fact, the State got on top of the coolmore outbreak and indeed the shepherd and outbreak very very quickly and go to under control without rural and regional victorians having to change their behavior they are covered normal if you like. So this is good news moving forward is that you could. Lower the borders have much freer flow of people and that the compromise for people in the states with Navarro spread at the moment is just ready to come forward for tasting and the systems got ready to respond, which is a small price to pay for tourism and families getting back together again,

Australia Victoria Professor James Mccall New South Wales New South Wales Victoria Regional Victoria Wales Melbourne University Of Melbourne Ustralia Navarro Novartis
Monica Royer, founder and CEO, Monica Plus Andy

Skimm'd from The Couch

04:46 min | 1 year ago

Monica Royer, founder and CEO, Monica Plus Andy

"Hey Everyone Danielle. Here I'm excited to get into this episode with our guest and curly will be back next week today Monica royer joins us on skimmed from the couch. She is the founder and CEO of Monica Andy An organic baby and children's clothing company. Monica had the idea to launch her company literally from the hospital after she gave birth. Who've with the mission of being the most thoughtful children's brand ever created and as we'll get into entrepreneurship definitely runs in her family Monica. Thank you for joining us today welcomed skin from the couch Danielle. Thank you so much for having me. I'm super excited to be here. Thank you. So I just WanNa say that like literally I think one of the days after I had told our team that I. Was Pregnant I had a call with Monica and I was like only slightly panicked about the fact that I was maybe a first time mom and really had no clue what I was doing and was like everyone keeps telling me I need a lay at and I don't even know what that is and Google that and Monica was like such a calming presence and literally knows this case inside a now. Thank you so much what we're is really excited to welcome people into Motherhood, in new, parenthood. So congratulations to you. Thank you. So let's start with an easy question scam your resume. To actually take back to what you can't see on link to in, which is that I came from a very hardworking family and so at the age of twelve, my mom was the manager, the ultrasound department at Good Samaritan. Hospital in Downers Grove and she's like you're gonNA start volunteering. So she went an air sign me up I was working at the front desk outpatient registration and that at fourteen she was like job permit time. So we went I started stocking the shelves at now very defunct retail store of which I. Can't even remember the name but work ethic with something was really important to my parents and so I spent all the time before I graduated from college with all of my summer jobs in the hospital. So physical therapy like you name it I worked all around the hospital when University of Illinois in Champaign Urbana graduated and I immediately got a job in the pharmaceutical industry. So I spent the first decade doing absolutely nothing related to what I'm currently doing but I worked at both Pfizer and Novartis for that decade which was. Very different from currently in that I launched. Monica. Nandy officially in July of twenty fourteen. So now this is my new baby and what I've been most recently working on what's something that we can't Google about you or look up on Lincoln I originally wanted to be a marine biologist. nine or ten old I would have told you wanted to be a marine biologist terrified of the ocean look at seeing but being in it. So that was sort of a non starter, the marine biology career, but I remained totally obsessed with like orcas. Great White Sharks in my very favorite place to travel as the San Juan islands outside of Seattle, marine, biologist, and pharmaceutical industry. This is all very, very interesting. So we're GONNA get into your family. And the support system that you've built around you. But I when I was talking to you a few weeks ago, you were talking about your mom and how her story had such an impact on you tell us about what it was like growing up in your house. What kind of expectations were there? Yeah. So my mom is an immigrant from India. She moved here from India's her dad was dying of Emphysema and some money home when she was nineteen. Years old as I have always a revered both of my parents Andy I always say that will never win the lottery because we did the first time by the parents that we got. So a massive amount of respect for both of them. But my mom, there was something about the family that she came from her family was very matriarchal in in a society in India that was much the opposite in. So my grandfather had nine children altogether the first. Five of which were girls as in India, like at that time most people wanted boys but my grandfather really cherish having girls in he educated each of them like they were boys and so when my mom came here, she came here on sheer well of the education that she had received and so education was of the utmost importance specifically for my mom mom was the only person in her family to marry outside of her Indian cultures or a dad is. Know his ancestors from European background and so my brother and I were so close growing up because we were so different from everybody else we were between world instead of fitting into any world in particular and so I think that unique experience really shaped the adults that we became.

Monica Royer Danielle Founder And Ceo India Google Downers Grove Good Samaritan San Juan Islands Pfizer Emphysema University Of Illinois Nandy Andy Novartis Seattle
Swiss giant Novartis halts COVID-19 hydroxychloroquine study

Bloomberg Businessweek

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Swiss giant Novartis halts COVID-19 hydroxychloroquine study

"Novartis will stop a clinical trial using the anti malaria drug touted by president trump to treat covert nineteen patients citing in a statement flow enrollment for the test Novartis said the recruiting challenge made it unlikely the team could collect meaningful data about hydroxy caloric when in a reasonable time frame no safety issues were reported or efficacy conclusions reached the FDA revoked emergency use authorization for two malaria drugs after finding they were unlikely to work against the virus and could have dangerous side effects

Novartis FDA President Trump Malaria
Undruggable Drugs

a16z

08:54 min | 1 year ago

Undruggable Drugs

"So I thought maybe we could start about just talking about what the category of undrivable really means to the industry. What is traditionally mean? This is a favourite subject but also for me a sore subject. The term undrivable refers to as yet the inability to drug a protein or protein family or a piece of origny. It said an unfulfilled promise. Imagine Drug hunting with small molecules. Where I've worked and trained as sculpting drug molecule that fits into the pocket of a protein. What if there's no pocket? That protein may be regarded in our discipline as a Priori undrivable. So is it always shifting kind of category or was there a particular group that always was understood to be that kind of undrivable? It's very much both you know. Mars is unworkable right until we arrive there serious. Human Diseases of the non infectious nature are often caused when pathways go awry and these cellular pathways are driven by little machines called proteins. That are globular and They have in where biology occurs. Enzymes that metabolize food and such when these pathways go awry. We tried to identify a critical note in that. Pathway typically a protein and work to understand functionally. If it's too active in which case we tried to inhibit it or not active enough in case we tried to activate it in the discipline of drug discovery. This biological knowledge is very powerful but sometimes we regrettably find out that it's a type of protein or protein. Fold that has never been drug before and this creates real challenges. So this is the undrivable when we have no idea how to get that protein there these are the undrivable proteins and and there are whole families of very tantalizing protein targets creating a conceptual risk that often keeps many scientists away from pursuing coordinated efforts in drug discovery. In my time as a professor I studied the way genes were turned on and off and cancer as a cancer doctor. I was interested in the proteins that would cause the growth program to be activated to turn one cancer cell into two and so on and so on these proteins called transcription factors that bind. Dna turn genes on our consideration be beyond the reaches of drug discovery undrivable. Class which is regrettable because the perception that they may be hard to drug has kept many scientists away from even trying so people. Don't they literally? Don't touch it because it seems like such a challenge. There are a couple of important exceptions. The estrogen receptor binds estrogen. It is therefore drug -able by the sex hormone estrogen rest revile. But the most commonly activated gene all of cancer called Mick the protein that sits around the human genome orchestrating. The Growth Symphony has never been successfully drug even though it is one of the best. Validated targets in Over the last thirty years in cancer science. It's so interesting because I sort of assumed that it had to do with a lack of of biological knowledge. But it's not using the not. The biology is very well understood. But we just haven't understood how to approach it so what is changing now. What are where are we in the landscape of these undrivable? Categories of drugs. I mean one way to think about that. Is that in a sense? When we mean undrivable. It's undrinkable by the way we normally do things. And only when you start to develop these new methods you realize even in the old targets. There's other things you might WanNa hit in other ways to hit it. That's right one of the things that really interests in years. You know we think about targets. We add adjectives to the targets. We HAVEN'T DRUG TARGETS. In the fullness of time there may be no such thing as an undrivable target when you take in sort of the full momentum of different modalities that we might go after a specific target. Can we take the other side of that coin for second? Is there such thing as a novel target a novel target in the language of drug discovery is maybe the first recognition that a protein is really involved in a disease process and the biological experiments have validated that protein or gene in that process novel targets may be fully drug -able like the proteins that sit on the surface of a cell that because of successful prior campaigns to drug kindnesses are now as a group considered easily drug -able but sometimes novel targets are in these undrivable protein families and this gives us pause? I believe that some of the best validated targets in disease biology would have clarified path to helping patients. If only we could get out of our own way and really commit to approaching these proteins as drug -able to challenge the dogma till echo of the the old concept that's right I'd love to hear what some of those successes that really sort of forged a whole new path forward for people were and then also break down the tech behind. What made those possible. I think a very fine example where drug discovery has taken down and undrivable protein. Target is our work to develop the first hitter of what's called foss face in this case a protein called ship to okay. Foss faces are some of the most interesting proteins in disease biology there. Fossil taste is very important for diabetes. And a couple extremely important for cancer you might know what a kind aces. This is a protein that drops what are called phosphate groups onto proteins and there are a great many important kindness. Inhibitor Drugs That followed once. Novartis developed the first if not one of the first called Glee Vic for chronic myeloid leukemia as there are interesting kindnesses that drop phosphates onto proteins. There are counteracting faces that pull them off Interesting and it's for no particular reason that kind aces are so commonly drugged and Fossa tastes are not Except that for twenty years people tried to make phosphates inhibitor drugs and they just couldn't do it. It's one of the most famous protein families in the UNDRIVABLE CLASS. And there's something really peculiar about it. Phosphates drug discovery campaigns almost always produce a very potent and sometimes very selective inhibitor of a pure enzyme studied. Say outside of a cell. Okay but these molecules don't work when the enzyme is inside of the cell the pocket. That's drugged in the phosphate. Tastes is very positively charged. You know how opposites attract the molecules that are discovered are very negatively charged. And they can't get into cells. Scientists Bang their heads against the wall for decades trying to make phosphates drugs for cancer and diabetes and other disease states and were unsuccessful. Well some very creative. Scientists at Novartis did really interesting experiment. They imagined that may be a way to inhibit. The FOSSA taste isn't to go for the most active site But to try to inhibit the enzyme through what we call an alistair excite to sort of sucker punch the phosphates at a different part of the protein and so we perform to high throughput screens. One with the full length phosphates that has two or three globular domains like three beads on a string and second full high throughput screening campaign where we just looked at the active enzyme. Pocket it self. We found two thousand hits in this essay and we through all of them out except to we only kept the molecules that would work in the full length protein but wouldn't work in the small format protein Basically that you'd find the the molecules that would hit the pocket that's only presence when the whole protein is there exactly drug discovery is like trying to find a needle in a haystack. Performed thousands sometimes millions of experiments with chemicals to try to find the one chemical. That does what we want. We threw out all the molecules that would hibbitt inhibit the active site and kept only molecules. That worked when these other sites were present called Alistair excites. After many years of very careful science we produce the very first inhibitor of a phosphate tastes and the way this molecule works is it glues the ship to protein together we call it an intra within the same molecule and Intra Molecular Glue. What a cool

Cancer Novartis Diabetes Cancer Science Intra Molecular Glue Growth Symphony Alistair Professor Fossa Foss Mick
Are the lockdowns working?

Monocle 24: The Briefing

07:11 min | 1 year ago

Are the lockdowns working?

"Governments will be wary. That lockdowns may prove to be like wolves in rather be in being rather rather easier to stop than stop. But what do the scientists think? Well he is one on joined once again by monocle. Twentyfold Health and science correspondent. Dr Chris Smith Regular listeners will know that Chris spends his busy days working as a virologist at Cambridge University in Chris. First of all. Is it possible at all? I know this might be a bit of A. How long is a piece of string question but possible to quantify what difference the lockdowns have made? We think that they've made us turn the corner. Andrew as in when you model what this was doing certainly in the UK and other countries in terms of the growth of the pandemic and the number of cases it was growing exponentially and quite quickly. We saw the numbers of cases growing level and off and then admissions to hospital leveling off and then the number of people losing their lives leveling offer now beginning to to go down so this is certainly this intervention broken the chain of transmission or at least made it run through trickle rather than down a nice drag strip so it's definitely putting an obstacle in the way of the spread of the virus In terms of how long it's GonNa take for the peak to drop down get out of the foothills and onto level ground again though. We don't know that yet. So that being the case how and what certainty does anybody know? When do I even start lifting? Lockdowns how do you make that judgment? That's the million dollar question or in the case of what the U K economies being hit by billions per week and people really want to this question if I asked lots of times of lots of different people. Both Vala gist mathematicians politicians. I talked to and I get the same answer. We don't know So people are beginning to look at this from another perspective which is rather than what's out trigger point when to institute change the beginning to say. Well what do we think we could do to sort this out and walk? We therefore implement straight away spicer very interesting mathematician in Paris yesterday. And he's come up with very interesting strategy of carving countries up into a series of sales almost like mobile phone network cellular network cells. And thinking about how you call the country up not just arbitrarily doing in a way where you say. Well where are the people? Where do they go to work? We create sales where you don't divorce people from their work of course and these cells are ring-fenced so you have a Green Cell Novartis Activity Red Cell Virus activity so it's backed up by testing in surveillance and the idea is that you don't allow people to move outside their cell unless they have a very good reason to do so and you put in place. I measures in each cell to make go green by the vars control there. And once you've got to adjacent green sells a you merge together and so now people can move freely within that green area. You probably with me now. You can see you. Divide the country as honeycomb and slowly green or red turns to green under these circumstances. And this he says for a country the size of France or population the size of the UK. You'd be looking a five or six months of these sorts of measures in order to get control and have us bank to something resembling what life used to be like. What are we learning so far about public consent to such measures? Because obviously what we've been going through all over the world. These last few weeks has been absolutely without precedent certainly in reactionary. I think it just has been completely without precedent. So we're having to learn as we go along about what people are willing to put up with Have you been surprised in any direction by the cooperation of Publix? We knew that people were certainly very very good at getting behind this in the in the outset. And we know that people when you when you generally throw down the gauntlet in front of the people and say. There's a very good reason to do this. Let's get behind it people. Do I mean Captain told me who said I want to raise a thousand pounds by doing one hundred laps of my care home garden for my one hundredth birthday and threw down the gauntlet internationally and got twenty seven million pounds. He's raised now just goes to show. The people of re good at getting behind. The cause of the compliance was excellent. But when all this began the psychologists said to policymakers members of government there will be a period of time during which compliancy is very good and then people will begin to tire of this. And you won't be able to get them to do it forever. Many people pooh-poohed this idea but we're beginning to see evidence of this. Because if you if you look at the traffic densities own roads. Traffic density is rising again. If you look at the number of people who actually back at work numbers are going back up. People did get behind it to stall with but I think people are beginning to tire. And we're not going to be able to hang onto people's confidence in this forever so is is it possible then or arguable. Might even be a good thing that some of the lockdown restrictions being lifted that. We're seeing in some places at schools or small shops that those there's actually a psychological aspect To those decisions as well as a strictly medical one well one school of thought. If excuse the PUN is the by sending bag schoolkids what you actually do is facilitate a whole heap of spread through that sector of society and since we know the risk that school kids Ingende and given the schoolkids have younger parents on average the risk. Their parents is going to be really low. This is one way of a controlled spread through a sector of society leading to natural acquisition of immunity and resistance to this without actually placing additional risk in in the way of people who in my swamp so some cynics saying well one way to solve this problem. Is You just Let the scores Go back. And this will take care of the immunity and immunization naturally of quite a broad swathe of society. Now that's certainly one approach and other approaches to say we're not going to do anything to have vaccine. Most people agreed that this is impractical and at the opposite end of the scale completely to the vaccine and not doing anything is the we. Just go business as usual now. Most people are comfortable that we can't do that but so something somewhere between the two where we use. What will be probably much richer. Data informed by testing in terms of where immunity is around the country where the viruses circulating in the country and where people are living working commuting where the facility for spread is greatest. If we combine all of this information. I think we probably will end up adopting something like the model. I outlined that the Parisian mathematicians are proposing perhaps not identical but something which enables a degree of normality in some places reinforced by testing and surveillance together with Other signs brought to bear such as issues like vaccination when that eventually materialize. If it does an any drugs we can throw it this as well as continuing to protect the most vulnerable people either by shielding them or by testing the workers who are going to care for them and then only deploy workers to care for the most vulnerable people who know on our immune.

Dr Chris Smith UK Green Cell Novartis Lockdowns Cambridge University Publix Paris France Andrew
Novartis, U.S. drug regulator agree to malaria drug trial against COVID-19

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:21 sec | 1 year ago

Novartis, U.S. drug regulator agree to malaria drug trial against COVID-19

"Drug maker Novartis has won approval from the FDA to conduct a trial of the anti malaria drug hydroxyl clerk win against covert nineteen disease have a drug already has FDA approval for emergency use Novartis plans to start recruiting four hundred forty patients for its phase three or late stage trial within weeks at more than a dozen US

Novartis FDA Malaria
COVID-19 Escalates but Biotech Bright Spot in Trillium Therapeutics

Breaking Biotech

09:31 min | 1 year ago

COVID-19 Escalates but Biotech Bright Spot in Trillium Therapeutics

"So again. I'm glad to be back and appreciate everybody's attention today. And we have an extensive show ahead of us so I'm going to talk about a variety of different things. I WANNA touch on some latest biotech news a menu to talk about the vijen earnings report that. I said I would get to so. There's a few interesting tidbits. There have to talk about the covert nineteen story because that's been really blowing up and I think there are significant implications for the market. And then I'm GONNA finish up by talking about the latest in the anti CD. Forty seven technologies and specifically. I'm going to focus on trillion but also gonNA touch on T. G. Therapeutics so at that. Let's just get right into it. And the first piece of news I had to mention. Is that a sperry on recently. Heard News that they're two compounds. Were approved by the FDA. The one is just the paddock acid pill which they've named it next next little and the dog acid is it. Ahmad Combo pill was also approve. Called next Zet so good news for them. They finally breached the finish. Line are GONNA be able to sell these products. The stock did KINDA BUMP UP AFTER. This news came out but then with all the News Cove Nineteen. The stock did sell off. And I think it's hanging around fifty bucks I still have ten shares. Probably GonNA sell relatively soon just to you know take the prophets and look for more opportunities that have larger chance of bringing a return on my investment but great news for them. The next piece of news I want to talk about is and we heard that they are exploring a potential buyer according to Bloomberg. We haven't heard too much confirmation since then but in the past week we've seen the stock runup quite significantly and it looks like there's a good chance that somebody could pick them up. I'm still holding only about ten shares unfortunately but I'm probably going to sell them just because I feel like we've heard a lot of these rumors once in a while. And often times they don't come to fruition Annan. Pretty happy with the Prophet made so far and given it's only ten shares. I think I might again sell these enda and look for other opportunities. That are coming around the next piece of news. I want to talk about his ammon. And they have been all over the place lately We heard that they released some post trial documents. Because they're undergoing this litigation right now to maintain exclusivity for their patents and you. I kind of glanced at them. I don't really know what to make of them. We're still waiting for a judgement to come down and we'll see that. Relatively soon I think and negativity around the stock. I think is going to be uplifted once that goes through. And we should see a return. All-time highs I've been adding the stock as it's been down and it's pretty heavy in my portfolio now so. I still think that they're goodbye here. The next piece of news on touch on is the latest from the American Society of Retina specialists. And this is because I have touched on wet. Amd in previous videos by interested in this space and they announced that Bayview patients and this is the drug for wet amd that was recently approved by Novartis and this a s R s society issued a warning about fourteen cases of retinal vascular disease with eleven of those being occlusive retinal vascular. Now this can be actually pretty serious condition. That can lead to permanent blindness. So it's It's fair for the society to to issue a warning to people who are considering this therapy especially given that. There are other therapies. That don't have this risk that have been approved in in circulation for awhile now. Nevada stands by view. And they said that. There's been an estimated. Forty six thousand injections done a bill view so far and they did not see that this happened in their phase three trials they did mention there were sixteen cases of ubiquitous and nine cases of Iras. But they still stand by their own compound and they're saying that they're doing post market surveillance to see that's going to be a problem but When this news came out we saw that Novartis Kinda dipped and regeneration stock increase quite a bit just in the expectation that more people are gonNA stick with Lia which is the drug that was approved. That's been approved for a lot longer than bayview and there are more frequent injections. But it's obviously more safe. So all of this could be prevented if re-genesis BIOS drug there gene. Therapy for wet. Amd can hit the market and then patients would only really need one injection hopefully to To prevent Amdi from happening. So that's kind of an interesting thing going on with the amd space so to hit the major stories that I want to talk about today though. We're GONNA talk about biogen. The cove in nineteen esscalation. And then I have here. That Gilead announced that they're going to buy the company named forty-seven for four point. Nine billion dollars and this is worth mentioning because the company talking about which is trillium also has an anti CD forty seven antibody in hopes of using it for hematological malignancies but also potential in solid tumors. So we're GonNa talk about that as the feature story but first thing. I want to talk about his budget so I went through the earnings report and I have touched on by. Jin on a number of different occasions in this podcast. And I think it's a really interesting company being in that kind of mid to large cap space what they announced that their revenue went up seven percent year over year. And amongst all of that the MS franchise was actually down four percent year over year. But what they did is they included cruise. Which is an anti CD. Twenty compound but it's also used to treat ms so they included that in the press release to make the overall year over year revenue increase by two percent. And I think they did this. Because the franchise itself up sixty percent of by toll revenue so to show that that franchise is actually increasing has kind of beneficial from a PR standpoint. They also announced that verity was approved for relapsing. Ms And we did hear that last year. Visionary is similar detector but it has fewer Gi side effects so this was approved it was shown to be non inferior to tech Videira so this is just adding to its. Ms Franchise is going to be continuing to prevail in being a large revenue generator. For by. John. I believe we also saw and I mentioned this last time that the Texas air decision was positive for biogen. So that compound is can also be protected. Biden's going to maintain its exclusivity. So that's good news for that. I don't see the franchise decreasing substantially. It's probably only going to increase with the vulgarity. Approval there are competitors coming on the space but given that by agendas so many MS compounds right now. That are pretty effective. I think it's going to be a continual driver of revenue for the company now in terms of the upcoming revenue generator spin. Rosza is is one of those that's done in the market for. I think almost a year now and revenue increased nine point three percent year over year which is great and this franchise makes up fifteen percent of total biogen revenue so that has increased over the past few quarters. I think as I as I looked at this and they did mention here that we expect the rate at which spinner is a revenues will grow will moderate in twenty twenty compared to twenty nineteen primarily due to a lower rate of new patients starts combined with the impact of loading does dynamics as patients transition from dosing every four months so the way the payment system works for. Spin Rosza is that it costs seven hundred fifty thousand for the first year and then subsequent loading years just cost three hundred seventy five thousand Subsequently so we see this big boost in revenue. When there's a lot of new patients starts and then it Kinda tapers off as patients or just getting that loading dose. So I think that's why they're saying that. Revenues will moderate because the amount of new patient starts is actually decrease and I think this is due to vexes. Launch of excess Novartis is launch of their own therapy for spinal muscular atrophy. So I think as that competition continues the amount of revenue that's generated by spin. Raza is GonNa flat now and patients who likes Raza will probably stay on it but I think that that increased competition. It's still going to harm the new patient start so I don't see this space necessarily increasing too much now. Other things to consider is the repurchase program and this boost the stock price pretty substantially in the last year they repurchased twenty four million shares and that was a cost of five point nine billion dollars and by my calculation that means in the current repurchase program they have about twelve million shares to continue to buy and their net. Cash is still three point. Five billion dollars so they have a lot of cash on hand to buy current shares that are outstanding which is only going to support the price of the Stock. Moving forward another thing. They announced is the commercialization rights to idea as well as loose cintas. So going back to what I said about the wet. Amd space these two compounds are the current kind of establish treatment for wet amd with view just recently being added the size of the market for I league in Los Angeles is eleven billion dollars but these are going to be biosimilars and as we know. Biosimilars don't generate nearly as much money as the actual panel drug the current by similar. That biogen has day only make about one tenth of the revenue of the panel

AMD Novartis T. G. Therapeutics Raza Ms Franchise Annan Rosza Spinal Muscular Atrophy Solid Tumors Sperry FDA Bloomberg Enda American Society Of Retina Texas Nevada JIN Biden
Crisis Looms in Antibiotics as Drug Makers Go Bankrupt

Houston's Morning News

00:48 sec | 1 year ago

Crisis Looms in Antibiotics as Drug Makers Go Bankrupt

"My attention crisis looms and antibiotics is drug makers go bankrupt now we talk all the time of the high cost of prescription medicine and big pharma big farm hamlet other stuff but evidently quite a few of them are running out of money New York times says at a time when germs are growing more resistant to common antibiotics many companies that are developing new versions of the drugs are hemorrhaging money and going out of business gravely undermining efforts to contain the spread of deadly drug resistant bacteria anabolic startups like at igen and the gam have gone belly up in recent months pharmaceutical behemoths like Novartis in Allegan have abandoned that sector in many of the remaining American anti by the companies are teetering toward

New York Times Igen Novartis Allegan
"novartis" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:15 min | 1 year ago

"novartis" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Square and Kelly square for the funeral of firefighter lieutenant Jason Minard Kevin burning WBZ's traffic on the three now it's time for the four day WBZ accu weather forecast with us for a live now meteorologist Kerry Swindon hammering Kerry it's gonna be a wet afternoon it is gonna be a wet afternoon and a cold one at that periods of rain at coastal flood advisory goes into effect by the way around two PM our high this afternoon thirty five inland forty to downtown realfeel temperatures mainly in the twenties and lower thirties it'll be brisk and cold tonight with rain possibly mixing with some sleet and freezing on some services well inland both my thirty five to thirty eight near the city close to the freezing well inland and a few leftover showers of rain possibly mix was sleet and snow for Tuesday morning clouds breaking for some sun in the afternoon not as cold high forty two inland forty eight downtown still chilly with clouds and a shower possible on Wednesday high forty four mainly sunny Thursday high forty nine I thank you weather meteorologist Kerry she wanted hammer WBZ Boston's news radio and steady rain right now in Salem at thirty six degrees were thirty eight in Springfield forty six on the Cape in Falmouth right now in Boston the rain is moving in and were thirty five degrees only one thing you can do to protect yourself and your family from the high cost of elder care plan ahead my friends at the Commonwealth advisory group can help one eight hundred seven oh five fourteen fifteen to set up a no stress consultation as twelve twenty five time for doing the business watching shares of Danvers based LBO met after results presented at the American heart association meeting yesterday showed use of the company's key heart pump in Pella was associated with higher rates of adverse events and costs Novartis said an analysis of the phase three clinical trial of it's interesting heart failure treatment showed greater benefits in certain groups interest demonstrated reduced risk in total heart failure hospitalizations and cardiovascular death in women compared to men Novartis has significant operations in the bay state and HP's board unanimously rejecting Xerox holdings unsolicited takeover proposal saying the twenty two dollar a share offer is too low and citing concerns about the smaller Connecticut based rivals prospects in the printing industry I'm bloomers care in Moscow with New England business on WBZ Boston's news radio.

Novartis New England Xerox American heart association Commonwealth Jason Minard Kevin Square Moscow Connecticut HP Kelly square Pella LBO Danvers Falmouth Springfield Salem Boston Kerry Swindon thirty five degrees
"novartis" Discussed on AP News

AP News

09:13 min | 1 year ago

"novartis" Discussed on AP News

"Flare ups of sickle cell disease are extremely painful and damaging when red blood cell stick together blocking blood from reaching organs and small blood vessels the new drug from Novartis is called a dock Veoh during testing it reduced pain episodes in half for about 200 study participants researchers are still testing whether it might help extend the life of sickle cell disease patients possible side effects include influenza and high fever and the drug costs more than $80000 a year I'm Jackie Quinn

Novartis Veoh influenza Jackie Quinn $80000
"novartis" Discussed on AP News

AP News

09:13 min | 1 year ago

"novartis" Discussed on AP News

"Flare ups of sickle cell disease are extremely painful and damaging when red blood cell stick together blocking blood from reaching organs and small blood vessels the new drug from Novartis is called a dock Veoh during testing it reduced pain episodes in half for about 200 study participants researchers are still testing whether it might help extend the life of sickle cell disease patients possible side effects include influenza and high fever and the drug costs more than $80000 a year I'm Jackie Quinn

Novartis Veoh influenza Jackie Quinn $80000
"novartis" Discussed on AP News

AP News

09:13 min | 1 year ago

"novartis" Discussed on AP News

"Flare ups of sickle cell disease are extremely painful and damaging when red blood cell stick together blocking blood from reaching organs and small blood vessels the new drug from Novartis is called a dock Veoh during testing it reduced pain episodes in half for about 200 study participants researchers are still testing whether it might help extend the life of sickle cell disease patients possible side effects include influenza and high fever and the drug costs more than $80000 a year I'm Jackie Quinn

Novartis Veoh influenza Jackie Quinn $80000
"novartis" Discussed on AP News

AP News

12:47 min | 1 year ago

"novartis" Discussed on AP News

"The food and drug administration's approved a doc fee for patients 16 and older it's given as a monthly infusion and cuts in half the occurrences of sickle cell pain episodes but the drug from Novartis AG is pricey between 85000 and $113000 a year sickle cell disease is an inherited blood disorder affecting about 100000 Americans mostly African American it's a debilitating condition causing anemia delayed growth vision problems and painful swelling and hands and feet because the organ damage from sickle cell disease shortens the lives of patients there is ongoing testing to see if a deck video might address that too I Jackie Quinn

Novartis AG blood disorder Americans Jackie Quinn $113000
Novartis pulls Zantac and its generic brand over possible cancer link

In Search of the Lord's Way

00:55 sec | 2 years ago

Novartis pulls Zantac and its generic brand over possible cancer link

"This is help call for help the drug is called the dean but most of us know it by its brand name zantac millions of Americans take zantac or generic versions of ranitidine for heartburn but there are concerns about these drugs now the testing is found possible contamination with the chemical that's been linked to cancer that chemical called NDMA is also found in many foods including bacon cheese and beer as a precautionary measure a division of the Swiss drug company Novartis has stopped distribution of generic zantac recently certain blood pressure pills were recalled because of similar contamination the food and drug administration has been looking into the matter but so far is not issued any directives the FDA does say if you take one of these drugs and are concerned and thinking about stopping you should talk to your doctor first for more health news go to fox news health dot com house call

Ranitidine Novartis FDA
Novartis has halted distribution of generic Zantac. Here's what you need to know.

Morning Edition

00:41 sec | 2 years ago

Novartis has halted distribution of generic Zantac. Here's what you need to know.

"The drug company Novartis's holding the distribution of popular heartburn medicines that were found to be contaminated with a probable carcinogen and here's rob Stein has more the drug company says it is halting worldwide distribution of heartburn medicines containing we needed dean these are generic versions of the popular heartburn drug zantac the move comes after the food and drug administration found some of these products contained low levels of a substance called N. D. M. A. N. DMA is a probable carcinogen the FDA is investigating the source of the contamination the same contaminant was previously found in blood pressure and heart failure

Novartis N. D. M. A. N. Dma FDA Heartburn Rob Stein
"novartis" Discussed on Health Care Rounds

Health Care Rounds

06:19 min | 2 years ago

"novartis" Discussed on Health Care Rounds

"The f._d._a. Announced tuesday that novartis artis submitted the drug application for zolkin's ma the company's novel gene therapy treatment for spinal muscular atrophy with manipulated data the f._d._a. Says it is assessing the matter remains confident that the gene therapy will continue to be available to patients echoing a statement from the agency's press release acting f._d._a. Commissioner dr ned sharpness tweeted that the agency quote will use its full authorities to take action if appropriate which may include civil or criminal penalties realties the agency wrote in a statement quote. It is the manufacturer's responsibility to submit complete and accurate information in marketing applications for evaluation nation by the f._d._a. If we become aware of concern with data submitted to the agency as part of our review of a product application is in the best interest of patients their caregivers are givers and the public that we disclose such information to the extent permitted by law. Here's our take we're covering. to issue as the f._d._a. Acknowledges in statement statement occurred during animal testing not during the crucial human trials that demonstrated that drug safety and efficacy second the f._d._a. Says it is confident. The zolkin's must should remain on the market bottom. Line headlines have been sensational. There isn't much to this story and let's not forget that so against what is truly truly a breakthrough therapy offering hope for patients whose children were previously subjected to a horrible quality of life and certain death novartis says it is taking taking steps to address the incident such as exiting the small number of of exa scientists involved in these data inaccuracies and hiring a thousand new of excess employees days and the f._d._a. Will determine the appropriate regulatory or legal actions to take fortunately in this case. It looks like there hasn't been an won't be any harm armed done to patients. You can read novartis official statement on their website. Here's what else you need to know c._m._s. It has agreed to reimburse any f._d._a. Approved car t. cell therapy's the agency announced wednesday cartel therapies are used to fight certain cancers by using the patient's own genetically modified immune cells c._m._s. that it will cover car. T. cell therapy is when they are provided in healthcare facilities enrolled in the f._d._a.'s risk <unk> evaluation and mitigation strategy programs for f._d._a. Approved indications and for off label uses that are recommended by c._m._s. approved compendium s._m. Health is introducing an individual health plan in saint louis market this fall for coverage to begin january one twenty twenty. The plan called well. I health will utilize s._m. Health network of physicians hospitals and clinics and we'll be offered on the a._c._a.'s health insurance marketplace place. The plan is the health systems i for a in the insurance market in saint louis it currently operates dean health plan in wisconsin which provides coverage to about four hundred thousand members prevention bios tip losers received the f._d._a.'s breakthrough therapy designation the company the announced last monday to bloom ab an investigational anti cd three monoclonal antibody is being developed to prevent or decay clinical type one diabetes and at risk individuals the designation will expedite the drug development and regulatory review new york city launched n._y._c. care a program that offers health care to uninsured residents who've lived in the city for at least six months and cannot afford or do not qualify for health insurance for now members can receive care at one of seven locations in the bronx operated by n._y._c. health and hospitals. The program will be implemented a city wide by year end a statement by the governor's office noted that about half of the city's six hundred thousand uninsured residents are likely eligible for enrollment in n._y._c. Care c._v._s. has expanded. Its care pass program to participating c._v._s. pharmacies throughout the u._s. The company announced last monday for a membership fee. Five dollars a month or forty eight dollars. Annually members can get one to two day home delivery of qualifying prescription option drug orders and other store items at no extra charge members also have access to a twenty four seven pharmacists helpline and receive discounts on certain certain health related c._v._s. products walgreens customers.

saint louis spinal muscular atrophy zolkin walgreens dr ned sharpness Commissioner twenty twenty official wisconsin a._c._a. new york forty eight dollars Five dollars six months two day
Spinal Muscular Atrophy, US And Novartis discussed on WBZ Morning News

WBZ Morning News

00:24 sec | 2 years ago

Spinal Muscular Atrophy, US And Novartis discussed on WBZ Morning News

"How much US regularly approve the most expensive medicine ever. Gene therapy Medicare a disorder that rapidly destroys a baby's muscle control our mission at Novartis is to discover new ways to improve an extent, people's lives. The gene therapy developed by Navarre will cost more than two million dollars. Treats, a rare condition called spinal muscular atrophy, which strikes about four hundred babies born in the US each year.

Spinal Muscular Atrophy United States Novartis Navarre Two Million Dollars
Novartis now has the most expensive drug ever after getting US approval

The Mentors

00:36 sec | 2 years ago

Novartis now has the most expensive drug ever after getting US approval

"US regulators have approved the most expensive medicine ever, according to correspondent migrants you the most expensive medicine ever has won approval from the US food and Drug administration. Zoll jen's is priced at two point one two five million dollars sold by the Swiss drugmaker Novartis, they'll Jasmine's a one time therapy that treats an inherited condition called spinal muscular atrophy, or the rare disorder destroys a baby's muscle control and kills nearly all patients with the most common type of the disease within a couple of years. Novartis says it will let insure as make payments over five years, and we'll give partial rebates if the treatment

Novartis Zoll Jen Spinal Muscular Atrophy United States Drug Administration Jasmine One Two Five Million Dollars Five Years
"novartis" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

03:40 min | 2 years ago

"novartis" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

"The stock Blackstone in the banks are calling the shots, and you're just one for the ride got except that so after yesterday's gaining spike car, does it make sense to even think about owning trade web Webeer. Well, that depends on the valuation basis and back of the envelope. Math. I think trade web could be selling for roughly thirty one times. This year's earnings estimates thirty one keep this summer mind that's much more expensive than the major stock exchanges in electron electric brokerage services, but these aren't necessarily good comparisons. I think the best comparison here may be market access, which is another latronic trading platform for bonds. And you know, I like that very much. We had him on the show. Always welcome back market access sells for fifty times earnings that makes trae web seem like a bargain especi-. When you consider the trade web, actually as a fast growth rate that mere really cements my liking of TWA bottom line when you look into trade web. It's easy to see why it's IPO was such a huge hit. It deserves to be after yesterday's monster move the stock is far from cheap. But you've got my blessing to buy this one. Although, obviously, these prices a little more speculative just be careful bide slowly hope you'll get a pullback so you can get more in at an even better basis. Lee in Virginia Lee peo-, Jim colored time I wanna talk to you about smart sheet, which I just added to my portfolio. I think it's a play that could become one of your pro princes. It's up more than fifty percents for the year. But just after I bought my shares at dropped ten percent. And that's using this one or is there. No, no, no, you're right. It's got a little niche. It's a little niche. But I think that let's do more wanted for you. Because I didn't understand why it just dropped. I'm hoping was just part of that overall anti cloud that we had, but I can't say that without. Owing more friend, Pennsylvania. Fred. Questions on dropbox with March of eighteen twenty one hundred reach two hundred forty three fifty somewhere around Germany since it is hovering around twenty one hundred twenty three hours. So that supporters released for good except last quarter had somewhat of a which I'm fairly down this site. Settled by I know, I got to say hold it here. Look, we're big fans when it came to house, we still like it. I know it's been a great stuff. And sometimes you just pick stocks. And but what can I say it hasn't done a lot? But I think through is doing a good job. I think it's just a matter of time for it does better. But a lot of people don't have the time to okay, no, you're IPO people you have my blessing to by trade web. Even if this were speculating because it's moved up so kit so much. That's why tread carefully that much money at what headache with Amgen and Novartis doing over the migraine drug ama- big our by honor suitable is stuck in the middle. I'm s. What it means for the company, then good news? If the dog ate your home. I did it for you. And it could make you some money and all your calls rapid fire in tonight's fish the lightning rounds. So stay with Kramer. Monday kickoff. The trading day was squawk on the street. Live from post nine at the NYSE. The amount of waste. It's horrible. Taking take you to stand up right here is taking a step. You are against pollution. I am wo. It all starts at nine AM eastern. Now, there's a knock down drag out fight going on in the pharma space over my as someone who suffers from my grains. I am clan..

Kramer Blackstone trae Germany Lee migraine Virginia Amgen Fred Pennsylvania NYSE Novartis twenty one hundred twenty thre ten percent
Novartis Johnson And Merck discussed on Dave Ramsey

Dave Ramsey

00:16 sec | 2 years ago

Novartis Johnson And Merck discussed on Dave Ramsey

"Drugmakers sake. Don't blame us for price increases Novartis Johnson and Johnson and Merck. All blamed bigger cuts taken by middlemen in the industry through rebates and discounts. Those so-called middlemen, including pharmacy benefit management companies say they typically keep less than

Novartis Johnson Merck
"novartis" Discussed on FT Big Read

FT Big Read

02:50 min | 3 years ago

"novartis" Discussed on FT Big Read

"I'm on a data from the opinion and analysis desk. Podium pharma face, it's more than a thousand lawsuits claiming it ignited and fueled the US opioid crisis. Since David Crowe prosecutors, say the company exaggerated the benefits of painkiller Oxycontin and his marketing practices sharply criticized. But it has also emerged that through that ownership at the generic opioid, make roads, former podiums owners, the Sackler family have a big market shed than me lightest since David. Like many sows people walking in the US pharmacies who's industry cow Panera had often heard about the legendary bonuses on offered Pudu pharma, the make of the now infamous agreed painkiller, Oxycontin, she recalls. I remember one of the reps telling me you could make forty thousand or fifty thousand dollars a quarter in bonuses. I thought, wow, Dr actually company's paying that kind of money. Why can't I find something like that? I had two kids were getting ready to go to college. It sounded as if it was too good to be true. In two thousand eight miss Pinera decided to quit her job at Novartis the Swiss drugmaker and join Purdue a career move that has since become the source of bitter regret. I belong to the diner in Medford New Jersey. She recounts how she became concerned about the tactics Purdue used to increase sales of Oxycontin drug that has been blamed for sparking the US opioid crisis, MS Pinella claims. She and her colleagues were instructed to boost sales of Oxycontin a potent and addictive painkiller by Gresley taunting, inexperienced doctors while underplaying risks bee's this Panera who left in twenty thirteen and who's lost? Yes. Subpoenaed by the state attorney general in New Jersey says, I feel bad that the company was so blase so negligent about taking responsibility. I feel in this led the public and misled the doctors, and they misled the salespeople. The actions of miss Panera and her colleagues at Purdue have become central to the legal case that prosecutors are now building against the company. There are mold in one thousand lawsuits for by states and local governments in the US alleging drugmakers marketing practices ignited and then fueled the accurate crisis which claimed more than forty two thousand lives and twenty sixteen. Litigation, which is expected to reach court. Early next year is designed to extract hundreds of millions of dollars from the company and its owners. The billionaires sacra family public officials, say they need the cash to help offset.

US Panera Purdue Medford New Jersey David Crowe Pinera Pudu pharma MS Pinella Novartis Gresley attorney fifty thousand dollars
Sanofi and Novartis are stockpiling drugs to prepare for Brexit

24 Hour News

01:56 min | 3 years ago

Sanofi and Novartis are stockpiling drugs to prepare for Brexit

"From a to z A North Carolina newspapers blaming President Trump for its. Decision to drop Sunday comics in an editorial the. Is Sonian in Lumberton says it'll no longer print it's, eight page color comics section in Sunday editions because of rising costs caused by the Trump administration's tariffs on, Canadian newsprint that tariffs put in place in March. Caused newsprint prices to go up by twenty five to thirty percent the newspaper says it's a decision we. Really believe was made, at the White House it, will now run. Only a, single page of. Black and. White comics. And puzzles pharmaceutical company Sanofi has begun to stockpile more drugs in Britain. Than usual as part of contingency plans for delivery delays after Brexit. AP correspondent Charles de LA desma reports the pharmaceutical group, says uncertainty in. The Brexit negotiations the planning for no deal scenario with a senior management Clear that patient safety is the company's main priority concern is growing in Britain about a no deal Brexit abruptly ending forty, years, of cohesion and triggering, tariffs I'm boulder checks that could delay shipments of everything from food and. Fuel to clothing and cars the, largest here is that. Britain could drop out of Europe wide agreements the govern areas such as aviation and prescription drugs Charles de LA desma London Facebook says it's uncovered a sophisticated attempt to influence u. s. elections AP correspondent Warren Levinson reports on some. Phony accounts Facebook says it has removed thirty two accounts from Facebook and Instagram finding. Them to be fake and involved in what it called coordinated political behavior it did. Not say the accounts originated in Russia and stopped short of calling them an effort to affect this year's congressional election but they appear to hold the playbook of two. Thousand sixteen when Russia's internet.

Facebook Britain Charles De La Desma President Trump Trump Administration Russia North Carolina Lumberton White House Sanofi Charles De La Brexit Warren Levinson Europe Instagram London Thirty Percent
"novartis" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

04:59 min | 3 years ago

"novartis" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"To date we've had principal investigators that is those of the lead scientists on a given experiment from from companies like ally lilly and novartis we've also i had a principal investigator from the department of defense and we've also begun to support space biology program investigators those individuals typically come from academia they also include some nasa scientists okay right so the lead scientist on any of the nasa research missions couldn't be from these other institutions be anyone yeah and they've probably never flown an experiment in space before right so that's where you would come in to help them get everything designed and set up the whole project supports that so my you know personally my function is to review the is to evaluate whether the plans that are developed to support the experiment do what they need to do it's sort of a simple way of now early in the project we devise what what's described as a validation mission so we brought together either science science experts scientists who flown experiments in the shuttle era and animal that narian 's to develop the first mission in which we could test out the the plan essentially and that mission had half of that mission supported novartis principal investigator lead scientists and half of it tested all of our procedures and processes we carefully monitored the animals and all that now to get the the most benefit from this mission and from subsequent mission we collected samples from from the animals and we preserve them and in such a way that subsequently various types of analyses in assays can be performed in we can learn even more about them so we take the samples we stored them very cold temperatures to maintain their their the quality and then we sent them out to different scientists around the country who who have expertise and interests in analyzing them and one group which received some of these sounds samples was g lab and so hall leave it to john to to kind of explain how gene lab can further magnify the benefit gained from this kind of approach right exactly that's where john comes in sorry we've been ignoring you so please jump in here so just as ruth is the project scientist for rodent research you're the project scientist for the gene lap project right that's right so can you tell us what does that mean you do and what is gene lab at the highest level my job is to again inform the engineers and all the other team members of what the requirements of the scientific community are going to be so my primary job is to ensure that the land product which will discuss what that is suits the needs of the scientific community so i have a scientific type scientific training have scientific contacts and so i can give that perspective to the rest of the team gene lab is a relatively new initiative here at nasa and at its core what we're trying to do is to drive the production of more data sets and also the reuse of data sets from biological experiments performance base and ruth has already brought up the road and research project and is a great example of this so if we again go back to this validation study that ruth mentioned mice were flown is an teams did primary analyses on these mice and then tissues were deposited to a database or a tissue storage facility gene lab then was able to effectively write a proposal to access those tissues and generate more data from them so we generated data on the transcript dome of those tissues and this or the transcript dome is meant to be a comprehensive view of the arna profile of a cell in our arnaiz very important to how a cell operates it's kind of what the cells are doing tells you that right so it's the genome is you can think of it as being the sort of the hard drive of the cell and then the are a is produced from the genome and that then gets converted into proteins proteins are doing actual chemistry and so the art arnaiz intermediate intermediary between those those two states and there's very nice technologies now to actually measure that aren't a profile in a very precise and robust way so we were able to do that from a number of tissues from this rodent research validation study gene ab one of the core values of gina is that it's an open science initiative so we we generate.

principal
"novartis" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

04:59 min | 3 years ago

"novartis" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"To date we've had principal investigators that is those of the lead scientists on a given experiment from from companies like ally lilly and novartis we've also i had a principal investigator from the department of defense and we've also begun to support space biology program investigators those individuals typically come from academia they also include some nasa scientists okay right so the lead scientist on any of the nasa research missions couldn't be from these other institutions be anyone yeah and they've probably never flown an experiment in space before right so that's where you would come in to help them get everything designed and set up the whole project supports that so my you know personally my function is to review the is to evaluate whether the plans that are developed to support the experiment do what they need to do it's sort of a simple way of now early in the project we devise what what's described as a validation mission so we brought together either science science experts scientists who flown experiments in the shuttle era and animal that narian 's to develop the first mission in which we could test out the the plan essentially and that mission had half of that mission supported novartis principal investigator lead scientists and half of it tested all of our procedures and processes we carefully monitored the animals and all that now to get the the most benefit from this mission and from subsequent mission we collected samples from from the animals and we preserve them and in such a way that subsequently various types of analyses in assays can be performed in we can learn even more about them so we take the samples we stored them very cold temperatures to maintain their their the quality and then we sent them out to different scientists around the country who who have expertise and interests in analyzing them and one group which received some of these sounds samples was g lab and so hall leave it to john to to kind of explain how gene lab can further magnify the benefit gained from this kind of approach right exactly that's where john comes in sorry we've been ignoring you so please jump in here so just as ruth is the project scientist for rodent research you're the project scientist for the gene lap project right that's right so can you tell us what does that mean you do and what is gene lab at the highest level my job is to again inform the engineers and all the other team members of what the requirements of the scientific community are going to be so my primary job is to ensure that the land product which will discuss what that is suits the needs of the scientific community so i have a scientific type scientific training have scientific contacts and so i can give that perspective to the rest of the team gene lab is a relatively new initiative here at nasa and at its core what we're trying to do is to drive the production of more data sets and also the reuse of data sets from biological experiments performance base and ruth has already brought up the road and research project and is a great example of this so if we again go back to this validation study that ruth mentioned mice were flown is an teams did primary analyses on these mice and then tissues were deposited to a database or a tissue storage facility gene lab then was able to effectively write a proposal to access those tissues and generate more data from them so we generated data on the transcript dome of those tissues and this or the transcript dome is meant to be a comprehensive view of the arna profile of a cell in our arnaiz very important to how a cell operates it's kind of what the cells are doing tells you that right so it's the genome is you can think of it as being the sort of the hard drive of the cell and then the are a is produced from the genome and that then gets converted into proteins proteins are doing actual chemistry and so the art arnaiz intermediate intermediary between those those two states and there's very nice technologies now to actually measure that aren't a profile in a very precise and robust way so we were able to do that from a number of tissues from this rodent research validation study gene ab one of the core values of gina is that it's an open science initiative so we we generate.

principal
"novartis" Discussed on MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"novartis" Discussed on MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

"Couple of days about this person shouldn't be held even though we were trying to get documents because she had moved that was his surgeon and then we found out that she had been in washington dc all along i think what's going on here both with respect to russia and with respect to the novartis matter the president and his allies are awfully afraid of what is in these documents and for example on the nevada's deal in particular what i can tell you is our finance investigators are very good they understand financial crimes tax crimes and treasury secretary mr mnuchin knows about this personally because our investigators determined that he failed to disclose a hundred million dollars in assets before his confirmation hearing in terms of the likelihood of success here obviously you have leverage as an individual senator putting a hold on nominees until you got this information that you want typically the way this works is that that starts a negotiation that starts discussion that at least makes the department think about whether or not they might wanna loosen up in terms of this information do you have support from other committee members have you had any indication from treasury in terms of whether or not they're willing to give you what you want i have talked to mr mnuchin about access to documents but what we're going to do particularly on the fart navarre dist matter is isolated this administration and the treasury secretary as the outlier we have been able to get information indicating that the company is willing to cooperate mr cohen's council says he's willing to cooperate and there are a lot of questions to be determined here what exactly was.

russia novartis president nevada mr mnuchin senator washington financial crimes mr cohen hundred million dollars
"novartis" Discussed on The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer

The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"novartis" Discussed on The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer

"The white house says at and t payments president trump's personal lawyer michael cohen to consult on a merger with time warner or proof that mr trump won't be influenced by special interests because of his justice department is trying to block the deal our justice bertha jessica schneider as more details just at and t now says hiring we're cohen was a big mistake a big mistake and at and t and novartis are both using that word mistake the ceo's of both companies have sent out emails to their employees fessing up about this existence of contracts with michael cohen but these recently revealed payments for what seems to be primarily access to the president well it's raising a lot of questions both ethically and legally tonight to companies that paid michael cohen hundreds of thousands of dollars to gain access and insight into the president are saying they made a mistake at and t ceo randal stevenson sent an email to employees worldwide taking responsibility for hiring cohen saying there was no other way to say it at and t hiring michael cohen as a political consultant was a big mistake stevenson also announced that one of the executives involved in the deal would be retiring novartis ceo of son narasimhan who is not at the helm when the company contract with cohen acknowledged in a note to employees he's we made a mistake and entering into this engagement and as a consequence are being criticized by a world that expects more from us the perception is that what they were trying to do the by access or by information about the president and it doesn't look good a gop strategist tell c n n cohen capitalized on his long relationship with the president using this as his sales pitch to powerful entities looking for a way into.

white house michael cohen warner jessica schneider novartis ceo president randal stevenson consultant mr trump t gop
"novartis" Discussed on MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"novartis" Discussed on MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

"Story the drug giant ceo sending an email to all staff saying quote yesterday was not a good day for novartis given the news about their relationship with cohen but if yesterday was bad for novartis today could be worse take a look at this new reporting it turns out and this is according to stat news which specializes in healthcare coverage that the hundred thousand dollar monthly retainer fee that novartis was paying to cohen's llc was to help it quote better understand you as healthcare policy matters and it was four times more i'm going to repeat that quadruple what they paid any other qualified external lobbyists also according to stat news novartis has spent twelve million dollars on lobbying since trump took office compare that to the one point two million that went entirely to michael cohen about ten percent of everything this giant company says they've spent on lobbying then you have the amount at and t handed over to cohen michael in his initial report had said at and t had given a central consultants about two hundred thousand the actual amount now that this is all coming out with new reporting it tops out closer to six hundred thousand eight hundred and t saying what the six hundred grand is four well that explanation has already shifted rapidly in the new story i you heard it was expertise unquote regulatory reform okay i don't know that that's his expertise but okay then they said it was four and understanding of the inner workings of trump that might be closer to what go and knows but now and this is worse washington post reporting internal documents that's what they say obviously to themselves that reveal for the first time ever that at and t six hundred thousand dollars from michael cohen had a specific condition that cohen advise them on the wapping eighty five billion dollar merger between at and t and time warner which requires trump administration appointed regulators merger that trump had opposed during the campaign.

novartis trump michael cohen ceo t washington six hundred thousand dollars eighty five billion dollar hundred thousand dollar twelve million dollars ten percent
"novartis" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"novartis" Discussed on The Takeaway

"The only thing he had to offer was his relationship with president trump so apparently that is that's what we're talking about here is this a pay to play essentially that he did he offer access is that what he's getting paid for clearly the companies said one novartis one navarre disofficial was telling people yesterday that they were in fact seeking access in the official statements they said they were seeking an understanding of the president they were seeking insight into the president but it's really important to understand here i think this point is kind of confusing essential consultants elsie was not a real company it was a shell company it had no employee's it had no infrastructure there was no lobbying firm paul manafort currently under indictment for money laundering actually was a lobbyist head a lobbying firm michael cohen just had his name and that email signature private attorney to president donald j trump to sell so i think it's a really important question and and in fact novartis sort of was like well he didn't really do anything for us and so we didn't renew his contract but we paid him anyway because we couldn't get out of it so it looks like it was purely a way to get in with trump administration i think what is so striking about this story as everybody understands that that's what happens in the world even donald trump clearly understands it but now actually what we're seeing people are just sort of saying like yeah that's what we were going for.

navarre disofficial president elsie paul manafort michael cohen attorney official president donald j donald trump
"novartis" Discussed on Biden's Briefing

Biden's Briefing

02:42 min | 4 years ago

"novartis" Discussed on Biden's Briefing

"About twothirds of terminal cancer patients without and approved immunotherapy option but prasong says that isn't stopping physicians from prescribing the drugs anyway hype has encouraged rampant off label use of checkpoint inhibitors as a lastditch effort he says even for patients with tumorous that show no evidence they'll respond to the drugs the antibodies were available off the shelf but at a list price near one hundred fifty thousand dollars per year it's an investment prasong says doctors shouldn't encourage lightly especially when there's no reliable way predicting who will respond and who won't this thwarts one of the goals of cancer care says preside when you run out of helpful responses how do you help a patient navigate what it means to die well merck and squibb have dominated this first wave immunotherapy selling almost nine billion dollars worth of checkpoint inhibitors since they went on sale in 2015 roche astra zeneca novartis ally lilley abbvie and regenerate on have all since jumped in the game spending billions on acquiring biotech startups and beefing up inhouse pipelines and eight hundred clinical trials involving a checkpoint inhibitor are currently underway in the us compared with about two hundred in 2015 this is not sustainable genentech vp of cancer immunology ira melhman told the audience at last year's annual meeting of the society for immunotherapy of cancer with some many trials he said the industry was throwing every checkpoint inhibitor combination at the wall just to see what would stick after more than a decade stretching out the promise of checkpoint inhibitors patients and businesses were ready for something new and this year they got it car t cell therapy the immunotherapy involves extracting a patients tcells and genetically rewiring them so they can more efficiently home in on tumors in the body training a foot soldier as an assassin that can slip behind enemy lines in september the fda cleared the first car teeth therapy treatment for children with advanced leukemia developed by novartis which made history as the first ever gene therapy approved for market a month later the agency approved another live cell treatment developed by kite pharma for a form of adult lymphoma in trials for the lymphoma drug fifty percent of patients saw their cancer disappear.

prasong lilley abbvie us vp leukemia squibb roche astra zeneca genentech fda one hundred fifty thousand dol nine billion dollars fifty percent