37 Burst results for "Nova"

Fresh update on "nova" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:40 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "nova" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

"Year. Liz Anderson WTO news. China placed nearly 2 million people under lockdown in central ennui province, where authorities reported nearly 300 new cases today to the latest in a string of outbreaks testing Beijing's no tolerance approach to COVID. The outbreak and ennui were officials first found hundreds of cases last week, comes as the Chinese economy begins to rebound from a months long lockdown in Shanghai and disruptive COVID regularity restrictions and regulations in Beijing. A first dual language program for the schools in the Roman Catholic diocese of Arlington. Inside nova reports saint Ambrose Catholic school in annandale is launching a program for kindergarten as this coming school year to provide reading and instruction in English and in Spanish. The school says by the time those children, complete 8th grade, every student and the parish's K through 8th grade school will receive instruction in both languages. The superintendent of schools for the diocese says the hope is that the children develop skills to help them communicate more effectively

Liz Anderson Covid Beijing Saint Ambrose Catholic School Roman Catholic Diocese China Shanghai Annandale Arlington
Fresh "Nova" from WTOP 24 Hour News

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:26 min | 6 hrs ago

Fresh "Nova" from WTOP 24 Hour News

"It's 5 23 now Herschel woody Williams, the last remaining Medal of Honor recipient from World War II, will lie in state at the U.S. capitol. West Virginia senator Joe Manchin announced the honor at a memorial yesterday where Williams was remembered for his courage, humility and selflessness. Williams, who died last Wednesday at the age of 98, was a legend in his native West Virginia for his heroics under fire over several crucial hours at the Battle of Iwo Jima. As a young marine Corporal, Williams went ahead of his unit in February 1945 and eliminated a series of Japanese machine gun positions. To your health, sponsored by D.C. health, get vaccinated D.C., go to vaccinate dot D.C. dot gov. China placed nearly 2 million people under lockdown in central anhui province where authorities reported nearly 300 new COVID cases today. It's the latest in a string of outbreaks testing Beijing's no tolerance approach to COVID. The outbreak and ennui were officials first found hundreds of cases last week comes as the Chinese economy begins to rebound from a months long lockdown in Shanghai and disruptive COVID restrictions in Beijing. A young designer is making a fashion statement with her new HBCU clothing line. Ashley Jones is the owner of tones of melanin, she started the brand in 2017 and decided to focus on HBCU streetwear clothing. I went to school at northern state university and, you know, when I went in my bookstore, I didn't see anything that really represented my population. Her line is now in duke's sporting goods at HBCU bookstores. All happened like really fast. We have reversible shorts. We have, of course, at your sweatshirt t-shirts. We're getting into vegan leather bags. Ashley says supporting HBCUs is her main message while creating a sense of pride. The education is top not and you're prepared for the world. Melissa, how will WTO news? A first dual language program for the schools in the Roman Catholic diocese of Arlington. Inside nova reports, saint Ambrose Catholic school in annandale is launching a program for kindergarteners this coming school year to provide reading and instruction in English and Spanish. The school says that by the time those children complete 8th grade, every student in the parish's K through 8th grade school will receive instruction in both languages. The superintendent of schools for the diocese says the hope is that the children develop the skills to help them communicate more effectively. Money news of 25 and 55, minions the rise of gru won the box office battle this weekend bringing in more than $108 million in ticket sales. By the end of today, it will likely have earned close to a $128 million. At film is on track to become one of

Herschel Woody Williams Senator Joe Manchin Williams D.C. Battle Of Iwo Jima West Virginia Beijing Northern State University Anhui Ashley Jones Saint Ambrose Catholic School U.S. Shanghai China Roman Catholic Diocese Ashley WTO Annandale Melissa Arlington
Dr. Sam Pappas: We've Learned Natural Immunity & New Treatments Work

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:48 min | 4 months ago

Dr. Sam Pappas: We've Learned Natural Immunity & New Treatments Work

"So now we have multiple vaccines. Now we have France's Collins and others saying, yes, there are issues of heart inflammation, myocarditis. We have gone much further than what you helped me with originally, which is hydroxychloroquine, the Z pack, then Ivermectin came along now. We have the new nova, the new vaccine that's still under testing. Novavax. So tell us about what we have learned in just the last few months about COVID and the way to treat it. Well, we've learned that natural immunity is fantastic. We kind of knew that already, but it's been proven now multiple multiple times, but still not acknowledged, so we know natural immunity is a great place to be in a safety net. We know that many, many more treatments are out there and as the variants have gotten weaker and the new variant omicron and I want to listeners to know that's how you pronounce it. It's omicron. Yeah, not Omni cron. So you know, I had a trachea. I actually found that the British, I went and I checked with the 83 year old Professor of anatomy at Stanford from the UK and it is tricky and not in America. But in the original, real English, it's tricky. That's an intro from the last excellent. You do your homework. So we've learned that with the new variants that the treatments are much more effective that less people are getting hospitalized and having serious complications. It's a milder version. And attacking mostly the upper, which is less dangerous. Once it goes into the lower into the alveoli, that's really dangerous, especially for the elderly. Exactly. But I'm a little different than a lot of my peers who are for early treatment. Many of them say, well, only if you're 50 or above, and my take is, this can have a chronic component to it,

Heart Inflammation Novavax Myocarditis Omni Cron Collins France Stanford UK America
Canadian Ezra Levant Discusses Trudeau and the Truckers

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:56 min | 5 months ago

Canadian Ezra Levant Discusses Trudeau and the Truckers

"Talk to me about kind of Canadians in general near view of Trudeau. I mean, has he still popular? Is he still, I mean, it doesn't seem that way, but he calls it a fringe minority. Is that true? Well, it's funny you say that. We have a multi party parliamentary system. So Trudeau won the last election with only 32% of the vote. So it's quite rich for him to say that anyone who criticizes him is a fringe majority when 68% of Canadians who voted didn't vote for him at all. I should say that the latest polls show that the truckers, 32% of Canadians say they see themselves in the truckers. So if the truckers were a political party, they would immediately be at the top of the polls in Canada. So that's a bit of a political earthquake. These truckers, by the way, they weren't organized by any political party. There's no super PAC. They're really not even organized. It's sort of a organic movement. People said, I'll join I'll join. And over the course of time, probably a 100,000 trucks joined. Some came and went somewhat to different parts of the country. And along the roads, maybe a million Canadians went out to see them to wave at them to cheer them on. It was so much so that the Canadian province of Nova Scotia passed a health order. Again, no debate in a legislature just issued an executive order that it is illegal to stand by the road to quote support the trucker convoy. And the word support and trucker convoy are specifically named. So you can go to the side of the road to oppose the trucker convoy. You can go to the side of the road to oppose or support any other thing you want. But the government of Nova Scotia specifically made it illegal to support this trucker

Trudeau Canada Nova Scotia Legislature
No. 2 Baylor primed for top after 57-36 win over No. 6 Nova

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | 7 months ago

No. 2 Baylor primed for top after 57-36 win over No. 6 Nova

"James James again again Joe Joe had had sixteen sixteen points points with with seven seven rebounds rebounds as as the the second second ranked ranked pair pair stifled stifled number number six six Villanova Villanova fifty fifty seven seven thirty thirty six six am am Flagler Flagler had had ten ten points points as as Baylor Baylor earned earned its its fifteenth fifteenth straight straight win win dating dating to to last last season season the the bears bears never never trailed trailed in in their their first first non non conference conference home home game game ever ever against against the the top top six six opponents opponents Villanova Villanova shot shot only only twenty twenty two two percent percent and and had had several several extended extended scoring scoring droughts droughts while while being being held held to to its its lowest lowest point point total total in in six six hundred hundred eighty eighty nine nine games games under under coach coach Jay Jay Wright Wright who who is is in in his his twenty twenty first first season season I'm I'm Dave Dave Ferrie Ferrie

Villanova Villanova Flagler Flagler Baylor Baylor James James Joe Joe Bears Jay Jay Wright Wright Dave Dave Ferrie Ferrie
The Incredible True Story of Squanto

The Eric Metaxas Show

05:09 min | 7 months ago

The Incredible True Story of Squanto

"In 1608 before any ships before any people settled in what's now Massachusetts, I never knew this, because we all know that the Mayflower landed there in 1620. Chris, you knew that? I did at one point in my life. Right. So 1620 is when the pilgrims land at Plymouth. Sorry. But I always assumed growing up that that's the first time that anybody came to like what's Massachusetts. But I found out that's not the case. And the story of squanto, which I'm going to tell right now, which just wait, wait till you hear this. It starts in 1608, and it turns out that English trading ships would travel from Europe from England to Iceland, Greenland make their way down Nova Scotia all the way down and they would trade with the natives. Now I never knew that. So the natives were familiar with English sailors coming and trading and giving them knives and pots and pans and they would give them pelts and whatever. And they would trade. I never knew this. Well, in 1608, a group, a group, a ship led by a captain hunt lands or drops anchor off of what is today Plymouth Massachusetts. And the braves come down to the shore to trade with them as they've done before. Well, just so happens that this captain hunt was a bad man, and instead of trading with the braves, they whack them over the head, put them in the long boat, take them out to the ship, throw them in the hold, sail to malaga, Spain and sell them into slavery. This is 1608, one of the braves was a 12 year old. Boy named tisquantum. Now this is true story. This is all documented. I've done the research. Others have done the research. It's true. So he has bought by some kindly friars, who seemed to treat him well. Teach him the Christian religion, and this is the part that we'll never know how this happened. But they arrange for him to be freed and to travel to London. Now imagine from malaga Spain to London. So this is an Indian from what is today Massachusetts, a Native American, a patuxent, makes its way to London with the idea, and this is where it's crazy of getting back across the Atlantic to go back home. I know. It's like being on the moon and saying, so when's the next ship going back? There's no next ship going back. What are you talking about? But I guess the idea was not insane. He worked in London from what is it around 1612, 1613 for four or 5 years with a family called slany. This is all documented. This Indian named squanto to squantum learns the English language. He's there when he's there when Queen Elizabeth is on the throne, we're talking Shakespeare is writing his play. So he's in London. This Massachusetts Indian, and this is years before the pilgrims ever get to Plymouth rock, crazy, right? In 1618, I believe 1619, a ship is found. For him to go back to his home. And he's going to translate obviously because he knows the language. He's going to be on the ship working with these English as they're stopping, you know, and he's going to be doing the translating and so on and so forth. So somehow he gets passage on a ship. The ship ends up having to spend the winter in I can't remember if it was Iceland or Greenland. It's in my book. Where does it say? Newfoundland now, hold on a second. Anyway, the point is that it took them quite a while to get there, right? So they basically, no, it was Newfoundland. Sorry. They spend the winter in Newfoundland. And then the next spring, this is like 1619, they bring him to what's now the coast of Massachusetts drop him off. Thank you very much. Goodbye. This sounds crazy, right? This is document. This is a true story. So a year plus before the pilgrims land. This Indian has made the journey from Plymouth to Spain to London, spans 5 years London, learns the English language, learns the ways the English, and then ends up back where he started. He finds his way on foot to the village, which is right where Plymouth is today, right? Village where his Indian, where his family is, they have all been wiped out. In ten years, he's dreamed about getting home, he's dreamed about returning. He's dreamed for ten years. He's thought in his mind of doing the impossible to get all the way back

Massachusetts Braves Plymouth London Malaga Greenland Iceland Spain Slany Nova Scotia Chris Newfoundland England Europe Plymouth Rock Queen Elizabeth Atlantic Shakespeare
Founder of American Majority Ned Ryun on the Glenn Youngkin Playbook for Success

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:46 min | 8 months ago

Founder of American Majority Ned Ryun on the Glenn Youngkin Playbook for Success

"And we're back with the founder and CEO of American majority Ned Ryan. Let's break it down. Let's look at what does this mean? Yes, it's one election, but it's a resident of the Commonwealth. Right, man, I'm excited. It's so easy to ride off all these overpaid rich bureaucrats who moved into nova change the demographics of the state. Well, that's over. This man, the nice thing, my wife, you know, said, the thing about junkin is he's like Trump because even in his acceptance speech, he was rattling off the things he's going to do day one. Yeah, that's right. He's going to have a committee meeting. No. No. Batting CRT tax cuts put advanced courses back in. Right. I mean, there's a whole long list. Huge things that as a former CEO of Carlisle group, you know, he should be able to actually implement in a business like fashion. So let's pull back from the Commonwealth. Right. Let's look at what this means nationally. Let's look at what it means for next year and 2024. Let's break down first the Trump effect. I think my old boss, I might be biased. Played this really delicately and well. He did. Because he did that phone rally, but nothing else. He did a soft endorsement, but didn't come out banging the drum on Fox every single day for Glen. Glenn came out of the closet came in on my show after mucking around my producer for a few weeks. Quitting himself, well, and then once he came on maestra, he was you opened, you know, the force that he came out of breitbart he came out of Fox Glenn was everywhere suddenly, very interesting, which means he's not fully distancing himself. He walked a very fine line. Extrapolate this for next year in 24 Ned. Well, that was the smart part about what young Ken did and I think he literally has laid out a playbook for Republicans in 2022 if they're smart, which is a massive question. Let's be honest. We're talking about that master question next. Right. Drive the playbook. The playbook is he saw he took the side of the parents. It's common sense approach in which the parents should have an advocate in which we fund public schools, we should not be abused by them. We should not have our children indoctrinated and then our kids. And it's our money. The funds everything. And Republicans need to embrace this and go, yeah, we're siding with parents. I mean, this is so common sense. I still have been around politics so long. I'm sure there's going to be Republicans will find a way to mock this up in 2022. But if they fall the Glen young can playbook and embrace it and say I'm gonna be an advocate for parents, parents have every right to be involved in their children's education. They should have every right to be involved in how their taxpayer dollars are

Ned Ryan Junkin Carlisle Group Fox Glenn Donald Trump Nova Breitbart Glen Glenn FOX NED KEN
Rocktober (MM #3846)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 9 months ago

Rocktober (MM #3846)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason. Even though I've worked in and around country music for what 40 years, something like that, it's hard to believe. It's not the only type of music I enjoy. I'm a rock and pop kid from way back when, love some hip hop, love all sorts of things. But what always makes me smile as we turn the calendar to October is when I hear the first radio station announced that it's rock October. I often wondered where the term rock October came from. I remember hearing it probably in the early 80s listening to one of my favorite rock and roll stations back in the day. And to this day, most rock stations usually in the classic rock variety announced that it's rock October. Now what I don't know is what that means, I used to joke back when I lived in Akron that our sister station when they celebrated October should get ready for Aldo November, a very veiled reference in an old Aldo nova song called fantasy, a one hit wonder if you will. It's something that always made me chuckle and it still does to this day and I don't know why, because if you like rock music, you're listening all the time. 365 days a year, at least 12 months of the year. It's October for some and I heard the first announcement the other day, and I just smiled.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Nasa Akron
Rocktober (MM #3846)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 9 months ago

Rocktober (MM #3846)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason. Even though I've worked in and around country music for what 40 years, something like that, it's hard to believe. It's not the only type of music I enjoy. I'm a rock and pop kid from way back when, love some hip hop, love all sorts of things. But what always makes me smile as we turn the calendar to October is when I hear the first radio station announced that it's rock October. I often wondered where the term rock October came from. I remember hearing it probably in the early 80s listening to one of my favorite rock and roll stations back in the day. And to this day, most rock stations usually in the classic rock variety announced that it's rock October. Now what I don't know is what that means, I used to joke back when I lived in Akron that our sister station when they celebrated October should get ready for Aldo November, a very veiled reference in an old Aldo nova song called fantasy, a one hit wonder if you will. It's something that always made me chuckle and it still does to this day and I don't know why, because if you like rock music, you're listening all the time. 365 days a year, at least 12 months of the year. It's October for some and I heard the first announcement the other day, and I just smiled.

Kevin Mason Nasa Akron
Senate Republicans block government funding bill, setting up a possible government shutdown

Marketplace Minute

00:30 sec | 9 months ago

Senate Republicans block government funding bill, setting up a possible government shutdown

"A bill funding the government and raising the debt ceiling. I'm nova safa with the marketplace minute. The vote in the senate fell far short of the sixty needed to avoid a filibuster. All republicans were against the measure on the grounds that democrats. The party in power should address the debt ceiling on their own. Democrats have signaled. They'll try again. I with a standalone government funding bill. That republicans are expected to support. The deadline is midnight. Friday to avoid a government shutdown. The president

Senate
Democrats Do Not Know How to Deal With Adversity

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:58 min | 10 months ago

Democrats Do Not Know How to Deal With Adversity

"They have a lot going for them. One thing they do not know how to do is they do not know how to deal with adversity. This regime that is currently running our country. They struggle with opposition. This is one of the reasons why i am trying to get conservatives to mount a counter-offensive against what this regime is doing. They are far more fragile than i think. People realize that they are not able to deal with criticism confrontation when they get into a state of confusion. All of a sudden they start fighting amongst themselves. This is why a unified conservative movement and ignoring people like liz. Cheney and adam kin zinger is so critically important cut fourteen is a cut from. Msnbc were they are covering this development over the weekend of elizabeth mic. Donahue is a parliamentarian for the united states senate and she blocked the entire passage of the amnesty bill and what. Msnbc to say about this well. Mendy hassan comes out and says you know what democrats are going to get voted out because we can't get our agenda through you see as soon as they come up against any opposition they shatter. Let's play that tape now. Democrats being democrats than nova overall the parliamentarian upon mentoring. Which means they're going to go into the mid next year saying we couldn't give you all the wonderful things we wanted to give you. Because of the parliamentarian and voters will say who the hell is the parliamentarian and vote out democrats. So basically he's saying is. Why are we listening to this parliamentarian. Who cares about the senate rules. What matters is the will of the people what matters is what we wanna do.

Adam Kin Zinger Elizabeth Mic Msnbc Mendy Hassan Donahue Cheney Confusion LIZ Senate United States
"nova" Discussed on NOVA Now

NOVA Now

07:44 min | 10 months ago

"nova" Discussed on NOVA Now

"This week began with tropical storm. Nicholas reaching category one hurricane force right before making landfall along the texas gulf coast and last week hurricane larry reached category three and then weakened but not before causing power outages as a category one in newfoundland canada. The atlantic hurricane season runs from june first through november thirtieth and. This has already been record-setting hurricane henry alone produced the rainiest our on record in new york city a record that was broken again less than two weeks later by hurricane ida here just a few of the recent headlines hide i made landfall off the coast of louisiana packing winds of up to one hundred and fifty miles per hour extremely dangerous cat. Four storm unleashing damaging winds torrential rains and of life threatening storm surge. The remnants of hurricane ida delivering a historic soaking in the northeast. Potential wrath is bringing up the issue of climate change and its effect on hurricane. So here's what. I'm wondering about hurricanes getting more frequent stronger more destructive and his any of this connected to climate change his nova now where we look for the answers behind a stormy headlines. I'm a look patel. All right sorry i guess we lost communications. We are looking at imminent landfall. Abyss store if you're watching the news on august twenty ninth. You might have seen al roker getting soaked by hurricane ida as barreled through new orleans one hundred fifty miles per hour are are like are right now forecast storm surges upwards of fifty to sixty feet twenty eight inches of rain or bore with this system. Ida is the latest storm to at the us as a category four hurricane but even after it was downgraded to a tropical storm. It wasn't finished what people didn't expect. Was that as it kept on going. It stayed strong enough and it swept up enough water vapor to dump record amounts of rain in the new york area and some places. The highest one hour rainfall total ever recorded. Catherine heyhoe is an atmospheric scientist and the chief scientist for the nature conservancy. She's also the author of saving us a climate scientists case for hope and healing in a divided world in the states. Dozens died in. Ida's wake it goes without saying that hurricanes are some of the most powerful natural phenomena on our planet floods and rip currents can result from a hurricane strong winds heavy rainfall in storm surge which is went coastal waters rice abnormally high levels. Heyhoe is convinced that the data shows that hurricanes are getting stronger and that it's because of climate change. Here's the thinking. Climate scientists estimate that ninety three percent of the excess heat trapped in the atmosphere by greenhouse gases finds its way into the ocean and warm water is hurricane fuel. What we're seeing is when they formed because there's so much more energy available to them. More of them are stronger. They're slower so they move slower and they don't more rain on us and it's very simple reason that as you warm the air its capacity to hold water vapor goes up goes quite fast seven percent for one degrees celsius increase in air. Temperature kerry emanuel is a professor of atmospheric science at the massachusetts institute of technology. Then this means that extreme rainstorms not just hurricanes but any kind of strong thunderstorm or or other kinds of storms. That rain will generally rain more so as they storms move along. There's more water vapor for them to speak up and dump on us for example with hurricane harvey that hit the city of houston back in august. Two thousand seventeen. We know that it had about forty percent more rain than it would have. If the same hurricane had happened one hundred years ago also. The warmer ocean water evaporates quicker and that makes more water vapor. So there's this whole feedback effect going on where the warmer gets the stronger and more damaging the hurricanes get and then there's also the fact that warmer water takes up more space so sea levels rising for two reasons reason number one is because land-based ice in greenland and antarctica. Smelting and that water is going into the ocean. But the second reason is simply because as the ocean gets warmer and actually literally takes up more space so when a hurricane comes along a lot of the damages due to hurricanes along the coast because of storm surges well as sea level rises. Those searches can reach further and further inland flooding. More and more areas. That wouldn't ordinarily be flooded. And as we destroy our coastal wetlands and as we build more and more valuable infrastructure rate along the coast. We're putting ourselves even more at risk. It's a lose lose loose. You may think hey hurricanes mainly affect coastal areas but that's not as true as it once was when hurricanes move over land you know they. We can pretty quickly right. You're unplugging them from the ocean so they're not plugged into their energy source anymore but because there's warmer air and more water vapor in the air and because they're getting stronger to begin with. We're also seeing that. Hurricanes are lasting longer at higher intensities over land than they used to and catherine heyhoe says hurricanes and tropical storms are moving farther north before they dissipate. And that's because warmer water is spreading further po word so they can maintain the hurricane status further northward than they used to so. It isn't like hurricanes have never made it to candidate before. Well now though hurricanes are moving up the coast in along halifax neva newfoundland. They're getting storms. That are still at hurricane strength because the warm ocean water is warm enough to keep them going further. North warmer conditions also can cause wind speeds to go up as you add greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. You increase the upper limit of wind. Speed that you can have thermo dynamically in a hurricane now. A very tiny percentage of actual storms reach this speed limit. But a few do and it's very important to recognize that that goes up so that in the future we expect to see and we're beginning to see records. being broken on wind speed in hurricanes. Climate scientists can model or atmosphere and oceans over vast scales. Dial different factors upper down on the computer model and a bunch of consequences fallout and they see all of this as temperatures get warmer. The models don't necessarily show hurricanes getting more frequent at least not in the north atlantic but they predict that hurricanes get stronger and more intense and extreme storms generally dumped more rain but how accurate are these climate models does nature actually behaved the way computers predict what do the observations on the ground. Tell us that after the break. Okay let's take a look at what these look like on the ground. When we think about hurricanes there are few important features to consider their frequency. How many of them. We see in a season there track so their location and.

hurricane ida hurricane texas gulf coast hurricane larry atlantic hurricane hurricane henry Catherine heyhoe Heyhoe kerry emanuel newfoundland al roker hurricane harvey Nicholas
"nova" Discussed on NOVA Now

NOVA Now

07:20 min | 10 months ago

"nova" Discussed on NOVA Now

"End of march through july of two thousand twenty. We actually found some surprising results. there was A little bit of relief for some adolescence reduction in school related stress came in terms of school. Schedule pressure when when Schools were closed in a move to online learning but however there were increases in a bunch of other types of stress for everybody there were increases in loneliness which wished we shouldn't find surprising in another study. Actually that the american psychological association fielded in august of twenty twenty. Really most notable stressor was at the actual uncertainty about the school year. So one thing that our bodies and brains really don't like is not being able to predict our environments that lack of being able to plan for the upcoming school year or lack of ability to plan for their future where some of the largest stressors that youth especially college age. Young adults were reporting but some were worse off than others. There were disparities by parent education level in terms of the impact so the pandemic with much worse impacts on stress and mood for Youth from lower and actually moderate education families and also one of the reasons that we might be seeing increases and depression and again that is likely to be born on equally by different socioeconomic groups and different racial groups given that there's been more more deaths in individuals of color and there's been more death in lower income groups the parents and the families are just encountering more stress there in the jobs that are As front line worker is they're more likely to get exposed to covert as a result they more likely to encounter job loss and they are more likely to have a challenge with working at home. Her previous research has also pointed to an important source of stress. The other thing that really stood out in my research in terms of predicting biological stress was Experiences of racial discrimination democ brought on a rise in anti asian hate in. Its first summer incidents of black people. Dying at the hands of the police also dominated the headlines. M adams team is currently analyzing how bees may have caused additional stress for young people. So we see these differences in stress exposure and stress biology as a as a probably an understudy pathway explaining some of the disparities in health and educational outcomes. And they're looking for ways to interrupt that pathway where engaged in a racial ethnic identity promotion intervention where designed by adriana taylor at harvard where we're having group discussions about race about discrimination about identity and that the meaning of identity and it turns out that having a strong ethnic identity helps to buffer you. From the stresses of discrimination and race related stress one of the most effective ways to reduce the damaging effects of stress on the mind and body for anyone is to improve sleep because your body expects a certain sleep wake cycle being consistent getting that predictability to your body helps you sleep well and that really has positive effects both on mental health physical health and academic outcomes. There's a whole bunch of sleep hygiene tips that you can find on the internet But i wanna emphasize that anything that increases your feelings of safety security. Regularity predictability is good for sleep and so for younger kids a bedtime routine involving parents. who gives you that. Sense of safety and security is really helpful as we now reopen schools and we have all these kids going back now to in person learning. What potential stressors are. You worried about one. A problem is that we've been getting very used to socialize elation and have less recent practice with entering social situations and that can be really scary and create anxiety just as we found there was a bit of a relief from that social stress at the beginning of the pandemic. I'm worried about increases anxiety in kids as they reenter the school situation men particularly for kids that might be prone to social anxiety. That's a concern for angelica apparent. Who spoke with us now. Have two children. My oldest is gabriel. He's ten years old and his autistic he also have social anxiety and has a surface. Doctors support him with his needs. He had a huge development with his social emotion of this year's remote learning. Because of the pandemic i was able to be by their side and break down the social emotional situations they have at school. I'm hoping they're able to replicate that at school. Emma adam continues the other worry. Is that The for a lot of kids. The schools are starting in person. One hundred percent right away. I would actually want a slower transition back to in person learning with a perhaps a hybrid model for a little bit just so that. The shock of those social transitions unfolds. Little more more slowly. The other thing that's happening is that kids Adolescents are going back to early school. Start times Something that's going to eat into sleep time okay. So how can parents help Do their best to try to give guidance. Regarding that times and wake times and convey how important it is to get sufficient and regular sleep schedule and then the other thing parents can do is beyond the lookout for signs of depression and anxiety. Everybody's going to have a bit of the jitters but you know if your child isn't eating if your child is losing weight or gaining weight rapidly if their mood seems Much more subdued than usual over a longer period of time these are maybe signs that clinical intervention is required. But emma adam has also found reasons for hope we might be going back as we emerge hopefully at some point from this pandemic to a slightly kinder more empathetic society because so many people have experienced stress loneliness and depression during this pandemic. there's been a bit of a sea change in terms of acceptance of mental health issues. One thing we did notice in the low to moderate education group of adolescence is with the pandemic came an increase in caring. and so. I'm hoping that as kids get back to school what they will. Experience is a kinder environment both in terms of how peer street than and also in terms of how teachers treat them and the administrations nova now is a production of gbh npr ex. It's produced by terence bernardo aria daniel. Jocelyn gonzales is a bell hibbert sunder lopez salvi and roslyn tortoise. Ilias julia court krishnan are the co executive producers of nova..

adriana taylor american psychological associa depression Emma adam adams harvard angelica gabriel emma adam anxiety terence bernardo aria daniel Jocelyn gonzales bell hibbert lopez salvi npr roslyn tortoise Ilias julia krishnan nova
What Is a Breakthrough COVID-19 Infection?

South Florida's First News with Jimmy Cefalo

01:54 min | 10 months ago

What Is a Breakthrough COVID-19 Infection?

"Dr Deborah and Mulligan, professor at Nova Southeastern University's College of Osteopathic Medicine. She is board certified in pediatrics and emergency medicine as welcome our dear doctor. Good morning, Jimmy. Let's talk about little bit about breakthrough infections. I think I saw that about 83 85% of the people hospitalized in the state of Florida. Were not vaccinated, but there are some And that's the breakthrough infection. Right? That's what we call it. Tell us about this. Yeah, sure. So, you know, we had a really good vaccine driven strategy for the vaccinated. It was supposed to be a worry free, hot back summer of socializing and fun. That was before Delta. You know, this tough, formidable folks spoil their plans and rising covid breakthrough infections. Among fully vaccinated is a reminder that these vaccines are not a silver bullet. Nor is the mask a full proof invisibility cloak. So let's define what is the definition of vaccine breakthrough infection for our listeners. It's the detection of SARS Kobe to RNA or antigens. Collected from a person more than 14 days after they completed recommended doses of covid 19. So I have had patients who were diagnosed with Covid Illness, but they hadn't been fully vaccinated. So, for example, maybe you got the first shot. It was a week later, they hadn't got their second shot. So Jimmy, these vaccines are intended to prevent severe illness. That was the end point, and they're doing that. They were not intended to prevent spread 100%, although they were pretty marvelous until you know Delta came along. These vaccines are working as expected there, bolstering memory B cells, protective D cells and antibodies to protect us from severe disease. They're doing that.

Dr Deborah Nova Southeastern University College Of Osteopathic Medicin Mulligan Jimmy Florida Sars Severe Disease
Measure of Business Investment Holds Steady in July

Marketplace Minute

00:20 sec | 11 months ago

Measure of Business Investment Holds Steady in July

"Hold steady. I'm nova safa with the marketplace minute. That measure from the commerce department is of so-called core capital goods orders. The reading was unchanged in july missing forecasts for a half a percent climb but suggesting businesses are continuing to invest in equipment despite supply chain constraints a review of corporate earnings

Commerce Department
U.S. Recruits Commercial Airlines to Help Move Afghanistan Evacuees

Marketplace Minute

00:26 sec | 11 months ago

U.S. Recruits Commercial Airlines to Help Move Afghanistan Evacuees

"Commercial airlines called in to help with afghanistan evacuations. I'm nova safa with the marketplace minute. The pentagon is enlisting eighteen aircraft from united delta american and handful of other airlines there to transport refugees. The civilian planes won't fly into kabul though they'll go to staging areas and cutter germany and elsewhere. It's the first time the pentagon has enlisted airlines since the iraq war in two thousand. Three

United Delta Pentagon Afghanistan Kabul Germany Iraq
"nova" Discussed on NOVA Now

NOVA Now

02:17 min | 11 months ago

"nova" Discussed on NOVA Now

"In your <Speech_Female> vehicle <SpeakerChange> to take <Music> you where you wanna go <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> in terms <Speech_Music_Female> of. Who will do <Speech_Music_Female> all this. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> Ideally it's <Speech_Female> going to be a <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> combination <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> of government policy <Speech_Music_Female> incentives and <Speech_Music_Female> then private sector <Speech_Music_Female> in ovation. <Speech_Music_Female> And this <Speech_Music_Female> can sort of build <Speech_Music_Female> up into <Speech_Music_Female> a positive <Speech_Music_Female> feedback loop <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> that can actually <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> bring about quite <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> rapid change <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and you could even <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> get to a point <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> where <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> electric vehicles <Speech_Music_Female> are <Speech_Music_Female> an asset <Speech_Music_Female> for the power grid. <Speech_Music_Female> You know where on <Speech_Music_Female> some days they <Speech_Music_Female> could act as <Speech_Music_Female> storage. <Speech_Music_Female> You know kind of acting <Speech_Music_Female> as batteries for power <Speech_Music_Female> grid. 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It's <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> driving habits <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> budget and well. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> What type of ride suits <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> your fancy <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and with engineers <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and scientists continuing <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to improve these <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> vehicles and their batteries. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> We may <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> all one day <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> be able to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> drive onto a greener <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> less carbon <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> intense future <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> rooms room to that. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Won't i probably <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> shouldn't say room. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Because i think electric cars <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> are supposed to be more <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> silent. <SpeakerChange> But <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> you get the point. <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Nova now <Speech_Male> is a production of gbh <Speech_Male> npr ex. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> It's produced by <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> terence bernardo <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> ari daniel <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> jocelyn gonzales <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> isabel <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> hibbard sunder <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> lopez monsalve salvi <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and roslyn tortoise. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Ilias <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> julia cort. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> And krishnan are the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> co executive producers <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of nova sukey. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Bennett is senior <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> digital editor. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Christina monon is <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> associate researcher. <Speech_Music_Male> Robin caz moore <Speech_Music_Male> is science. Editor <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and devon robbins <Speech_Male> is managing producer of <Speech_Music_Male> podcasts at gbh <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> our theme music <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> which always charges <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> me up is by <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> dj kid. Koala <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> i'm <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> a look patel. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> We'll be back in <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> two weeks which is enough <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> time for you to read <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> up on the engineering <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> marvels of all the <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> electric vehicles out <Speech_Male> there. Like the bmw. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> I three hundred <Speech_Male> kono. Electric jaguar <Speech_Male> key <Speech_Music_Male> narrow e <Speech_Music_Male> nissan leaf volvo. <Speech_Female> Xc forty <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> recharges the outta <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> e-transport back. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> The tesla model <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> three s. x. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> or y. Or <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> maybe you'll be <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> like me live in a city and <Speech_Music_Male> not have a car at all and cruise <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> around on a bicycle <Music> <Advertisement>

"nova" Discussed on NOVA Now

NOVA Now

05:37 min | 11 months ago

"nova" Discussed on NOVA Now

"By scottish. Chemist william morrison in eighteen ninety in des moines iowa and then the nine thousand nine hundred united states census tabulated that twenty eight percent of all cars produced in america were electric outselling all other types of cars but in one thousand nine hundred eight ford introduced the model t a mass produce gas powered vehicle that was affordable and widely available and this put electric cars to sleep then in the nineteen seventies. The price of gasoline hit record highs in the news was buzzing about oil bryant. Who's are moving. Definitely upward in madonna's area today dealers raised prices to more than forty cents a gallon. Sell the us department of energy funded efforts to try and make a cost effective electric car. But easies didn't become popular in the seventies the technology required to give them enough range at a reasonable price. Wasn't there yet but today it is biden's twenty thirty target is part of build back better. His economic plan that aims to position won't america to drive electric vehicle future forward out compete china and tackle the climate crisis unquote that climate crisis. A warming world is caused largely by the burning of fossil fuels like gasoline which releases carbon dioxide into our atmosphere where it traps heat. According to the epa passenger cars account for about seventeen percent of those emissions so the question is could electric cars. Cut that back sufficiently. What do we need for them to effectively. Replace the ones. Most of us are driving. One of the key developments. That's allowing the electric cars of today to compete with the gas powered. Cars is batteries. I think the lithium ion technology was a real milestone in moving from low volume demonstration vehicle to high volume opportunity. Denise grey is the president of lg energy solution michigan inc tech center as she points out the faster and farther. You wanna drive an electric power the more power. Your battery needs to store without getting super heavy in the process. The problem for engineers is that no battery stores as much energy per pound as gasoline. But there might be hope because we've seen batteries get better and more advanced with time. Think about in a regular vehicle. There's a twelve battery in there in. That battery helps to start up the vehicle and to provide The initial support for all the electrical devices and a vehicle. You know the radio. The instrument cluster. That thing on the dash with all the lights and indicators but as the technology has improved batteries have been able to take over additional functions as we see that this battery energy can be also helpful in moving vehicle from point to point b. You you have a growing and size of the battery so it goes from the twelve volt battery to say in a mild hybrid of forty eight volt battery and then the next stages the full hybrid like a press which has an internal combustion engine and an electric motor. That is a full hybrid. Meaning that it's a larger battery. It may give you full electric mobility if you're going at a below twenty five miles an hour and then the next battery again next battery and size and capacity. Maybe it's a four hundred volt battery and now it's a larger battery like in the case of pacifica for example. So now you've gotta plug where you can plug it in and maybe you can go twenty thirty forty miles on pure electric depend upon your driving habits and the last stage. We call it a full battery electric vehicle. These are what we call e. vs think tesla and the growing number of cars from other companies also hitting the market now. The battery is a lot larger. But it now is your soul. Power device in the vehicle the energy device that powers the vehicle to move however far. You want to go like in the mustang mach e or in the chevrolet bold. Those are rechargeable. You can plug it in at the end of the day and recharge it for the next driving experience. Okay it seems like the whole history of visas. Basically the history of batteries. So let's take a pause and review the basics. Batteries store chemical energy and converted into electrical energy. We can use and they've been evolving for two centuries using different materials but they also have the same basic tried and tested design. If you pull a aa battery out of your control you'll see it has to ends one positive and one negative inside the battery. Those are called that. Cathode and the ano- electrons flow from one to the other generating an electric current in a controlled way. The keyword here is controlled. Remember and ev battery has a store a lot of chemical energy right which can make them a little volatile if anything goes wrong case in point just last month. This hit the news a defective battery inside. The car is led to nine volt fires and prompted. Gm today to issue its second recall the nearly sixty nine thousand vehicles worldwide..

william morrison us department of energy america Denise grey lg energy michigan inc tech center des moines madonna bryant biden iowa ford epa
Weekly jobless claims at a new pandemic low - Midday - Marketplace Minute - August 19, 2021

Marketplace Minute

00:17 sec | 11 months ago

Weekly jobless claims at a new pandemic low - Midday - Marketplace Minute - August 19, 2021

"Weekly jobless claims at a new pandemic low. I'm nova safa with the marketplace minute. The labor department says initial claims for state unemployment benefits declined last week for the fourth straight week. They totalled three hundred forty eight thousand. That is the lowest weekly numbers. Since mid march of last year.

Labor Department
Sipekne'katik Chief Mike Sack Arrested as Treaty Fishery Begins Its Season in N.S.

Native America Calling

02:03 min | 11 months ago

Sipekne'katik Chief Mike Sack Arrested as Treaty Fishery Begins Its Season in N.S.

"The chief for the second largest mic. Mac band and nova scotia was arrested after launching a treaty lobster fishery negative first nation chief. Mike sack was arrested monday. He says officers with the canadian department of fisheries and oceans detained after his communities. Boats left the wharf sack told abt end that their charges were filed the treaty fishery which started in two thousand and twenty is self regulated by Inequity first nation is not been endorsed by the dfo federal body that regulates fisheries in canada. The f. o. Says the treaty fishery is an illegal fishery mcmahon non-indigenous lobster fishers continued about all for fishing rights stemming from one thousand nine hundred nine canada's supreme court ruling that upholds the halifax treaties the provides for the right to fish for digits people in canada. Last fall fishers began what they called it moderate livelihood fishery fishing where and when they wanted including outside the federally regulated fishing season. Non-indigenous fishers disputed the fishery pulled traps and burned a lobster pound the second equity fisheries department says that it is no longer using the term moderate livelihood fishery because it's a phrase coined by a court decision. The black feet incident command team issued an announcement this week outlining strategies to stop a recent surge in in nineteen cases. You'll also public radio's taylor. Stagner has more the black feet incident. Command team issued an announcement outlining strategies to stop a recent surge in cove nineteen cases. The black feet nation has issued a mandatory mask mandate tribal offices will be closed to the public and non essential tribal government. Travel will be suspended. James neely is the public relations representative for the black feet nation. He says that the reservation is not shutting down and it is. This does not affect her coming through to the park. This does not affect anybody leaving the reservation. Neely also says there are eighteen. Active cases of corona virus and these individuals have been linked to one hundred others through contact tracing the black feet nation has lost forty eight tribal members to the cove in one thousand nine pandemic for national native news. Taylor stagner

Mike Sack Canadian Department Of Fisheri Canada DFO Nova Scotia Stagner Mcmahon Halifax Supreme Court James Neely Taylor Neely Travel Taylor Stagner
"nova" Discussed on NOVA Now

NOVA Now

02:27 min | 11 months ago

"nova" Discussed on NOVA Now

"That countries have vaccines to be able to protect their populations. Here's monica gandhi. Again we have had these vaccines authorized in this country. Since actually december fourteenth two thousand twenty any deaths worldwide from ovid nineteen is essentially preventable and to me the fact that it's eight months later in counting and we haven't gotten all the healthcare workers vaccinated worldwide vulnerable people. Who are older. It is so tragic as such a moral and ethical failing. I hate the delta very the delta very to hate it so much the denver is like just wrecking all this progress and for those of us who were from india originally. I have to say it was a very tragic time as you know on. My family was greatly affected as many vars or in india by it and it was awful to hear them comment on our backs hesitancy. So monica ghandi's and jennifer nozzles most important recommendation.

monica gandhi denver india monica ghandi jennifer nozzles
"nova" Discussed on NOVA Now

NOVA Now

08:11 min | 11 months ago

"nova" Discussed on NOVA Now

"Surrounding. Kobe shocked jennifer nozoe. Very early in the vaccine rollout and we heard about a tremendous amount of resistance among healthcare workers to get vaccinated now. It wasn't the doctors and the nurses who were seeing patients but it was other people in the health system who should have seen the impact. Kobe was having on their hospital in their community. But in many cases they were resistant to getting vaccinated impart out of a belief that the virus was a hoax. And so that to me. That is quite stunning to have that level of dis- false belief in places in populations that you think above all should now really i mean struck me as a far bigger problem than we've ever dealt with before family and friends play an important role in convincing those around them to get vaccinated jennifer. Nozoe says it's going to take a concerted effort from all of us not just the medical community to get enough people out there to get the shot. I have become increasingly convinced that we need bigger solutions. And the spreading online of the amount of disinformation. That's out there is killing us literally killing us. She cites research from the center for countering digital hate on what they're calling. The disinformation doesn't almost two thirds of the online lies about vaccines are spread by just twelve highly influential personalities. These are people who have made businesses out of spreading lies thirty six million dollar industry for these twelve individuals who you know. In some cases employees bloggers and people in in multiple countries to try to spread the disinformation. Us surgeon general. Vivek murthy has issued an advisory on how misinformation is hampering our efforts against cova york city health. Commissioner dave chalk. She has written an open letter to twitter and facebook. Ceos to root out those responsible for planting untruths on their platforms. And because the forces of disinformation are so insidious especially on social media. Jennifer nozoe encourages us to feel compassion for those four taken by these campaigns. Start from a place of empathy. One thing. I have commonly found among the people that i talked to. who have these beliefs. Is they first of all talk about not knowing who to trust and not knowing where to go further information and when i asked them. Can you talk to your doctor. It is very common that they say they don't have one for people who have not benefited from the medical establishment for much of their life. Who have probably had trouble accessing it and have not been able to come to see it as a resource to them to suddenly. Now have this new tool. That's here to save them. You know. I think we have to understand. The forces that have created susceptibility to this misinformation and to try to at least hear people out in in why they feel a certain way. And why they're scared. Jennifer nozoe is taking every route possible to get the correct information out into the world even serving as an advisor on the movie borat subsequent movie film in the film the kobe shutdown forces borat to stay in the home of two conspiracy theorists. Where is. I do not see anybody on the street. Everybody's at home. They're telling him to stay inside so they don't spread it as far as those vows. They're wanting everybody to quarantine. I do not have nowhere else to go. could i stay home. She then appeared in the follow documentary. Debunking borat addressing the myths from the film working on that project in particular was Really a privileged in debunking borat A got to talk to two gentlemen who you know. Probably have beliefs that align with qa non believers you know. I think when you hear about these things on the news we have a tendency to kind of like other people and think that they're not like you but these are two gentlemen who are just trying to figure out their way in the world just like the rest of us you know. They're trying to take care of their families and take care of themselves in the same way just. Unfortunately they've along. The way accumulated beliefs. That i think are hurting them more than they're helping them. I think we have to constantly be in in feedback mode where we take in. What people's complaints are so that. We can understand if we need to do something differently. But it seems like it literally is just a matter of vaccine distribution to contain this pandemic. That's that's what it's gonna take. Am i correct in saying that that boldly like this is just a matter of getting vaccines out there. The return to normal is only going to be achieved through immunity. And there are two ways to do that. You can get vaccinated and be protected against severe illness or you can get the virus and play roulette. One of the biggest challenges is the fact that people who don't have symptoms potentially can can spread it and that just makes control without vaccines much much harder to do and in particular you know. These new variants are potentially shortening the incubation period the period of time for which you're exposed to potentially you can transmit it that makes it even harder to intervene using contact tracing in isolation in quarantine to try to stop transmission so really important that we vaccinate which brings us back to the question of boosters in how that discussion's impacting parts of the world where people want the vaccines but can't get them because that's part of the reason why i think countries are holding onto vaccines that they're not using as opposed to sharing it with the countries in the world right now who have not even had the opportunity to give even their most vulnerable people. I shot. It felt very premature to talk about booster shots in this theoretical sense. The united states rather than talking about global vaccine equity that should be the priority right now correct from a public health perspective. Guess we need to make sure that it's not just us who has vaccines but the rest of the world because it's not going to serve us. Well if the virus rages and other parts of the world unchecked unfortunately when we're talking about vaccine equity in the ability to roll out vaccines and vaccine uptake. All correlations lead to income. So you know about seventy five percent of the vaccines that have been administered in. The world to date have been administered by about ten high income countries. That is the single biggest predictor of only who has access to vaccines. But also who is starting to Require vaccination for travel and require vaccine passports so inequities are going to compound and they are compounding along income lines so well in the spring and early summer life felt like it was starting to return to normal in some parts of the us in many parts of the world the variance. We're destroying lives. And up ending some countries success at controlling the virus particularly with the delta variant being as transmissible as it is a number of countries that had been previously great at responding to bid are now having extraordinarily heartbreaking surges in cases and ultimately you know deaths delta's just outrunning those efforts and just making it near impossible. So when i see places like australia which for the last year was not even wearing masks quarantining anybody who was coming into the country really being aggressive with their contact tracing efforts and testing despite all of that now having multiple cities under lockdown and no signs of of the spread of the virus abating despite those efforts really i think underscores the urgent need to vaccinate people as quickly as possible particularly the people who are most at risk of dying and to protect the healthcare workers. Who have the extraordinary levels of exposure. We're not going to move on from this pandemic until we make sure.

Jennifer nozoe jennifer nozoe Nozoe Kobe Vivek murthy cova york city health Commissioner dave chalk borat jennifer us twitter facebook delta australia
"nova" Discussed on NOVA Now

NOVA Now

01:38 min | 11 months ago

"nova" Discussed on NOVA Now

"On the horizon. It was an exciting time. We have to be vigilant. But i do think a safe and effective vaccine is the silver bullet i mean. We don't see polio. we don't see smallpox. This is what vaccines do. This vaccine will be doing. Its job if a year from now we don't have this virus in our lives. I absolutely look forward to thanksgiving twenty twenty one It better be a big feast and it will be if he do this right yet. Here we are at the beginning of august. Twenty twenty one and these are the headlines. America's covert recovery has hit a dangerous road block the united states topping one hundred thousand new corona virus cases just friday a stunning fourth wave hospital admission surging more than six thousand a day. The highest number of patients since february. Dr anthony vouching warned this latest surge driven by the delta variant will get worse. Remember when we were just dreaming about getting vaccines for copa nineteen. Well they're here and surprise the pandemic still is as well. We've got the emergence of new variants of the virus and infectious continuous spread across most of the world. In the meantime people have questions. Can the vaccines handled the new variants. And wait. Do any booster shots and there are still a lot of folks who wonder are the vaccine safe. Today we'll get you answers and talk about just what it'll take to get to the other side of this pandemic. This is nova now where we give you the shot science behind the.

Dr anthony vouching smallpox polio united states
"nova" Discussed on NOVA Now

NOVA Now

03:57 min | 1 year ago

"nova" Discussed on NOVA Now

"Was a supersonic fighter aircraft. We've been making them for maybe twenty years. It will do all sorts of things that totally defy your intuition. It's appointee fast looking thing and it sitting up on its tail and then it moves forward flying. The aerodynamic surfaces would essentially be stalling. It defies your intuition. Your fiscal understanding of how aircraft work mostly. Because you've looked at a lot of aircraft in your lives. All of us have none of which had thrust control if the government were working on another wild aircraft that could do unexpected things in the sky. Would they tell us not necessarily in the one thousand nine hundred. They secretly tested. U2 spy-planes nevada leading two years of supposed- ufo sightings absolutely if the federal government. We're doing something special. There might be all sorts of people certainly citizens and maybe even other folks in the government that don't know about another category in the report is other well in that being of other this is where the classic ufo the classic flying saucer would find itself in that taxonomy. I personally don't spend too much time because if it's a flying saucer from another planet well i'm not gonna worry about it. Because the fact that they got your way so far ahead of us that if they wanna come eat our brains or enslave us our brains will be eaten and we will enslaved. They've got a huge upper-hand. If there are creatures that live in other parts of the universe which i do definitely believe the mathematics tells us that are so these are vast distances human beings using the technology that we all lost fiscus. We understand today. Were to try and go from here to the nearest star. It would take generations of human beings living in spacecraft successfully. Think about how long the longest most stable nation has existed on the surface of earth and a group of humans would have to be more stable and the exist for a longer period of time in a spacecraft to make it to the next star and so if another species figured out cross that distance in appreciably shorter time. They've got crazy technology. There's a set of laws of the universe a set of behaviors of the physical universe that we have yet to understand and that maybe when we unlock that which might be tomorrow it might be in one hundred years. We may never get there that we might find a universe filled with a chorus conversations between other intelligent species. That are happening. My sense is that if these ever were or are other entities from another place. They're leveraging set of laws of physics that we have not discovered yet nova now is a production of gbh in px. It's produced by. Terence bernardo ari daniel johnson gonzales. Isabel hibbert sunday lopez. Mon salvi and rosalind tortoise. Ilias julia krishna are they co executive producers of nova sukey bennett senior digital editor. Christina monon is associate researcher robin kazimierz science editor and devon. Robbins is managing producer. Podcasts at gbh our theme music is by the dj with other worldly astronomical turntable talent dj kid koala. I'm a low patel. We'll be back in two weeks which is enough time for you to try and find a you a p. and decide if it's a foreign government spy plane a cloud formation a missile test venus a massive balloon ice crystals a secret military experiment. Or maybe just maybe it's an alien spaceship becoming to say what's up gbi.

nevada federal government Terence bernardo ari daniel jo Isabel hibbert Mon salvi rosalind tortoise Ilias julia krishna nova sukey bennett Christina monon robin kazimierz lopez Robbins gbi
"nova" Discussed on NOVA Now

NOVA Now

04:14 min | 1 year ago

"nova" Discussed on NOVA Now

"It would look like a dream or a ghost or something. Stelter also led the team that developed. The sky crane landing system for the curiosity rover which landed on mars in two thousand twelve. But way before. That don't and before that i was a wannabe rock and roller back. In nineteen eighty-four 21-year-old. Adam was playing bass for a rock band in the bay area. Heading to a gig. One night there was a big beautiful constellation over the east. But on his way back he had a cosmic revelation at as a driving home. After the show was over the west. I was like whoa. The stars are moving. Stealth was looking at the constellation of orion which made him curious about the stars. So we sign up for courses in astronomy and physics at the local community college. I was totally blown away by the idea that there are some simple laws that govern the way our universe works. Then i got into physics and the application creative application of physics which is the art of engineering one of the beautiful things about science. It's an endeavor to discover the truth. It's an endeavour to understand our universe and so very very woven into that act is appreciating the partial nature of our understanding of the universe. We know that we don't know all the laws of physics there are poll zones our universe that we can't quite understand and explicitly described today. He says there is science to support the possibility of life beyond earth through the kepler mission and our observations of the solar system and our galaxy. We've come to realize that..

Stelter bay area Adam
"nova" Discussed on NOVA Now

NOVA Now

05:54 min | 1 year ago

"nova" Discussed on NOVA Now

"Hey everyone who out. There is into aliens. This earthlink sitting right here certainly is which is why in late june. I was totally psyched. When the pentagon released its nine report on unidentified aerial phenomena or uap formerly known as ufo's and it was invading our news cycle. The've report provides an assessment of over one hundred forty ufo sightings between two thousand four and this year a number which involved navy personnel. The report comes after the declassification of a few videos showing mysterious sightings and while it doesn't mention extraterrestrial links to these events it says there's too little information quote to allow for detail trend or pattern analysis so we have to ponder have explores from elsewhere in the universe. Been visiting us science. Tell us about what we might be seeing in the sky. This is nova now where we rode for answers behind the headlines. Join us. i'm a patel. Some videos that have circulated in the news and social media show black and white images of what a pilot would see during flight clouds water. But then you see some kind of blobs or take tax because they look like tiny candy that seemed to make unusual movement patterns. If truth is what you are after. You don't have to do belief you can do. Confirm there are rigorous processes forgetting their. How came oh. Luce is an astrophysicist at george mason university. He's been space science education lead for nasa science mission directorate. I wanted to get his reaction to the release of at you. Ap assessment okay so now we can apply some rear analysis and figure out what's going on i've completely given.

earthlink pentagon navy patel Luce george mason university nasa
"nova" Discussed on NOVA Now

NOVA Now

02:09 min | 1 year ago

"nova" Discussed on NOVA Now

"I'm walking into the farmers market at the ferry building in san francisco on this lovely saturday morning talk some farmers about drought. How it's affecting them. In what the public needs to know you know we're all under rationing now and it's only july The creek is really really low. This year has been the hardest here in the past decade and we have only yielded or twenty percent of our crops. Well it's just the sheer quantity of water that it takes to grow stone fruit. It takes apples. It takes ago almonds. And i think the quantity is just something that you know. The normal city dweller has no concept of a lot of customers have seen an increase in prices. They don't really understand that our whole life in farm relies on the weather and when there's no rain then we have lost product and just barely stay afloat definitely fearful for the future of farming. So you've just heard farmers annabel emily molly and atom talk about how they're struggling in these dry times but it's not just the bay area. It's all through the western half the us almost all of arizona's dealing with drought with more than half of the state facing exceptional drought conditions. The largest reservoir in the united states is running on empty lake. Mead behind iconic hoover dam is at its lowest level in nearly ninety years that means water shortages higher fire risks farmers in parts of new mexico. Say they are being asked not to water their crops. One hundred percent of california is now in a drought. And if you could believe it it could get even worse. It's hot and dry and much of the western. Us is experiencing a historic mega drought. There's a couple of questions we got to ask like how our scientific innovations helping us adapt to and prepare for droughts like this one particularly their effects on our food supply. Also who's especially vulnerable. And how does all this effect those of us who don't live in drought-prone areas because guess what it does this is nova now. Where were you science to quench your curiosity..

annabel emily molly san francisco Us hoover dam Mead arizona new mexico california
Surfer Survives Great White Shark Attack

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

02:03 min | 1 year ago

Surfer Survives Great White Shark Attack

"The West and East Coast is more from a B C's aerial. Russia officials urging beachgoers to remain vigilant after a little girl was apparently bitten by a shark off the coast of North Carolina. Emergency responders rushing to Ocean Isle Beach over the weekend. The seven year old sustaining injuries to her leg authorities say were consistent with a shark bite based on their size and pattern. When more people go in the water. There is an increase opportunity for an interaction with a shark, and so you see that happening on the east coast of the United States during our summers, but it comes as researchers say. They have located a separate 12 FT. Great White named Ironbound off the shores of North Carolina Monday that shark being tagged off Nova Scotia two years ago in the West, a surfer bitten by a great white shark south of San Francisco in the back of his right leg. I hustled over to him and and the first thing he said, was shark bite. Can you help me? I've been bit by a shark. And so I kind of immediately went into You know kind of this fight or flight mode and and did my best to try to try and help him bystanders helping to wrap the wound until paramedics could transport the 35 year old man to the hospital, and they lost about a pint of blood. And they were able to put a tourniquet on new drone video from earlier this month showing a shark swimming close to the site of that attack. Increased likelihood is obviously gonna occur. In the summertime when more people are getting in the water, and particularly if people are choosing to get in the water in and around seals. Basically now swimming with their food, Though these incidents are rare, experts caution to pay attention to your surroundings before deciding to jump in the water. People do need to just use some common sense when they go to the beach. I want to swim right out into the middle of the food chain. If you see Bates and fish crashing and seals feeding and birds diving moved down the beach to a quieter place where you can go swimming in the whole food change, not colliding. As for that little girl in North Carolina. She got some stitches in the hospital, but she's okay. And that's a B C's aerial. Russia coming up next

Ironbound North Carolina Ocean Isle Beach East Coast Russia Nova Scotia Swimming San Francisco United States West Bates
"nova" Discussed on NOVA Now

NOVA Now

04:21 min | 1 year ago

"nova" Discussed on NOVA Now

"Yeah i. I had to rise to another state mentally in.

"nova" Discussed on NOVA Now

NOVA Now

07:06 min | 1 year ago

"nova" Discussed on NOVA Now

"We all have felt the force. The pandemic in our bodies more on all that after the break funding for nova now is provided by draper pushing technology boundaries and engineering tomorrow's capabilities. Your next team may be at draper. Which is hiring now. Learn more at draper dot com said very good stall thereby gun with nigeria. Shoe swelter moment during her career as an athlete show and became a two time to sport to season olympian. And you may think she started off as track as her first sport. And you'd be wrong funny enough. I was actually a basketball player. But i happen to be what i like to call hood fast. Which means you. You could beat everybody. Which shoes off in the middle of the street head back elbows flying so when i got to my senior year in high school that was when i decided that i was going to do this. Track thing for real you know. I didn't really start running. Any time is worth a division one school noticing until right before the month before going to college within my first season as a collegiate athlete qualified for the national championships. And we all realize that okay. Maybe these legs were kind of made to run. I ended up becoming three time national champion for nigeria and then a summer olympian it. Just kind of sprung upon me after having friends and track and field that went into the sport of bobsled so my friends that were competing in winter. Sports cheering for them. Seeing the sport i was like man. I think i can actually do this sport. you know. maybe i'm not done with sport with done with shrek. a oh yeah ended up Getting into the sport a bobsled and making the us team that twenty six in twenty sixteen. And that's when. I realized that i needed to go ahead and do something. Bigger was to start the first african team have to ask you what it was like transitioning to bobsledding as he track and field. And what you did to prepare. And the reason i'm asking this question for our listeners out there it's because a very legit video i saw about you building a training course for yes. Today's monday september seven labor day. Two thousand fifteen. I am trying to find the supplies to build a sled that i will practice in houston so i went to the hardware store and i picked up a bunch of wood and i built a sled out of wood in my garage and ended up becoming not only the most useful tool to help me stay competitive that season but then it also became. Be most important tool at creating the nigerian bobsledding. John and i didn't stop there after all this. She combined her love of sports with her nerdy science side and became a bio mechanistic. Chiropractor so i needed to understand. Every single part of what it takes fundamentally to execute a sprint a jump a throw whatever movement that we're trying to do what happens to the anatomy when we are trying to perform at our best so i've been a bio mechanistic For about ten years now. A little over ten years And really just understanding the shapes sizes forces angles the way that you move and how that translates to injuries injury prevention and production of excellence and so translate the things that you do. Well the things that you're inefficient at doing as an athlete and show you now how to do that. As a chiropractor. I look at making sure everything from the joints from the head to toes are all in optimal functional positions. Are they gonna absolutely empathize. Some of her patients when she got to the twenty twelve games she herself was struggling with an injury. I learned that. I had a short tibia and that was my lead leg from our hurdle leg and at the games i had a stress fracture in that leg so this leg was at any given time ready to snap in half and i thought to myself what could have come of my career. Had someone noticed before the olympic games that i had an anatomically short leg. And i had been able to train and adapt to an actual performance life with whatever i needed to be to be able to be the most efficient. I could be so. I work a lot with. Nfl athletes nba athletes in olympia. Because what i have to offer is not just limited to what. I learned academically reaching the pinnacle of sport twice. Hey i understand. I get it and i can envision what it is that you need as well as help you get there watching you compete at the height of your track and field career looking back on that. Were you listening to your own body like when when it came to the stress fracture. How did you as an athlete. How do you juggle pushing yourself too. Hard listening to the physical. Signs physical manifestations of injury in our bodies so what i did at the peak of my career was i learned my body's language. I knew before they. The doctors even told me that. If i got an x ray that i had the dreaded black line there was a definitely a crack in that in that leg for sure i knew when i hit the ground i was like this leg is a goner that year because of everything i had gone through mentally emotionally physically with my health and all my entire career was essentially built up for that year so me and my body had a very clear understanding of what was going to happen that year. We we're going to keep going and we're going to leave it to god to tell us that this leg was not gonna make it because at that point i was willing to allow my leg to snap in half before i was done. There was no way. I was going to willingly accept defeat so my body and i we had conversations. Are we going too. Far are we. Not we were getting treatment every single day. Acupuncture laser massage therapy. I had a chiropractor that i was saying. Then i would wear sleeve. I would tape it every day. Like i was doing whatever i needed to do to push out be inevitable. Which was that. There was a crack in that bone. So.

John twenty twelve games olympic games twenty sixteen twenty six olympia three time Today houston first season about ten years first sport two time draper dot com monday september first over ten years Two thousand fifteen nigerian twice
"nova" Discussed on NOVA Now

NOVA Now

07:14 min | 1 year ago

"nova" Discussed on NOVA Now

"Changes in our physiology that exist for millennia. even before the first olympic games of ancient greece. In seven hundred. Seventy six bbc. Humans have recognized the importance of exercise and physical activity but in the late eighteen hundreds and early nineteen hundreds. We started gathering and analyzing the data documenting its impact on our help and these early epidemiological studies show that physically inactive were more likely corner heart disease than those with more active lifestyles translation. Humans are meant to move and it kind of reflects the reality that we are designed for regular activity that should be our baseline is genetically we come from a a history of moving pretty regularly pretty often every darn day because we just we had to it totally makes sense and i think a lot of people including myself saw the negative effect of sitting still sitting on our hands all day long during the pandemic and just kind of feeling totally out of funk from your perspective. What kind of busy logical changes can you expect to see. An average person who just hasn't been able to get out there and get moving as much the adapt fade. The body is amazingly efficient. But what the body basically says is is not need this anymore. This organism is no longer asking me to do this work and is quickly as that stress. Resolves as soon as you quit doing this when people go into space and gravity is eliminated. They also lose bone mass lose muscle mass. All of these things because now that stimulus is not there. That's one of the big challenges with with spaceflight tanna national space station all hammy and friends. Now i love theron when i'm on. Her astronaut. Karen nyberg was a flight engineer aboard the international space station for expeditions. Thirty six and thirty seven in two thousand thirteen. Luckily we have the capability to run here on the space station too. In fact it's one of the three exercises that we do on a daily basis to help our hearts and our bones and are strong walter here without the gravity of earth affecting our body every single day in a way we've had a kind of a spaceflight situation because people were forced into their homes. They couldn't get out on their bikes. It couldn't run. You know in the worst scenarios what we're seeing in italy and in france and perhaps part of areas in the united states was man that was just really strict curtailment of the opportunities for exercise. So that puts a damper on your jogging. And your your fitness training now. Suddenly you do not have that stimulate for that tation and you lose some of the adept patients that were hard fought for with your regular dogging trips your trips to jam to do string training and so the muscle mass went down the cardiovascular fitness gut poor and probably you used to being able to eat more and you kept eating more and so probably quite a lot of people gained weight we saw an overall a big change in body composition less muscle more fat and so as people try to kind of re shift and regain their two thousand and nineteen body compositions. If you're the personal trainer for over a billion people would you recommend people. Just go back out to their old routines or use this moment for a little reinvention if you will well. It's not an either. Or i do think that we learned from some of these situations. The good news is if. I'm the coach of a billion people i'm going to say. Hey you know what that same body is there. That same capacity to adapt is there. Don't think you have to achieve at all in a week. Just get back out there. Get the routine started again. Then everything else is going to happen. But i do think but one of the problems that we're going to see is it people. They're going to be in a hurry to get back what they've lost and then we're going to see various of injuries and so just ease into it a little bit folks so that we don't replace one reason not to be able to exercise with a new reason is because you've got to win out there and ended up tearing something i think easing into. It is probably key for the majority of people who haven't been hitting the weight wreck in about a year and a half but what about the physiologic effects of the stress. That you mentioned on our body is that something that people also need to take into account. We'll stress an interesting concept. But there are many different ways it gets triggered and i think for a lot of people. Exercise was a healthy release for this stress mechanism and when gets taken away then for a lot of people. It was psychologically challenging. You know they. They needed that. Their bodies and their brains had developed a certain dependency. Stress is accumulative. It comes from many different directions and we generally have ways of mastering in but when we have these routines and they get abruptly changed. Dramatically changed that really challenges people. It challenged my daughter. Who's a distance runner and boy olympic athletes who are perhaps some of the most Minute the most structured in their lifestyles. They were really hit hard. A lot of athletes really struggling Logic look at these professional athletes elite level athletes and a lot of them. Stand in this hero. space already. Gone is a bio mechanistic and chiropractor. They start to feel like i'm invincible. They start to feel like this doesn't affect me and so then they start ignoring. How much does pandemic really did. Set them back because really they were lonely they were sad they were stripped of the one thing that they pretty much did the most consistently all day. So a lotta times. That's their outlet a lot of times. That's where they release. That's where they have the most fun that's where they interact with the most people. Auditors also a two time olympian who competed for nigeria and a twenty twelve summer olympics in the hundred meter hurdles and in two thousand eighteen. I competed in the winter olympics. as the driver of the first ever bobsled team for the continent of africa making me the only athlete on the planet to compete in both the summer and winter olympics for an african country through all this she was struggling with some serious medical issues. So i do understand the body and mind of an olympic athlete under stress. Even the idea of feeling like gosh. I can't do the things that i know that i'm capable of doing or i can't be called on to perform in the ways that i know that i can perform there are a lot of residual effects from that Mentally that a lot of athletes are dealing with right now and it's not only athletes..

Karen nyberg italy france hundred meter united states two time olympic games of ancient greec late eighteen hundreds thirty seven two thousand winter olympics Thirty six earth both nigeria one about a year and a half one reason africa early nineteen hundreds
"nova" Discussed on NOVA Now

NOVA Now

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"nova" Discussed on NOVA Now

"Every day. There's so much. News and headlines are so sickle and asunder could feel like we're drowning in a sea of questions is the truth really out there. Can you mix vaccines in general. What can we expect this hurricane season. How has cove impacted alcohol consumption over the last year but when we're wondering about questions like these we separate fact fiction being injected with chips what we're being injected with is this incredible scientific breakthrough that keeps us safe. That's where we come in from the pbs series nova nova. Now a biweekly podcast digging into the science behind the headlines. I'm a look patel. Physician medical journalist and an all around mouth in the name of science on this podcast we pass the mic to brilliant people to get their perspectives and insights on pressing science topics. That are impacting us right. Now the science is ever more pervasive in the courts. What you've got to learn how best to deal with. I think we can often use polls lead people to believe that we know the answer before the event actually happens. And so that's that's so far from the truth there are a lot of disparities of this country's inequities diagnosis chatting with credible experts. Who can help us understand our world. Maybe it's a judge or a geneticist for sound engineer. Or maybe it's your high school biology teacher. Who's still mad at you. It is we want to talk to them. We're looking for answers. The hypothesis was or people who watch horror movies doing a better job of handling the pandemic this same kind of chemicals that are released in the fight or flight response can also be associated with excitement or happiness so they would fly up to these fields of cumulous pal and students would cross the smoke from. I would be able to see carbon monoxide rocket up. And that's kind of we're like man we can really use this for detecting look like acids diseases and irises and everything..

last year nova nova
Bipartisan Group Grows in Effort to Reach Infrastructure Compromise

Marketplace Minute

00:31 sec | 1 year ago

Bipartisan Group Grows in Effort to Reach Infrastructure Compromise

"A key milestone in the effort to reach a bipartisan compromise on an infrastructure spending bill. I'm nova safa with the marketplace minute. The group of senators working toward that end has more than doubled in number two twenty one that includes eleven republicans and suggests there may be the sixty votes necessary in the senate to pass a bipartisan infrastructure. Bill the senators are discussing trillion dollars in spending. That's less than president. Biden wants white house advisers are on capitol hill meeting with the senators.

Senate Bill Biden White House Capitol Hill
What Does Pride Look Like in Small-Town Canada?

The Big Story

01:47 min | 1 year ago

What Does Pride Look Like in Small-Town Canada?

"I'm jordan heath rawlings. This is the big story. Sheltering is the co director producer and editor of a new dock from extra called small town fried facial jordan. Before we get into the details. Maybe just tell me. Which small towns did you guys go to absolutely so we went to taber alberta Which has a population of about nine thousand people We also visited annapolis royal in nova scotia and they have a population of about five hundred people and Our last location was in norman wells in the northwest territories and they have a population of about eight hundred people. This documentary is fascinating And i love the idea behind it and we're going to get into the specifics of where you went and what you saw. But can you just start by explaining in general what is so fascinating and meaningful about pride in small town. Canada so My partner of twelve years Grew up as a closeted queer teen in the mid nineties. Much like myself Only she grew up in a small town nestled in the also in the ottawa valley This would have been in the mid nineties when You know the internet and gsa's and all of that good stuff. wasn't readily available to us and In two thousand eighteen her small town Called smiths falls celebrated their first Pride event. I think it was about fifty. People may be that what walked down their main street with their rainbow. Flags and Her mom was there and she got very emotional. And i asked her if she was okay and she said i just never thought i would see this happen. here in my small town

Jordan Heath Rawlings Nova Scotia Alberta Jordan Ottawa Valley GSA Smiths Falls Canada
The Stories of the Stars

Greeking Out from National Geographic Kids

01:59 min | 1 year ago

The Stories of the Stars

"In greek mythology. Stars are more than joust stars. A group of stars were constellation is sometimes arranged in a certain shape that makes it look like an image of something kind of like a big connect the dots puzzle the greeks used to believe these shapes represented heroes and warriors that deserve a spot in the sky to be remembered and revered for all eternity. It is a true honor to be placed among the stars but of course stars are only large incandescent celestial bodies that are so far away. They look like tiny points of light. They are not the outlines of long ago. Heroes you gotta make everything less cool. I make everything way more cool with science. scientists use. Exploding stars called super nova's to try to communicate with aliens since super nova's are the brightest things in the sky. They send messages in the opposite direction. Hoping aliens are looking our way okay. That is cool. I admit okay now. We've already mentioned a few of the heroes placed in the sky. Hercules for example era please erica's right heracles. Exactly and today we're going to discuss. Two more characters earned their rightful place in the night sky. Orion and callisto ryan and callisto are rarely talked about together. I do not know if they have ever interacted. That's true. We're not sure if the two ever met each other. But they both were honored by the gods after their deaths and they both share a very important friend in common artists. Artists is the greek goddess of the hunt and wild animals. She is also the goddess of the moon and protector of young girls and women who are not mother's responsibility.

Callisto Ryan Erica Orion
"nova" Discussed on Pete's Paranormal Universe

Pete's Paranormal Universe

03:21 min | 1 year ago

"nova" Discussed on Pete's Paranormal Universe

"Jack. Have you seen him no. We haven't seen anyone lovers. Did jet prepare to go fuck. Fuck gig gig it over the car we you on the cover dan nominee heat wave.

"nova" Discussed on Pete's Paranormal Universe

Pete's Paranormal Universe

03:29 min | 1 year ago

"nova" Discussed on Pete's Paranormal Universe

"A nuclear explosion. Pack your bags were getting out of here. I live in an hbo share noble. Run to make..