20 Burst results for "Nouvelle"

Hispanic Business at PepsiCo with Esperanza Teasdale

Marketing Today with Alan Hart

05:14 min | 3 months ago

Hispanic Business at PepsiCo with Esperanza Teasdale

"Let's talk about the professional path and You are now the vp gm of the hispanic business unit for pepsico. What was your path to get there. Yeah i am studied engineering for college. So i was math and science person in high school and my physics teacher mr adrian nouvelle who actually was so important to my life that he came to my wedding by way and kind of steered me into the space helped me with College application letters recommendation. And so i studied engineering before. You're so i've been in a manufacturing environment for awhile. Bump steel toed shoes uniform union arment. And that's really where i started my career At the same time my company was so gracious that They paid for my mba. So i went to Uconn in stamford connecticut to take classes at night and really got more exposed to concepts of business management marketing research and just really loved it and so then when i asked for a new gig they said finance or sales and unlike okay sales and sales and all i need to go into marketing because marketing guides what we're doing in sales and i think they could do a better job and so i was lucky that my General manager at the time created a job and that was that was the beginning of my marketing career. So very classically trained at unilever and then pepsi around marketing from like you know the analysts all the way through up till now you know a vp gm. Which i'm really proud and excited about and And yeah i feel like i'm in a really great role. Right can make a big impact on the careers of our of our folks drive to mercy inclusion and drive the business results faster than general market because the population is growing so quick so and There's just so many things that are benefiting from being in this role that That i'm really grateful about. But that's kind of the the journey really. It was not linear at all Did not start off wanting to and marketing that side of my brain and that analytical process orientation i think does just a market yeah i think increasing edge to a home maybe ten years ago when you made the original switch i think today it's much more analytically rigorous than it has been in the past But yeah no. That's that's phenomenal. And i've had a few folks on the show. That have transitioned from engineer to sales marketing. And it's it's funny the way you went through that transition in how you described it because a few of them have described it similarly meaning they. They went from engineering the sales and then they realized my words not yours. How bad marketing screws it up. And they need to go help marketing. Try to figure that out because it it comes down to the sales folks at some level whether their marketing is getting it right or not so. It's an interesting learning curve and A pathway that. I've heard before. So what would what drove what drove the creation of the hispanic business unit. And how are you guys thinking about like measuring success. That's a that's a big scene seemingly to me as an outsider like it seems like a big big thing like a big shift in how you're organized. Yeah this was created. I believe in twenty eighteen by out. Carrie who at the time was still pepsi. Co when of are really incredible leaders kirk. Tanner who's our ceo and My current boss. Greg lyons our cmo and they just really realize that you know the hispanic Business is untapped potential and if we have a fixed mindset about it and we're not going to capture that growth and So what's the do different because in the past. Yeah we had a multicultural team. That definitely had A role but didn't necessarily have ownership and so the do different had to be to create an organization that was dedicated to this and have the right resources. And that's what they did and And it's been pretty successful. Ever since the the key measures to the other question you had really is around. Hey can we help grow faster with hispanic consumer than the general market. Can we help build equity with this fan of consumer and And those are some key metrics we look at and so far. We've we've been We've been pretty pretty successful doing that.

Mr Adrian Nouvelle Arment GM Pepsico Uconn Pepsi Stamford Unilever Connecticut Greg Lyons Carrie Tanner Kirk
"nouvelle" Discussed on Extra Pack of Peanuts Travel Podcast

Extra Pack of Peanuts Travel Podcast

03:33 min | 11 months ago

"nouvelle" Discussed on Extra Pack of Peanuts Travel Podcast

"Hello, travel nerds, and welcome to the extra pack of peanuts travel podcast the show that teaches you how to travel more while spending less I'm your host, Travis Jerry joining me today as someone who's a retired diplomat who has fifty years of travel under his belt, and who speaks twenty languages Steve. Kauffman from link. Dot Com Steve Thanks for joining me and a huge welcome. To be here and we're just talking about this right before you hit record. It's easy to be blown away by this number. Right like twenty languages. People like Whoa that's insane, but that was not always the case for you. Let let's back it up a bit and kind of tell us what your language learning journey has been like. Okay well I grew up Montreal, but in the English speaking part of Montreal because in those days the two communities were kind of separate, which is not the case today, but it was in those days more than fifty years ago. And then I got interested in French. We'd had it in school I couldn't speak, but I got very interested. Interested in the culture in those days was Lat Nouvelle vague in all the movies, and so I ended up getting keen on franchise I hitch. Actually I worked on a boat to get across. Europe I ended up settling into France by studied for three years, and that Kinda got me into a situation where I transferred myself into someone fluent in. In another language, which is a a life changing experience so then when I joined the Canadian diplomatic service and they wanted someone to learn. Chinese I said I'm your man. I was confident that I could learn so then. I was sent to Hong Kong in man. Then and then I ended up going to Japan where I live for nine years. And then once you know you can do something fun to do it. And then I just did it. It with other languages as well and and particularly as as sixty eight. I had nine languages when I retired, and now I've learned another eleven since the age of sixty. Wow, so it was just something for you that you again. You didn't have any special skills as in a kid or a teenager right? Didn't it didn't speak French even at that point and it just you kind of the bug a little bit. What have you felt as far? Far, as you said once, you know, you can do it. You and you like it. You just start doing it. Have you felt that it becomes easier the more that you know? Is there like a bit of a tipping point? Maybe where it becomes harder, it becomes easier always easier and I think I had. It's possible that my situation was favourable. Because I was actually born in Sweden, and at the age of five. My family moved to Canada. I quickly forgot Swedish, but that was there in my brain when I was very young, and of course you, can you hear French around? Montreal and I think that the more flexible. Your brain is different sounds different ways of saying things those are those are. Positive but I was at this polyglot conference. Speakers of many languages probably Glide Conference in Montreal, and I was speaking to a group of six hundred people, and I said how many of you grew up in a lingual family, and hardly anybody put their hand up, so it's not a condition but anything that makes your brain more flexible if you only have one language, your brain is set up to deal with one set of sounds. One set of sort of ways of saying things, and as you find that there are other ways other sounds, your brain becomes more flexible, and so you're resist the new language less and less so I learn languages today at the age seventy four faster than I did when I

Montreal Lat Nouvelle Travis Jerry Kauffman Europe Hong Kong Steve Japan Sweden Canada France Simon
Learning A Love Of Language With Steve Kaufmann

Extra Pack of Peanuts Travel Podcast

03:33 min | 11 months ago

Learning A Love Of Language With Steve Kaufmann

"Hello, travel nerds, and welcome to the extra pack of peanuts travel podcast the show that teaches you how to travel more while spending less I'm your host, Travis Jerry joining me today as someone who's a retired diplomat who has fifty years of travel under his belt, and who speaks twenty languages Steve. Kauffman from link. Dot Com Steve Thanks for joining me and a huge welcome. To be here and we're just talking about this right before you hit record. It's easy to be blown away by this number. Right like twenty languages. People like Whoa that's insane, but that was not always the case for you. Let let's back it up a bit and kind of tell us what your language learning journey has been like. Okay well I grew up Montreal, but in the English speaking part of Montreal because in those days the two communities were kind of separate, which is not the case today, but it was in those days more than fifty years ago. And then I got interested in French. We'd had it in school I couldn't speak, but I got very interested. Interested in the culture in those days was Lat Nouvelle vague in all the movies, and so I ended up getting keen on franchise I hitch. Actually I worked on a boat to get across. Europe I ended up settling into France by studied for three years, and that Kinda got me into a situation where I transferred myself into someone fluent in. In another language, which is a a life changing experience so then when I joined the Canadian diplomatic service and they wanted someone to learn. Chinese I said I'm your man. I was confident that I could learn so then. I was sent to Hong Kong in man. Then and then I ended up going to Japan where I live for nine years. And then once you know you can do something fun to do it. And then I just did it. It with other languages as well and and particularly as as sixty eight. I had nine languages when I retired, and now I've learned another eleven since the age of sixty. Wow, so it was just something for you that you again. You didn't have any special skills as in a kid or a teenager right? Didn't it didn't speak French even at that point and it just you kind of the bug a little bit. What have you felt as far? Far, as you said once, you know, you can do it. You and you like it. You just start doing it. Have you felt that it becomes easier the more that you know? Is there like a bit of a tipping point? Maybe where it becomes harder, it becomes easier always easier and I think I had. It's possible that my situation was favourable. Because I was actually born in Sweden, and at the age of five. My family moved to Canada. I quickly forgot Swedish, but that was there in my brain when I was very young, and of course you, can you hear French around? Montreal and I think that the more flexible. Your brain is different sounds different ways of saying things those are those are. Positive but I was at this polyglot conference. Speakers of many languages probably Glide Conference in Montreal, and I was speaking to a group of six hundred people, and I said how many of you grew up in a lingual family, and hardly anybody put their hand up, so it's not a condition but anything that makes your brain more flexible if you only have one language, your brain is set up to deal with one set of sounds. One set of sort of ways of saying things, and as you find that there are other ways other sounds, your brain becomes more flexible, and so you're resist the new language less and less so I learn languages today at the age seventy four faster than I did when I

Montreal France Lat Nouvelle Kauffman Travis Jerry Steve Hong Kong Europe Japan Sweden Canada
"nouvelle" Discussed on The Catholic Culture Podcast

The Catholic Culture Podcast

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"nouvelle" Discussed on The Catholic Culture Podcast

"Everybody welcome back to the Catholic culture podcast. I'm here today with Richard Dick. Lou Richard is the creator of Youtube Videos on theology at a channel called. Dick lose views. And he's a doctoral candidate at the Catholic University of America in theology. Richard Welcome to the show. Thank you going to be here something. You've been focusing on in your youtube. Channel is a number of different theologians associated with what's called the Nouvelle Theology and were here today to talk about that some of these individual theologians but also kind of concept of the Nouvelle Theology in general and the degree of validity that has the misleading perceptions that it's given rise to in thinking of all these theologians as part of kind of a unified group or a trend moving in the same direction at the very least so perhaps we can start with the context of this discussion. The reason it interested interested me what you're doing over there is. I've been getting the impression that in certain circles. I mean I. I suppose basically in traditionalist circles. There's a tendency to kind of look for a scapegoat for problems in the church in the past several decades especially since Vatican two and of course there there a number of different scapegoats that are used in the sort of purely. Let's say in the purely intellectual around often the blame is put on thinkers like Lubok or on Balthasar. Even you know some people would accused ratzinger of being a modernist now and.

Richard Dick Lou Richard Richard Welcome Youtube Catholic University of America Lubok ratzinger
"nouvelle" Discussed on The Catholic Culture Podcast

The Catholic Culture Podcast

02:45 min | 1 year ago

"nouvelle" Discussed on The Catholic Culture Podcast

"Hello listeners as you. No doubt are well aware. The economy has taken a significant hit as a result of lockdowns related to the coronavirus pandemic were undergoing and nonprofits like Catholic Culture Dot. Org are no different. We've certainly been struggling more than usual to make ends meet but thank God are generous. Boosters have enabled us to run special Easter Challenge Grant in which any of your gifts up to thirty. One thousand dollars will be matched and thanks to your generosity. We just have about four thousand dollars left to go to meet this grant completely. That said we're also coming close to the end of our window here. The deadline is pentecost may thirty-first so now is the time for us to Max that thing out so we can keep going now. I know many of you are struggling economically just as we are but if you're among those who can afford to help and you value the work we do at Catholic culture not only our podcast but our news -tary our liturgical calendar resources are vast store of church documents and the Great Catholic articles. Please consider helping out again. We just have a little over four thousand to Go so we've almost made this thing and for that. I'm really thankful to all who have already given all donations to Catholic. Culture are tax. Deductible we pray for all of our donors and not just the donors but all of our readers and listeners daily and in fact even if you can't give anything please offer us your prayers and if you yourself have been suffering either physically or financially from the pandemic please email us at witness at Catholic Culture Dot Org so he can add you to our prayer list so to help us out go to Catholic culture dot org slash donate slash audio. Thanks so much and God bless you. Oh and while you're at it check out our new podcast criteria the Catholic film podcast in which James Maev ski and I explore the Vatican film list. You can hear our first couple of episodes at Catholic culture dot org slash criteria. Welcome to the Catholic Culture podcast. I'm Thomas v Murals. This podcast is an offering to the holy family and less importantly a production of Catholic culture. Dot Org hey.

"nouvelle" Discussed on Bigmouth

Bigmouth

02:35 min | 1 year ago

"nouvelle" Discussed on Bigmouth

"Insane at audio boom dot com slash big mouth. Although I know people do go back and listen to them randomly which quite like if you want to support the show please do you and you can buy us that virtual pint of Patchen dot com slash big mouth podcast playing out today is my choice of Jinx. Don't usually get to choose one. I have been listening to that. Lana del Rey album. Let's go mainstream. I mean day. Every day is really good. It's she is the new Bobbie gentry. It's beautiful. Lyrics are absolutely fantastic she. He is subverting every single Joan stereotype as she goes along. It's clever clever stuff. It's also called Norman Rockwell with an exclamation mark. That's I mean leave. Call it out that is wonderful. It said this is a cover of sublime hit doing time from one thousand nine hundred six in Lana del Rey style. Ez Rallies on the microphone awesome J of the people task will qualify to represent the AL VC Z. to party and dance to guess uh-huh. Go uh-huh a you microphone. Some of the people dance well represented these the man. How can you afford gasp at big SUV. I pay less gas and everyone l. I got the free get upside. Gas At twenty five cents a gallon cash back every time I buy gas. Hold on hold you up to twenty five cents off a gallon with the free gifts so I guess APP while I'm paying full price. You know people aren't over a million dollars last year. You just got to take a picture of.

Bobbie gentry Lana del Rey Norman Rockwell Joan million dollars
"nouvelle" Discussed on Bigmouth

Bigmouth

13:05 min | 1 year ago

"nouvelle" Discussed on Bigmouth

"For the Times that he's in America. They love people. They like. You know it's the kind of justification of capitalism isn't it you know individualism. All the I see through the Bullshit Oh shit stuff but actually did bring their own bullshit into the office. It's just business business. Why ignore the regulations and you we literally can say in the political situation we are in now. Why bother you know until yeah yeah is it. Is that justifying that tonight quite hard to take these things out of context really. This is the story that we have been given. This is the story that I mean we know he's GonNa you know he won't he won't be justified in the end and you know great but I'm slightly sick of maverick men cutting us way with their illiberal attitudes because I think is leading us where we are now. What I found amusing about the first episode is that Russell Russell Crowe is in every scene almost and he wobbles because of all his fat suit stuff. He's got he's modeling acting inverted Father Christmas Mus going and blessing people with his great wisdom in his Great Noble Shit Strategy and he is sort of saint in Saint also Russell Crowe Russell Russell Crowe as an actor pretty much from wants to do a fake Russell Crowe due this television. He got a being resembling around he will he. He will contributed to the dialogue and you know he's a great actor. Don't get me wrong but he's the similar kind of person that's just cast as a greater right to regard true yes. I must be any such a ham. I mean he does open even now Sienna Miller actor. Did anyone recognize her. I I had to go double. Check looking for the right after this being really really badly served. I think really really good but because of their kind of you know the top top scandals in her life that she she was almost like two well known as a person peoples cast yeah. It's really good. I think yeah I'm so royal fashion. I find it difficult when people put on the suit on the extra lows I think couldn't you have found an ugly actor. Couldn't you found a fat latter. Instead of having making star said they get money. Yuccas. Rupert Murdoch is Simon McBurney. Yes he's pretty familiar to hey yeah. I could recognize his voice and he looks like he's talking to him. Ask good makeup yes. I'm sure they win awards that was I. I believe what I'm thinking is going. Come women towards its. Mame isn't every scene is what will we get the emmy for in this. We've got it for the dressing. Should we get it from the Moscow if he got ego to matter for me honk quite weird that is being shown on Sky Lantern. Isn't it alongside succession. Yes yeah so we have we unpick Murdoch enough. I mean is that sort of thing as well. That's it's like when you have a lot of restaurants that serve in the same scene same stretch supportive. Maybe I don't feel so history isn't it so the people who write things or who commissioned things are implicit in that time and they're interested in something happening in the ninety s and how now plays out now because they are of the age now film has done this sort of not specifically typically. Fox News but it has done about TV is bad night. Call one of my favorite films is about Network TV and if it bleeds it leads network. Even it is part of that this still a narrative the still a trope the TV is bad. We see drama after Dharma even if it's on TV TV the TV is a as a source. They can't touch politics qualities as far too powerful but we're still seeing the same message is that People Watch TV as G pige and they will be dominated decide these people a vision quite often but every single person I've worked man he works in TV and I live in West. London uh-huh surrounded about a quarter as much TV's right yeah Morton everybody. Obviously you say I look at Mortimer. Millions suddenly become everybody's favorite and I listened to a couple of inches a podcast interviews with him and he says basically he writes with Vic Reeves in the morning and then he goes on and he watches Talley also absolutely less less less than on a loves it and he knows because he he gets things commissioned that the the people commissioner do not watch telly was to tell you that he was which is something like naked and afraid where you get dropped jungle and I have no clothes so you know nobody watches. Is that nobody who makes it so only interested in telly. That's like this which is essentially a film dont like to see a program Matt. TV Not being awful for you not the brain and not treating me like stupid with us the royal going to happen because we talks real told that when we were growing up and I say to my son. Oh the funny thing as we were told don't watch too much. TV will do something actual to your brain and now they say that about video games games yeah a scream. I think a lot of this drama is based on Gabriel Sherman's two thousand fourteen biography loudest voice in the room so I think they feel they've got a big data data set to draw from. They're going to use this however. I still think it's following the same old pattern and I think it's I don't know if I want to watch him. Become the bad guy because I think I know so he's going to in however many episodes being it being something that you feel a little bit. You feel like you've seen it before those people there they are the president and one is the Prime Minister Anna China yeah yeah he set up as the slightly funkier character the start and you just know it's going to go wrong. You want to see it go wrong. The interesting thing is why Oy anyone sets out folks knees and we've seen that there's an yeah there were other stories. I think now there is a film bombshell coming out with Margot robie Nicole Kidman Shelley's throne which is about the same thing but it starts the three-nation women now that's interesting to women and there is a competent who is some of the women got interested in this one. I think that's such as I look that's little Father Christmas. It should be coming up or maybe January in. This country won't be watching the whole of this series. y'All stupidly just Sir please. WHO's coming towards the end of the show which means closing time chatter. What will I guess be discussing over our car at the local Bistro as they get out bid for Rodents Jassem Jake by jean-michel Jarre on ebay James met well multi for me an-and Hanane excuse to talk about succession which I know you covered by. Is the greatest thing on by miles. The opening credits about are fantastic tastic. I mean say so much in such a great way by using faked up home video or home. Super Alright is and I noticed that because you see on that flakes that the new skip intro button yes which when you're watching AH old comedy programs is fantastic because they are the worst things unless suicide and juicing things in the world including piece of Fry Lori onwards and I feel like people have out there game out because the other thing that's on TV the moment his staff. Let's flats southbound about two seconds long in try so I think that's just an interesting autistic phenomenon and also the wonderful thing about succession titles. It was which we didn't turn the show and I meant to is the alphabetical. There's no there's no main star. All the actors are listed alphabetically and you just think yes. This is the kind of show then then that's going to invite me in really important as well yeah yes films as you know used to have in the thirties and forties all the titles at the front because they know people would've left. They just say the end at the left at the end the end and then you go out to the cinema until I I like it all upfront because obviously people are streaming aiming. I repeat in Japan and wonderful on also the music motif. You get all of the music and then you hear it going through the show. Oh so the music you mentioned the why the why is opening credits were always when he saw a new morning credits is obviously language language for this is a good program when that good yeah and okay well. I should do gook. That's why I listen to so. This is focus. I think people may have heard or the May have locked but it's literally called. Have you heard Georgia's dot com so it's from Jersey poet and it came out I mean longtime got almost a year ago okay and they came out and they caused no furry and I you know admittedly I I have to admit that they passed me by. I didn't hear them. They weren't really promote it and then the British protests awards of which I was kind of patron they I mean it was hilarious. The the the show organizers sent me this spreadsheet of the winners and I was like how can you have won all fiction. He one like you come really close political and then basically if you listen to the all these podcasts can you know why because what he does is he's a poet so so when you're listening to the podcasts it goes through lots of different kind of ways of presenting information emotion to UC's brilliant analyzing music he talking and then after all you think oh my goodness and then he's also does kind of drama. He traumatizes does kind of thing around the around Grenfell. It's it's really really innovative and I listened to a lot of podcast. I have never listened to anything like this before anyway so it one it did absolutely brilliantly the podcast awards and it was just great it you know one of the year quite rightly wonder seven other awards anyway now the reason why I bring you now. It's the BBC decided to basically to broadcast custody is coming out on radio four. You'll be able to access them and I find it quite interesting that despite the fact that are incredibly important and lots of people listen to them. There's something about going onto radio. Four that means it will get a massively bigger which is obviously very important and the new series that he's done. We'll we'll come out on radio for as well so I kind of I suppose I bring it because I want everyone to listen to it but also to say that actually it's still quite interesting because a lot of people still just have the radio on in the background music or they have a bit of five live or they have radio in already for and it just takes over in the background and to put it on there is quite important for certain people people and I really hope that lots of people listen to it. Yeah I listened to some of it and it's amazing when he goes into rhyme because it's not always rhyme. He goes into poetry. You just stop what you're doing. It breaks up but then it brings something else to it. Produces neatly yes a record is really really good if attention constantly because because it's moving and changing intern great before well-done. George the poet Kazi we'll have I'm going to do for my closing closing time chatter brexit playing cards it had to happen. Nigel farage the ace of spades. If brexit is a disaster I will go go and live abroad says the credit card greenheart. WHO's the Queen of Hearts who is Jacob Jacob Small sir. I'm not an advocate withdraw from the e U. But instead. I want fundamental renegotiate renegotiation of terms. says how. Boris is the foresight clubs brexit means brexit wonderful. I mean I ve very funny and indeed you can play the game shithead quite well full enough my may over the road of course my road. Does these cards they are from brexit most wanted dot com come if you want some very very good and funny said they have cheered me on the back. Say what's on the so yes. There is a a AH passport says the European Union yield e Sil-. I guess very good okay. That's it. That's the end of the show. Thanks to our special guests. Maranda saw and James Med thanks to producer Alex Reece and don't forget you can hear all our past episode. Take your completely.

Russell Crowe Russell Russell brexit Rupert Murdoch Russell Crowe James Med America Sienna Miller Fox News European Union emmy Margot robie Nicole Kidman She Vic Reeves London jean-michel Jarre Japan Nigel farage Sky Lantern Mortimer Mame
"nouvelle" Discussed on FoodStuff

FoodStuff

04:47 min | 2 years ago

"nouvelle" Discussed on FoodStuff

"But yes, the French nouvelle Orleans was founded by Jean Baptiste, the Moyen Banville who came from new France it kit Canada in seventeen eighteen it was named for French regent Phillipe the second do. Dolan's the city expanded from the UK or the old square which later evolved into what we call the French quarter and starting around seventeen twenty three the city built up on this sort of crescent shaped highground around a sharp. Bend of the Mississippi River, his nickname crescent city. I've always wondered since it was a port city it quickly became an important trading town and the capital of the French colony the conditions were kind of miserable though, a monkey mosquito filled swamp. So love the first people sent to Louisiana were criminals. The only ones that France could get to go. Historians like describe it as the impossible, but an edible city a story. We heard while we were there is the colony requested France sent boatloads of women can't very well have a colony without women. But imagine you're a French lady you get on a boat. New arrive at this swamp full of criminals and mosquitoes. They weren't happy. No, no. They wanted to eat away their sorrows with bread. I can only tell you. But we didn't grow well in Louisiana. So they went up to the governor's house. Banging on pots and pans demanding high quality bread beyond the next shipment. And France are they out of there. But instead Madame lingua a family friend of governor bien Bill taught the women how to make cornbread that is how the story goes. Anyway. The settlers made a lot of these culinary adaptations partially because the governor had collaborated, but the native peoples up in new France to feed the colonists there, and it really shaped what New Orleans cuisine would become here's Liz Williams, the founder and director of the southern food and beverage museum in New Orleans. But I think that's the reason there is a cuisine in Vienna. Is because we actually have a French background as opposed to what some much of America do America had which was English. So if you were an English colonist you wanted to maintain your identity as an English person. So you wanted to eat likening person. And there were actually settlements in the early days in America where people starve to death and not because there wasn't food. But because they felt the food of the savages was not the food that they would eat because they will to English. Whereas since we were French, we didn't have that attitude, and our attitude was if it's here, it's French because this is much France as France. So we have to eat an alligator, it's okay, because it's a French alligator it was around the time of this. Supposed- corn bread revolution. In the middle of the seventeen hundreds that we start to see Cajun communities for form. We also talked to Amanda Mik fill-in, the associate director of museum programs at the historic New Orleans collective, which is a museum research center and publisher located in the French quarter. Amanda, who is Cajun herself spoke a bit about this along with Jessica the history of the Cajun Zeh are where winkle the Acadians their group of French settlers that were originally from the Nova Scotia can east coast area of Canada in the mid eighteenth century around seventeen fifty five the British took over that area of Canada and actually forcefully expelled all about twelve thousand Kadian from that region. Meaning they loaded them onto boats. They ship them up and down the east coast breaking up communities breaking up made friends never saw each other again, thousands of people died of disease and of drowning when some of the ships sank it was horrific and some of them did settle in other parts of Canada some settled along the east coast with the largest gr. Of these actually over about twenty period came down to Louisiana because at that point. It was Spanish territory and Spain and France, we're on good relations at that point. And they needed good Roman Catholics to who knew how to work the land to come into Louisiana and go out from New Orleans into the rest, Louisiana and settle that land. And so they did. And they've so they've been here since the seventeenth sixties, and they wherever they have landed whether it be along the water or kind of in the prairie parts of the state..

France Louisiana New Orleans Canada America Mississippi River Moyen Banville governor bien Bill Dolan Jean Baptiste founder and director UK Amanda Mik Phillipe Madame lingua Cajun Zeh Spain Liz Williams Vienna associate director
"nouvelle" Discussed on Movie Crush

Movie Crush

02:49 min | 2 years ago

"nouvelle" Discussed on Movie Crush

"There was there was even one of his films from the nineties called nouvelle Wagner was released by the German label SEM, it's it's it's the soundtrack not not as in. Here's all the music from the movie. Is the audio track from the movie released as a as a double CD album, and it actually holds up in that environment because his use of sound and music the way he he cuts things in and out. And and the way the the whole film anyway is made up of largely like quotations from different books. And so on it just it just works as like an audio tapestry. Yeah. Without the picture track. So he him for me like his movies are in a way, they're hard to love the way, you would love like, I don't know like a John Hughes movie or something, you know, there's that kind of like it reaches into like your emotions more. He's much more the intellectual side. But just there's nobody that has influenced you know, my way of thinking and interfacing with movies than him. So I think it's gotta be him to. That's great. And then finally we'll be going one on one. How do you do it at the theaters? I I usually go maybe four or five rows back. Back dead centre, close are like to see if the of the focus puller like messed up, or you know, I I like to really see, you know, I like to see awards and all kinds of and I like for my, you know, my my vision to be largely filled up by the film to not have too much in the peripheral. That's not the movie, right? So sometimes I'll go like Paul also works. Here we go to see movie he prefers to sit much further back in the theater. So if he's the one picking seats, I will sit where he sits you guys don't split up. No, no. No, no. But yeah, I large, you know, I much prefer to kind of be immersed in the movie in that way. But the the key for me is dead center. I hate sitting off access right? I wanna I wanna be kind of like in the center of the frame and the center of the film. So that things are landing kind of where I think the filmmaker wanted them to land. Gotcha. Yeah. Yeah. Sure. And as far as snacks, and that kind of thing I'll get like a couple of water if I get a snack from the from the. Concession stand. I will finish during the previews during the trailers. Yeah. And then once the movie starts, it's like, yeah. No fidgeting time. It's go time just like lock into your seat, and you know, no, no bathroom trips. Nothing. You know, awesome. Yeah. That's how you do it people. All right, man. This is great. I re I love doing this. I can't wait Kubrick to look for Barry Lyndon coming in about a month. Yeah. And then we'll finish with eyes wide shut. But have a feeling people are going to be like more, Casey. Let's keep it going. Yeah. I'd need to dive into some good. And maybe we'll just sort of tackle some of the all time classics. Yeah. Awesome. Thanks, chuck. Yes..

nouvelle Wagner Paul John Hughes Casey Kubrick Barry Lyndon
"nouvelle" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"nouvelle" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Adrift at sea. Data has details. Eighteen year old Aldy nouvelle Adeline was rescued by a Panamanian ship and crew near Guam after a storm sent his Rahm palm a wooden fishing raft. Adrift without a motor or a paddle for forty nine days within a week Adeline said he ran out of food and survived on the fish that he caught and cooked using wood from the raft. He drank rainwater, and according to one report, strain seawater through his clothes and drank that Atta says he lit a lamp on his raft. Every time he saw a passing ship and that happened more than ten times. But no one responded to him until three weeks ago by that time his raft drifted about twelve hundred miles from the original location in Indonesia to Guam that's about the same distances going from New York to Miami, the Panamanian vessel and crew responded to his emergency signal and rescued him Adeline was able to swim to safety and the crew hauled him on. The ship where they offered him water a blanket and some bread he is back home tonight with his family, but there are questions about his employer. This is the third time adelines fishing vessel went adrift the third time. Can you believe it so Jeff he actually had a radio that his employer gave him? That's how he put out the call for help. By the way, apparently told his brothers and sisters. I'm not working on that raft anymore. His parents said we agree. What one would think there shouldn't be a fourth time. All right. Thank you very much still add here tonight. They knew words that could change the way you play scrabble. WBZ news time seven forty nine. Our top local stories tonight in the WBZ newsroom. An active shooter situation in Marshfield on main street near ABC equipment continues. WBZ TV says police are looking for a man who shot a woman dozens of cases of hepatitis A reported around Massachusetts one patient has died. How.

Adeline Aldy nouvelle Adeline WBZ Guam Atta Jeff Marshfield Indonesia Massachusetts New York Miami forty nine days Eighteen year three weeks
"nouvelle" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"nouvelle" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Before we return to the CBS evening news. Breaking news out of Marshfield on the south shore police there have issued a code red alert. They're asking residents near main street in a four mile radius to stay inside of their homes or buildings wherever they are. They're calling this an active shooter situation off of main street by ABC equipment. We're going to follow this story. We have a reporter on route right now to Marshfield back to the CBS evening teenagers, telling an extraordinary story tonight of how he says he survived seven weeks adrift at sea. David beg hill has details. Eighteen year old Aldy nouvelle Atalanta was rescued by a Panamanian ship and crew near Guam after a storm sent his Ron Paul a wooden fishing raft. Adrift without a motor or a paddle for forty nine days within a week Adeline said he ran out of food and survived on the fish that he caught and cooked using wood from the raft. He drank rainwater, and according to one report strain seawater through his clothes and drink that Atta link says he lit a lamp on his raft every time he saw a passing ship and that happened more than ten times. But no one responded to him until three weeks ago by that time his raft drifted about twelve hundred miles from the original location in Indonesia to Guam. That's about the same distance is going from New York to Miami. The Panamanian vessel and crew responded to his emergency signal and rescued him Adeline was able to swim to safety and the crew hauled him on. The ship where they offered him water a blanket and some bread he is back home tonight with his family, but there are questions about his employer. This is the third time adelines fishing vessel went adrift the third time. Can you believe it so Jeff he actually had a radio that his employer gave him? That's how he put out the call for help. By the way, apparently told his brothers and sisters. I'm not working on that raft anymore. And.

Marshfield CBS Adeline Guam Ron Paul Aldy nouvelle Atalanta David beg hill ABC Jeff Atta reporter Indonesia New York Miami forty nine days Eighteen year seven weeks three weeks
Adeline, Guam and Ron Paul discussed on WBZ Afternoon News

WBZ Afternoon News

02:00 min | 2 years ago

Adeline, Guam and Ron Paul discussed on WBZ Afternoon News

"Eighteen year old Aldy nouvelle Atalanta was rescued by a Panamanian ship and crew near Guam after a storm sent his Ron Paul a wooden fishing raft. Adrift without a motor or a paddle for forty nine days within a week Adeline said he ran out of food and survived on the fish that he caught and cooked using wood from the raft. He drank rainwater, and according to one report strain seawater through his clothes and drink that Atta link says he lit a lamp on his raft every time he saw a passing ship and that happened more than ten times. But no one responded to him until three weeks ago by that time his raft drifted about twelve hundred miles from the original location in Indonesia to Guam. That's about the same distance is going from New York to Miami. The Panamanian vessel and crew responded to his emergency signal and rescued him Adeline was able to swim to safety and the crew hauled him on. The ship where they offered him water a blanket and some bread he is back home tonight with his family, but there are questions about his employer. This is the third time adelines fishing vessel went adrift the third time. Can you believe it so Jeff he actually had a radio that his employer gave him? That's how he put out the call for help. By the way, apparently told his brothers and sisters. I'm not working on that raft anymore. And

Adeline Guam Ron Paul Aldy Nouvelle Atalanta Atta Jeff Indonesia New York Miami Forty Nine Days Eighteen Year Three Weeks
"nouvelle" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"nouvelle" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"One let's just call Mookie Betts and asked Lookie bats but. He thinks because that guy right handed hitter that Craig's here Betts park at At Camden. Yards I mean the water Juan hitting the air, centerfield Mullins a step back down a couple in and makes a, one handed catch Yeah I mean his name should be on the spot he has dominated Here. At Camden Yards Abrek Gardner coming up and on get Giancarlo Stanton and nouvelle Spar stain at Lowe's Gardy, in this one strikeout-to-walk two run Homer and another. Strike yeah no doubt I mean you're talking Mookie Betts loves hitting in this park I offering in the dirt Thirty two thousand four forty five or paid crowd here today A, good crowd I guess maybe it's more from our vantage point but that feels a little bit like they count it to people twice Maybe it needs doubleheader aspect headcount count the people now for later One that's. A little high Well that should. Be two separate attendances Cooking the books a little bit To down voided I Gilbert leading.

Mookie Betts Betts park Camden Giancarlo Stanton Mullins Abrek Gardner Craig Juan Lowe
"nouvelle" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"nouvelle" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"You subscribe if you were gonna list everything you could possibly want in a scifi novel would robots be there maybe aliens faraway planets how about a chaotic dystopia future are you nodding your head right now you get all of these when you read sylvan nouvelles latest novel only human it's the third and final installment in the fem files series which follows this young girl named rose who lives in the future giant robots have killed a hundred million people on earth you know your average john grisham fair but even though the story takes you into a war against an army of invading alien robots it's actually kind of relatable and weirdly timely as well listen all all stop all at sylvan nouvelle explained this whole thing a little better all right so in the first book rose finds a giant mental hand buried on the ground and the the scour the earth looking for these giant metal body parts left here by a civilization that was ear thousands of years ago in book two we get to meet people who built these things and well without spoiling the story just say things don't go well lot of people died the you mentioned a number of people and the end of the book things are sort of okay but the main characters get transported to another world and then almost a decade is passed and we haven't heard from him and they come back and they find that mankind has reacted to the news that we learned in in waking gods in the in a poor way which isn't really surprising i love how concisely you can summarize those books for life you know for someone who wrote them you can you can summarize them pretty good did it's horrible i hate i hate doing that i kind of encierro somehow live under pressure on the radio.

john grisham rose sylvan nouvelle
"nouvelle" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"nouvelle" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"If you were going to list everything you could possibly want in a scifi novel would robots be there may be aliens faraway planets how about a chaotic dystopia in future are you nodding your head rate now you get all of these when you read sylvan nouvelles latest novel only human it's the third and final installment in the feminist files series which follows this young girl named rose who lives in the future giant robots have killed a hundred million people on earth you know your average john grisham fair but even though the story takes you into a war against an army of invading alien robots it's actually kind of relatable and weirdly timely as well listen all all stop all at sedan nouvelle explained this whole thing a little better all right so in the first book rose finds a giant metal han buried on the ground and the the scour the earth looking for these dry middle body parts left here by a civilization that was ear thousands of years ago in book two we get to meet the people who built these things and well without spoiling the story just say things don't go well a lot of people died the you mentioned the number of people and at the end of the book things are sort of okay but the main characters get transported to another world and then also decade has passed and we haven't heard from him and they come back and they find that the mankind has reacted to the news that we learned in in waking gods in the in a poor way which doesn't really surprising i love how concisely you can summarize those books for you know for someone who wrote them you can you can summarize pretty good it's horrible i hate i hate doing that i kind of caesar somehow live under pressure on.

john grisham rose sedan nouvelle
"nouvelle" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"nouvelle" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"You subscribe if you were gonna list everything you could possibly want in a scifi novel would robots be there maybe aliens faraway planets how about a chaotic dystopia future are you nodding your head right now you get all of these when you read sylvan nouvelles latest novel only human it's the third and final installment in the fem files series which follows this young girl named rose who lives in the future giant robots have killed a hundred million people on earth you know your average john grisham fair but even though the story takes you into a war against an army of invading alien robots it's actually kind of relatable and weirdly timely as well listen all all stop all at sylvan nouvelle explained this whole thing a little better all right so in the first book rose finds a giant mental hand buried on the ground and the the scour the earth looking for these giant metal body parts left here by a civilization that was ear thousands of years ago in book two we get to meet people who built these things and well without spoiling the story just say things don't go well lot of people died the you mentioned a number of people and the end of the book things are sort of okay but the main characters get transported to another world and then almost a decade is passed and we haven't heard from him and they come back and they find that mankind has reacted to the news that we learned in in waking gods in the in a poor way which isn't really surprising i love how concisely you can summarize those books for life you know for someone who wrote them you can you can summarize them pretty good did it's horrible i hate i hate doing that i kind of encierro somehow live under pressure on the radio.

john grisham rose sylvan nouvelle
"nouvelle" Discussed on Le journal de 7h00

Le journal de 7h00

02:35 min | 3 years ago

"nouvelle" Discussed on Le journal de 7h00

"A desert given up on your four in psalm on service and ekg reformist founded plus more incisive detail bike strong telecasts joyce tim sebastian needs secratary novella one dish victim the pope assault authority formerly the communities in was on victim only on the street is also a simple is never prepared don't come next week lupone say land a video shoot i these are all on your own so we don't want we don't care on the twitter resume just only tishman but onto shlep on the past british poesie miss could piper regime luanda libertarian ron among new skill is opposite keanu prisons desert him okay he knew so power some ramona liquid co lugano of almost surgical free phuket on a semi toed shoes kept klay call novocur magno coffee don't forget shawn meter don't from the in tableau own communities policemen portion dimension you keep it again to louis chief suspects shit an easy year loop at home to license if jim nouvelle siri to compulsively do grave the twenty two million to be river monto count won't it home is on vote on hulu counts meal twenty on newt the gap senor from uc weekend swim papas ever for who will you do some contests with some council ms linnea exceptional don't suggest stimulus not leftovers from chanel desert sushi astrologers every hospital the tel pomo of the writing is on plus approve your faucet zany lipa some smooth move monte report did not and could affect retailers to police was on and refunded what accelerate university clip prepared is examined funny onto the homeless say positive while i'm on is shows politically paseo suma newly that you compose e bacterial dismantle amazon on these exam document on vulgar manner drama series polian kelly's oop was on allah university brooke king led to the depositi sitter in sweden modern it is from premediated don't do don't consider hongkou italian lugo prescription extremely heavy debris younger years call delicious l pretty soon avantis on every bond city eliminate say say of homes so far this year loop together.

assault louis amazon kelly brooke king tim sebastian twitter klay novocur magno shawn hulu newt sweden
"nouvelle" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"nouvelle" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"French pastrana me he said had lost a mythical figure pool baku's gained renown as one of the pioneers of nouvelle cuisine from the 1960s with his emphasis on fresh local produce prepared with a light touch and presented exquisitely a move away from heavy rich dishes with elaborate sources but he later distanced himself from some of the more extreme variance of this approach once dismissing them as a joke confident enough to resist the vagaries of fashion he ensured a lasting legacy according to the british television shift brian turner he was a non late very much in guiding together nouvelle cuisine where individual torsion key liked do large portions of issues but the man was inspirational to lots and lots of people go down with the names like she's got a slight skull pa like his name will be remembered forever born into a family of chefs he remained ever faithful to the area round legal he's signature restroom there with these colorful facades a temple to go maize from around the world in 2015 it reached fifty consecutive years with the maximum three michelin stars he's vaunted simplicity did not shackle of for selfpromotion however he named one of his creations a soup enriched with truffles and foie gras party of the president valery giscard d'estaing buttering up the man who awarded him the leisure donor and he's artful blend of the culinary in the entrepreneurial helps give rise to another modern phenomenon the celebrity chef as for his own tastes he loved women as well it seemed as food maintaining too long to mistresses alongside his wife and pull baku showed there was a limit to the kind of minimalism sometimes served up as nouvelle cuisine i love butter cream and wine he said not little peas cut into four particularly if you have to share them unable hot with thatch report and that's all from us for now but an updated version of the global news podcast will be available for you to download later if you want to comment on this podcast all the topics covered in it you can send us an email address is global podcast bbc dot c o uk i'm alex richardson until next time goodbye.

pastrana baku brian turner valery giscard alex richardson president
"nouvelle" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"nouvelle" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"French pastrana me he said had lost a mythical figure pool baku's gained renown as one of the pioneers of nouvelle cuisine from the 1960s with his emphasis on fresh local produce prepared with a light touch and presented exquisitely a move away from heavy rich dishes with elaborate sources but he later distanced himself from some of the more extreme variance of this approach once dismissing them as a joke confident enough to resist the vagaries of fashion he ensured a lasting legacy according to the british television shift brian turner he was a non late very much in guiding together nouvelle cuisine where individual torsion key liked do large portions of issues but the man was inspirational to lots and lots of people go down with the names like she's got a slight skull pa like his name will be remembered forever born into a family of chefs he remained ever faithful to the area round legal he's signature restroom there with these colorful facades a temple to go maize from around the world in 2015 it reached fifty consecutive years with the maximum three michelin stars he's vaunted simplicity did not shackle of for selfpromotion however he named one of his creations a soup enriched with truffles and foie gras party of the president valery giscard d'estaing buttering up the man who awarded him the leisure donor and he's artful blend of the culinary in the entrepreneurial helps give rise to another modern phenomenon the celebrity chef as for his own tastes he loved women as well it seemed as food maintaining too long to mistresses alongside his wife and pull baku showed there was a limit to the kind of minimalism sometimes served up as nouvelle cuisine i love butter cream and wine he said not little peas cut into four particularly if you have to share them unable hot with thatch report and that's all from us for now but an updated version of the global news podcast will be available for you to download later if you want to comment on this podcast all the topics covered in it you can send us an email address is global podcast bbc dot c o uk i'm alex richardson until next time goodbye.

pastrana baku brian turner valery giscard alex richardson president
"nouvelle" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"nouvelle" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"Which the appreciate it i think but he he gave me a he gave me a level of credibility in this business that was invaluable i am was so fortunate to have their moment with him at that moment in time and then i mean you only directed me and three films yes nouvelle air you'll like on it and cash nashville yes merely one of the great american films of all time absolutely and when we were filming it i knew we were doing something good and even when it was finished and it was being celebrated in the you know you remember the famous uh controversy about polling kale writing her review before the film was actually finished and released she had an early imia was now those were the days are yes people used to talk of a film criticism in those days l angela wendell but as they say don't get me started while you exactly exactly but it's interesting and and i knew the film was good there but then we had the 20th or the twentyfifth anniversary screening here in at the academy mmhmm and it was a full house and i was there in celebration of bob in the movie and all of met and i was also a little bit intimidated at who all had come to you know celebrate the twentyfifth anniversary of national and i sat down and that theater in that movie ran and you know i don't think i've ever been able to look at it quite as objectively as i was able to that night it's one of the great movies of all time it just is it just is an ice there watching that and realizing that.

angela wendell twentyfifth