26 Burst results for "Norwegian Refugee Council"

"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:55 min | 7 months ago

"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"That's a Bloomberg business flash now back to some of our interview highlights from daybreak Europe this year Let's revisit one of the big geopolitical events of the year the U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan and the Taliban's takeover of the country It was a major blow for western democracy and caused chaos as the U.S. and its ally staged a massive evacuation of vulnerable Afghans One month after the crisis Bloomberg spoke to the Jan eagle and secretary general of the Norwegian refugee council who warned that the country was on a countdown to economic collapse and even worse humanitarian crisis Here he is speaking to Caroline hepker and Anna Edwards in September Just tell us what you have seen and heard in Afghanistan why do you think that the economy is so close to really enormous ruin Because I've been sitting down with so many women with men with displaced people with people who are at the bottom of the Afghan society already and they tell me there is zero income now They have no money left They can not afford to buy any fruit They are in living in the open in many places It's really really miserable conditions and will weak away from the winter which is incredibly harsh here in the African mountainous areas And people will perish So my message to the NATO countries and all of the international financial institutions and so on that left these same 40 million African civilians is left us resume work commit and transmit funding were independent from the authorities new authorities here The Taliban we can help people survive It's a race against the clock Okay so that's the economic reality that you've observed January good morning to you What about the way that the Taliban is treating the people of Afghanistan We hear reports some of them horrendous And it's difficult to know whether they are outlier events or the new normal for the way that the Taliban wants to operate Well I also hear stories of terrible things still happening in Afghanistan Of course the people I met and these are these are the most vulnerable basic sets securities now better The war is not happening anymore There was pricing all over before corruption that was rampant is down but indeed we have a collapse of the economy no public servant has been paid here since May I mean the end of the salaries happened before the takeover when the chaotic last month of the previous regime the Taliban regime are not providing a government services that banking system is not functioning et cetera So really the people we need to concentrate on and they are not being fed at the moment That's our mission where humanitarians Yes The South Asia terrorism portal which tracks this issue says that terror attacks in Pakistan neighboring Pakistan have gone up because of the Taliban victory So there is a contrast with the security the added security that you say that some people have mentioned with this idea of deadly terror attacks being on the increase and instability in the region obviously being increased What is the humanitarian need How much do you think that is needed now in terms of money and investment to try to help Afghanistan as far as you're concerned The needs are tremendous Listen the World Bank had 70% of the topic sector on their payroll by the ministry It's all gone I met now with my teammate colleagues and my mail college here in Kabul We have 2000 aid workers and teachers on the ground We did not go for the door They tell us that they are often the only breadwinner now in their entire extended family it's very important to understand that it's the same civilians This is my point Then it's have gone up because of the economic collapse That's the real story now happening here People will perish massively this winter unless we get the international organization that are independent of the Taliban independent of the government And we got assurances we can work all over the country from them That was January eagle and secretary general of the Norwegian refugee council speaking to Caroline hapka and Anna Edwards and that was one month after the U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan one of the big geopolitical events of the year And Jan was talking about how the Taliban was on a countdown to economic collapse So that is sure to be in focus for the rest of the 2022 and will hopefully speak to Jan again about that Now straight ahead on daybreak Europe will revisit some of your square mile segments that looked at the issues that matter to London These included restaurant no shows and an iconic Camden theater Yes we're going to take a look at what will happen when coco opens.

Taliban Afghanistan Norwegian refugee council Anna Edwards Caroline hepker Afghan society U.S. daybreak Bloomberg NATO Europe Pakistan South Asia World Bank Kabul Caroline hapka Jan Camden theater London
"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:29 min | 7 months ago

"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Both And in fact I began I firmly believe that we will be will be one of the leaders of this just as we've been love leaders on bringing private silence to the table at top 26 If comp 26 is remembered for anything I think it's going to be remembered as the finance cost And we've got to give a shout out to the work of Mark Carney in bringing the G farms coalition together and putting with finance was not only in the room as at the table finances on the table a 130 trillion of private finance available And a lot of that finance is going to be to address your question directly fitting the issue of dealing with the issue of transition getting those industries that are the wrong end of spectrum on the Brown end through to the green and the Mark mark on it talks about the 40 shades of green one of them being brown and we need to get industries moving along that transition pathway That's going to require finance and the City of London fantastic UK financial services sector is absolutely well placed to be the place to get that finance And global capital markets Brexit has the city given up on equivalence for financial services with the EU My view is that my view is that the equivalence now is not something that is future will depend on I see it in my practicing career in my day job as a royal I've watched how the clients I've gotten the financials of exactly the big banks doing deals how they've been able to they've been able to pivot and find ways to continue delivering services to that clients in Europe and around the world Without equivalents So I think we'll be on beyond that discussion around equivalents It was great It was great to see ten days ago In the beginning acknowledging the key role that clearing plays in Europe the clearing appearing facilities provided through London I think it was great It was great to see an extension of the recognition of our query our failing regime I'm sure there will be more positive news a lot of that nature in time But the city I think has looked at has thought about has moved on beyond beyond Brexit and beyond these challenges And we're providing science with out there We're working with clients in Europe and we're working with our friends and clients around the world as well All right the city beyond Brexit interesting And then just loss of your view on hybrid working I mean the City of London I walk around every day It's much busier and we look at the pret index of the Bloomberg terminal which tracks people buying sandwiches and gives us a very good reading of what the city is at the moment And it's busy isn't it But hybrid working is still here for many companies in financial services and in canary wharf the City of London and other places What's your view on the benefits and the dangers of hybrid working Maybe it's my age or whatever I'm a big fan of The Office I'm a big fan of getting people together creativity the energy that you get when you're in the room together Again seeing it in my day job a bit different it's made particularly for the junior lawyers getting the getting the genius in botching They learn by being in the more senior more experienced members of the team to I think there's a huge advantage to that But companies each company is going to take tackle the slightly differently I don't think we can be I don't think we can be prescriptive about it If a more at a higher level of hybrid working works in some businesses I'm sure it's here to say we're going to we aren't going to get back to a full 5 day a week in the office for everybody That's not good to happen And in many ways that's a very positive thing And it's of course it was sort of happening anyway before the pandemic I remember I remember being in the office on July Friday in 2019 and saying to one of my colleagues looking around a rather MTR system this is nothing that's the official said to my client So you've done this an email about not coming in today It was a lot of this stuff is as it has been happening anyway What we're seeing I think just as with so many things and acceleration of some trends because of the pandemic But the office is definitely the effort to get to here today And as you say the city is so much busier and has great to see that life back on the streets Life back on the streets in the City of London well of course that was before the overcome variant reared its ugly head so we'll see what happens next That was the lord of mayor of the City of London Vincent Kievan speaking today break Europe's Caroline hecker all about the challenges in the role including diversity and meeting climate goals Now still ahead on Bloomberg daybreak Europe we will take a look back at what happened when the U.S. pulled out of Afghanistan and the Taliban took over That's with Jan eagle and secretary general of the Norwegian refugee council Jan spoke to Caroline hepker one month after the U.S. withdrawal and he had some stark warnings.

London Mark Carney Europe Bloomberg terminal EU canary wharf UK Vincent Kievan Caroline hecker Jan eagle Norwegian refugee council Taliban Afghanistan Caroline hepker U.S. Jan
"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

The World: Latest Edition

06:14 min | 11 months ago

"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

"Their bunk account. No matter how much they have on there and only once a week and the queues are like kilometer long. How about your afghan colleagues male or female. Do they feel safe coming to work. While all asking man anti mel stats are coming. Back to work in the office in kabul we may have a who are staying at home because their families are not comfortable but like ninety eight percent are back in the office and we have reopened our field officers in the kabul informal settlements. Meaning where all the it piece are living in the outskirts of the city and are internally displaced persons. We have been able to real ben schools in some areas and there are still areas where taliban is not allowing our female staff to resume work. I'm without our female staff. He refused to open officers. Refused to resume activities. We've heard that. The offices of some international ngos have been broken into and trash and their supplies stolen. How concerned are you about that. Well that is very concerning. However is reassuring the ngo community that these are criminal elements and that they are in process of getting their functions in place. The taliban police are even saying to us that even for them this quick takeover was a surprise that we're expecting a more. Orderly handover so they have needed a few weeks to get sorted things out yesterday. The chief of the taliban police told ngos he was meeting. Got even have repossessed. Some vehicles that criminal elements had stolen and that they realize belong to ngos and they have ngos that missing of equal. Call this number and we will sort it out and return the only two year. So there's mixed messages. You mentioned taliban police. Do you and your staffers interact with taliban officials and footsoldiers on a daily basis. We see the foot soldiers at driving through town. Yes i do drive through town. And i go to and from the office and even go to see locations in kabul where we have services for internally displaced people but yesterday we had a meeting with the chief of the taliban police and the message was we wanted to look after you. We want to make sure your says. Tell us what you need. We want ngos to feed safety. Want to stay under. Never what is the level of need in afghanistan right now and what is able to be met by the few groups that are still on the ground there first of all. I believe that most of the ngos who left will soon return the un has its airbridge up and running and unexpecting a lot of Ngos resuming work in the weeks to come but the needs are staggering. It is a catastrophe. Somebody say that it's on the brink of catastrophe we are full head into it. More than one. Million children are at risk of dying. This winter from starvation eighteen million people are in need of humanitarian assistance. Veep public sector is about to collapse. Who will pay the salaries four public teachers or health workers in clinics and hospitals. These are questions that needs to be answered may needs to be answered fast. The situation is dire enough going afghanistan. What are the most dire needs in terms of humanitarian relief for afghanistan. Right now even now. Money doesn't help because the market is dwindling due to the famine crops. I mean forty percent of the crops is failing due to the drugs. There's not enough food in country needs to come either by airplanes or by land from neighboring countries. If food does not reach afghanistan people are going to stop to desk and in high numbers. In addition in a couple of months the winter will come and their minds degrees in kabul on in the northern part of the country people need shelter. people need blankets. People need winter clothes to themselves and to their children. They need firewood. They need wintry station assistance and they needed before the winter comes astroid. You described the situation in afghanistan as dire. What's an image that kind of lives with you in terms of what the dire situation really looks like every time the snow comes in november december. I travelled out to the cobble informal settlements. Because i then see children running around barefoot or in plastic slippers in slush in frozen water and snow. People are living under a tarpaulin or with makeshift walls made of cloth etcetera. And it's a good reminder for me why. I'm in this line of work and why i continue to work in afghanistan despite the somewhat cumbersome situation i was gonna ask why are you staying put in kabul. It's my duty. It's my job. I was actually out of the country when kabul fell on. I managed to get back on. I have no intention of leaving. The askins behind afghanistan needs says more than ever astronauts. Slayton is in kabul. She's the country director for the norwegian refugee council. Thank you very much for speaking with us. Thank you the small baltic nation. Lithuania doesn't usually receive many asylum seekers last year. Barely one hundred crossover over the country's eastern border to apply for asylum this summer more than four thousand have arrived. European leaders blamed neighboring belarus for orchestrating a refugee crisis in revenge for the eu slapping sanctions on the authoritarian leadership of russian. President alexander lukashenko but as andrew connolly reports from the lithuanian. Bela russian border. The reality is more complex. Little village of vedeno is in southeast into through ania. Close to the border with belarus on a basketball court in school building for us. There's.

taliban kabul afghanistan un askins norwegian refugee council Slayton Lithuania andrew connolly belarus alexander lukashenko vedeno eu basketball
"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

03:49 min | 1 year ago

"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on NPR News Now

"This labor day is a financial turning point for close to nine million americans poised to lose pandemic related jobless benefits more from npr's asthma holid- millions of people are set to lose some form of unemployment assistance because of the pandemic the federal government had been chipping into give unemployed people in additional three hundred dollars a week. The biden administration was also offering unemployment to people who typically don't get it they gig workers or freelancers a couple of weeks ago. The white house specified that individual states could use stimulus money to extend jobless benefits. But it doesn't appear that any states are doing that. In fact a number of republican led states decided to end the benefits earlier this summer arguing that they were overly generous and discouraging people from working. The economists have found little evidence of that us mukalla. Npr news as the us confirms its first successful overland evacuation of citizens from afghanistan. Some aid groups say they are committed to remaining in the country and helping those in need despite the taliban returning to rule in afghanistan after the exodus of us forces from the country ahead of the norwegian refugee council in kabul asteroid slate and tells npr's here and now she's not concerned for her own safety to printed. they slay. I feel safer now than before. The reason for that is a no. I'm not a target taliban. Know me i have been here. For many years. They have specifically told me and the international humanitarian community that they need us and they want us to stay and deliver was clear. Though is how afghan women and girls will fare. The taliban repeatedly sought to reassure afghans in foreign countries. They will not impose brutal rule women and girls were largely barred from private life. Global industry group for maritime shipping is given its support for a proposal for larger vessels to pay a carbon emission surcharge the marks reports from london. The international chamber of shipping. And un's monday that. All international vessels five thousand gross tonnes heavier should pay a fixed tariff each metric tons of carbon dioxide they produce the chamber represents around four fifths of the entire world's much shipping fleet. Which in turn is responsible for the movement around ninety percent of international trade. The plan is part of an effort to reduce emissions in the shipping industry which experts estimate is responsible for around three percent of greenhouse gas emissions. The sector has faced rising pressure to clean up the money collected from the tariff would be pooled in climate fund focused on developing cleaner fuel technology. Npr unused on the marks jarred by some of the images showing extensive damages from hurricane ida lawmakers from both parties are vowing to upgrade the nation's ailing infrastructure. At least fifty people from virginia to connecticut died in the store most caught in fast rising flood waters. At least sixteen deaths were blamed on the storm in louisiana mississippi and alabama. Us financial markets are closed for the holiday. This is npr. A veteran combat shooter accused of fatally killing a mother her three month old baby and two others and what appears to be a random attack in florida is being held without bond authorities say thirty three year old. Brian riley surrendered early sunday. After a shootout sheriff's officials say riley stopped a family's home saturday evening claiming to be on a mission from god. He was ordered to leave but returned hours later. Killing four people inside eleven year old girl shot multiple times survived but was in critical but stable condition. Today french film star john. Paul belmondo has died at eighty eight starve. Breathless was often compared to marlon brando. And humphrey bogart. Npr's bob bundle says belmondo wasn't original. His face was craggy and with a cigarette dangling from his lip. He always looked to be spoiling for a fight. But his brand of rebellion catnip for mid-century audiences cast him as an existential killer opposite. Jean seeburg is.

biden administration npr taliban mukalla Npr news norwegian refugee council afghanistan Global industry group for mari international chamber of shipp asthma federal government kabul white house hurricane ida us un Npr
"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

08:17 min | 1 year ago

"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on Here & Now

"Or stop you from the education aspect of what your group does educating women while it's too early to tell What i can say is that I'm not worried for my own sake to in that regard because you can say enough kinda some there three genders there are male female and lady foreigners we come in a special category they would never impose the same kind of restrictions on me i said would on an african woman. A students sledding a country director in afghanistan for the norwegian refugee council. Thank you so much What good work you do there and thank you for sharing a few moments with us. Thank you for having me. This is here now and for a few months. Now people around phoenix. Arizona have been able to hail taxis without a human driver. The service is through waymo alphabet self driving car project. Sure your seat belt is fastened. The writer said four agents. Well oh my god. We're driving look at the front seat. Look at the front seat. There's nobody in this car but me. I'm the only person in this car. I'm sitting in the backseat and the car is driving. That was here. Now's peter o'dowd last year. Taking one of those first rides will link to that piece that here and now dot org. It was a major first step in the race to get autonomous cars onto america's roads but recently a headline from bloomberg khader i it reads way is ninety nine percent of the way to self driving cars. The last one percent is the hardest. Gabriel coppola covers the auto industry for bloomberg and joins us from detroit with more on that. Welcome to the show. Thank you thanks for having me. Yes so you and your colleague mark. Bergen wrote this latest article on way mo. And we're focusing on this company because as you right they are still ahead of everyone else in this effort with that. How good is way mos right now. Well it's fair to say there are still the best in the industry mean to this at this point. They are the only company that has managed to offer taxi. Rides with no human driver than it really is a very big achievement. At the same time you write that one percent that one percent is still a killer. What are the limitations. Well there's a term that people in the industry is a lot called the edge cases in really what that means is sort of those very rare occurrences just freak things that can happen or maybe not so free. you know. There's a weird construction going on in a road or there's a parked car and the computer can't tell if that person is parked in getting ready to leave or parked in though he person's getting out of the car there are some situations that you can't anticipate on if the robot hasn't seen it before it doesn't have the kind of human like intelligence to figure it out and so it's still needs human help in that regard right you also right. I mean something. Like weather handling rain or sleet or snow. They've got to figure out all of those types of conditions as well but once they get all of that figured out there's also a lot of questions about manufacturing capacity. what have you learned. Yeah waymo took over. They leased plant here in detroit in a neighborhood called him traffic a few years ago and this was kind of hailed by the ceo at the time of this is the world's first autonomous vehicle manufacturing plant. We're going to you know. Be cranking out rubber taxis and things like that but when i spoke to some of the folks that have actually worked inside the plant. Work there They described a situation which was much more kind of painstaking and difficult but basically what they're doing is they're taking cars from for example jaguar land rover which makes the electric i pace suv. That waymo is now. Deploying in san francisco engineers come in. They have to kinda hook up all the special sensors the kind of eyes and ears and brain the car. Hook it all together. The problem is we can take a car apart like that even partially and you put it back together. You might misplace a wire and then and then. The car doesn't work then so y'all kayla call up an engineer in london over. You know it's a problem that engineers have to figure out and takes days. That's very different from what you imagined with like sort of you know. High volume manufacturing where. There's an assembly line cars. Just being cranked out. This is going to slow and it's manual in. Its people taking things apart and putting them back together right with that though right there up against traditional auto companies. They're still ahead of all of them but waymo is a tech industry and its roots are in the tech industry. Who are they up against in the automotive industry in this race to get these driverless cars on america's roadways. Yeah well there's been some consolidation. I would say because this is such an expensive project. A lot of companies. Just kind of throw in. The towel uber threw in the towel recently and sold his business. That we don't want to deal with this anymore but you still got crews which is controlled by general motors. Gm you've got argo controlled by ford. There's a company called aurora which is actually founded by Some top engineers from google itself and tesla that are still pursuing this and one of the things. I found interesting in the story was. There's this big debate. You know between silicon valley to them a software problem. There's a certain arrogance about it. They think they can solve any problem. The world we just throw a lot of software engineers at it and they don't always at least for folks in detroit they feel like they don't always appreciate how complex manufacturing is so. There's kind of a debate. I think i sense to debate between how important that manufacturing stuff really is you know what for my reporting. It sounded like it was a serious headache. Wayman will dispute that and say it's not but you know i've talked to people who say no. It really is an issue. What are some of the regulatory environment challenges for a company like this even if they built a perfect autonomous vehicle. Can they just put it on on the road whenever they want to. Great question As of yet the government the federal government does not have a standard. that says. This is what you have to prove. You can do to say an autonomous vehicles safe. It's really State by state. Some states are more lax than others but there are autonomous vehicles being tested all over the country a lot of these companies flocked to states that have less regulation less disclosure requirements. Things like that so while everybody is start out in california. Now you see people working. In arizona and florida which have more i guess Lax or more accommodating regulatory environment another challenge with waymo is also internal strife. There have been some changes in leadership. Yes what i think you're referring to earlier this year the ceo. John craft chick who had he actually was an auto executive who has kind of brought into waymo to kind of help. Grow the business side. He left in the spring and a lot of other pretty pie. Level executives left as well And that definitely did raise a lot of eyebrows about you know what's going on here. Why is there this big exodus of talent and As far as i can tell you know mark and i from our reporting. It's not that people don't still believe in the mission. They feel that it's taking a lot longer than they expected. And i think that's probably true for a lot of the self driving companies. If you look at sort of the peak hype that we were seeing twenty sixteen seventeen. This was right around the corner now. People realize that this is gonna take much longer to really achieve this. That's gabrielle coppola reporter for bloomberg talking with us about the challenges of bringing.

norwegian refugee council peter o Gabriel coppola bloomberg detroit waymo dowd Bergen afghanistan america phoenix Arizona Gm kayla san francisco tesla Wayman
"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:25 min | 1 year ago

"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And snow during the day, so these people need urgent assistance so they can survive the winter. And what is your group to do? You bring in food you bring in water? I mean, you talk about Helping people who are living under tarps. Can you bring food in We are now in the process of putting in large procurement from Pakistan on relief items, not because these items are not available in Afghanistan, but because the banking system has partially collapsed. I mean, the banks were closed for many days. You can say the economic condition is in free fall. This is also partially due to the impact of the covid not so much because businesses in Afghanistan close during the Corvin, but mostly because The usual donors are reducing their funding in a situation where their own economy is badly hit by the covid pandemic, So it is kind of like the perfect storm. Yeah. Can you just give us a sense of some of the things you're seeing images that come to you? Photos in your mind if you will, um, that tell us what's happening. You know, we all focus on girls in school and women's right to work and move around freely and make life choices on their own. But this is also a huge impact on boys and men. It was a real concern that they would be sort of thrown back to the 19 nineties, when there were restrictions on what kind of clothes they could wear. They couldn't you know, have a party and dance. They could not watch movies or listen to music or be active on Facebook and Twitter, And I don't think we should underestimate the drive for these boys. And young men to leave Afghanistan. Yesterday. I know you've told us that your organization has worked with the Taliban. The Taliban has told you they want you there because they need your help. Do you worry that there is going to be there going to be members of the Taliban? Who maybe haven't gotten that memo, as they say, and are going to see you and demand that you not be outside without a male relative for Somehow take out on you. Feelings about Other Western countries, the U. S, um or stop you from the education aspect of what your group does, Uh, educating women. Well, it's true early to tell, Um, what I can say is that, um I'm not worried for my own safety in that regard, because you can say in Afghanistan there are three genders. There are male, female and lady foreigners. We come in a special category. They would never impulse the same kind of restrictions on me as they would on an African woman. My students, Latin country director in Afghanistan for the Norwegian refugee Council. Thank you So much. Uh, what good work you do there and thank you for sharing a few moments with us. Thank you for having me.

Afghanistan Taliban Twitter Facebook Yesterday three genders Norwegian refugee Council Pakistan U. S African 19 nineties Latin Corvin covid
"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

The World: Latest Edition

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

"Is being as a brutal propaganda war as well as brutal real war makes. It's hard to name a single incident whether or not you know something like completely opposite interpretations or all versions of of what's occurred. Yeah i mean it's hard to find a hopeful narrative here with the fighting tigray. What does this suggest about where the conflict is headed very significant developments on the battlefield but in many ways why it hasn't resulted the core and it's disputes. What are the core reasons for that is the federal blockade to grind forces. Say they are on the offensive to get round the blockade. The federal government says win over moving the blockade. Because it's a great enforces the aggressive here. There was also a massive problem in west tick right. That is the region that's amhara regional forces on have taken over and claimed as rightfully i'm horror regional territory. They are still in control of that. Lodge swathe of land which is adjacent to to saddam. Saddam and disagree enforces. lead does Intent on taking back that line from our control so that is a massive obstacle to a ceasefire hit so with the ethiopian government. Suspending the norwegian refugee council and doctors without borders from conducting aid operations and tigray. Help us understand. Why would they do that. And what do you think. Means for the overall relief effort as a grand forces have become resurgent and and as has been increasing reporting human rights abuses on humanitarian crisis. Inside right that has led to increasing allegations inception in Saba ethiopian more generally including amongst the official stats cooperating and actively supporting the Forces i think those are very overblown claims and it is simply products of this conflict situation that those agencies are committed to providing humanitarian relief. They want to do so in all areas mansa when they pushed to get access to rebel held areas. The governments will act is connected to the government might perceive that as offering support to those opposing forces. You as the federal operation has faced such massive problems integrate.

tigray ethiopian government norwegian refugee council federal government saddam Saddam Saba government
"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:37 min | 1 year ago

"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is the world we are co production of GBH. Boston NPR X Between Turkey and Syria. There is a key border crossing, It's become the only reliable way for food and medicine to reach 3 to 4 million Syrians. Last year, Russia vetoed a resolution at the U. N. Security Council to keep three other crossings open. Russia is a close ally of Syrian President Bashar al Assad and helps his government limit aid to opposition held areas. Now Russia's signal that next month it will vote to close the one remaining border crossing. Humanitarian groups say millions of displaced Syrians would then lose access to critical aid. Earlier today. I spoke with Basma, a loose from the Norwegian Refugee council, and I asked her as President Assad asking Russia to seal off the Syrian border with Turkey. I think that could be something that could be happening in the background. I think from where we stand as humanitarian organizations, we constantly see humanitarian operations and the delivery of assistance being hijacked by different political actors and manipulated Meet different political agendas. And so I think this this might be another attempt within that space. But I think the most importantly, is to make sure that assistance does reach people inside Syria across the country. Irrespective of who's you know, in control of the territory that they live in. Right. So if this soul border crossing Bob Ojala is closed next month, what do you see as the options if Gavin Hauer is closed, then that means the massive Yuen structure that Operates under the cross border resolution will cease to exist. We saw that in the Northeast with the closure of the ought to be a crossing where the U N stopped programs and that means that also, um, with Expecting to see if the cross if the resolution is no law is not renewed this July that the U. N will, you know, halt its programs, But then it will also withdraw its funding, and that means Syrians will be a the first to suffer the consequences. And be the humanitarian response will be completely hindered and diminished. So you'll probably still have see some NGOs that will still continue to to try to program but with much less resources and much less, you know, very little ability to maintain the coordination and the capacity or the scope. That they have to reach the people in the northwest. So Basma. I guess there's also the option of transporting these shipments of aid through the Syrian capital Damascus. Is that a realistic option and is that happening already? So far, we haven't seen any cross line missions successfully reach northwest Syria out of Damascus. So I think the chance of that increasing to match the capacity and the scope that the U N has been able to do through cross border is is very unrealistic. There's absolutely no substitute for the cross border mechanism. Um, brings in over 1000 trucks. The Bible how, and it's really inconceivable that they'll be able to to meet those meet those needs and match the same scale of of the response through through class line. What do you see at stake if this single border crossing is shut down? Are we seeing a humanitarian catastrophe that would start to unfold? Absolutely. I mean, will likely see a deterioration in the situation. You know, with the covid pandemic. We're talking about over 90% of Syrians under the poverty line, and you know there's 13.4 million people in Syria that are in need of assistance. Three million of those at least are in the northwest. And so if we're no longer able to reach them, then that means that three million people that will not be able to access food won't be able able to access clean water proper, You know, shelter things of the sort that are, you know the basic basic needs that people rely on and have grown very dependent on to be able to survive the day to day struggles in northwest Syria. So tomorrow, Biden is said to meet with Vladimir Putin. Can Biden have any influence on Russia's decision? At this point? Do you know if it's even a topic in their meeting? We're hearing that the cross border resolution is going to be on the agenda. So I think that is promising. And it's an indication of how the U. S government is really prioritising this issue and raising it at all levels, including, you know the most senior level within the US government. But in terms of you know how much influence they can have. We're hoping that the U. S. And Russia will be able to put the politics aside and really, you know, facilitate humanitarian access and assistance to the people in need based on needs not based on politics. I mean, a bad case scenario would probably imply a lot more migration. What about pressure from other members of the U. N Security Council what countries are actively trying to lobby Russia not to cast a vote to shut the borders down? Think from from what we've been hearing, there seems to be a consensus within the U. N Security Council with than most of the members that on the need for the cross border resolution, so I think In that, In that sense, I think there is a proper understanding among council members that you know the crossword and mechanisms is crucial. It's the life saving mechanism and that we need to extend it. How much of that is going to resonate with, you know parties that are not in favor of this. Mechanism is to be determined, but it seems like for now there is a consensus for the most part across New York on on the on the need for this for this resolution to be renewed. Basma Solutions, the policy and advocacy adviser for the Norwegian Refugee Council, speaking with us about the possibility that Russia will shut down, they sold border crossing for humanitarian aid from Turkey to Syria, Basma Thank you very much for speaking with us today. Thank you so much for having me Michael High in the mountains of eastern Turkey. Rural health teams are trying to convince people to get vaccinated for Covid. Just 17% of people in Turkey have received a shot. Government health workers are trying to boost the numbers by hiking into isolated towns to reach people who can't come in for an appointment during mascara and tagged along with the team to get a better sense of what it will take to achieve success in a massive walk in freezer health department worker in the Turkish border town of Asche Calais loads up a bag with doses of covid vaccine than a doctor and a nurse. Take it and drive for miles past tiny sheep herding village. It's nestled into the mountains to reach their most isolated patients..

Vladimir Putin 3 U. N Security Council U. N. Security Council New York Norwegian Refugee Council Asche Calais Last year 17% tomorrow Russia Damascus Three million Biden Norwegian Refugee council next month today U. S government Bible Earlier today
Aid agencies fear impact in Yemen after US terror decision

PRI's The World

03:47 min | 1 year ago

Aid agencies fear impact in Yemen after US terror decision

"With just nine days left for the trump administration today a big shift in us foreign policy in the middle east which could have long lasting effects secretary of state. Mike pompeo says the us will designate. Yemen's who the rebel movement a foreign terrorist organization this could seriously complicate future efforts to deal with yemen's humanitarian crisis and bringing the war to an end with us as yemen spokesperson for the norwegian refugee council mccormick. She joins us from auden. We need to quick reminder rena who are and what they represent to the state department specifically under mike pompeo sarala are otherwise known as to who 'this and they're the movement that took over the cups to of yemen's on a abide five years ago which sparked at the us to get involved in saudi led coalition in support of the government at attempt to remove them they significance for the united states has been an their accusations that the unser allow movement are backed by iran which of course for the us has broader regional at considerations and so it seems clear that this latest move is part of that regional strategy to try to minimize iranian influence in the region. This is quite fresh news. What is the reaction from yemen to do. Most people think this plan designation of who these as foreign terrorist organization was politically motivated. Well the news came in for us yemen time just this morning and so people are really trying to get to grips with us. At the moment. It's been mixed reactions here in yemen. Answer the otherwise known who have come out and in turn accused. The united states government of acting in a terrorist way other reactions from aid organizations have been the same message that has been given to the united states government for the last few months when such a move was being suggested which is that on many levels. This would be catastrophic and it would certainly have a widespread impact on the humanitarian situation. Here on the ordinary of yemenis who are trying to live their lives your organization the norwegian refugee council. What are you looking at are concerned about. What the implications of this they're going to for our ability to run an office hire staff and get goods into the country get critical supplies like food and water and supplies to help fight kovic around the country to the communities who need it's the most get materials for building emergency shelters an widely the kind of impacts that. We're looking at art. That really the feeling is that this will be devastating for the yemeni economy which is already in ruins after more than five years sustained violent or is it your expectation that the incoming biden administration will reverse this plan decision to label the husky rebel movement a foreign terrorist organization. It may not be possible to reverse this decision on if not then it is possible to put in place. The kind of protections in safeguards that are needed so these would be safeguards immediately and for all humanitarian activities near monitoring supplies. It also safeguards so that imports of critical and food and other supplies can come in and out of the country would go a long way towards mitigating or softening some of the impacts of this designation and as for the rest we i suppose we will have to see on the twentieth of january when the new administration comes in we are asking for the biden administration to make yemen one of its number one priorities on day. One re mccormick the yemen spokesperson for the norwegian refugee council. Speaking with us from auden. Thank you very much here. Very welcome

Yemen Norwegian Refugee Council Mike Pompeo Mike Pompeo Sarala United States Us Yemen United States Government Auden Rena Mccormick Middle East Saudi Biden Administration Iran
Ethiopian PM says troops ordered to move on Tigray capital

NPR's World Story of the Day

04:30 min | 1 year ago

Ethiopian PM says troops ordered to move on Tigray capital

"Ehthiopian prime minister this morning has ordered his army to move on the capital of the tigray region in the north west of the country. This decision came after his seventy two hour. Ultimatum ended for tigray leaders to surrender. The central conflict here is between the new government of ethiopia and the old government of ethiopia. An aid groups have been sounding the alarm about a humanitarian situation that is deteriorating quickly. Tens of thousands of ethiopian refugees have fled the fighting into neighboring sudan. Npr's ada peralta is following this unfolding. He's in nairobi Good morning eater. Hey david let's start with his offensive. I mean the prime minister had been warning about this. It sounds like it's happening. Now what do we know. Yes so prime minister. Abby acclimate who won the nobel peace prize last year. He says that the last chance for this war to have been resolved peacefully has now closed and he says his troops are going into michaela to try to flush out the leadership of the left. The people's liberation front and he says that will try to do everything to protect civilian lives but michelle is a big urban densely populated city. Think of something. Like saint louis and and even the government has admitted that any fighting will result in civilian deaths in abbey's military has warned that they will use heavy artillery and that the left has said that they will defend the city so this war which has been going on for about three weeks now. Hundreds have already been killed. Tens of thousands have fled as you said and this will no doubt Be the most consequential battle so far. I know this is an incredibly frustrating situation for a year to try and cover this all but impossible to get in there and actually see what's happening firsthand But you know there's been weeks of fighting around the capital. What are you hearing about the conditions on the ground. It is hard to report. But i think we can safely say that there has already been Some pretty gruesome killings that the international community is saying could amount to war crimes We know for example that in a village near the sudanese border there was a huge Massacre videos from there have shown family members crying over bodies of their loved ones in the middle of the streets and the government's human rights commission sent a group of investigators there and they say that more than six hundred people were systematically slaughtered. They say that they were killed with machetes. Their houses were set on fire. They say that militants tied ropes to their necks and dragged them to death. The government commission blames a youth militia aligned with the rebels for this but the refugees fleeing into sudan say that it was the militias aligned with the government. Who did this. So we know with certainty who committed these atrocities but what we know for sure is that civilians have already suffered terribly in this conflict. Got it sounds like it. And what about these tens of thousands of people who are fleeing where they going. What are they facing so they are going into eastern sudan will. Carter is based there. He's a humanitarian with the agency norwegian refugee council. And let's listen to a bit of what he's been. Seeing many of total stories of happens not tillery and strikes and parts of western tigray region which is where most of the refugees we've seen have come from and of past couple of weeks. I guess troop movements militia movement through their this season. They've really fred for their lives. Are you suddenly and there. Was this one woman who spoke with who who had fled across the border and her story released stood out. Here's what happened to her. When the conflict began she was pregnant. Nine months pregnant when this broke out and have given birth on the way to the border crossing and had no one around that she knew it's women seeking safety stopped to help her deliver thankfully. There was no complications with the delivery and charges alive at the moment at least sleeping next to everyone in a big communal tent. So david i mean these are the kinds of situations and stories that show you just. What a tough humanitarian crisis. This has also become really What sounds like an awful situation. A dangerous one with a lot of people life. A lot of people's lives at stake

Ada Peralta Ethiopia Abby Acclimate Tigray Sudan Michaela Nairobi NPR Government Commission Saint Louis Abbey Michelle Government David Human Rights Commission Carter Fred
Dogs Can Be Trained to Sniff Out COVID-19, Studies Suggest

TIME's Top Stories

07:28 min | 1 year ago

Dogs Can Be Trained to Sniff Out COVID-19, Studies Suggest

"Are now emerging in refugee camps. Why did it take so long for the virus to reach them By Melissa Godin. For a number of months, the world's largest refugee camps appear to have been spared the worst of the coronavirus pandemic but human rights groups now say cove nineteen infection rates are on the rise in the temporary. That house millions of the world's most vulnerable people with alarming consequences both for those vulnerable groups, as well as the world more broadly the United Nations high. Commissioner for Refugees reports that globally twenty one, thousand of the world's thirty million refugees have tested positive for the virus across ninety seven countries at the end of September. Thirty two new cases were reported in the refugee camps. In Cox's Bazar. Bangladesh home. To seven hundred, forty, five, thousand Rohingya an ethnic minority fleeing violence and discrimination in. Myanmar. In Greece, more than two hundred, forty refugees have tested positive for the virus on the island of Lesbos, and in Lebanon, Syria and Palestine. Cova nineteen outbreaks have occurred at several camps over the past month though UNHCR reports the numbers rose sharply in September. The true number of cases remains unknown because of limited testing. Aid agencies had long expressed fears about the potentially devastating impacts of the virus for those living in crowded camps where medical services are sparse yet for the first six months of the pandemic case rates remained far lower than expected while low testing rates in refugee camps could explain why so few cases have been reported experts say camps isolation from host communities, as well as the imposition of strict laws down measures curb the spread of the virus even if refugees have so far been spared the worst of the pandemics immediate health impact, the outbreak has taken a huge toll on refugees lives. The global economic recession has led to major cuts to humanitarian funding for refugee camps, causing food shortages, and. Employment Opportunities for displaced people with the Norwegian Refugee Council estimating three quarters of displaced people have lost income since the pandemic began lockdowns have also further restricted refugees mobility with countries like Greece placing tighter restrictions on refugees than the rest of the population. Moreover, many experts say governments are using the pandemic as an excuse to violate refugees rights. Governments are using covid nineteen as a pretext to block people from the right to seek asylum says bill freely the director of human rights watches. Refugee. And Migrant Rights Division. It runs roughshod over the basic principles of refugee protection. He says now, as the virus begins circulating in camps around the world experts worry that refugees who have already suffered so much from the pandemic may not get the medical support they need. If the disease gets introduced into more refugee camps, it would be a tinderbox says freekick noting that the virus would spread rapidly the low case rates we have seen so far free lick says are just a lucky break. Why have cove nineteen rates been lower than expected in refugee camps? covid nineteen rates in refugee camps or unexpectedly low in part because the camps tend to be isolated from surrounding communities limiting the odds of the virus spreading into the camps camps are situated often in the most desolate unwanted land that a country can find free like says, no one casually goes in and out national lockdowns also help protect refugees from the virus in Jordan, for instance, which hosts seven hundred. Forty seven thousand refugees mostly from Syria the government implemented. One of the world's strictest lockdowns, shutting down airports for several months and jailing people who broke quarantine. There was tight lockdown that was put in place towards the Third Week of March including the shutting down of all the borders and airspace says, Juliet Toomas. UNICEF's Chief of communications for the middle, east, and North Africa, about Jordan this help she says. Additional restrictions placed specifically on refugee camps also helped limit viral spread. Many camps have reduced the number of people entering and exiting. For instance, in Bangladesh's Cox's Bazar only twenty percent of the usual number of humanitarian workers were allowed to enter during the first few months of lockdown and deliveries were made less frequently in order to reduce potential transmission according to Saad Hamady a south. Asia campaigner for Amnesty International many of the operations except the essential ones were carried out remotely Hamadi says, these are the measures that might have reduced or delayed the spread of the virus. There are other factors however, that could explain low case numbers. Half of refugees worldwide are under the age of eighteen according to the UNHCR and their relative young age may make them less susceptible. To having a severe infection with the virus if young people are ACM dramatic or have mild symptoms, they may also be less likely to get tested. It's also possible that there have been cases of course at nineteen that have gone undetected and camps. While some testing is available, it's hindered by shortage of testing supplies and medical personnel to carry out the tests. Some refugees also don't. WanNa get tested for fear that they may have to self isolate and therefore be unable to carry out any income generating activities they rely on for survival in Cox's Bazar the world's largest refugee settlement in Bangladesh less than one percent of the population has been tested. The lower case numbers could therefore be a result of low testing rates. The actual number of cases could be higher. But experts say that despite low testing rates cove in nineteen infection rates in camps still have not been as bad as expected. Even if you carried out a large number of tests, it still likely to be a low number of infections says somebody if Cova Nineteen was spreading through camps undetected camps would witness rising numbers of people requesting medical attention or rising numbers of deaths neither of which have been the case in several camps according to UNHCR data I do think there's a hidden outbreak to an extent, but we're not seeing other indicators showing a massive outbreak says to Jacobson cares country director in Syria were not seeing a host of people falling ill or dying.

Unhcr Bangladesh COX Norwegian Refugee Council Syria Government Cova Greece Jordan Director United Nations Melissa Godin Commissioner Myanmar Migrant Rights Division Juliet Toomas Asia Unicef
"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on AP News

AP News

13:44 min | 2 years ago

"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on AP News

"An international aid group says hundreds of thousands of people in 19 countries could be displaced by armed conflict in the 2 months since you inspector general called for a global ceasefire because of the pandemic the Norwegian refugee council says the ongoing large scale displacement hurts efforts to stem the outbreak and he's a damning verdict the international diplomacy the council's young England tell C. A. P. the U. N. security council has not in any way supported the secretary-general's cool for global coronavirus ceasefire blaming what he said was squabbling among council members the way forward is for U. N. member states on the security council to exert greater pressure on armed groups including withholding support and weapons I'm Charles the assessment

Norwegian refugee council secretary-general Charles C. A. U. N. 2 months
Despite global truce appeal, 661,000 people newly displaced

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 2 years ago

Despite global truce appeal, 661,000 people newly displaced

"An international aid group says hundreds of thousands of people in nineteen countries could be displaced by armed conflict in the two months since you inspector general called for a global ceasefire because of the pandemic the Norwegian refugee council says the ongoing large scale displacement hurts efforts to stem the outbreak and he's a damning verdict the international diplomacy the council's young England tell C. A. P. the U. N. security council has not in any way supported the secretary-general's cool for global coronavirus ceasefire blaming what he said was squabbling among council members the way forward is for U. N. member states on the security council to exert greater pressure on armed groups including withholding support and weapons I'm Charles the assessment

Norwegian Refugee Council Secretary-General Charles C. A. U. N.
Despite global truce appeal, 661,000 people newly displaced

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 2 years ago

Despite global truce appeal, 661,000 people newly displaced

"An international aid group says hundreds of thousands of people in nineteen countries could be displaced by armed conflict in the two months since you inspector general called for a global ceasefire because of the pandemic the Norwegian refugee council says the ongoing large scale displacement hurts efforts to stem the outbreak and he's a damning verdict the international diplomacy the council's young England tell C. A. P. the U. N. security council has not in any way supported the secretary-general's cool for global coronavirus ceasefire blaming what he said was squabbling among council members the way forward is for U. N. member states on the security council to exert greater pressure on armed groups including withholding support and weapons I'm Charles the assessment

Norwegian Refugee Council Secretary-General Charles C. A. U. N.
"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on AP News

AP News

09:36 min | 2 years ago

"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on AP News

"The Norwegian refugee council says the ongoing large scale displacement hurts efforts to stem the outbreak and he's a damning verdict the international diplomacy the council's young England tell C. A. P. the U. N. security council has not in any way supported the secretary-general's cool for global coronavirus ceasefire blaming what he said was squabbling among council members the way forward is for U. N. member states on the security council to exert greater pressure on armed groups including withholding support and weapons I'm Charles the assessment

Norwegian refugee council secretary-general Charles C. A. U. N.
Despite global truce appeal, 661,000 people newly displaced

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | 2 years ago

Despite global truce appeal, 661,000 people newly displaced

"The Norwegian refugee council says the ongoing large scale displacement hurts efforts to stem the outbreak and he's a damning verdict the international diplomacy the council's young England tell C. A. P. the U. N. security council has not in any way supported the secretary-general's cool for global coronavirus ceasefire blaming what he said was squabbling among council members the way forward is for U. N. member states on the security council to exert greater pressure on armed groups including withholding support and weapons I'm Charles the assessment

Norwegian Refugee Council Secretary-General Charles C. A. U. N.
Yemen records its first COVID-19 infection

Weekend Edition Saturday

02:45 min | 2 years ago

Yemen records its first COVID-19 infection

"Now to Yemen where aid workers say they're bracing for the worst after the country recorded its first coronavirus case this week after five years of fighting between a Saudi led alliance and the Iran backed Hootie rebels the health care system in Yemen is already battered and peers Jana Raff has this report from Amman Jordan seven children are treated at the Yemeni hospital for malnutrition and disease three quarters of the population now depends on food and medical aid most of it delivered or funded by aid organizations Yemen has been largely cut off from the world by fighting this week recorded its first covert nineteen case these Grande the head of the U. N.'s humanitarian program in Yemen spoke to us from the capital sana'a she says the country is not prepared as virus spreads authorities on the north end of sorties in the south they have stopped the arrival of passengers they've gone into lockdown we're struggling to get the kind of equipment and the kind of resources on the kinds of medicines that we need here UN agencies are competing for things like ventilators in corona virus tests in what has become a global competition for lifesaving resources Yemen imports almost all of its food and medicine the new restrictions made getting food and medical care to people even more difficult the Norwegian refugee council's advocacy director Sultana Begum speaking to us from London says she has appealed to Yemeni authorities to allow aid operations to continue but you haven't heard past there are new restrictions that are being put in place restrictions in movement and our restrictions in terms of road closures in terms of you want like carrying a black kids coming in and out of the country so our appeal to them really is when they're preparing to combat the virus eight find safe measures to what with us D. U. N. is also facing a funding crisis in part because last month the United States cut off tens of millions of dollars in aid to Yemen saying some made was at risk of being diverted by armed groups there are forty one major you when programs and thirty one of those programs what I shot this month of April we're talking with the programs health programs water and sanitation programs protection program shelter program so we have the quote is created by the war we have a crisis created by cove it is indeed a fragile cease fire the US political envoy says he'll try to bring the two sides back to talks even if it's a virtual negotiating

Yemen Iran Jana Raff Amman Jordan Malnutrition U. N. Sana'a Norwegian Refugee Council Director Sultana Begum London United States UN
"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on AP News

"P.'s at Charles de Ledesma reports it says it's worried only twenty seven percent of funds for twenty nineteen have been provided so far the Norwegian refugee council says the with owning a home off of twenty nineteen gone humanitarian organizations who received just twenty seven percent of the money needed to provide relief to people affected by crises worldwide this year its general secretary John Eklund says the card lack of funding is alarming he adds a total of twenty six billion dollars is required this year to provide relief for around ninety four million people in the house of the donor countries have contracted only seven billion so far the NRC singled out the crises in Cameroon and Congo as examples of regions in the heat I'm Charles Taylor that's my prince Harry and his wife Meghan the Duchess of suspects were among those to attend the lion king premiere in London the royal couple was met with cheers when they arrived and walked in to the tune of Elton John's can you feel the love tonight John says it's astonishing to see The Lion King born again thing you thought it would never happen but because the jungle book was so wonderfully done and reinvented this one's been done the same way and they'll give a more realistic view other stars were on hand including Donald Glover and Seth Rogan radio news I'm typical are the four freshmen Democrats president trump tweeted should go back to where they came from are fighting back Michigan congressman rishi to to leave says trumps attack as an effort to distract from his immigration.

London congressman Michigan president Congo general secretary trump Seth Rogan Donald Glover Elton John Charles de Ledesma Meghan Harry Charles Taylor Cameroon NRC John Eklund Norwegian refugee council twenty seven percent
"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on AP News

"Britain's fifty pound low to be code breaker and computing pioneer Alan cheering the bank of England announced Monday Turing was chosen because his groundbreaking work on computers and artificial intelligence he works during World War two with the secret plexi park code breaking center we he helped crack **** Germany's secret codes by creating the touring bomb a forerunner of modern computers he also developed to the Turing test to measure artificial intelligence the UK's highest nomination noticed the loss to be redesigned and switched from paper to more secure and durable pulling up the touring bank notes will enter circulation in twenty twenty one an alarm is being sounded by a leading advocacy group AP's at Charles de Ledesma reports it says it's worried only twenty seven percent of funds for twenty nineteen have been provided so far the Norwegian refugee council says the with only haul off of twenty nineteen gone humanitarian organizations who receive just twenty seven percent of the money needed to provide relief to people affected by crises worldwide this year its general secretary John Eklund says the card to the lack of funding is alarming he adds a total of twenty six billion dollars is required this year to provide relief for around ninety four million people in the house of the donor countries have contributed only seven billion so far the NRC singled out the crises in Cameroon and Congo as examples of regions in the heat I'm Charles so that's my the US women's soccer team is getting a donation from Procter and gamble which is already a sponsor of the team but now.

Norwegian refugee council US Congo general secretary AP bank of England Procter Cameroon NRC John Eklund Britain Charles de Ledesma UK Germany Turing
News in Brief 10 May 2019

UN News

03:45 min | 3 years ago

News in Brief 10 May 2019

"This is the news in brief from the United Nations a record forty one million people remain displaced worldwide because of conflict or natural disasters after an increase of more than a million individuals in a single year, the finding by UN partner, the Norwegian Refugee Council or an RC points to ongoing clashes in Syria along with often under reported tensions in the Democratic Republic of the Congo or DRC if the opium and Cameroon here's an RC head yon Egland speaking in Geneva. Let me give the example of Cameroon. I was just there in south west of the country, the southern and western anglophone parts of Cameroon there is armed conflict. Nobody's talking about. Nobody's engaging to end. There is no mediation. There is no humanitarian program commensurate to the scale of the suffering, but there are hundreds of torch villages, and there is now between four and five. Five hundred thousand people displaced in the anglophone part of Cameroon apart from conflict, extreme weather events are natural disasters. Also, responsible for people fleeing their homes, some of the worst storms and tropical cyclones were in China, India, and the Philippines, and our seas internal displacement monitoring centre said with ten million people displaced in those three countries alone in many countries conflict and natural disasters combined to create mass population shifts, not least in Afghanistan where drought has triggered more displacement than armed conflict. Similarly, these security crisis in northeast Nigeria has been aggravated by flooding. That's affected eighty percent of the country. And I'll see maintains to Myanmar now where the UN human rights office h HR set on Friday that these state military known as the tatmadaw may be responsible for opening fire on hundreds of men and boys in Rakhine state killing six of them. According to spokesperson, Rupert Colville, the victims are believed to have been detained following attacks. By an armed group. The. Erica army onto tatmadaw army bases in April the latest esscalation in a long running conflict. According to the tap door. Soldiers opened fire when the group tried to seize that gums, but other sources dispute this account and give a different version. They say the door opened fire indiscriminately after one of the detainees tried to escape since the second of may most of the boys and men have been released in groups, Mr. Colville said, however up to fifty remain incommunicado detention without access to lawyers doctors or any other form of protection they are reliant on family members for food, according to the UN human rights office, which says it is also concerned over an announcement. That the episode will only be investigated by the military and finally nearly nine hundred youngsters have been released by a pro government armed group in northeast Nigeria. The development of Friday has been welcomed by you and children's fund UNICEF which warned that those freed will need long-term help if there to lead a normal life. His UNICEF spokesperson crystal billion rack. The children and young people released today would benefit from reintegration programs to help them return to civilian life and sees new opportunities for their own development without the support many of the children released from armed groups struggle to fit into civilian life. As most are not indicated and have no vocational skills of the eight hundred ninety four children released in mighty Gurry. One hundred six girls they were recruited by these civilian joint task force or CGT f which committed to ending the practice last September under a UN led action plan since that deal was signed more than seventeen hundred children and young people have been released. Daniel Johnson UN news.

Cameroon UN United Nations Rupert Colville Unicef Norwegian Refugee Council Nigeria DRC Opium Partner Gurry Syria Myanmar Geneva Afghanistan Daniel Johnson Egland China
"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

05:05 min | 3 years ago

"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Got it. If the government is telling but to home, but I think. There and need money life. So I do want gaming. To tell us more about the plight of intimidated to space people around the world, we can talk not too young Egland. He's the secretary general of the Norwegian Refugee Council who composite the global report on internally displacement, welcome to the program. Every time we speak to you. It seems like a moment of deja vu we've been here before. But now more than a million people since twenty seventeen displaced if the topping that list. More people fleeing violence in this country than anywhere else in the world. What's going on? RL horrific ethnic clan. Clashes into communal violence, so many positive things have happened of late in SEO is itself. Rec- seething refugees. It has now a peace process with neighboring trivia, but all of the country now. From tribes ethnic groups s you just had a story to tell us about. What has to happen is that the ministry piece that has been created will succeed that there will be local peace processes Logan reconciliation processes because this cannot continue to point nine million people displaced in a year is a tremendous. Miss Eglin James here jebron, south Sudan. Well, what's your read right now g think the Peacedale that is just about holding so far is that should assign? A better things to come for the country. Many more people being displaced in the future. The peace deal is is tremendously positive news. But it has to be put in to real life. It has to be realized and our report from from our internal displacement monitoring Santa here in Geneva found that a minimum of three hundred and twenty thousand people were also displaced from their homes driven home spy violence in south Sudan. In spite of the peace agreement. So again, there there is so much unfinished business at the same time as there are so many of these intercommunal conflicts, local conflict tribal conflicts that a really causing havoc among families, and we look at those trouble conflict. But we also look at the evidence pointing to week governors. What about international diplomacy is the international community doing enough to help? Not at all. The United Nations has to really stick. Conflict prevention conflict resolution. When we see more than ten million million people display driven after the homes by blunt, highlands conflict. Ethnic violence last year alone. STO Diaz democrat Republican of Congo, Syria, Somalia, Nigeria and the and the Central African Republic, the top places it just shows that no it's not going. The x Ray of international politics. Is not going because we're not people and protecting people to stay in the homes as they won't there isn't solution to this. And that is. Is is peace and making locally and then outside of that governance and international diplomacy. There's also the case of extreme weather to effecting which parts of the world because this does play a huge role in internally displacing people very briefly if your kids. Yeah. Because I also found that seventeen point two million people last year where where displaced by disasters more people live more exposed to more extreme weather, and that is particular in Asia so conflict and violence at this displacement has happened predominantly in Africa in twenty eighteen. Placement because of disasters in Asia. But there are too many these comes together lethal. Tale of events for families Afganistan drought on top of conflict. Somalia natural disasters on top of conflict on the secretary general of the Norwegian Refugee Council compiling that report the global reporting internally displaced pay people the highest the world has ever seen forty one million people have had to flee their homes..

Norwegian Refugee Council communal violence Sudan Somalia Asia Afganistan Eglin James United Nations Geneva Africa STO Diaz Central African Republic Santa Nigeria Syria
"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:11 min | 3 years ago

"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I was really shocked. She went home and talked to her husband about the picture. And it was just luck that he had seen an article written by the BBC that day about an Indian man called Mr. Moraga who'd invented a low cost sanitary towel machine in India. And I read historian I was inspired and moved by his work. And I thought that machine should be in the camp that I just seen in the area that I just seen. And that's why I know about Amy because I wrote the article she's talking about. Back in twenty fourteen BBC outlook spoke to I don't actually I'm more of an anthem who Amy calls, Mr. Muto guy. He's a school drop-out from a poor family in southern India, and he set off on a personal odyssey after a strange encounter with his wife. The model would I in? Did one day. So something she is trying to run away from me hide something from me. Then my phone. She was trying to hide the fees of engaging plot from me, we should be very honest with you, I won't even use it to clean my way. He was so shocked by the rags his wife was using when she had her period, and by the cost of sanitary pads that is said about figuring out how to make a cheaper alternative to families, horror difficulty. I collected our own ten to fifteen used to Senator pets from lemon. Brought it home started. It ended up being a the back of me yard. Then my mom saw it. And that was the reason she left me stating. No, this is not to mention it's none of your business. Undeterred eventually managed to design his own machine that could make low cost sanitary pads. The machine was decided in such a way that anyone educated military understand and start using it just an hour. Can you help to him instead of their own microphone factories using a machine sadaqa produce pads for themselves and start small businesses to the ideas spread the microphone factories were popping up across India giving access to Ford -able sanitary pads to extremely poor women for the first time so back to Amy this is twenty fourteen she found out about Morgan anthems idea and she was on a mission. I started to research whether or not that machine had been put in these places. Whether it was obviously so much need for for sanitary towels, and they couldn't find a thing. I'd always wanted to make a difference any fear that I had hesitancy about maybe seeing whether this could work was really put to bed by. By the fact, that I could just think about those women in the camps. And thank well. If I don't do something or if I don't go and help these people they'll be still, and if I don't go I'll be in my cozy home, but what kind of human being would I be if I at least didn't try to see if there was a way forward. So Amy started a charity called loving humanity? She got stuck into research made contacts with your organization's look after refugees and eventually got access to the secretary refugee camp in Jordan home to some eighty thousand Fiji's from the war in Syria. There. She spoke to refugees and camp officials about the need for the pads and the chances of setting up a microphone factories. She said that all the community groups are taking care of food. They're taking care of their issues, but nobody is asking gears. How do you feel with the sanitary pads for us? It's an interesting idea we want to try it out today was a big day for me talking to the guy. He's in charge saying, yes, we can do this. And we really want to help you then Amy travel to India to see the people running the microphone factories, and suddenly it all seemed very doable. Just build a summit pad factory in the refugee camp simple. She got to work to be honest at the beginning. There was no plan. It was every day was a new step in to just keep on walking down the path. And see what happened the first problem? She hits was that exporting the machines materials from India added massively to the cost she couldn't afford to pay an anthem going rate. So she had to figure out the solution. I just came home from India with samples materials, I didn't even know what that industrial names were that commercial names west I sent samples off. Laboratories in different parts of the world saying eventually, she found a cheaper supplier. And but six machines and the materials you needed to make the pads in the camp, the UNHCR who run the camp gave them some land an old guest bottle distribution center on some protection from the elements in the form of a huge canvas tent. And I was like I can't have a factory in a canvas tent. That's not gonna work. This is the desert so UNHCR paid for half of that that rob hall to be converted into sandwich panels into concrete floor, and it was really beautiful the refugee authorities picked fifteen of the most vulnerable women in the camp to be her workforce. They taught them how to say we made samples and from there. We will really off in two thousand sixteen the machines from India arrived, and and that was very exciting. And so that year, I traveled a few times to Jordan and in December. We opened the factory the Norwegian Refugee Council running the factory on the ground with Amy providing support from outside. They made their I pads and tested them with groups of women in the camp. And that's when things started Garrone the top sheet of the sanitary pad instead of absorbing blood, actually, repelled it it looks exactly the same as the product it should have been. But actually, I had bought something which was called hydrophobic rather than hydrophobic, which is an absorbing material Amy was using the wrong material. This wouldn't have been a huge problem if the supplier within the same country but getting the right material through customs took six months. Then lots of women complain that the past which is small launching another problem solving mission for Amy and the time consuming redesign and just when it looked like it was going to be up and running. They realize the problem with the wood pulp supply, one of the basic materials used to make the pads. It was shipped in sort of three meter by one meter huge cardboard boxes, which ones opened you couldn't see it. So eventually cockroaches and mice found their way in and it it was devastating really after all this time to then have material that we couldn't use sanitary pad production was put on hold. It was gossiping to see this project. Stop which you needed to stop. It wasn't. It was not good enough to supply stuff, which is not clean or there's a risk of infection. Whatever. You went on this great mission to start a Senator Pat factor in a refugee camp. Do you feel that you failed? No, I'm not.

Amy India UNHCR Senator BBC Norwegian Refugee Council Mr. Moraga Mr. Muto Ford Fiji rob hall Jordan secretary Morgan Syria three meter six months one meter one day
"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:59 min | 3 years ago

"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Trump's decision to veto a Bill passed by both houses of congress, which would have ended you support for the Saudi led coalition involvement in the war there. President Donald Trump called the resolution and unnecessary and dangerous attempt to we can his constitutional powers. Yemen has been devastated by a conflict that escalated in March twenty fifteen when he rebel who the movement cease control of much of the west of the country and force president top monsoon had to flee abroad alarmed by the rise of group. They believe to be backed militarily by region shop power, Iran. Saudi Arabia and each other mostly Sunni Arab states began an air campaign aimed at restoring Mr. government, the US has provided billions of dollars of weapons and intelligence to this coalition. Let's hear what Carl's Camry from the Norwegian Refugee Council, which has been providing humanitarian relief in Yemen had to say about President Trump's decision to veto the Bill. This means is that millions of civilian lives would remain risk on tire nation will stay cripple shocking. Twenty four million Yemenis rights now need agent lifesaving gauge that is more than four of the entire EM corporation and the US president insists on delivering bombs and weapons that are being used against them. And as top donor of Yemen's humanitarian response the US engaging in Douglas, it is role of feeding gimmes with one hand and providing weapons to them with the other doctor Saudi Talib is Yemen's former minister of trade and industry as well. As a former member of parliament and former member of of the supreme national authority for combating corruption. What does he make of President Trump's decision? Of course. Of course, the beginning. I must say that we support the the veto that Trump tags up has has shoot not that we agree with many of the policies that visits from has has taken as 'specially being Yemenis and putting us on the list that enough answer the United States. But definitely we must look at this from a different perspective. I active off Yemenis. There are several perspectives. Of course, that is as the national perspective, the US perspective, the European perspective. But what about what about the Yemeni perspective for Miami perspective? Why'd you why'd you support the? Yemen. All this threat in Yemen has actually started when the hose ease have over overthrow the government and to pull the capital elevated that has areas of Yemen, we must I want that. Who are they and they are definitely a sectarian and violent dictatorship that believe that the right godly right rule Yemen. And therefore, and they are very brutal about it. Yes. No except Yemenis themselves. Have condemned ho these many many times in the said, they the knowledge the part that they have played the ho- these horror, of course, reported to be backed by Iran for the situation Yemen right now. However, however, we've also seen the effect of e Saudi led coalitions air strikes on Yemen. The Saudi led blockade of aid TM we've seen what they were. What these airstrikes have done to the Yemeni. In terms of starvation in terms of absolute devastation of some of these areas in terms of children, dying because of the lack of basic, medical assistance. All of this is attributed to the Saudi led coalition in which the US is backing. So when you say you veto when when you say you support that veto, which means that the US is going to continue toback Saudi how is that going to benefit Yemen? Okay. Thing that really benefits. Yemen is to actually reinstate the country audience. The government's the legitimate government for Yemen to be all under one under one. Accepted ruled internationally accepted rule, which is which is not by the until we saw the other problems that had started to solve to sort out was the form of the state hasn't done that. Military campaign, the military campaign, of course, was was envisaged at the beginning to only take few weeks, and it has it has taken several years now, and I I would not speak of defend the situation that was caused by the acids. But I will definitely do not will not take the blame out of the UC's. Pose a main. Sequencer accept the consequences of the military campaign have been devastating for years because they have the superior military powers. I'm not I'm not saying that the whole didn't play a huge part in this. But but for you to say that this veto that you support to veto that will then enable Saudi to get more arms to be used in Yemen. Where does that leave Yemen? Where does that leave the Yemeni people? Well, it depends on actually the clarity and the the clarity and the non I'm big unity. I would call it all of the especially the United States was on the hose, and including also the European particularly the UK. And big on who the and how they should be offered. How will they be continue to be part of Yemen society after this war's ended Salah Saadi in tala, Yemen's, former minister of trade and industry. Thirteen minutes past it's Newsday with.

Yemenis Yemen President Donald Trump United States Saudi Arabia president Iran congress EM corporation Norwegian Refugee Council Salah Saadi Miami UK Carl UC Douglas Thirteen minutes one hand
"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on WSB-AM

"At six o'clock. I'm Jennifer Griffiths live in the WSB twenty four hour news center. We're WSB's top story this hour to teenagers. Seriously injured in Cobb County. One with life threatening injuries. Here's Cobb County. Police officer Neal Pirelli. The two crossing the screen. They were in the crosswalk, and then they were struck by a Mercedes Benz sedan channel two is reporting that the athletic program that we learn high school was in the process of donating old weight room acquitted, the two victims were carrying a weight rag getting ready to load it on U-Haul when they were struck by a car, the driver, a seventy three year old woman. Sixty six degrees in Atlanta, mostly cloudy, lows forty seven to fifty one mostly cloudy tomorrow, high sixty seven to seventy one Atlanta's most accurate and dependable forecast is coming up. The gbi is working on its eighteenth officer involved shooting investigations of the year. WC SP's Abby Johnson reports it happened on Friday. Gbi says thirty four year old Thomas swin grove town, Georgia charts at Athens, court county police officers was what data scribe as an air soft replica style handgun causing seven officers to fire at him Jeffrey Guillen, but the Athens Clarke county police department shooting our did again to render first aid in the individual. Well was transported to a local hospital where he did succumbed to his injuries officer involved shooting took place in a church parking lot on Westlake drive in Athens, Abby Jessen WSB police have released bodycam video we hope to have more on this story coming up soon. A couple has come forward with a tape. They believe has embattled singer R Kelly sexually abusing young girls. Attorney at attorney Gloria Allred is representing Jerry and Sally Dennis. The Dennis family says they found an old VHS tape with what they thought was a concert of the R and B singer. Instead, they witnessed a horrifying act of what happened to what appeared to be Kelly engaging in sexual acts of what they see as obviously an underage girl. The Norwegian Refugee Council says it is deeply distressed by the airlines crash in that two colleagues are missing statement says the two staffers had been scheduled to travel on Sunday morning from to Nairobi the statement gives no further details all one hundred fifty seven people on that plane were killed. There were also eight Americans on board. WSB news time is six zero two.

WSB Cobb County officer gbi R Kelly Abby Johnson Athens Clarke county Atlanta Jennifer Griffiths Athens Norwegian Refugee Council Abby Jessen Neal Pirelli U-Haul Benz Thomas swin grove Dennis family Jeffrey Guillen Gloria Allred Attorney
"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

11:20 min | 3 years ago

"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"You comes from gales bakery and roasted careering Capitola teaching Italian fillet sandwiches, including the Tagliani made with salami ham in Pov Alani with lemon marinated mozzarella and tomato on a rustic. Priscilla beget Gaels bakery dot com for six to twelve hundred the time is three six. This is Casey is is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Mary Louise Kelley got I'm Ari Shapiro. The turmoil in the Virginia state capitol is stretching into a fourth day to catch you up on Friday picture surfaced from governor Ralph northbound's medical school yearbook showing one man in a K K K robe and another in black face, the governor a democrat, I apologized for the photos, then he reversed course and denied he was in them all the while. He has refused to step down from office despite growing calls for him to do. So from both sides of the. L NPR's Danielle Kurt leave and joins us now from Richmond. Hi, Danielle has the governor spoken publicly today. No, he has not what we do know is that he met with staff last night and he met with his cabinet today. But we don't know what happened in those meetings. He, but despite all of these calls for him to resign. He really hasn't made any public motions that he is willing to do. So so we're just waiting to see lots of other people have been talking today. Tell us what other lawmakers there in Richmond have been saying about the governor. Right. So the Virginia Democrats have already called for him to resign now today outside of his office. The Republican speaker of the house Kirk Cox spoke to reporters, and he was asked if he would go so far as to try to impeach governor north of now he made it clear that he really hopes. It doesn't come to that end at the bar for that would be very very high. Anyway, here's Kirk obviously impeachment. That's very high standard. So I think that's why we've called for the resignation. We hope that's what the governor. Does. I think that would obviously be less. Pain for everyone. In addition to that when he was asked he said that Democrats haven't talked to him about impeachment anyway. So the focus right now is still very very much on wanting north. I'm to resign. What about other people in Richmond or not lawmakers? How are folks reacting to this? A lot of them are very angry. I mean, especially today there were around one hundred eighty more protesters just outside the governor's mansion in state capital. Once again calling for him to resign yelling for him to resign. A lot of these people are people who really supported north them. They told me I canvas for him. I phone Bank for him. I really wanted him to win. So I feel really like my trust is betrayed. Do. You have a lot of very angry Democrats here now aside from that. When when you get past the protesters, I did speak to one woman downtown Richmond today who said she also had supported north them. But that you know, she's not sure how to feel about him right now. But she also told me that those people who do want him to resign. She said she she sees that she understands that. And if that is a widespread sentiment that doesn't bode well for north. If even the people who are ambivalent are willing to air on the side of the people who want him to resign. Now, if he did step down, the Lieutenant governor would become governor. And that's a manning, Justin. Fairfax who is facing controversy himself today Philipson with what's happening there. Right. So Justin Fairfax Lieutenant governor very early this morning tweeted a denial of some sexual assault allegations that just came out. Now, those allegations are of incidents that allegedly took place in two thousand four and they were published by a website called big league politics. Now, listen with remember that that's the same conservative websites that I published that photo of north yearbook page from medical school. Now, we should add here that we haven't heard anything from the accuser herself, and we have not been able to verify her accusations. So there's a lot that still left to shake out here. And this additional storyline is making an already tense situation. Even more tense. That's NPR's Danielle Kurt Slaven following the story from Richmond Virginia, and we will have updates as it unfolds. Thank you so much. Thank you are. I want to bring in another voice here Cornell William Brooks, he's a longtime Virginia resident and he's a professor at Harvard's Kennedy School he is immediate past president of the N double ACP, and he is here in our studios. Welcome is great to be here. I said, you're a longtime Virginia resident how long you lived there for over twenty years now, and you voted for Ralph Northam, what went through your mind. Does the story broke on Friday? I was more disappointed than shock, and I was profoundly shocked, you're saying shocks. And I think that was the reaction of a lot of us as we watch this play out. Are you shocked that someone would think it was okay to go to a party in black face in the mid eighties in Virginia. First of all though that was many years ago. In the mid eighties in Virginia. The fact that the matter is the term hate crime came into being in the eighties. The clan was still vocal and viable in the eighties in the eighties. There were hate crimes were PECH weighted against African Americans and let us take no in the eighties. We as a Commonwealth were yet wrestling with a legacy of massive resistance to the abolition of Jim crow and the integration of the public schools opinion of party in black face is as bad. Now is it was then give me a sense of how the conversation is playing out where you live in your community. And I was a story you tell me about a conversation. You had over the weekend. I don't at the gym at church and your grocery line mean, it's a story. That's that's really struck a deep chord in in the sense that. This is Virginia. People want to think of it as a mid Atlantic stayed where some people have a southern accent? But is in fact, a state in the south and are those that I've heard from who who say that. People thirty five years ago. Who went to? Who grew up where the governor grew up had those kinds of attitudes. With that being said those same folks say we can't excuse that. I would point do we say to ourselves as a state. People people have to be accountable for their own racism. And so I've ever lots of folks talking about. Wrestling with. Being forgiving and holding people accountable. And I think there's a real tension in. In the churches, you hear people wrestling with how do we forgive? How do we hold people accountable? And how do we avoid being taken for granted? Do you see any path forward to healing? As long as Ralph north as governor. No. The reason being is in order to. He'll one must acknowledge the depth. The severity. The danger the wound and when you lie. When you appear to look for. The best way to render the diagnosis and the prognosis. Healing is difficult to impossible to move forward. We have to knowledge what happened to move forward. We have to acknowledge the pain that was caused and to move forward. It means that the government must be more concerned about the people he hurt then his political career professor Brooks. Thank you. No. Thank you. That's harvard. Professor and Virginia resident Cornell William Brooks. The US Canada and other countries in the region are going to send humanitarian aid to the Venezuelan people. The question is how will they get supplies into the country? They're trying to help national assembly president Juan Guido who's locked in a power struggle with leader, nNcholas Maduro NPR's. Michelle Kellerman reports the head of the US agency for international development. Mark green has been tweeting pictures of food aid meant he says for Mounir is children in Venezuela. And he's been meeting with one guy does representatives in Washington to figure out how to bring in what the US is promising will be twenty million dollars in assistance in Canada today. Prime minister Justin Trudeau chaired a meeting of the group of regional countries. Backing Guido Canada is stepping up and announcing fifty three million dollars to address the most pressing needs events Waylon on the ground, including the almost three million refugees. There's been a lot of talk about moving aid independent as well from Columbia. That's where Chris. Visit is based for the Norwegian Refugee Council. We haven't seen any build up of aid on the border these last few days. Of course, we have notice the talk, and there's quite a bit of concern of the impact of that. They concern is that a big new eight operation could look to political in a country where there's now essentially to competing, president nNcholas Maduro and the one the US is backing one Guido business speaking via Skype says aid groups need to stay neutral is a very tense political situation the region, we asked humanitarian organizations, we are impartial. We are neutral, and it's important for us that humanitarian aid assisting people in need are clearly separated from any political process that is ongoing that concern is that goodbye, Patricia McElroy v of interaction an umbrella organization of US aid groups, she says, it's not clear how the US plans to get aid independence, Waylon and US officials aren't giving. Details. Well, our call is for us. Not to politicize the humanitarian assistance humanitarian needs from the populations are what we should be keeping at the forefront of our minds and not how we could be using humanitarian assistance to further the interests of one side or another mcilree says it's risky for aid workers to be seen as supporting one side. And they need to prepare for the long term. You know, this isn't gonna be over in a few months, even if the crisis. The political crisis is resolved the needs of the population will likely be protracted, the oil rich nation is suffering, hyper inflation and shortages of food and medicine problems. The US blames on Madero Guido is calling for an aid conference in Washington next week. Michelle Kellerman,.

Virginia Richmond US governor Ralph northbound president Michelle Kellerman NPR Danielle Kurt Danielle Kirk Cox Tagliani Canada Priscilla Casey Wrestling Ari Shapiro Mary Louise Kelley Norwegian Refugee Council
Saudi-led forces begin assault on Yemen port city of Hodeida

BBC World Service

02:01 min | 4 years ago

Saudi-led forces begin assault on Yemen port city of Hodeida

"Let's start this half hour in yemen were gunfire has erupted in east strategic port city of hodeida as the saudi led coalition stead line expired for who the rebels to withdraw from their data is the port of entry for most of the humanitarian aid to yemen the country courses on the brink of a famine so it needs that aid badly earlier this week the united nations and the international red cross withdrew their staff from the city fearing an attack was imminent the united arab emirates part of the saudi led coalition said diplomacy hadn't managed to get the ho the alliance to leave they regarded their deadline has expired and military operations would begin i spoke earlier to the bbc's frank gardner who's currently in yemen i think it's an inevitability that if the hutus didn't withdraw militias from the city that the and the saudi and the yemeni government had really lost patients they made that very clear to me i spoke a few hours ago to the yemeni for minister and he said this this deadline that was announced this was a decision agreed by all parties in the coalition they had set their sights sometime again more than a year ago the coalition on her data being the key tipping point so this is something that they've they've decided they've got to do and they seem to be ignoring international protests by eight groups of the enormous humanitarian cost this is going to be in the short term at any rate to ordinary yemenis or frank gardner they're referring to the united nations and the red cross as well who've been calling this morning for all sides to protect civilians in the fighting six hundred thousand people at least civilians in her data let speak now to mohammed abdi who is the country director for yemen on behalf of the norwegian refugee council and mohammed we heard there that some organizations have already pulled their staff out you still have people there in the.

Yemen Hodeida United Nations International Red Cross BBC Frank Gardner Mohammed Abdi Director Norwegian Refugee Council United Arab Emirates Saudi Led Coalition Saudi Yemeni Government