26 Burst results for "Norwegian Refugee Council"

Aid agencies fear impact in Yemen after US terror decision

PRI's The World

03:47 min | 7 months ago

Aid agencies fear impact in Yemen after US terror decision

"With just nine days left for the trump administration today a big shift in us foreign policy in the middle east which could have long lasting effects secretary of state. Mike pompeo says the us will designate. Yemen's who the rebel movement a foreign terrorist organization this could seriously complicate future efforts to deal with yemen's humanitarian crisis and bringing the war to an end with us as yemen spokesperson for the norwegian refugee council mccormick. She joins us from auden. We need to quick reminder rena who are and what they represent to the state department specifically under mike pompeo sarala are otherwise known as to who 'this and they're the movement that took over the cups to of yemen's on a abide five years ago which sparked at the us to get involved in saudi led coalition in support of the government at attempt to remove them they significance for the united states has been an their accusations that the unser allow movement are backed by iran which of course for the us has broader regional at considerations and so it seems clear that this latest move is part of that regional strategy to try to minimize iranian influence in the region. This is quite fresh news. What is the reaction from yemen to do. Most people think this plan designation of who these as foreign terrorist organization was politically motivated. Well the news came in for us yemen time just this morning and so people are really trying to get to grips with us. At the moment. It's been mixed reactions here in yemen. Answer the otherwise known who have come out and in turn accused. The united states government of acting in a terrorist way other reactions from aid organizations have been the same message that has been given to the united states government for the last few months when such a move was being suggested which is that on many levels. This would be catastrophic and it would certainly have a widespread impact on the humanitarian situation. Here on the ordinary of yemenis who are trying to live their lives your organization the norwegian refugee council. What are you looking at are concerned about. What the implications of this they're going to for our ability to run an office hire staff and get goods into the country get critical supplies like food and water and supplies to help fight kovic around the country to the communities who need it's the most get materials for building emergency shelters an widely the kind of impacts that. We're looking at art. That really the feeling is that this will be devastating for the yemeni economy which is already in ruins after more than five years sustained violent or is it your expectation that the incoming biden administration will reverse this plan decision to label the husky rebel movement a foreign terrorist organization. It may not be possible to reverse this decision on if not then it is possible to put in place. The kind of protections in safeguards that are needed so these would be safeguards immediately and for all humanitarian activities near monitoring supplies. It also safeguards so that imports of critical and food and other supplies can come in and out of the country would go a long way towards mitigating or softening some of the impacts of this designation and as for the rest we i suppose we will have to see on the twentieth of january when the new administration comes in we are asking for the biden administration to make yemen one of its number one priorities on day. One re mccormick the yemen spokesperson for the norwegian refugee council. Speaking with us from auden. Thank you very much here. Very welcome

Yemen Norwegian Refugee Council Mike Pompeo Mike Pompeo Sarala United States Us Yemen United States Government Auden Rena Mccormick Middle East Saudi Biden Administration Iran
Ethiopian PM says troops ordered to move on Tigray capital

NPR's World Story of the Day

04:30 min | 8 months ago

Ethiopian PM says troops ordered to move on Tigray capital

"Ehthiopian prime minister this morning has ordered his army to move on the capital of the tigray region in the north west of the country. This decision came after his seventy two hour. Ultimatum ended for tigray leaders to surrender. The central conflict here is between the new government of ethiopia and the old government of ethiopia. An aid groups have been sounding the alarm about a humanitarian situation that is deteriorating quickly. Tens of thousands of ethiopian refugees have fled the fighting into neighboring sudan. Npr's ada peralta is following this unfolding. He's in nairobi Good morning eater. Hey david let's start with his offensive. I mean the prime minister had been warning about this. It sounds like it's happening. Now what do we know. Yes so prime minister. Abby acclimate who won the nobel peace prize last year. He says that the last chance for this war to have been resolved peacefully has now closed and he says his troops are going into michaela to try to flush out the leadership of the left. The people's liberation front and he says that will try to do everything to protect civilian lives but michelle is a big urban densely populated city. Think of something. Like saint louis and and even the government has admitted that any fighting will result in civilian deaths in abbey's military has warned that they will use heavy artillery and that the left has said that they will defend the city so this war which has been going on for about three weeks now. Hundreds have already been killed. Tens of thousands have fled as you said and this will no doubt Be the most consequential battle so far. I know this is an incredibly frustrating situation for a year to try and cover this all but impossible to get in there and actually see what's happening firsthand But you know there's been weeks of fighting around the capital. What are you hearing about the conditions on the ground. It is hard to report. But i think we can safely say that there has already been Some pretty gruesome killings that the international community is saying could amount to war crimes We know for example that in a village near the sudanese border there was a huge Massacre videos from there have shown family members crying over bodies of their loved ones in the middle of the streets and the government's human rights commission sent a group of investigators there and they say that more than six hundred people were systematically slaughtered. They say that they were killed with machetes. Their houses were set on fire. They say that militants tied ropes to their necks and dragged them to death. The government commission blames a youth militia aligned with the rebels for this but the refugees fleeing into sudan say that it was the militias aligned with the government. Who did this. So we know with certainty who committed these atrocities but what we know for sure is that civilians have already suffered terribly in this conflict. Got it sounds like it. And what about these tens of thousands of people who are fleeing where they going. What are they facing so they are going into eastern sudan will. Carter is based there. He's a humanitarian with the agency norwegian refugee council. And let's listen to a bit of what he's been. Seeing many of total stories of happens not tillery and strikes and parts of western tigray region which is where most of the refugees we've seen have come from and of past couple of weeks. I guess troop movements militia movement through their this season. They've really fred for their lives. Are you suddenly and there. Was this one woman who spoke with who who had fled across the border and her story released stood out. Here's what happened to her. When the conflict began she was pregnant. Nine months pregnant when this broke out and have given birth on the way to the border crossing and had no one around that she knew it's women seeking safety stopped to help her deliver thankfully. There was no complications with the delivery and charges alive at the moment at least sleeping next to everyone in a big communal tent. So david i mean these are the kinds of situations and stories that show you just. What a tough humanitarian crisis. This has also become really What sounds like an awful situation. A dangerous one with a lot of people life. A lot of people's lives at stake

Ada Peralta Ethiopia Abby Acclimate Tigray Sudan Michaela Nairobi NPR Government Commission Saint Louis Abbey Michelle Government David Human Rights Commission Carter Fred
Dogs Can Be Trained to Sniff Out COVID-19, Studies Suggest

TIME's Top Stories

07:28 min | 10 months ago

Dogs Can Be Trained to Sniff Out COVID-19, Studies Suggest

"Are now emerging in refugee camps. Why did it take so long for the virus to reach them By Melissa Godin. For a number of months, the world's largest refugee camps appear to have been spared the worst of the coronavirus pandemic but human rights groups now say cove nineteen infection rates are on the rise in the temporary. That house millions of the world's most vulnerable people with alarming consequences both for those vulnerable groups, as well as the world more broadly the United Nations high. Commissioner for Refugees reports that globally twenty one, thousand of the world's thirty million refugees have tested positive for the virus across ninety seven countries at the end of September. Thirty two new cases were reported in the refugee camps. In Cox's Bazar. Bangladesh home. To seven hundred, forty, five, thousand Rohingya an ethnic minority fleeing violence and discrimination in. Myanmar. In Greece, more than two hundred, forty refugees have tested positive for the virus on the island of Lesbos, and in Lebanon, Syria and Palestine. Cova nineteen outbreaks have occurred at several camps over the past month though UNHCR reports the numbers rose sharply in September. The true number of cases remains unknown because of limited testing. Aid agencies had long expressed fears about the potentially devastating impacts of the virus for those living in crowded camps where medical services are sparse yet for the first six months of the pandemic case rates remained far lower than expected while low testing rates in refugee camps could explain why so few cases have been reported experts say camps isolation from host communities, as well as the imposition of strict laws down measures curb the spread of the virus even if refugees have so far been spared the worst of the pandemics immediate health impact, the outbreak has taken a huge toll on refugees lives. The global economic recession has led to major cuts to humanitarian funding for refugee camps, causing food shortages, and. Employment Opportunities for displaced people with the Norwegian Refugee Council estimating three quarters of displaced people have lost income since the pandemic began lockdowns have also further restricted refugees mobility with countries like Greece placing tighter restrictions on refugees than the rest of the population. Moreover, many experts say governments are using the pandemic as an excuse to violate refugees rights. Governments are using covid nineteen as a pretext to block people from the right to seek asylum says bill freely the director of human rights watches. Refugee. And Migrant Rights Division. It runs roughshod over the basic principles of refugee protection. He says now, as the virus begins circulating in camps around the world experts worry that refugees who have already suffered so much from the pandemic may not get the medical support they need. If the disease gets introduced into more refugee camps, it would be a tinderbox says freekick noting that the virus would spread rapidly the low case rates we have seen so far free lick says are just a lucky break. Why have cove nineteen rates been lower than expected in refugee camps? covid nineteen rates in refugee camps or unexpectedly low in part because the camps tend to be isolated from surrounding communities limiting the odds of the virus spreading into the camps camps are situated often in the most desolate unwanted land that a country can find free like says, no one casually goes in and out national lockdowns also help protect refugees from the virus in Jordan, for instance, which hosts seven hundred. Forty seven thousand refugees mostly from Syria the government implemented. One of the world's strictest lockdowns, shutting down airports for several months and jailing people who broke quarantine. There was tight lockdown that was put in place towards the Third Week of March including the shutting down of all the borders and airspace says, Juliet Toomas. UNICEF's Chief of communications for the middle, east, and North Africa, about Jordan this help she says. Additional restrictions placed specifically on refugee camps also helped limit viral spread. Many camps have reduced the number of people entering and exiting. For instance, in Bangladesh's Cox's Bazar only twenty percent of the usual number of humanitarian workers were allowed to enter during the first few months of lockdown and deliveries were made less frequently in order to reduce potential transmission according to Saad Hamady a south. Asia campaigner for Amnesty International many of the operations except the essential ones were carried out remotely Hamadi says, these are the measures that might have reduced or delayed the spread of the virus. There are other factors however, that could explain low case numbers. Half of refugees worldwide are under the age of eighteen according to the UNHCR and their relative young age may make them less susceptible. To having a severe infection with the virus if young people are ACM dramatic or have mild symptoms, they may also be less likely to get tested. It's also possible that there have been cases of course at nineteen that have gone undetected and camps. While some testing is available, it's hindered by shortage of testing supplies and medical personnel to carry out the tests. Some refugees also don't. WanNa get tested for fear that they may have to self isolate and therefore be unable to carry out any income generating activities they rely on for survival in Cox's Bazar the world's largest refugee settlement in Bangladesh less than one percent of the population has been tested. The lower case numbers could therefore be a result of low testing rates. The actual number of cases could be higher. But experts say that despite low testing rates cove in nineteen infection rates in camps still have not been as bad as expected. Even if you carried out a large number of tests, it still likely to be a low number of infections says somebody if Cova Nineteen was spreading through camps undetected camps would witness rising numbers of people requesting medical attention or rising numbers of deaths neither of which have been the case in several camps according to UNHCR data I do think there's a hidden outbreak to an extent, but we're not seeing other indicators showing a massive outbreak says to Jacobson cares country director in Syria were not seeing a host of people falling ill or dying.

Unhcr Bangladesh COX Norwegian Refugee Council Syria Government Cova Greece Jordan Director United Nations Melissa Godin Commissioner Myanmar Migrant Rights Division Juliet Toomas Asia Unicef
"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on AP News

AP News

13:44 min | 1 year ago

"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on AP News

"An international aid group says hundreds of thousands of people in 19 countries could be displaced by armed conflict in the 2 months since you inspector general called for a global ceasefire because of the pandemic the Norwegian refugee council says the ongoing large scale displacement hurts efforts to stem the outbreak and he's a damning verdict the international diplomacy the council's young England tell C. A. P. the U. N. security council has not in any way supported the secretary-general's cool for global coronavirus ceasefire blaming what he said was squabbling among council members the way forward is for U. N. member states on the security council to exert greater pressure on armed groups including withholding support and weapons I'm Charles the assessment

Norwegian refugee council secretary-general Charles C. A. U. N. 2 months
"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on AP News

AP News

13:44 min | 1 year ago

"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on AP News

"An international aid group says hundreds of thousands of people in 19 countries could be displaced by armed conflict in the 2 months since you inspector general called for a global ceasefire because of the pandemic the Norwegian refugee council says the ongoing large scale displacement hurts efforts to stem the outbreak and he's a damning verdict the international diplomacy the council's young England tell C. A. P. the U. N. security council has not in any way supported the secretary-general's cool for global coronavirus ceasefire blaming what he said was squabbling among council members the way forward is for U. N. member states on the security council to exert greater pressure on armed groups including withholding support and weapons I'm Charles the assessment

Norwegian refugee council secretary-general Charles C. A. U. N. 2 months
Despite global truce appeal, 661,000 people newly displaced

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 1 year ago

Despite global truce appeal, 661,000 people newly displaced

"An international aid group says hundreds of thousands of people in nineteen countries could be displaced by armed conflict in the two months since you inspector general called for a global ceasefire because of the pandemic the Norwegian refugee council says the ongoing large scale displacement hurts efforts to stem the outbreak and he's a damning verdict the international diplomacy the council's young England tell C. A. P. the U. N. security council has not in any way supported the secretary-general's cool for global coronavirus ceasefire blaming what he said was squabbling among council members the way forward is for U. N. member states on the security council to exert greater pressure on armed groups including withholding support and weapons I'm Charles the assessment

Norwegian Refugee Council Secretary-General Charles C. A. U. N.
Despite global truce appeal, 661,000 people newly displaced

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 1 year ago

Despite global truce appeal, 661,000 people newly displaced

"An international aid group says hundreds of thousands of people in nineteen countries could be displaced by armed conflict in the two months since you inspector general called for a global ceasefire because of the pandemic the Norwegian refugee council says the ongoing large scale displacement hurts efforts to stem the outbreak and he's a damning verdict the international diplomacy the council's young England tell C. A. P. the U. N. security council has not in any way supported the secretary-general's cool for global coronavirus ceasefire blaming what he said was squabbling among council members the way forward is for U. N. member states on the security council to exert greater pressure on armed groups including withholding support and weapons I'm Charles the assessment

Norwegian Refugee Council Secretary-General Charles C. A. U. N.
"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on AP News

AP News

09:36 min | 1 year ago

"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on AP News

"The Norwegian refugee council says the ongoing large scale displacement hurts efforts to stem the outbreak and he's a damning verdict the international diplomacy the council's young England tell C. A. P. the U. N. security council has not in any way supported the secretary-general's cool for global coronavirus ceasefire blaming what he said was squabbling among council members the way forward is for U. N. member states on the security council to exert greater pressure on armed groups including withholding support and weapons I'm Charles the assessment

Norwegian refugee council secretary-general Charles C. A. U. N.
Despite global truce appeal, 661,000 people newly displaced

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | 1 year ago

Despite global truce appeal, 661,000 people newly displaced

"The Norwegian refugee council says the ongoing large scale displacement hurts efforts to stem the outbreak and he's a damning verdict the international diplomacy the council's young England tell C. A. P. the U. N. security council has not in any way supported the secretary-general's cool for global coronavirus ceasefire blaming what he said was squabbling among council members the way forward is for U. N. member states on the security council to exert greater pressure on armed groups including withholding support and weapons I'm Charles the assessment

Norwegian Refugee Council Secretary-General Charles C. A. U. N.
Yemen records its first COVID-19 infection

Weekend Edition Saturday

02:45 min | 1 year ago

Yemen records its first COVID-19 infection

"Now to Yemen where aid workers say they're bracing for the worst after the country recorded its first coronavirus case this week after five years of fighting between a Saudi led alliance and the Iran backed Hootie rebels the health care system in Yemen is already battered and peers Jana Raff has this report from Amman Jordan seven children are treated at the Yemeni hospital for malnutrition and disease three quarters of the population now depends on food and medical aid most of it delivered or funded by aid organizations Yemen has been largely cut off from the world by fighting this week recorded its first covert nineteen case these Grande the head of the U. N.'s humanitarian program in Yemen spoke to us from the capital sana'a she says the country is not prepared as virus spreads authorities on the north end of sorties in the south they have stopped the arrival of passengers they've gone into lockdown we're struggling to get the kind of equipment and the kind of resources on the kinds of medicines that we need here UN agencies are competing for things like ventilators in corona virus tests in what has become a global competition for lifesaving resources Yemen imports almost all of its food and medicine the new restrictions made getting food and medical care to people even more difficult the Norwegian refugee council's advocacy director Sultana Begum speaking to us from London says she has appealed to Yemeni authorities to allow aid operations to continue but you haven't heard past there are new restrictions that are being put in place restrictions in movement and our restrictions in terms of road closures in terms of you want like carrying a black kids coming in and out of the country so our appeal to them really is when they're preparing to combat the virus eight find safe measures to what with us D. U. N. is also facing a funding crisis in part because last month the United States cut off tens of millions of dollars in aid to Yemen saying some made was at risk of being diverted by armed groups there are forty one major you when programs and thirty one of those programs what I shot this month of April we're talking with the programs health programs water and sanitation programs protection program shelter program so we have the quote is created by the war we have a crisis created by cove it is indeed a fragile cease fire the US political envoy says he'll try to bring the two sides back to talks even if it's a virtual negotiating

Yemen Iran Jana Raff Amman Jordan Malnutrition U. N. Sana'a Norwegian Refugee Council Director Sultana Begum London United States UN
News in Brief 10 May 2019

UN News

03:45 min | 2 years ago

News in Brief 10 May 2019

"This is the news in brief from the United Nations a record forty one million people remain displaced worldwide because of conflict or natural disasters after an increase of more than a million individuals in a single year, the finding by UN partner, the Norwegian Refugee Council or an RC points to ongoing clashes in Syria along with often under reported tensions in the Democratic Republic of the Congo or DRC if the opium and Cameroon here's an RC head yon Egland speaking in Geneva. Let me give the example of Cameroon. I was just there in south west of the country, the southern and western anglophone parts of Cameroon there is armed conflict. Nobody's talking about. Nobody's engaging to end. There is no mediation. There is no humanitarian program commensurate to the scale of the suffering, but there are hundreds of torch villages, and there is now between four and five. Five hundred thousand people displaced in the anglophone part of Cameroon apart from conflict, extreme weather events are natural disasters. Also, responsible for people fleeing their homes, some of the worst storms and tropical cyclones were in China, India, and the Philippines, and our seas internal displacement monitoring centre said with ten million people displaced in those three countries alone in many countries conflict and natural disasters combined to create mass population shifts, not least in Afghanistan where drought has triggered more displacement than armed conflict. Similarly, these security crisis in northeast Nigeria has been aggravated by flooding. That's affected eighty percent of the country. And I'll see maintains to Myanmar now where the UN human rights office h HR set on Friday that these state military known as the tatmadaw may be responsible for opening fire on hundreds of men and boys in Rakhine state killing six of them. According to spokesperson, Rupert Colville, the victims are believed to have been detained following attacks. By an armed group. The. Erica army onto tatmadaw army bases in April the latest esscalation in a long running conflict. According to the tap door. Soldiers opened fire when the group tried to seize that gums, but other sources dispute this account and give a different version. They say the door opened fire indiscriminately after one of the detainees tried to escape since the second of may most of the boys and men have been released in groups, Mr. Colville said, however up to fifty remain incommunicado detention without access to lawyers doctors or any other form of protection they are reliant on family members for food, according to the UN human rights office, which says it is also concerned over an announcement. That the episode will only be investigated by the military and finally nearly nine hundred youngsters have been released by a pro government armed group in northeast Nigeria. The development of Friday has been welcomed by you and children's fund UNICEF which warned that those freed will need long-term help if there to lead a normal life. His UNICEF spokesperson crystal billion rack. The children and young people released today would benefit from reintegration programs to help them return to civilian life and sees new opportunities for their own development without the support many of the children released from armed groups struggle to fit into civilian life. As most are not indicated and have no vocational skills of the eight hundred ninety four children released in mighty Gurry. One hundred six girls they were recruited by these civilian joint task force or CGT f which committed to ending the practice last September under a UN led action plan since that deal was signed more than seventeen hundred children and young people have been released. Daniel Johnson UN news.

Cameroon UN United Nations Rupert Colville Unicef Norwegian Refugee Council Nigeria DRC Opium Partner Gurry Syria Myanmar Geneva Afghanistan Daniel Johnson Egland China
"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

05:05 min | 2 years ago

"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Got it. If the government is telling but to home, but I think. There and need money life. So I do want gaming. To tell us more about the plight of intimidated to space people around the world, we can talk not too young Egland. He's the secretary general of the Norwegian Refugee Council who composite the global report on internally displacement, welcome to the program. Every time we speak to you. It seems like a moment of deja vu we've been here before. But now more than a million people since twenty seventeen displaced if the topping that list. More people fleeing violence in this country than anywhere else in the world. What's going on? RL horrific ethnic clan. Clashes into communal violence, so many positive things have happened of late in SEO is itself. Rec- seething refugees. It has now a peace process with neighboring trivia, but all of the country now. From tribes ethnic groups s you just had a story to tell us about. What has to happen is that the ministry piece that has been created will succeed that there will be local peace processes Logan reconciliation processes because this cannot continue to point nine million people displaced in a year is a tremendous. Miss Eglin James here jebron, south Sudan. Well, what's your read right now g think the Peacedale that is just about holding so far is that should assign? A better things to come for the country. Many more people being displaced in the future. The peace deal is is tremendously positive news. But it has to be put in to real life. It has to be realized and our report from from our internal displacement monitoring Santa here in Geneva found that a minimum of three hundred and twenty thousand people were also displaced from their homes driven home spy violence in south Sudan. In spite of the peace agreement. So again, there there is so much unfinished business at the same time as there are so many of these intercommunal conflicts, local conflict tribal conflicts that a really causing havoc among families, and we look at those trouble conflict. But we also look at the evidence pointing to week governors. What about international diplomacy is the international community doing enough to help? Not at all. The United Nations has to really stick. Conflict prevention conflict resolution. When we see more than ten million million people display driven after the homes by blunt, highlands conflict. Ethnic violence last year alone. STO Diaz democrat Republican of Congo, Syria, Somalia, Nigeria and the and the Central African Republic, the top places it just shows that no it's not going. The x Ray of international politics. Is not going because we're not people and protecting people to stay in the homes as they won't there isn't solution to this. And that is. Is is peace and making locally and then outside of that governance and international diplomacy. There's also the case of extreme weather to effecting which parts of the world because this does play a huge role in internally displacing people very briefly if your kids. Yeah. Because I also found that seventeen point two million people last year where where displaced by disasters more people live more exposed to more extreme weather, and that is particular in Asia so conflict and violence at this displacement has happened predominantly in Africa in twenty eighteen. Placement because of disasters in Asia. But there are too many these comes together lethal. Tale of events for families Afganistan drought on top of conflict. Somalia natural disasters on top of conflict on the secretary general of the Norwegian Refugee Council compiling that report the global reporting internally displaced pay people the highest the world has ever seen forty one million people have had to flee their homes..

Norwegian Refugee Council communal violence Sudan Somalia Asia Afganistan Eglin James United Nations Geneva Africa STO Diaz Central African Republic Santa Nigeria Syria
Saudi-led forces begin assault on Yemen port city of Hodeida

BBC World Service

02:01 min | 3 years ago

Saudi-led forces begin assault on Yemen port city of Hodeida

"Let's start this half hour in yemen were gunfire has erupted in east strategic port city of hodeida as the saudi led coalition stead line expired for who the rebels to withdraw from their data is the port of entry for most of the humanitarian aid to yemen the country courses on the brink of a famine so it needs that aid badly earlier this week the united nations and the international red cross withdrew their staff from the city fearing an attack was imminent the united arab emirates part of the saudi led coalition said diplomacy hadn't managed to get the ho the alliance to leave they regarded their deadline has expired and military operations would begin i spoke earlier to the bbc's frank gardner who's currently in yemen i think it's an inevitability that if the hutus didn't withdraw militias from the city that the and the saudi and the yemeni government had really lost patients they made that very clear to me i spoke a few hours ago to the yemeni for minister and he said this this deadline that was announced this was a decision agreed by all parties in the coalition they had set their sights sometime again more than a year ago the coalition on her data being the key tipping point so this is something that they've they've decided they've got to do and they seem to be ignoring international protests by eight groups of the enormous humanitarian cost this is going to be in the short term at any rate to ordinary yemenis or frank gardner they're referring to the united nations and the red cross as well who've been calling this morning for all sides to protect civilians in the fighting six hundred thousand people at least civilians in her data let speak now to mohammed abdi who is the country director for yemen on behalf of the norwegian refugee council and mohammed we heard there that some organizations have already pulled their staff out you still have people there in the.

Yemen Hodeida United Nations International Red Cross BBC Frank Gardner Mohammed Abdi Director Norwegian Refugee Council United Arab Emirates Saudi Led Coalition Saudi Yemeni Government
"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"You're talking about donald trump president trump of what he said he has his special language for diplomacy but what about russia which of course is attracted criticism for supporting i said russia as as a danger on this i believe that there are so many proxy wars going on in in syria that some other fighting going on has nothing to do with the serious so we should be careful not to point fingers on the the russians quite a few other players in the theater so here we are talking about syria as i said about twelve million people displaced or refugees but if you look at what's going on in the democratic republic congo similar number of people displaced terrible violence particularly in the key region and it's not got as much attention as syria shouldn't you as arguably the best known african most widely admired african currently in the world shouldn't you be speaking about the diaz e every day of the week what is happening in the sec is very tragic attempts have been made to get the government to cooperate there's so many envoys operating in congo today i'm not even sure i can list them on situations like congo indicates their limit to international pressure an international and influence and we need to find a way of strengthening the local population and look look a civil society to take on the fight and to work with them but you know you sit there are lots of envoys there but there were sixteen thousand u n stabilization forces in the drc a country the size of western europe so that really they're not going to be able to be very very effective jan egeland the head of the norwegian refugee council says the democratic probably the congo it was one of the worst crises on earth yet no one seems to care about it is he right why you think it doesn't count as it because they are africans the could be a part of.

russia syria sec congo europe norwegian refugee council donald trump president diaz
"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on KQED Radio

"You're talking about donald trump president trump said he has his special language for diplomacy all right but wash about russia which of course is attracted criticism for supporting sharon i said i mean do you see russia as as danger leslie i believe that so many proxy wars going on in syria that some other fighting going on has nothing to do with syria so we should be careful not to point fingers on the russians quite a few other players in the theater so he'll be talking about syria as i said about twelve million people displaced or refugees but if you look at what's going on in the democratic republic of the congo similar number of people displaced terrible violence particularly in the key region and it's not got as much attention as syria shouldn't you as arguably the best known african most widely admired african currently in the world shouldn't you be speaking about the drc every day of the week what is happening in the essays is very tragic attempts have been made to get the government to cooperate that so many envoys operating in in congo today i'm not even sure i can list them on situations like congo indicates their limit to international pressure an international and influence and we need to find a way of strengthening the local population and look look civil society to take on the fight and to work with them but you know you sit oh there are lots of envoys there but there were sixteen thousand u n stabilization forces in the drc a country the size of western europe so really they're not going to be able to be very very effective egeland the head of the norwegian refugee council says the democratic probably the congo was one of the worst crises on earth yet no one seems to care about it is he writes in and why do you think it doesn't count as it because they are africans the could be a part of.

russia syria congo europe norwegian refugee council donald trump president sharon i leslie
"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

WORT 89.9 FM

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

"The conference because it didn't want to be complicit in a swindle he said the un with about sixteen thousand peacekeepers in the country was trying to justify its presence he added quote we need humanitarian aid but not that order i'm quote jan egland who now heads the norwegian refugee council has just returned from a mission to drc he said quote this is up there with yemen and syria in terms of number of people in desperate need i was not prepared for the scale of the suffering frankly unquote jeanphilippe choosy head of the un migration agency in congo described a scene in which a thousand families were camped in a school yard he visited and he told reuters quote it reminded me of when i first read dante's inferno unquote in a statement a coalition of congolese civil society groups said quote the crisis is a manmade tragedy marked by violence often statesponsored harsh political repression and flagrant and repeated violations of our people's most basic rights unquote a leading opposition politician called the government stance criminal jose barahona the oxfam country director said his organization had been forced to have food rations to ninety thousand people in kasai province he said quote the lack of funding forces us to make choices we shouldn't have to make last month we had to restrict the rations even further with over a quarter of people receiving no food at all unquote eglin said the drc got little international attention because congolese migrants do not wash up on european shores and congo's conflicts do not involve the big powers he said that on a visit to north kivu province in the east in february he found most aid agencies had left because of lack of funds and growing danger from one hundred militia groups in.

jan egland norwegian refugee council yemen syria reuters dante political repression jose barahona director eglin drc congo oxfam kasai
"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on BBC Radio 4

BBC Radio 4

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on BBC Radio 4

"Emotional europe you world is scheduled to go on sale where flint's of sodium the abundant us the evils when in the last few memon site spoke to gun egland the secretary general of the norwegian refugee council and the current chair of the united nations taskforces on humanitarian access in syria i asked him to assess the situation in eastern gouta it's a horrific rugby and battle now for the neighborhoods of damascus where there is total disregard for civilian lives it's worst sight the beseeched oppositionheld eastern gupta but the results with barrage of rockets going into the damascus governmentheld damascus so it seems to be totally out of control that's what the party said tell us i don't find it out to control i find the meant with guns and power deliberately wanting to eliminate each other and the women and children more did have have no regard so therefore our appeal is not only to the one month a ceasefire to humanitarian work all over syria but we have no appeal directly to the countries that have influence on the parties and the parties on the ground for a a a humanitarian pulse foisting gouta for these said fulfill both sites but the most tarom now is to get in supplies to three hundred than ninety thousand civilians we haven't beaten that two most of them for many months and also to evacuate hundreds and hundreds of people who are dying epochal a inside because the health sector has been destroyed an are totally in operable can you be specific about the country's will appointing to you all you appointing at the responsibility of the assad government and who else the government we are appealing cure is the is the russia russian government iran in government in particular a on the.

europe flint norwegian refugee council syria damascus damascus governmentheld damasc assad government iran united nations russia one month
"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The fbi had about the suspect nicholas cruz and today we're hearing that the fbi had had a specific tip off and failed to act on it we know without walls yes and that was separate a separate incident from that vague warning this was a call to an fbi hotline and the caller new nicolas cruz as he was concerned about him he related or the caller he or she she related the concerning behavior this social media posts the the desire to kill someone he said the the the number of guns that nicholas crews had and warned that the mr cruz was could potentially carry out a school shootings so quite specific information to this hotline and the fbi has admitted that it did not follow correct protocols in terms of of looking at a looking into the reports and conducting an investigation so quite an enlargement to make given that there had already been questions about how mr crews has slipped beneath reiter and why law enforcement had not seen reds reds flags beforehand offer plus russia aid agencies are warning of a worsening crisis in the democratic republic of congo the norwegian refugee council says thirteen million people are in need of emergency assistance and over four million displaced armed conflict spreading in various parts of the drc including it turey in the northeast catherine vr hunger went the to find out what's behind the violence village off two village destroyed by fighting between rival communities guns of armed young men terrorized the population below much of a to report this is isolated and difficult to get two for just arrived in the town of a blue collar and from what we understand from the un peacekeepers here's out of this has been a flashpoint in the fighting there several villages that have been destroyed m he poor.

fbi nicholas cruz reiter congo norwegian refugee council drc russia un
"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Traffic update julie deppish is away happy friday trent cheif happy friday to you as well it's up either couple of things number one in oakland eight eighty northbound before fifth avenue still two car crashed it was partially blocking the right lane there waiting on a towtruck meanwhile everybody's waiting on eighty northbound from heggem burger big delays there take five at he was spelled if that's a better alternative for you as don't look backed up balls you're trying to approach the lower deck of the baybridge eighty eastbound stopped up from 101 doesn't get better until you get to the tunnel on chase for kqed brought to you by the krones and colitis foundation i'm of whether upon the next newshour their second of a till heart series looking at violence and mexico's tourist centres this time from the famed resort city of acapulco friday on the pbs news stay with us for the friday edition of the pbs newshour it comes on after the world this afternoon at three o'clock on kqed public radio i'm carol hills and this is the world president trump weighed in on twitter this morning putting out a convoluted denial about as reported use of vulgar language and white house meeting yesterday with several people who were present at the bipartisan meeting have since confirmed his language trump reportedly used in offensive term to refer to haiti el salvador an african countries might just shrug it all off his trump being trump or to see a president playing to his base but this sort of thing does have real world consequences and we want to explore how this kind of story might impact america's reputation an influence around the world it's what political scientists call soft power on egland was one of norway's top diplomats he was under secretary general of the united nations in the 1990s i go on his also had a series of top posts in the norwegian he is currently head of the nonprofit norwegian refugee council noun egg on first of all what's your personal reaction to what's been reported about what donald trump said yesterday no i i if it's true it's very bad uh this is not the.

america norwegian refugee council under secretary haiti el salvador white house kqed trent donald trump united nations norway julie deppish president twitter carol hills pbs acapulco mexico krones fifth avenue oakland
"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on The Economist Radio

The Economist Radio

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on The Economist Radio

"Since intriguing me as we arrived in beijing we both hit the great five will we will cut off from ah email because a google is not accessible in beijing but then fell enough in engine suddenly like oxygen everything comes back and you can breathe emails again did hong kong i quote up with headaches tuning schmidt the former prime minister of denmark and the current chief executive of save the children international they're all currently a record number of people approximately eight hundred in forty one million in need of humanitarian assistance and mrs thorningschmidt tells me that there are three areas she wants to bring to our attention in 2018 in two thousand eighteen i'm afraid we will see more suffering we will see suffering in yemen which properly the biggest humanitarian the right now we have more than hundred children dying every day of diseases that we should have at could prevent of course we also have the children of syria who are still suffering that we still can't forget even though syria has left our tv screens we cannot forget those children the last group of people that i want to draw attention to also in eighteen is the ringa people there are six hundred thousand of those people more than half of them children and when you go to the camp in bangladesh you see that this is truly at children's emergency many of them have seen things that children should never be seeing they have seen their houses being burnt down decked parents killed invite in front of them there's talk about gang rape and sexual abuse of these children so this is something that should not happen and the most important for the international community is to step up and help the ringgit people wind bangladesh we cannot sustain this growth in needs that group see now for the last five years young egland is the secretary general of the norwegian refugee council and united nations special adviser on syria and he too believes that 2018 needs to produce unlocked of change too.

beijing google prime minister denmark chief executive yemen syria bangladesh rape secretary general norwegian refugee council mrs thorningschmidt united nations special adviser five years
"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"East plan for israel and the palestinians that mr trump claims he wants to achieve that clearly is great to be set back we don't really know quite where that plan had got to anyway i think most fundamental set of problems in the one of the biggest questions in my mind as to why he would do this now is that it comes at a time of a weakening american leadership in the region that's going to get even worse and of course at a time when israel the saudis and other gulf states a quite close on the problem of iran so why should the white house what to do something to upset ties in the region at the moment it's really throwing over the whole applecart turn of the mark has their the bbc's diplomatic correspondent now if i were to ask you are the worst crisis of conflicts displacement in the world is that people forced to flee their homes he might be forgiven for saying syria but it is in fact the democratic republic of congo that's according to a new report it's been issued jointly by the internal displacement monitoring centre and a major aid organisation the norwegian refugee council i style africa edits james kopp nhl about the studies key findings in the first half of this year almost a million congolese were forced from their homes largely through conflict and then as she is higher than the comparible number from syria now you could possibly argue that the violence the fighting in syria has been worse than it has been in parts of them had a republic of congo i suspect aid agencies and others would say that the mere fact of having to leave your home is pretty dramatic whatever the circumstances and they want to call attention to the fact that this is happening on such a large scale in the drc and why does it not get as much coverage as other areas where people in as i mentioned syria where people a forced ounce of their homeland white what why don't we had that much about it partly i think it's it's just the nature of news people look for what is new and so syria in the last few years has been in the headlines that conflicts and problems in the democratic republic of congo been coming on an offer for decades now really.

israel iran syria norwegian refugee council drc congo mr trump africa james kopp congolese
"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"East plan for israel and the palestinians that mr trump claims he wants to achieve that clearly is great to be set back we don't really know quite where that plan had got to anyway i think most fundamental set of problems in the one of the biggest questions in my mind as to why he would do this now is that it comes at a time of a weakening american leadership in the region that's going to get even worse and of course at a time when israel the saudis and other gulf states a quite close on the problem of iran so why should the white house what to do something to upset ties in the region at the moment it's really throwing over the whole applecart turn of the mark has their the bbc's diplomatic correspondent now if i were to ask you are the worst crisis of conflicts displacement in the world is that people forced to flee their homes he might be forgiven for saying syria but it is in fact the democratic republic of congo that's according to a new report it's been issued jointly by the internal displacement monitoring centre and a major aid organisation the norwegian refugee council i style africa edits james kopp nhl about the studies key findings in the first half of this year almost a million congolese were forced from their homes largely through conflict and then as she is higher than the comparible number from syria now you could possibly argue that the violence the fighting in syria has been worse than it has been in parts of them had a republic of congo i suspect aid agencies and others would say that the mere fact of having to leave your home is pretty dramatic whatever the circumstances and they want to call attention to the fact that this is happening on such a large scale in the drc and why does it not get as much coverage as other areas where people in as i mentioned syria where people a forced ounce of their homeland white what why don't we had that much about it partly i think it's it's just the nature of news people look for what is new and so syria in the last few years has been in the headlines that conflicts and problems in the democratic republic of congo been coming on an offer for decades now really.

israel iran syria norwegian refugee council drc congo mr trump africa james kopp congolese
"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"And actually contained that breach in the front line they sent the elite republican guards in the special forces entered that placed the reported in the past seventy two hours that they were able to contain the minor gains of the rebels achieved in the base i was referring to and of course and the course of that that has been an intense exchange of shuttling between both sides the rebels continued to show the mask casse with mortars rockets and other kinds of ballistics while the turn government carried out airstrikes on eastern quota last week regard reports that some of these airstrikes might have hit a storage used by organisations that our partners with the united nations the deliver aid to eastern without which is already epa seized area which will make the aid delivery to civilians in easter with a much more difficult the serie journalist alaa ibrahim the forces of the socalled islamic state had been almost defeated syria and driven out in iraq altogether most of its fighters including the thousands who came from foreign countries to join the organisation organization and our a dead or hiding or in detention but what's happened to the families of those foreign fighters on an early a podcast tim fuel reported on the relatives of chetchen women who disappeared in the chaos of iraq and syria in a second report on the wives all widows of isis fighters he examines whether they'll be able to return home with their children and start a new life or will they be prosecuted for complicity in i ask crimes there are some details listeners might find distressing the first i made the group i was asked attack mother and child hospital they told me that they had been under attack as they fled during that attack they both received quite horrific head injuries that's melanie markham of the norwegian refugee council which hopes care for tens of thousands of displaced people in the camps of northern iraq the mother had shrapnel wounds to the.

united nations syria iraq head injuries melanie markham norwegian refugee council alaa ibrahim tim fuel chetchen seventy two hours
"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:47 min | 4 years ago

"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Eight six if you have questions or comments you can also post any questions or comments you have on our website by simply going to kqedorg slash forum and clicking on this segment or you can tweet us our twitter handle is at kqed forum or email us forum at kqed that organ has listeners are well aware the refugee problem certainly and and access of humanitarian aid is not only centered on cereal though we're talking about syria for the most part here because our gives a special advisor to syria for the united nations but we're talking in fact about an organization that is so that has about twelve thousand filled workers all over the world and that is in twenty four countries and i wanted to just get an update also from youth secretary general but nigeria because i know you've been there just within the last couple of weeks and there's more displacement more difficulty getting aid uh there as well and people who are afraid because of vocal harav i mean thao hundreds of thousands of people indeed i was on behalf of norwegian refugee council which is which is trying to to reach the displaced people in the worst corners of the planet including north eastern nigeria where boko haram has displaced and the war on boko haram has has displaced nearly two million people m am eat say it's it into conflict you we have very little of in in global inuse media many think it's over it is not when i was there at the wet attacks and suicide bomba's every single day took helicopter to a small town for coal mangano it's a it's on the border from a of nigeria to to chat in the.

humanitarian aid syria special advisor united nations secretary general norwegian refugee council nigeria boko haram bomba twitter kqed
"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

01:40 min | 4 years ago

"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"But it isn't clear and they're all reports in the spanish press that this man spent time in brussels around the time of the brussels attacks in march last year so this is potentially a developing story nomo were the mattiello yet so far from the police you'd be sees gavin lead in boston the the un says thousands of civilians are fleeing the iraqi city of talloussa following a government offensive to dislodge islamic state militants from one of their last bastions in the country i asked the middle east analyst alan johnston for more on what's happening in tatta in the hours off to this battle began the un issued a statement signalling its real concern for the plight of civilians it talks as we had their of thousands trying to escape this major offensive families and be made to walk up to twenty hours in searing summer desert temperatures and they being reaching the safety of of camps in estate of dehydration and exhaustion but the aid workers admit that their uncertain about just how many civilians may be trapped in the area of the fighting a spokesman for the norwegian refugee council in iraq iraqis melanie markham it's very difficult for us to like an accurate assessment because we can't get in to tell a faucet he however asked off where in villages around the city in the last couple of weeks and i know that food and water are in very short supply of the last few days it's been reported to us by the government of iraq that fourteen thousand people have fled.

brussels boston un talloussa alan johnston tatta norwegian refugee council iraq gavin analyst melanie markham twenty hours
"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

01:40 min | 4 years ago

"norwegian refugee council" Discussed on NPR News Now

"But former police officer in suburban doused taxes as been indicted on a murder charge in the grand juries indictment of roy oliver includes four counts of aggravated assault with a deadly weapon oliver's accused in the shooting death of a black teenager who was a passenger in a car that was leaving a party oliver was fired by the bulk springs police department back in may the norwegian refugee council says more than a million people have been displaced by violence in central african republic calling it among the world's most neglected crises and appears of feb equipped stark tim reports that the agency wants greater attention paid to the conflict and more funding for humanitarian aid the norwegian refugee council says the mass displacement of civilians in central african republic is being chronic pain neglected by the welt which it says has never pay sufficient attention to the serie a crisis the relief group adds that less than two years off to the un downgraded the humanitarian crisis from its highest level in central african republic a sharp escalation in violence is prompting renewed calls for that to be raised again rival armed groups have signed various peace deals and ceasefire agreements in the past three years in c a r but set terry and fighting continues and more than one hundred thousand people have fled fighting since april off fbi quiz dumped an npr news accrai european share's down and asian markets struggled in tuesday trading japan's benchmark nikkei lost sixtenths of a percent a day after wall street closed virtually flat the dow shed a point san wall street futures are lower.

officer roy oliver assault norwegian refugee council humanitarian aid humanitarian crisis terry fbi japan murder un npr three years two years