35 Burst results for "Norway"

Europe's coronavirus resurgence: Are countries ready to prevent a 'second wave'?

Ben Shapiro

04:19 min | 18 hrs ago

Europe's coronavirus resurgence: Are countries ready to prevent a 'second wave'?

"According to the UK Daily Mail. Second wave is striking EUROPE, Spain reintroduces lock down Greece's He's worrying rising cases. The virus is more active in Germany amid warnings friends could quote lose control at any moment. According to the UK Daily Mail. A second wave of covert 19 appears to be striking Europe, forcing Spain to reimpose lockdowns in case is speaking to a three month high in Greece. Head of Germany's doctors union has declared the country is already in the midst of the second wave because people have flouted social distancing rules. Well, this is perfectly predictable. You can't people keep people locked down forever. For literally years in time. It's not a thing that you could dio instead, you're going to have to at some point allow people who are young and healthy to go out there, and if they get it, they get it. That is fact what Sweden is doing in Sweden, which remember until five minutes ago was the bad guy. Sweden has basically flattened her. It looks like Sweden may have reached her immunity is what it actually looks like. Meanwhile, in other countries, they got a problem. In fact it it seems pretty obvious what's happening here. Italy has not seen a second object. Why hasn't Italy Tina? Second uptick because they got nailed. Basically, here's the rule If it burned three population maybe you're done. It is not burned through your population. You probably are not done. Spain's 8500 cases over the weekend and all inclusive resort in Majorca was shut down. Two towns north of Madrid has been put under strict lock down as well. Finland today announced plans to reintroduce recommendations to work from home whenever possible. By August 1st, Finland's cases had risen by more than 300% in two weeks. That run understands us that governor of Florida can't believe. Also governor of Finland Donald Trump, obviously blowing it over in Finland is blowing it over in France as well. Authorities in France grappling with a sharp increase in fresh cases, which has seen more than 7002 infections within the last week. As well as a rise in the number of people being treated for covert 19 in the I C U Around 1200 cases are being reported for day. Two weeks ago, he rolling average with 719. Meanwhile, in Germany, they're seeing an uptick as well. Some 730 cases have been reported each day on average this week against the 460 being recorded her day about two weeks ago. So the second wave is, in fact hitting Europe. It really is kind of the first wife. It really is more the 1st 1 because the first wave Basically just got a little bit squished. And delayed Basically, everything just got delayed. Meanwhile, Sweden seems to be coming out the other end of this. According to Newsweek. As of Sunday, the latest death rate in Sweden for 100,000 people was reported to be 56.4 figure is lower than that reported in the U. K 69.6, Spain 16.8 and Italy, according to the latest report Sunday by Johns Hopkins University. The UK currently has the world's 4th 4th highest death toll Spain in Italy, where the former to European countries hit worse by the outbreak. Sweden's latest case fatality ratio proportion of deaths compared total cases was reported to be about 7.1% and figure is more than half the percentage reported in the UK, half that of Italy in Belgium and nearly half that of France. The reason being that a lot of young people are getting it in Sweden, and he's burned through some of the young population and now they're basically done. Sweden's 70 rolling average daily new cases has been mostly declining since as far back as April 16th when the average was in 99. The average dropped it to two average daily new deaths on August 2nd, according to world Ometer. New infections for 100,000 people in Sweden reported in the past 14 days has dropped from 46% compared to that reported in the 14 days prior. Meanwhile, Spain, France, Germany, Belgium, the Netherlands, each spiking between 58 206% in new cases. New cases in Denmark, Norway and Finland. All the other places that supposedly handled it better than Sweden have also seen. Their percentage is increasing at around three times the percent drop in new cases scene in Sweden in the past two weeks. So what That sort of says is, it looks like Sweden. Maybe this thing it may look like it's over in Sweden. Under technologies epidemiologist, Sweden's Public health agency. What we've cut down on movement in society quite a lot, if compared how much we travel in Scandinavian countries. The decrease in travel is the same in Sweden, as in the neighboring countries. In many ways, the voluntary measures we've put in place in Sweden have been just as effective as complete lock down in other countries. In other words, when you tell people don't travel, all that much people take it pretty seriously. The point here is that for all the talk about how we know how to handle this, and we just have to shut everything down, Lock down this lock down there. Sweden and locked down and may be the smartest of all sweet may be the smartest of all.

Sweden Spain Germany Finland UK Italy Europe France Donald Trump Florida Madrid Greece Belgium Johns Hopkins University Tina Ometer Denmark
Another cruise ship in Norway stalled over virus case

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 4 d ago

Another cruise ship in Norway stalled over virus case

"The cruise ship carrying more than two hundred people have stopped in on Norwegian hamba ordering everyone to stay on board off to a passenger in the previous trip tested positive for the coronavirus Norwegian official says all see dream one's eighty five crew members will be tested for the virus and the whole thirties are in contact with the national institute of public health only the the one hundred twenty three passengers should as well cruise ship owner see dream yacht club says the former passenger had no symptoms of could be nineteen during the early village but tested positive upon arrival in Denmark meanwhile the number of people on another Norwegian cruise ship who tested positive for the virus has reached forty four that's nine passengers and thirty five crew members I'm Charles the last month

Official Denmark Charles National Institute Of Public
43 test positive on Norwegian cruise ship

WBBM Evening News

00:34 sec | 4 d ago

43 test positive on Norwegian cruise ship

"Of passengers on a Norwegian cruise ship of tested positive for the Corona virus has reached 43 including a 10 year old child. The outbreak on the M s rolled a monster and is raising new questions about safety on cruise ships during the pandemic. Even as the industry is pressing to resume sailings after shutting down in March. Since the cruise line often acts like a local ferry traveling from port to port along Norway's West Coast. Some passengers disembarked along the route and may have spread the virus to local communities. A total of 69 municipalities in Norway could have been affected.

Norway West Coast
'We Have Made Mistakes': Norway Cruise Company Reports COVID-19 Outbreak

Morning Edition

00:53 sec | 5 d ago

'We Have Made Mistakes': Norway Cruise Company Reports COVID-19 Outbreak

"Number of cruise ship passenger is testing positive for the Corona virus continues to rise. After an outbreak in Norway. 43 cases are confirmed and hundreds who travelled on the ship are in self isolation settle over guard reports. The 1st 4 crew members were admitted to a hospital on Friday in Trump's air where the ship is now docked and where passengers were allowed to disembark. Norwegian media report The cruise ship company and Norwegian health authorities were aware of a possible issue on Wednesday when an earlier passenger tested positive. Company Horti. Gruden was told to issue an alert but failed to do so. Company officials have apologized and admitted making mistakes. Hurtigruten has now suspended operations and Norway has closed all ports to cruise ships for two weeks. The country has otherwise enjoyed a relatively low number of Corona virus cases and began opening to tourists in mid June

Norway Hurtigruten Gruden Donald Trump
Outbreak hits Norway cruise ship, could spread along coast

Atlanta's Morning News

00:25 sec | 5 d ago

Outbreak hits Norway cruise ship, could spread along coast

"One of the first cruise lines to resume sailing during the pandemic now has an outbreak region cruise ship line. Hurtigruten is stopping all trips after one of its ships infected at least five passengers and more than 35 crew members. He's also fear the M S rolled. Ahmanson may have spread the virus to dozens of villages along Norway's western coast. CBS's Lisa Matteo reports the Norwegian government will begin banning ships with more than 100 passengers from docking in its

Norwegian Government Hurtigruten Lisa Matteo Ahmanson Norway CBS
Norway cruise ship passengers with coronavirus reach 43

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 5 d ago

Norway cruise ship passengers with coronavirus reach 43

"Authorities say the number of passengers on Norwegian cruise ship who tested positive for the corona virus has not reached forty three the city of Toronto hi and this included two new cases a man in his seventies would like symptoms and a child under ten with no symptoms saying both have been passengers on the cruise ship from time sits about halfway to trump's so north of the Arctic Circle with the empty ship is now docked but since the cruise lines often acts like a local ferry some passengers have disembarked along the route and may have spread the virus to local communities the operate raises new questions about safety on cruise ships join the pandemic even as the industry is pressing to resume sailings after shutting down in March I'm Charles the last month

Arctic Circle Charles Toronto Donald Trump
Norway cruise ship passengers with coronavirus reach 43

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 5 d ago

Norway cruise ship passengers with coronavirus reach 43

"Authorities say the number of passengers on Norwegian cruise ship who tested positive for the corona virus has not reached forty three the city of Toronto hi and this included two new cases a man in his seventies would like symptoms and a child under ten with no symptoms saying both have been passengers on the cruise ship from time sits about halfway to trump's so north of the Arctic Circle with the empty ship is now docked but since the cruise lines often acts like a local ferry some passengers have disembarked along the route and may have spread the virus to local communities the operate raises new questions about safety on cruise ships join the pandemic even as the industry is pressing to resume sailings after shutting down in March I'm Charles the last month

Arctic Circle Charles Toronto Donald Trump
Coronavirus: Dozens test positive for Covid-19 on Norwegian cruise ship

WBBM Evening News

00:30 sec | 5 d ago

Coronavirus: Dozens test positive for Covid-19 on Norwegian cruise ship

"1 of the first cruise line companies to resume sailing during the pandemic, now has an outbreak. Norwegian cruise ship line Hurtigruten is stopping all trips after one of its ships infected at least five passengers and more than 35 crew members. Health authorities also fear the M S rolled. Ahmanson may have spread the virus to dozens of villages along Norway's western coast. It's currently docked in Trump, so the company also suspended two other ships in the region. Government says they will begin banning ships with more In 100 passengers from docking in its

Hurtigruten Ahmanson Donald Trump Norway
Norwegian cruise ship battles outbreak with at least 40 people infected with COVID-19

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:31 sec | 5 d ago

Norwegian cruise ship battles outbreak with at least 40 people infected with COVID-19

"That decided to start running it. Ships again has run into a novel Coronavirus problem. There's an outbreak region cruise ship line. Hurtigruten is stopping all trips after one of its ships infected at least five passengers and more than 35 crew members. Health authorities also fear the M S rolled. Ahmanson may have spread the virus to dozens of villages along Norway's western coast. It's currently docked in Trump's, so the company also suspended two other ships in the region. Government says they will begin banning ships with more than 100 passengers. I'm docking in its harbour, CBS News

Hurtigruten Ahmanson Cbs News Norway Donald Trump
Virus outbreak hits Norwegian cruise ship that stopped at dozens of ports

KCBS Radio Afternoon News

00:31 sec | 5 d ago

Virus outbreak hits Norwegian cruise ship that stopped at dozens of ports

"Line companies to resume sailing during the pandemic, now has an outbreak. CBS News correspondent Lisa Matteo has more Norwegian cruise ship line. Hurtigruten is stopping all trips after one of its ships infected at least five passengers and more than 35 crew members. Health authorities also fear the M S rolled. Ahmanson may have spread the virus to dozens of villages along Norway's western coast. It's currently docked in Trump's, so the company also suspended two other ships in the region. Government says they will begin banning ships with more than 100 passengers from docking in its harbors.

Lisa Matteo Hurtigruten Ahmanson CBS Norway Donald Trump
Outbreak hits Norway cruise ship, could spread along coast

AP 24 Hour News

00:27 sec | 6 d ago

Outbreak hits Norway cruise ship, could spread along coast

"From a cruise ship. A Norwegian cruise ship has hold it all it's trips and apologized. For making errors after an outbreak on one of its ships has shown that at least five passengers and 36 crew members Have been tested positive for the Corona virus. AP John Olson reports There are fears the ship could also spread the virus to dozens of towns and villages along

John Olson
German cruise ship sets sail, hopes short trip thwarts virus

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:32 sec | 2 weeks ago

German cruise ship sets sail, hopes short trip thwarts virus

"A German cruise ship has set sail for the first time since the industry was shut down because of the Corona virus with strict precautions. The T Y cruise ship set sail for the weekend cruise in the North Sea on Friday night. The DP, a news agency reported. Occupancy was limited to 60%. So that passengers can keep their distance. There were 1200 people onboard compared to the ship's normal 2900 capacity. The ship sailed from the port of Hamburg towards Norway, and passengers will spend the weekend at sea with no land stops before returning to Germany on

North Sea Hamburg Norway Germany
Climate change is hastening lakeshore erosion

Climate Cast

04:00 min | 2 weeks ago

Climate change is hastening lakeshore erosion

"Climate change is making more waves and eroding the shoreline of Lake Superior more quickly. I'm NPR chief meteorologist Paul Hunter on the shores of Lake Superior this is climate. So I'm back from vacation now, working inside the lab today, but I can still hear those lake superior way of swooshing in my head for the last three summers. We've stayed at some lovely cabins near. Grand Marais each year. The Big Lake has eroded the edge of the bluff closer to our cabin and this year. The edge is only about three feet away, and it's a fifteen foot drop down to the waves below. Charlie. Walters owns the cabins hi Charlie. Doing I'm doing great. How much would you say that? Shoreline has eroded in the past couple of years well this last year has been about a foot the previous year. It was only a couple of inches, but this last season it really picked up pace. We were pretty stunned when we saw the cabin this year that we stayed in its now perch, just a couple of feet from the edge. What are your options to save that cabin and address the shoreline? To Cabin, but you'd still have the Rozhin problem. I'm told you know they'd have to build up with rock and put some type of filter Mesh screen in and back fill with some soil and. Anyway be a long process and in the range of forty thousand dollars, so Charlie if this repair does turn out to be forty thousand dollars. What does that to Your Business? What's the impact there? My wife grandmother came over from Norway and his only things since nineteen thirty two. And right now in the process of fixing up the cabins, and then paying off loans, so it's a pretty big dent. We basically have to stop everything else. We're doing Charlie Walters. Your cabins are lovely I wish you the best of luck and I hope we talk soon all right. So many Lake Superior Property owners like Charlie are now facing costly repairs from erosion damage heavier precipitation in the lake. Superior watershed is boosting water levels to near record, highs and warmer winters mean less protective lake GEIS's forming to buffer the waves that may be speeding up the erosion process. Jay Austin is a professor at the University of Minnesota Duluth and works with the Large Lakes Observatory Hi Jay here from you, Paul? So how high are water levels running on lake superior now and in the past few years. We've had a remarkable run since about. About twenty seventeen of extremely high lake levels on the order of ten to twelve inches above what we would normally be seeing at this time of year, and what's the climate change signal for higher water levels in Lake Superior is it as simple as heavier precipitation in the Lake Superior Watershed when it comes right down to it? Yes, last several years have been much wetter than we would normally see here. The other one is the fact that is suppresses surface waves, and hence protects in some sense shoreline from that sort of wave driven erosion. The long term trend is indeed towards less is and how much of a winter temperature difference between total ice and no is does there need to be to make that change unlike superior? A year, where there is significant ice on the lake, and so people are going and visiting the ice, caves and people are ice fishing, the difference between one of those years at a year with basically no ice can be due to winter air temperature differences on the order of two three degrees. Fahrenheit, so the system is extremely sensitive to these relatively small shifts in winter, climate conditions J. Austin. Thanks for making the time in good to talk with you again. Thanks for having me on.

Lake Superior Charlie Walters Lake Superior Watershed Big Lake Lake Geis Jay Austin Paul Hunter Foot Drop Grand Marais NPR Chief Meteorologist Norway Large Lakes Observatory University Of Minnesota Duluth Professor
El Hilo: Walking to Venezuela

Rough Translation

03:56 min | 2 weeks ago

El Hilo: Walking to Venezuela

"We are back with translation from NPR Gregory Warner. You could say this story begins with a coat of house paint. There's a New Year's tradition in Venezuela to repaint one's house. Every December the holdover from win Venezuela was one of the richest countries in Latin. America families had money for these sort of luxuries. Caroliina order pays out, remembers the very first December that they did not have enough money for paint. The But I in her husband Orlando took it hard. Anthony Maheen NOPAL blessed, don't. Like US Orlando Pimentel was a civil servant at Venezuela wet, a lot of people working for him. He led an anti corruption investigation unit in the work. Itself could be frustrating. He'd collect all this evidence of corruption. No one would actually go to jail to instead. Orlando put his creative energy into cooking. His sons sort of Foodie. and He loves food, says he loved not only planning the meals, but serving them is a person that you would invite to your house for dinner and he ends up taking the Apron and taking the the knife from you. And you're like. Hey, how're Landau? Invited you. The economic crisis in Venezuela it started years before, but by two thousand sixteen, the signs were obvious. There were shortages of almost everything and massive inflation, which meant that Orlando salary stayed the same, but the money Bob less and less, you see your salary, becoming solid and water every month and every week you go to the supermarket and price gets up and up and up. Orlando and KARLEENA would ask themselves. Should he leave and seek opportunity abroad? The so many of their friends had done. So many professionals and teachers and other civil servants had gone to Peru or Colombia Ecuador to find whatever work they could and send money home. It was easy to see that the country was getting empty. Every night when you see out of the window and you see just a couple of lights in the building that in front of you because the rest of the apartments are closed. Caroliina was worried about him leaving. She read so many stories about xenophobia. Get yet his. Lesson Foyer Servant Selana. Backlash to the flood of Venezuelan job. Minnesota Norway Orlando she says was not worried about xenophobia. She says he always only saw the good in people, but that was also her worry. That will see see if went up on. Engine to others before paying attention to himself. What is it a comparable Bundy McGinnis moisture? Said we sal Tacoma goal set on. Orlando says the reason he stayed so long was because he just loved Venezuela, and he truly hope things would get better i. think he was kind of resisting. He was coping. He was trying to say okay. Let's try to do this. Let's try to find a second job. We call it. which is doing a lot of small jobs in order to survive? This has been chasing tigers or was it. Yeah, he's killing tigers. Why is it called Killing Tigers? Because it's so hard? I, don't know where the expression from because it's not easy to kill a tiger in my. Okay brief tangent here, but we kinda got obsessed with this expression, which at least one Arjun story traces all the way back to a blockbuster hit jazz tune from nineteen seventeen tiger, rag. It's a really hard song, but it was so popular that musicians were made to play several times a night, so you'd get phrases like they still haven't paid me for last month's tiger or killed the tiger again last night, and from there at least story goes came expression killing teicher doing something so hard that you have to do to pay

Venezuela Orlando Caroliina Orlando Pimentel BOB Landau Gregory Warner Anthony Maheen Nopal America Foodie. Arjun Tacoma Peru Karleena Bundy Ecuador
EBay to Sell Classified-Ad Business to Norwegian Firm for $9.2 Billion

KCBS Radio Morning News

00:42 sec | 2 weeks ago

EBay to Sell Classified-Ad Business to Norwegian Firm for $9.2 Billion

"EBay scored an even bigger price for its classifieds business than expected. The San Jose firm selling the unit to Norway's that had been to for $9.2 billion. More than a 1,000,000,000 above the widely reported price. Before the deal was closed, eBay will retain a significant stake in the classifieds business by getting a 44% stake and event as part of the deal. The move completes a serious paring down by eBay following a push in 2019 by activist hedge funds, Elliott Management and starboard value. Which also led to eBay selling StubHub to via Gogo earlier this year for $4 billion although that deal is being probed by regulators in the United Kingdom for potential antitrust issues,

Ebay San Jose Elliott Management Gogo Norway United Kingdom
Ebay Reportedly Getting Close to Selling Its Classified-Ads Unit to Adevinta

MarketFoolery

04:57 min | 2 weeks ago

Ebay Reportedly Getting Close to Selling Its Classified-Ads Unit to Adevinta

"The Wall Street Journal is reporting that Ebay is close to a deal to sell its classifieds and division to added Vinter, which is a global marketplace business based in Norway. It is looking like a cash and stock deal somewhere in the neighborhood of eight billion dollars. A shares of ebay are flat on this report. Maybe the. Investors are waiting for confirmation, or maybe this is due to the fact that year to date shares of Ebay up. Just north of sixty percent so. It's been a nice twenty twenty in terms of ebay share price. It has they're continuing to divest the the non-core businesses started with pay. Pal and continued with stub and this will. Leave, as it's activist investors wanted Ebay, easier to understand and more its financials more transparent, and if the activists investors are correct Dave unlocked value by pushing this strategy and this is is part of a winning strategy for for the company in the Stock time will tell but you know I I like what they're holding onto and I. Think they're talking about getting you know. Eight billion issue out of this, and there's some talk about expanding their payments operation. So as you mentioned you go back to two thousand fifteen, they. They spent out pay pal. The end of last year they strike that deal to sell stub hub and. God bless them. They were lucky in the timing of that because. I think they got four billion in the deal to sell Stub, and if for some reason that got delayed. Deep into twenty twenty, there's no way they're getting that amount of money. It's absolutely going to be a lower price so. Ebay got lucky in that regard. Let's go back to the activist investors though so. The activist investors want Ebay. To be a business. It's easier to understand. That there are more parts to the business when they have the classifieds business when the when they had stubhub. That kind of thing, it never struck me as any one of those parts of being overly complex. If. This deal goes through their basically down to the marketplace business, which shouldn't be hard to understand, so the activists get their wish there. Is that a business? Has a particularly bright future I I'm not saying it's doomed. It's not a bricks and mortar. It's not like they're storing up stores all across America, but I just wonder if the marketplace business in and of itself. Is An exciting attractive. Multiples growing business over the next decade. Well, it's a business where they're the leader having. Acquired all the advantages of first mover and having done a lot of other things right, not everything right over the last twenty years, but I think it's it is attractive. They're. A very relevant, possibly more relevant as people need to sell some stuff to get get through this period of time and those with money. You're looking to add stuff to the houses they're. They're trapped in so I think that they're getting more traffic and I don't see what you know. There are other companies that have taken a stab at trying to go after that business. and. They've really failed for the most part. Be Interesting to see what happens with the stock when this deal gets finalized. Also Out of into is a publicly traded company it's it's not listed in the US. Did Trades over the counter as best I could tell the overall market cap. Of this markets play marketplace business based in Norway. is about eight billion dollars so I'm I always find it interesting? When companies are like? Yeah, we'll basically come up with the cash and stock equivalent of the complete value of our company. To make this deal work. Yeah well since it hasn't been announced. We don't know what they're gonNA come up with in terms of. Some combination of cash and stock so Ebay may still have. You know public share interest in the resulting company with. Speculation right now as as to what that might look like, but yeah, it would radically. Increase the size, the business adventist doing.

Ebay Norway The Wall Street Journal Vinter United States America Dave
Capital Allocation with Blair Silverberg and Chris Olivares

Software Engineering Daily

54:31 min | 3 weeks ago

Capital Allocation with Blair Silverberg and Chris Olivares

"Blair and Chris Welcome to the show. Thank, you good to be here. We're talking about capital allocation today and I'd like you to start off by describing the problems that you see with modern capital allocation for technology companies. I'm happy happy to start there. So I think it might be helpful to give. The listeners, a little bit of our backgrounds so I was a venture capitalist at draper. Fisher Jurvetson for five years I worked very closely with Steve. Jurvetson and we were financing are very MD intensive. Technology projects that became businesses things like satellite companies companies that were making chips to challenge the GP you new applications of machine learning algorithm so on and so forth and I think the most important thing to recognize is that the vast majority of technology funding does not actually go to those kinds of companies. The venture space is a two hundred fifty billion dollars per year investment space. The vast majority of the capital goes to parts of businesses that are pretty predictable like raising money in in investing that in sales, marketing and inventory or building technologies that have a fairly low technical risk profile, so the vast majority of tech companies find themselves raising money. From a industry that was designed to finance crazy high technology risk projects at a time where that industry because technology so pervasive you know really do the great work of of many entrepreneurs over the past twenty to thirty years, technology is now mainstream, but the financing structure to finance businesses not has not really changed much in that period of time. Yeah, and then I guess I'll talk a little bit. My my background is I came from consumer education sort of background, so direct to consumer, thinking about how you use tools and make tools that ingrained into the lives of teachers, parents students I was down in the junior class dojo before starting capital with Blair. We were working on the Earth thesis He. He was telling me a lot about this. The the date out. There exists to make more data driven in data rich decisions. How do we go software to make that easy to access in self service and sort of servicing the signal from the noise, and we kicked around the idea and I thought that they were just a tremendous opportunity to bring. What Silicon Valley really pioneered which is I think making software that is easy to use in agreeing to your live into kind of old industry fund raising capital Haitian. The kinds of capital allocation that exist there's. And debt, financing and different flavors of these. Of these things say more about the different classes of fundraising in how they are typically appropriated two different kinds of businesses. So. You have the main the main groups you know. Absolutely correct, so there's. Equity means you sell part of your business forever to a group of people and as Business Rosen succeeds. They'll get a share in that. Success and ultimately income forever. Debt means you temporarily borrow money from somebody you pay them money, and then at some point in time that money's paid back and you all future income for your business, so equities permanent, not permanent. If you think about how companies are finance like. Let's take the P five hundred. About thirty percents of the capital that S&P five hundred companies use to run. Businesses comes from debt. In the venture world that's remarkably just two percent. And the thing that's crazy is this is two percent with early stage seed companies, also two percent with public venture, backed companies in places like the best cloud index, which is like a one trillion dollar index of publicly traded technology companies started their life, and in with injure backing many of them SAS companies, these companies, also just two percent finance with debt, but nonetheless within these these classes, the reason it's obviously economically much better for a business and pretty much every case to finance itself with debt because it's not. Not It's not permanent, and it can be paid back. It's much much cheaper to use debt. That's why you buy a house with a mortgage show. You know you don't sell twenty percent of your future income forever to your bank help you buy a house, but the reason that people use equity comes back to the risk profile so just like. If you lose your job and you can't pay off your mortgage. The bank owns your home. Same exact thing happens with debt in so restorick Louis, if there's very low. Certainty around the outcome in typically early stage investment you're you're doing a lot of brand new are indeed you have no idea if it's GonNa work you cope. You know over time that you'll be successful, but there's really quite a bit of uncertainty equities a great tool because you're. You'RE NOT GONNA lose a business, you know everybody can basically react to a failed. Are Indeed project. Decide what to do next had saints. Equity is kind of the continent tool for high technical risk, high uncertainty investments, and then debt is basically the tool for everything else, and it can be used as most companies do for. Ninety percent of The places that businesses are investing so if you're spending money on sales and marketing, and you know what you're doing and you've been running campaigns before. That were successful, very. Little reason you should use equity for that if you're buying inventory if you are a big business that's. Reach a level of success that on. Means you have a bunch of diversified cashless. Coming in businesses might take out dead on business kind of overall, so it's less important what specifically you're using the money for, but it's important to recognize that most companies are financed roughly fifty fifty equity versus dead, just just intra back companies that. That are kind of uniquely Equity Finance. Scaling a sequel cluster has historically been a difficult task cockroach. DB Makes Scaling your relational database much easier. COCKROACH! DVD's a distributed sequel database that makes it simple to build resilient scalable applications quickly. COCKROACH DB is post grass compatible giving the same familiar sequel interface that database developers have used for years. But unlike databases scaling with Cockroach DB's handled within the database itself, so you don't need to manage shards from your client application. And because the data is distributed, you won't lose data if a machine or data center goes down. cockroach D is resilient and adaptable to any environment. You can hosted on Prem. You can run in a hybrid cloud, and you can even deploy across multiple clouds. Some of the world's largest banks and massive online retailers and gaming platforms and developers from companies of all sizes, trust cockroach DB with their most critical data. Sign up for a free thirty day trial and get a free t shirt at cockroach labs dot com slash save daily thanks to coach labs for being a sponsor and nice work with cockroach DB. The capital that is being steered towards a recipient. It's often originating in a large source, a sovereign wealth fund or family office in it's being routed through something like capital allocators cater like a venture capital firm for example or a bank. How does this capital get allocated to these smaller sources? What is the supply chain of capital in the traditional sense? You know it's kind of funny to think about capital and things like the stock market in the form of a supply supply chain, but this is exactly how we think about it so at the end of the day. Capital originate. In somebody savings, basically society savings right you. You have a retirement account or your population like you know in in Singapore and Norway with a lot of capital, it sort of accumulated from. From the population and these sovereign wealth funds, or you're an endowment that's you know managing donations of accumulated over many many years, and ultimately you're trying to invest capital to earn a return and pay for something pay for your retirement pay for the university's operation so on so forth so that's Capitol starts, and it basically flows through the economy in theory. To all of the economic projects that are most profitable, inefficient for society, and so, if you step back, and you think about like how how is it that the American dream or the Chinese Miracle Happen? You know in in both of those cases different points of the last hundred years. Why is it that society basically stagnated? You know the world was a pretty scary. Scary place to live in up until about seventeen fifty, the industrial revolution started. Why is it that you know basically for all of human history? People fought each other for food and died at the age of thirty or forty, and over the last two hundred fifty years that it's totally changed. It's because we have an economic system that converts capital from its original owners. Diverts it to the most productive projects. which if they're successful, replace some old more expensive way of doing something with newer better way and so I think when when I described that like you know I, think most people can step back and say yeah, okay I. kind of see how capital flows through the system, it goes automatically to someone making an investment decision like a venture capital firm ultimately gets into the hands of the company company decides to invest in creating some great product that people love. Let's. Let's say like Amazon and then everybody switches from you know buying goods at some store that may or may not be out of you know may or may not being stock to the world's best selection of anything you'd never wanted. The most efficient price that's society gets wealthier basically through these these kind of steps in these transformations, but it's asking if you step back and think about it like nobody actually thinks it's processes as efficient as it could be like. We asked people all the time. People were interviewing journalists companies. We work with sewn. So how efficient do you think world's capital allocation is? I've never met a person that says it's pretty good. You know we're like ninety percent of the way there. In fact, most people think it's pretty inefficient. They think of companies like you know we work, and some of the more famous cases lately of of Silicon. Valley back businesses that that totally. underwhelmed disappointed. Their initial expectations and I think most people admit that the efficiency of capital allocation is either broken or nowhere close to achieving its potential, and so we basically we'll talk more about our technology and how we do we do. We basically think of this problem our problem to solve. There's an incredible amount of Apache inefficiency in how data that goes from a project or a company, ultimately funneling up to an investor flows, and so you know it's hard to place blame because there's so many people in the supply chain, but. But I think it super clear that if it's difficult to measure whether or not a project or a business is good at converting capital into value in wealth, and you know products that people want, it's nearly impossible for society to become really good and efficient at allocating its capital, so we're we're here basically to make the data gathering data transformation visualization communication of what's actually going on under the out of business as efficient as possible and you know from that, we thank some great things are going to happen to the economy. Goes a little bit deeper on the role that a bank typically plays in capital allocation. If you think about our bank works like let's take. Let's take a consumer bank that most people think about you gotTA checking account. Right, now you've got some money in that checking account. That account actually takes your money or dot and most people know this your dollars sitting in that account. You know just waiting around. You'd withdraw them. Your dollars are actually rolling up into the bank's treasury. There's somebody at the bank working with the regulators to say hey, how much of this money can we actually put into things like mortgages, commercial loans, all of the the uses of capital that society. Has In some some effort to. To, move the world forward and make the economy efficient, and so those deposits basically roll up into a big investment fund, and there's ratios that regulators set globally that say those dollars needed to be kept in reserve, versus how many are actually able to be invested, but with the portion that's able to be invested. It's there to fun. You know building a house to fund a business back -Tory to fund sales and marketing or inventory procurement for some other business, and so a bank was was basically the original investment fund, and a bank has unlike venture funds and other sources of. We typically think private capital. The bank has tricky. Problem were any moment all of the depositors holding the checking accounts could show up and say hey. I want my money back and so that's why banks have to deal with reserving capital predicting the amount of withdraw and classically everybody wants her money at once at the worst possible time, and so banks have to deal with quite a bit of volatility now if you take an investment fund on the other hand. Totally totally different structure, so your typical venture fund will have money available to it for a period of ten years from you know typically these larger pools of capital. We talked we talked about so very rarely. Individuals are investing retirement savings in venture funds, typically sovereign wealth funds down that's. Basically pools of that individuals capable. Win One of these funds makes a commitment to a venture fund. It'll say you've got the capital for ten years. You've gotta pay back. You know as investments exit, but other than that will check in ten years from now. We hope that we have more than we gave you the star with and there there's no liquidity problem because the fun has effectively carte blanche to keep the money invested until some set of businesses grow and succeed and go public and make distributions so one thing that's fascinating. The Tappan in the last twenty five years is private capital capital in the format of these kinds of funds. Have just grown tremendously and so today. There's a little over five trillion dollars. Of private capital being allocated in this way to think like buyout funds venture funds so on and so forth. Funds don't have the liquidity problems of banks. They can make much longer term for looking investments. This is created tremendous potential to make the economy more more efficient by taking out the time spectrum. You know this is why venture investors can do things like finance spacex or Tesla. Really. Build fundamental technologies in the way that a bank never could so this is an amazing thing it. However leads to a very long. You DAK cycle, so the incentive goes down when you take out the time line over which investment needs to pay back. To carefully monitor and understand what's going on in the business day today, so it's pretty interesting thing about the different pools of capital. There's not not to. Make it sound too confusing, but I think everybody will admit that the financial markets are incredibly diverse complicated we track basically about fifteen different kinds of capital, and they're sort of pros and cons with each one, but you know a bank is one. A private fund is wanted insurance companies balancing as another. You've got things like ETF and public vehicles that hold capital so there's quite a bit of complexity and the the structure of the financial markets. All right well. That's maybe the supply side of Capitol on. All kinds of middlemen and all kinds of different arrangements, but ultimately there is also the demand side of Capitol, at least from the point of view of companies getting started which is. Startups or computer in later stage with the maybe they're not exactly considered startup anymore, but they're mature. These companies have models for how they are predicting. They're going to grow, but oftentimes these companies are very. Lumpy in terms of how their their revenues come in how closely their predictions can track reality. So how do technology companies even model their finances? Is there a way to model their finances? That actually has some meaningful trajectory. Sure so first. Companies you know need need a base think of all the places that they're spending our money and. We're pretty. We Do I. Think a pretty good job of organizing this and making it simple so when we look at companies and we can, we can talk more about how the the cabinet machine operates, but when we look at companies, we basically think they're only a handful of places of money. Get spent you spend money on. Short term projects that you hope proficient things, sales and marketing. Houston money on paying for your sources of financing like paying interest on debt, making distributions to your investors, and then you spend money on everything else and everything else can be designing software building products on, and so forth, and so if you break the demand for capital down into just those three buckets. And look at them that way. Some pretty interesting things happen. The first is for the short term investments that you hope productive. You can track pretty granular nearly whether or not they are, and we'll come back to that. For paying back your investors, you sort of know exactly how much you're paying your investors so a pretty easy thing to track, and then for the operating costs you know most people will help us. Apax, that you're paying to keep the lights on things like Renton the your accountants, the CEO salaries on and so forth these are these are table stakes expenditures. You need to stay in business and so. Amongst each of those three things, there's different things that you wanna do to optimize and I'm happy to go into more detail sort of go through each one. If you think that'd be useful. Yeah Bliss a little bit more about about how these companies should be a modeling, their revenues are that is meaningful to model their revenue so that you can potentially think of them as targets for for capital allocation so. If we think about. Understanding what company might be a viable recipient of capital? How can you accurately predict the trajectory of that company, or or do they? Would they present a model? Would they develop a model good through a little more detail? How a company would serve justify? It's need for capital. So typically what what most companies do and this is not terribly useful or accurate, but I'll tell you what most people do I mean by the way like how central the entire economy predicts, predicts demand for capital works like this. Companies take. Their income statement on their. Balance Sheet historically. And they they basically have this excel file got a bunch of you know, rose and have different things like my revenue, my you revenue that sort of linked or my expenses that are linked revenue Mukasey could sold so on and so forth, and they grow each of those rose by some number that they hope to hit so if you want your revenue to double next year, you'll say my revenue one hundred dollars today I wanted to be two hundred. Hundred dollars twelve months from now I'm just GONNA draw a line between those two points and every month. There will be some number that's on that line, and that's why monthly revenue I want my expenses. You know everyone knows. Expenses are going to have to go up if my revenue goes up but I don't want them to go up as much as my revenue, so I'm going to draw a line. That's you know somewhere less than a doubling. and. You pull these lines together on one big excel file and there's your you know they're your corporate projections. In general, this is true for big companies small companies, but that's not actually how. Company revenue works because if you go back to the three categories, we talked about before, and you just focus on the one that talks about the short term investments. The. Way Company Revenue Actually Works is a company this month. Let's say they spend one hundred dollars on sales marketing. Well. They're hoping to get a return on that sales marketing, and so they're hoping that in the next you know six months. That's paid back. Twelve months that's paid back. You can actually track every time they spend money on sales and marketing. how quickly it gets paid back so it's that level of precision that can accurately predict revenue, and so what we do is we basically just get a list of every time? Money was spent on one of these short-term investments, so you sales and marketing for for an example, and then we get a list of all of the revenue that was ever earned. And we attribute between both of those lists causing effect. And we do that using a bunch of techniques that are pretty commonplace in your typical data, company or machine learning company. We use some math things like factor graphs. We use simple kind of correlations. We have You know a whole kind of financial framework to. Guess. What attribution should be because you learn a lot as you see different businesses and you see a bunch of different different patterns, which you can basically cluster on, but it is this linkage between spending on something like sales and marketing emceeing seeing revenue, go up or down, but makes or breaks a business, and you want to look at it and I is. Not a bundled. Entirety which is how financial projections are typically built? Okay, well! Let's talk a little bit more about what you actually do so if you're talking about early stage technology companies. Describe how you are modeling, those companies and how you are making decisions as to whether they should receive capital. When a company comes to capital they they come to our website. They sign up for this system that we built which which we've called the capital machine. And the first thing that they do is they connect their accounting system their payment processor typically, so think like a strike, and then sometimes they'll provide other things like a pitch deck or a data room, or whatever other information they have prepared. The system pulls down. All of the date in the accounting system and the the payment processor, and we look at other systems to these are the two key ones that all all dive into detail, and so, what ends up happening is from the accounting system. We get a list of all the times. Businesses spend money on these things like sales and marketing that we were talking about before. From the payment processor we get a list of all the revenue transactions in crucially we get it at. The level of each. Each customer payment, and so you know we scrub I all we really care about is having a customer ID, but once we have data at that level. We can start to do this linkage and say all right look. You know this business spent. A million dollars on sales and marketing and March of two thousand eighteen in April of twenty eighteen, and we saw revenue grow by twenty percent. That was a pretty substantial chain. You know what actually happened here. You can typically identify the subcategories of sales and marketing and start to do this link between these two, and this is really the you know the magic behind our our data science in our team pairing with our engineering team to figure out this problem and solve away that is, that's robust. Bud once we have these two data feeds, and the system goes through, and does all of these attribution. Populations were able to present that back to accompany a pretty clear picture of what's going on, and so we'll say things like hey. Your Business is pretty seasonal, and in the summer is when you're typically more more efficient at converting your sales and marketing dollars into growth so I, you want to finance growth in the summer. The second thing is only about eighty percent of your businesses financeable. There's twenty percent where you might not know it because you're not looking at this level of detail, you're busy building your business, which is exactly exactly what you should be doing, but Twenty percent of your businesses, not efficient. You're spending money on on your sales and marketing categories, product lines, and CETERA that just shouldn't exist and so if you get rid of those. If you double down on the part of Your Business, it is efficient. Then we predict your revenue will be act fifty percent higher, and we'll tell you exactly how much money you need to invest to raise money to to raise the revenue by fifty percent. We give you a bunch of charts that allow you to see how history and projections merged together and dig down. Inspect how we do that linkage to make sure you agree, but. This is what the capital machine does at its core. It Converts Company data into a fully audited completely transparent picture of. How business works where it sufficient where it's not efficient. And then that's where our technology stops, and where balanced she comes in, and so we then take this information, and we make balancing investments directly in companies, and so primarily at this point we lend money to technology companies that we see from their data are eligible for non dilutive funding. We make capital available to them directly. We basically allow them to access it through the capital machine. We use one system to communicate changes to the business. No keep both sides and form so on and so forth, but this is the kind of analytics layer that's essential to making these capital allocation decisions more efficient, and so I think you could imagine a day at least for us in the not too distant future when it's not just US using our balance sheet in this tool to make investments, but in fact, just like excel, every investor can benefit from a similar level of analytics and transparency, as can companies by getting more accurately priced faster access to capital less friction so on and so forth. Get Lab commit, is! Get labs inaugural community event. Get Lab is changing how people think about tools and engineering best practices and get lab commit in Brooklyn is a place for people to learn about the newest practices in devops, and how tools and processes come together to improve the software development life cycle. Get Lab commit is the official conference. Forget lab. It's coming to Brooklyn new. York September Seventeenth Twenty nineteen. If you can make it to Brooklyn, on September Seventeenth Mark Your calendar, forget lab, commit and go to software engineering daily dot, com slash commit. You can sign up with code commit s E. D.. That's COM MIT S. E. D.. And Save thirty percent on. Conference passes. If you're working in devops, and you can make it to New York. It's a great opportunity to take a day away from the office. Your company will probably pay for it, and you get thirty percent off if you sign up with code, commit S, e. There a great speakers from Delta. Airlines Goldman. Sachs northwestern, mutual, T, mobile and more. Check it out at software engineering daily Dot Com slash, commit and use code. Commit S. E. D.. Thank you to get lab for being sponsor. The inputs specifically if you think about a model for determining whether or not, a company should should be eligible to receive capital. I'd like to know how the the models are built. The the data science models that you're building are constructed from the point of view of the inputs. So how are you determining or how do you like company comes to you? How do you turn that company into some structured form of data that you could put into your models and determine whether it's worthy of capital. Yeah I mean it comes down to what what the data is your down so when we talk to a system like striper transaction records system, you know that that's the revenue of the company now where things get interesting when we connect to balance sheets in penalizing, it's of accompanying really onto understanding. Weighing. What exactly these numbers mean, and that sort of where we made our pipelines were built from the ground up to give us that granular. Of A company's cash family revolutions. Where's the money going where they allocating? And it's savable greenway or you once. What do you understand that data through that Lens? That let's build pretty sophisticated financial models Linda. And you know as soon as you have the picture of Company You can really do a lot of flexible analysis on the back leg distributed computation. Come stuff that you would never be able to excel and quite frankly a lot of these companies don't have the stacking internally or really the tools to understand for themselves, so you'd be surprised it you know when we surface this analysis back to the company by virtue of just being transparent on how we're making decision how it is perceived their business, the signals that were uncovering. These operators the CEO's the CFO's that are really focused on building company. Really surprising. They're really making these insights really transforming. How they think they should have capital. Should invest growing business. Are there any? Sources of Third Party data that you can gather to improve decision making. There are at a macro economic sense, and so it's actually quite useful to look at public company performance and say hey. SAS businesses in general. Most people notice, but facilities in general are seasonal in the fourth quarter. Budgets basically expire and people come in, and they buy a bunch of SAS. Software and so to take concepts like that basically shapes of curves, signals and apply them to private company. Financials is useful. Crucially though there is no private company. Data repository of any kind like it just doesn't exist, and you know notoriously even even with small businesses. It's actually quite quite difficult to get access to any sort of meaningful credit data, and so, what ends up happening is these aw. These businesses. Give you a picture of their business directly as an investor and you have to interpret it directly, and that's basically how this works totally unlike consumer credit, there's no credit bureau that people paying so most investors are analyzing the state and excel. Excel notoriously breaks when there's about a million cells worth of data, and so we've got this great visualization showing our data pipeline, and it's basically a bunch of boxes, and there's a little tiny. Tiny box in the bottom of corner that's excel, and there's a bunch of other boxes across the entire rest of the page that are nodes in our in our distributed computations, but accelerate very very limited, and so it makes it impossible to actually understand what's going on in business from the source data, and it's at the source that you see this variability in this linkage between profitable capital allocation decisions in unprofitable capital allocation decisions. Describing more detail, the workflow so a company comes to you and they're going to put their inputs into the. Would you call the capital machine? What does that workflow look like in a little bit more depth? Yes when they come to the website, they creighton count much like you would on. Twitter facebook account. When your details your email, you terrify your email, and then you on what's recalling like the capital portable on there? You have et CETERA. Tools to connect your sins record and these are typical offload. So you know people are very familiar with you. You know you say hey, let's connect by quickbooks you in your credentials and sort of be as secure way, and you click okay and the system checkmark by your quickbooks in the system start pulling that data out of regular cadence and. Depending on what system you're connecting you of the characteristics of that's not go systems of record, and how much data you have you know. The data's available anywhere from ten minutes to a couple of hours later and you know once we have Dr. System, we run that through our partake analysis pipeline in the users as a company. You get you get charged. In Tableau kind of call it, the insight Saban's these refused that we think would be helpful for you as an operator company understanding about Your Business in separately. We also get views of that data that are useful to our our internal investment team. Whoever is looking to capitalization systems? Are there certain business categories that are a better fit for modeling in better fit for the kind of. Predictable capital returns that you can, you can expect with the investments that you're making so like you ride sharing or Gig economy businesses or some businesses. What are the categories that are the best fit? Say Very few categories don't shit from the from the perspective of of linkages, but they're certainly models at their easier to think through and easier to understand, but our our system can underwrite today A. Lease on a commercial aircraft, a fleet of ships and Insurance Agency ask company the most important. Thing about our system is that the financial theory that underlies it is very general, just like p. e. rate is very general, and so that's kind of sounds crazy like. A lot of. A. Lot of people say what what businesses the best fit for your your system and you know it's kind of like asking what businesses the best for Warren Buffett like Warren. Buffett is a generalist. In any business, and he has a framework in his own head to figure out how to make ship comparable to American Express our assistant has a very similar framework. It just operates at the level of transactions instead of at the level of financial statements, but certainly within. That framework there's some examples that are just easier describes I think like you know thinking through the fishing of sales and marketing something. That's a lot more obvious than thinking through like the stability in refurbishment of commercial aircraft parts, which is a key question you know. Pricing pricing refurbished parts, which is a key question if your financing commercial aircraft and Our team, the ambassadors that use the capital machine internally which we primarily do internally do a little bit of partnering with without the groups to to use this as well. These people are all specialists in some particular area, but it's crucial to understand. They're looking at the exact same chance as all the other specialists and all the other areas, so it's like literally the the Fast Company and a commercial aircraft will have the same series of charts at investors. Are there two two draw their conclusion? Is the question for Chris. Can you describe the stack of technologies that you built in more detail? Yeah Yeah. Of course on the front, we are react type script, xjs, you know everything is on aws, and in the back, and we're. We're all python, and in really the reason for that is if you're doing any serious machine, learning or data science today can't really get away in python stack, so we're all python them back in. We have flasks. As a as our API late here and That's the that's a high level. And get a little bit more detail about how the data science layer works. Yeah, yeah, yeah, of course, so we put on the dea into basically a data lake the that goes down into Ardito pipeline in that's all air orchestrated on top of each called airflow, and we use a technology called desk for are distributed computation, and I think that this is a good choice. Choice for us at this moment you know I see us doing a lot of work on. You know using a spark in other distributed technologies in the future and his team and it turns out that when we pull this data down organizing the data was really important to us as we build a lot of attractions to make accessing that data, really easy for quantitative analysts. Important central to our whole technology is that we're able to do a lot of different financials experiment very quickly on top of this so the the implications of that really cascade down all the way into. You know what technologies where choosing how we structure our delayed. Even even how strokes are teams, so it really is brought up locations across all product. How is it when you're analyzing company that you have enough data that it warrants a spark cluster because I can imagine? The financial data around the company. How can there really be that much data to analyze how you do surprised in a lot of these transactions systems taking up the companies have been around a couple of years and their direct to consumer. These data sets can be can be pretty large. You know we're talking about in the millions and millions and millions of transactions that were pulling down and storing. Storing and that just on a per company basis. You know that's not even talking about if we wanted to. Benchmarks Cross companies, and also if we want to do scenario analysis, so you know one of the things we was part of a pipeline is take this data, and through like nine ninety nine hundred thousand simulations to understand the sensitivity of different variables on the performance of Your Business and If, you're starting out with starting that already large. Sort of a multiplying effect. On how much data the system is the old process? is you go through those different stages? And, can you tell me a little more detail? What would a typical spark job? Look like for a company that you're assessing. Yes, so first episode is ribbon. Our our financial didn't ingestion parts, so we download something on the order of you know forty fifty bytes of Tim's action data for for a company. We have to do all the work to interpret and understand what that means in reorganized that data in a way that are downstream analysis and primitives can. Make sense of and use for useful analysis so really the first step at this point job is is transformed the datum some it's useful, and then there's all the work on what are the clusters in order to machines and analysis in the computational. Resources needed to run simulations. You know not not just say local computer locally owned of fall over the only about thirty to sixty four gigabytes of Ram what league, so that's where workflow comes in creating easier faces into data, clusters and being. Should you know when you run a job? You know when it fails. You know it's done. You know when the team can't okay. This part of analysis done I had intermediate date asset to do more analysis on now get back to work is a lot of the time we spend developing internal tools to make. One other thing that'll mentioned that I think's important is. A lot of the underlying technology in our data pipeline it's no different than like what a tableau or you need. Traditional BI business would have access to, but what's fascinating when you have a vertically specific domain so financial data in our case you can make a lot of interpretations about the date of the let you do much more intelligent things, and so for example we. Don't have to make your own charts as a user of the capital machine. We make all the charts for you can of course. As a business we work with. Give us ideas for charts. You can mock up your own. We we basically have an interface for for business. The I team's to to write some code if they if they want to bought when you have clients who are thinking about financial risk, financial attribution across all of the companies that we see distilling that down into a series of indicators that are detailed, but generalize -able, and then publishing that back to all of the companies that use the capital machine to run their own capital, allocation, decisions and access, external fundraising and capital. Some pretty amazing things happen in so it's only with a vertical view. You actually having these we, we call our data scientists Kwan's, but but actually having these people who you know typically are graduate level economists, thinking for the first time about using transaction level data in their analysis, which is notoriously not not available to to normal economists that you get the kinds of insights and analysis the actionable for businesses, and then in terms of the data pipeline that then means we actually store a bunch of intermediate data that's opinionated in that way, and that makes it much faster to access much easier to benchmark much more useful across a network of companies, versus just that isolated excel model that. Explains only one business. One thing I'd like to ask you about. Capital intensity so there are kinds of businesses that are capital intensive for example where you have to pay upfront for a lot of ridesharing rides, and you know as Uber or lift. His has known in much detail. You allocate all this capital two things to subsidize rise because you try to win a market, there's all kinds of other capital intensive businesses. How does capital intensity change? What makes sense with regard to the equity financing the debt financing that you are shepherding for these companies? That is a great question and be because of where you focus in your audience. You totally get the most financiers don't so. The first point exactly like you said. Capital intensity means a business consumes a lot of capital. It doesn't mean a business has a physical factory or plant or railcars, so it is absolutely true exactly like you said that there are a lot of tech businesses that are incredibly capital intensive. If you are capital intensive business that means UNI especially if you're growing, you need to raise a lot of external capital, and so it is even more important that your capital or a big portion of your capital base is not dilutive. That's that's just essential. Table stakes because what you see with these businesses, the ride sharing companies are great. Example is by the time one of these things actually goes public the early owners in the business on a very very very miniscule. KEESA that business, still if you contrast that to company like Viva Systems which I think is one of the most capital capitol efficient businesses in venture history, I think that this race something like twelve or fifteen million dollars total before it went public in a at a multi billion dollar market cap. So capital intensity. Is a synonym for dilution your own way less. Than you think when you exit entities even more important that you figure out a way to raise capital non ludicrously upfront. Some broader questions zooming out in in getting your perspective. Do a thesis for what is going on in the economy right now where you look at. The fact that We have. Obvious pressures to. Reducing the size of the economy through the lack of tourism, the lack of social gatherings while the stock market climbs higher and higher, and it appears that the technology side of things is almost unaffected by Corona virus is there. Is there a thesis that you've arrived at or or their set of theses that through conversations with other people, you've found most compelling. Sure the most important thing to realize about the stock market is that it discounts all cash flows from all businesses in the stock market to infinity, and so the value, the stock market about eighty percent of the value. The stock market is. Pretty far into the future like more than three years from now, and so if you believe that the current economic crisis and this is why there's always a. At least in the Western, world, last two hundred fifty years after an economic crisis. If you believe the crisis will eventually revert, and there will be a recovery, then it only makes sense discount stock market assets by anywhere between ten and twenty five percent. If you believe businesses fundamentally going to go out of business because of this crisis, that's a different story, but that explains why something as terrible as Kobe nineteen and a pandemic. Only discount the stock market by by roughly thirty thirty five percent in a in March, but that's not what's actually going on today as you mentioned and so stock market prices now have completely recovered. That is something that we think is a little bit of out of sync with reality but I. I mention you know we're not. We don't spend too much time about the stock market beyond that we just look at you. Know Private Company fundamentals. We try to understand what's actually going on in individual businesses across all businesses that are network to see what you know what we can understand, and you know what kind of conclusions we can draw, and so if you take that Lens and you actually look at what's happening to businesses due to Cova nineteen, it's fascinating. Some businesses like think the food delivery space have gotten a lot more efficient, so those businesses lot like ridesharing businesses back twelve months ago, there was sort of a bloodbath between bunch of companies competing in local markets to acquire customers all all fighting Google and facebook console, and so forth you subsidies drivers, etc.. That's essentially stopped. These businesses incredibly profitable, the cost acquire customers has fallen by more than half a lot of cases. The channels were slot less competitive, and so if you're running one of those businesses. Now is a great time to be aggressively expanding. Weird things like commercial construction businesses. They're actually a handful businesses that we've seen do things like install windows and doors and commercial buildings whose businesses have accelerated because all of these buildings are closed down. Construction project timelines have gotten pulled up. All of these orders are coming. Do in they're you know sort of rapidly doing it solutions? There's obviously a bunch of other businesses have been that have been hurt by by the pandemic, but our general thesis are we've studied. Pretty detailed way the Spanish flu in nineteen eighteen, you know. These things eventually go away. There will be a vaccine. Economy will get back to normal, and as long as we can stay focused on working through this as as a society and of maintain our our fabric of of kind of economic progress then. DESAGUADERO values today will eventually make sense just sort of a question of of win for the stock market, and then if you're if you're actually running business in thinking about your own performance in isolation, really being clear about is now the time to invest and grow my business now the time to be very careful with my expenses interest, get through this for the next year or however long it takes for there to be a vaccine. So the way to think about your company, if I understand correctly if I was to to put in a nutshell, is that. I think of you as a data science middleman between large capital allocators, and and start ups deserving of capital, so the the sovereign wealth funds the banks the I guess. Funds of funds. These kinds of sources are essentially looking to you for guidance on where to direct the capital, and you're on the on the other side, absorbing data and creating opportunities from these startups to source the good directions of that capital. Just wrap up. Would you put any more color around that description or or refining anyway. Yeah I mean I. think that at the core of what capital is is where the. Core Technology Ambler of sort of. The private market if you think about public markets today, you've clearing-houses like the New York Stock Exchange, and you have companies that provide analysis on top of that like Bloomberg, you know we see a tremendous opportunity to shift the paradigm where you know the place where all the financial transactions happen. is also the place that collects the data improvise information for those making these decisions and yeah, so I think capitals really at the center of making a transparent technologically enabled financial marketplace. Guys. Thank you so much for coming on the show and discussing capital, and I guess one last question is. Do you have any predictions for how capital allocation for startups will look differently in five ten years? Sure so! The first prediction. And this is happening now. I mean the the infrastructure is. In place both within. And others. Most startups fairly early in their life. Think is equity only way to do this and. So. That's a cultural shift. That's that's already happened. People are starting to ask that question. The second prediction is. Seed and series a funding will be entirely unchanged. After series. There'll be a bifurcation between businesses that. Are Really. Capital intensive gigantic rnd projects think like SPACEX. The series, B. C. d. e. enough are really about building and launching a rocket. Those businesses will by and large not. Turn outside of equity to finance themselves, but there's very few of those businesses. Pretty much every other business businesses that you see raising a series B. Serie C. Will like any normal business in the entire rest of the economy raise maybe half of that capital nine allegedly either in the form of debt. Royalty financing factoring all of the other instruments that normal companies use to finance themselves in the void delusion that will happen roughly three years her. Now that'll that'll kind of we'll see obvious obvious signs of that from very early very early base, and then the final the final thing is. Steve Case talks a lot about this. With the rise of the rest, he's got this great venture fund that invests explicitly outside the coast, so kind of the rest of America and we've seen that there's there's a pretty dramatic distinction between being a coastal business non-coastal business from capital access perspective, but there's no distinction from an actual performance perspective, and so we'll start to see some of the regional. Differences in bias sees around where capital flows, go away. And so I would maybe put that on a five year timeline like raising capital is actually much more predictable, much less biased, and that's great back to the beginning of our conversation. That's great for the economy I mean every project or business that can convert capital, two products and services that people love should get finance. No questions asked doesn't mean it doesn't matter what the color of your skin is. What background you have whether you went to college didn't go to. College doesn't matter. You have a business with data that can prove whether people love it

Steve Case Business Rosen Fisher Jurvetson New York Chris Welcome Blair Silicon Valley CEO Restorick Louis Spacex Facebook Singapore
Melting glaciers sound like frying bacon

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 3 weeks ago

Melting glaciers sound like frying bacon

"As the climate warms, glaciers are melting noisily. It sounds like Bacon fry, and you can hear bubbling and cracking and pop writing notes. Grant Dean is with the scripts institution of Oceanography. His team has been working in fall barred an archipelago north of Norway to record the sounds of glaciers melting. He says those sounds contain a lot of information that can help. Scientists monitor the effects of global warming on glaciers. For example, glacial ice contains tiny air bubbles that burst when the ice melts. So researchers are analyzing the sounds of those popping bubbles to see how they correspond the speed of Glacial Melt. And they're developing methods of distinguishing the sounds of glaciers, melting from nearby icebergs melting Dean says other tools for remotely monitoring ice melt such as satellites and radar are expensive, so he says listening to glaciers could prove a relatively simple and affordable way to track how they're changing as the climate lawrence. The glaciers are talking to us. It's their own particular kind of language. We need to decipher it to understand the future of the glaciers.

Dean Institution Of Oceanography Norway
"norway" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

06:24 min | 2 months ago

"norway" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"Kinda Guy. Well here's the thing I would like to do this when I'm traveling anyway. I kind of like to make modular itinerary. So I'll think about like specific kind of types of days. I want to have but then I can slot them in and out depending on my mood and different reasons and I think one of the biggest reasons why that's a good tactic to use in. Oslo is because of the weather here. So it's not every day that you get son and if you show up here and it's a sunny day it's warm. Don't assume that it's going to be like that the whole week. You're here. I was here when I first came in July and I think there was three weeks of rain straight and I'm like really is the summer this is. This is insane. I haven't seen the sun in like a month so I like to build people's itinerary and people ask me what to first thing I say is just around the weather. Like have the things that you WanNa do but then let the weather be the guide for the things you actually end up doing. Got On that day. So you're not going to suggest a first day. You're going to suggest a museum day in a outdoor day and the order depends on what the weather is. I'm there exactly. I mean we could look at it like indoor outdoor sunny versus rainy type. Things I mean Norwegians. Have a famous saying it's all SEIC Norwegian it's do Finis Eka Kadoorie Vodka about a doorly. And that's just means there's no such thing as bad weather only clothing so like they go out and every type of weather and that's true. I mean my kids sleep in their sleeping bag at at the daycare outside in the stroller when their youngsters. And there's never like a training too hard. We're not going outside today situation. I mean they put on rain gear and

Jason Oslo Norway Chris Christianson Aquavit Vikings Brazil
"norway" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

Daily Tech News Show

06:08 min | 3 months ago

"norway" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

"Of fifty seats per screen. Ringin Kino in Oslo sold ninety six percent of its available tickets that led to it getting about half the average admissions. It gets because it usually doesn't fill up all the theater's so when it's allowed to sell all of its seats it sells about double that the top grossing title was onward followed by Bloodshot the gentleman parasite and local titles cloven three the final and Fluke Denver Brenston evening screenings in the early part of this week. Have been about seventy percent. And that's usually when you get. Nobody come into the theater and screenings for parasite this coming week are sold out now. What they're doing is staggering. The showtimes to try to keep people from crowding into the lobby. Concessions are still sold by people. But they're kept under control so popcorn is refilled and stored separately. They don't have out in a big open thing. They give you a Coffee Cup to get your coffee rather than leaving the coffee cups by the machine. But they're still a machine out there that's interesting. Cinemas are expecting some small releases coming in June and Norway's theaters counting on big releases in July to fill the gap. They planned to run some classic movies. In fact the owner of Ring Keno Keno told deadline. We're quite sure that some big children's movies will surprises by releasing early in July. They're more worried about having too many films when the glut happens at the end of twenty twenty. I'm beginning of twenty twenty one so Chris. I don't know about you but this is not what I would have expected. I would not have expected Sellouts even of a limited amounts and. I certainly wouldn't expect theaters to be hinting that we will earlier releases than we thought. I. Yeah I think there's a couple things going on here and it might be. You know being misinterpreted a little bit by the data. I think one of the things that's going on as people just WANNA get out and no matter what it is. Even if it's a movie theater bully it doesn't matter they WANNA go out so there's part of that but also it's a it's a desire to get back to normalcy and it's also of course it's a love for cinema too but what there's a lot of moving parts here like even if you're staggering seats like do people after specially in this country people going to have to wear masks. How do you keep people from congregating in the lobbies? Like you could stagger showtimes. But you know we have arclights. Twelve fourteen theaters. That's impossible you can't do that for for us The other side of the equation is movie theaters. Were in trouble to begin with before the pandemic because of the way Lower attendance and the way studios or releasing their movies. Now I mean you guys talked about the row with Amc and universal. And if you look back at that how ridiculous univer. Amc's response was thinking that universal was the only studio thinking about changing how they release movies. No it's all of them are thinking about it so I think what you're going to see is you know and I've I've been in love with the cinema since I was a tiny little child so I'd hate to see movie theaters. Go Away or even You know get diminished in any way. But I think there's there's going to be kind of a after an initial push and initial like everyone wants to go back out and see movies again. I think it's going to level off. I think you are going to see the same thing here like when they do reopen that people are going to want to go out but with the restrictions and the lower capacity. It's going to sound a little bit more like success than it really is. Because you also have the distribution models of the theaters and the movie studios. The split isn't really conducive to what the studio wants and with concessions and capacity is really what the movie theaters need. So you're Kinda of have like a bit of an impasse. Between attendance cost licensing fees and the way movies are being released so. I think all of things needed to be figure out before we could kind of see like a kind of a return to any kind of equilibrium with the the movie theaters. Yeah that's my rant. I I do think that part of this is going to be nostalgia people you know. There was a a supreme court situation in Wisconsin that temporarily or likely directly struck down there. Stay at home order and people were in bars because people want bars because they remember the time that they were there. Forget your personal feelings on whether or not they should be. The desire is what matters in this particular case? I think we are going to see probably larger and more vociferous movie attendants in this country when we are allowed to do it and in the in the short capacities but whether that is enough to save the theatre industry I think remains to be seen. Also I mean there's a big thing on that article that you just said like well we're getting a bunch of kids movies now. That's another thing. Our parents going to be taking all their kids. It seems the least you the theaters. Yeah and especially if they have to wear masks which they're not gonNA WANNA do and and their safety issue but also you've got all these options for streaming now and you know we mentioned onward at did really well. We'll onward came to Disney plus here so all our kids saw it on the streaming service. Anyway so you've got And these are always big huge summer moneymakers is the animated and the family. Pg Thirteen PG's and kids movies so They're going to be a big part of the equation. Moving forward yeah. I think this is interesting because of the numbers but it's also one theater in Oslo and they're going to start offering more of their theaters next week. It'll be very interesting to see when that compressed demand we're like this is the only theatre all of Oslo can go to right. That's that's a whole different situation than okay. Now you got three or four and at that point when do when do you hit when you run out of the people who are like yeah? I'm not worried I just want to get out. Want to go somewhere and you start going into the people that you're GonNa have to convince like say like hey man I can watch. Hbo With My friends over the Internet at home right now HBO. Nordic why would i? Why would I.

Oslo Amc Ringin Kino Hbo Norway Wisconsin Chris Disney HBO
"norway" Discussed on Zero To Travel Podcast

Zero To Travel Podcast

02:57 min | 8 months ago

"norway" Discussed on Zero To Travel Podcast

"All right. We are on our way to get the family Christmas tree and one of the great parts about picking out a Christmas tree is. It's right across the street from us. This guy comes. He parks trailer that I think he lives in for about three weeks. I don't know where he goes to the bathroom. But anyway he's got a nice bluff sand on their some beautiful light strong and a whole bunch of rows of Christmas trees and more with our kids kids who are Taking their time here we are in Oslo and we get to have a tree for a few weeks to enjoy and then we get one. Also we on a backward comes from unadorned to tell me about what. It's like to get the Christmas tree for you growing up in Norway Rural Norway. Well then we went. I went when my dad and my brother and we chopped down a three with an ax or a saw. Yeah we normally put on skis and went into the forest gang and then fam come on. This sounds like a fake story true. It's true yeah you put on skis you go out and chop down a tree. So we're doing the herb. Come air stay with me. We're doing the urban version of that. We don't have an ax. We don't have skis but we're are using our feet What do you think about the tradition of going to pick out a Christmas tree together? What does it mean to you? Oh it's nice for me. It's been like a thing I've done with my dad. It's been a thing that we've done every every till I was. I moved out that my dad had done mostly by himself. We went one time together with my dad. Thank I kinda Miss Ed head like a nice thing because trees like a big part of Christmas. It's usually yeah usually on the twenty four. Th You guys do it or the twenty third twenty third urge Ellie daughter. Take the three out the twenty third. We've decorated. Oh yeah way beforehand. Okay you go into the forest beforehand. Ellie Ellie what do you think about going to get the tree. We meatballs everybody meatballs. All right well L.. I didn't know meatballs would make an appearance this Christmas spectacular. But I'll tell you really quickly about getting the tree in America a lot of times it involves driving somewhere and then they put the tree and the roof your car and strap it in so a little less ideology than the going out into the forest thing but there was a time where we've gone to a couple of farms where you can cut down on your own tree and my dad did that and it was always a nice thing to go with your family and pick up a Christmas tree and it really gets into the spirit of Christmas sometime before for. What do you think Oscar? Okay getting. Skeptical look should we go get our tree guys. Let's go get into the Christmas. Christmas spirit will be putting it up decorating. Tonight's.

Ellie Ellie Norway Rural Norway Oslo Oscar America
"norway" Discussed on Zero To Travel Podcast

Zero To Travel Podcast

08:21 min | 8 months ago

"norway" Discussed on Zero To Travel Podcast

"Right and at the end there. I said tutorials and Georgia. We were laughing about that. I I can't remember the last time I said toodle 's increase. Yeah no months ago and we recorded this now in hindsight I have to ask you was it too soon to take out the decorations or perfect or should we have done it sooner. No not sooner but ah for this year it was probably perfect because it was really like depressing wetter and we needed to get the lights inter. Life's really it's it's November is pretty harsh in Norway. I would say it's the hardest months it's dark and cold and it's either rainy awards. Windy or snowing or just cold and dark so we needed it so this year. It's I'm not used to having it so early. But we had a great night hanging up like things and getting lights on and the kids were helping and they were so sweet when and that's like basically what Christmas is about. It's kits the children when you see like they look at ornaments and and they just enjoyed so much. And that's that's when you feel like I think I said to you like you feel like reborn in the way it's like you see Christmas through their ice and and then Christmas becomes really special again. That's a beautiful thing and since I'm a man child it's it's through is is well. I'm one of the children that neither the Seattle skyline well speaking of the skunk finally broke the seal on you speaking of breaking the seal which was the title of that segment. We're breaking the seal bussing decorations and I've been trying to break the seal with you on several American traditions. One of them being A Christmas story the movie a Christmas story. And now you know when I refer to the leg lamp. If you've seen the movie Christmas story this man in the movie the father other Wednesday quote Unquote Major Award and it's ugly leg lamp and his wife hates it so when he's not looking. There's a big controversy and she. She goes into water the plants and she breaks the leg lamp on accident quote unquote but it was a family controversy for years. I'm wondering are you going to quote unquote accidentally knocked the Christmas skunk into the Fires Thinking Oh i Love Candle see now so like putting on a little bit of fire. It wouldn't make a bad all right. Yeah so just to describe the Christmas which was one of the figurines. I grew up with actually not a small thing puts. Aw It's got a giant tail. I've taught my daughter that skunk spray. So she goes round spring spring as you heard in the segment and he's holding snowball uh-huh ball or she's holding a snowball. I'm not sure what the gender is. It's it's the Christmas gone. So it's it's a staple to the household now now rare species in the doors. I'm keeping my eye on you when you're walking around here. Watering the plants. The AL watching more than water to watch that Christmas gone. Okay okay well. Let's talk about unfortunately is not made of glass or porcelain. Then it would have been easier just like you ruined my things. That's a different eggs on Christmas. Okay not all the things I break an accident okay and I don't do that on purpose by the way I didn't burn. Your Salad. Alad spinner on purpose on the oven. I didn't burn the rubber handle on the hammer into the candle. Anyway whatever. We're not GONNA get all this all right. Let's talk about movies because I mentioned movies and I was gonNA share one or two more of the ones that I like to watch over the holidays but I wanted you to share your favorite movie that we have to watch that we have on the docket. Get to watch before we had up to angle. You love it. You know it you love. It took them that love actually love. Actually it's the best Christmas movie very popular here in Norway and by by the way if you want to hear all kinds of stories around the Norwegian Christmas from deeper discussions on the food to the Weird TV you program thing that we watched the what's the same procedures last year and all this stuff just go. Binge on the Norwegian Christmas spectaculars one through five. There's an open sleigh ride. There's all kinds of great stuff so if you're in the holiday spirit you're getting cozy with us. You want more Christmas stuff. After this you can dig into the archives for that. Oh I just wanted to mention that those are timeless episodes okay. Love actually is a great movie actually and I like I said very popular here and this had mentioned it. Yeah please it's British. Let's get back to this question. You know when is it too early to watch love actually like is there a. Do you have a seasonal thing on luggage love. Actually Yeah I can't watch it in like April may summer known. I know it's definitely even if it's on some wouldn't be on right. Wouldn't beyond that you have to like put it on yourself matt flakes or like video. You would never ever dare never did that. So when would you. When does it feel right to be December? It has to beat Zambia. Yeah okay interesting because again. We took the decorations out in November. And I love how by the way like you said the Norwegian Christmas. I miss you can hear this and the other spectaculars go deep on this topic. But you guys don't really start doing Christmas things too little little Christmas Eve. Which is the twenty third? Oh you do Christmas things but you like. I grew up with like nop decorating the three before. Like what we call me the day before Christmas Eve so but that's like little Christmas things happened but it's mostly in December right so I like how. I'm slowly working backwards pretty soon. We're cracking the Hewlett Bruce in October. We're doing the decorations November. No we might be watching love actually in July. Who knows no no no no? Let's not get carried away Jason and also. I have to say that we didn't put up with three like we didn't put up the Christmas tree or decorate the tree before it was December over. We did the rest of decoration but not the Christmas tree you sure about that. I didn't look the date on that same because guess what our next segment is us going to get the tree. We recorded a little bit when we went to get the tree because this is another big lead up event to Christmas. Is that when we're talking about one. Is it too early. But when you're getting the tree when you're doing these things these traditions he's rituals. I don't know what it is but the the Christmas spirit in the Kenyan Dali album. That was our favorite favorite out and that we heard like the Christmas spirit starts to take over the house. Take over your body take over your mind on your spirit and getting the tree is a big one for me for. That's like you get the tree bringing in house. Then it's it's on like donkey Kong right and before we play that. I should mention a a couple of movies that I love. I love Christmas story. Of course it's classic and Bad Santa Greats rate it's the rate at our one and elps another great one too so I just wanted to share those all right. That was our little movie discussion. Now I'M GONNA call the segment taking it to the next level with holiday. Prep because that's what you you do when you get the Christmas tree so hears us getting the Christmas tree having will discussion you might hear my daughter talking about meat balls at one point and this ties in with our trees name which is a pretty funny things when we come back. We'll tell you the name of the tree and sure the more of the Norwegian Christmas take a listen to us getting the tree.

Norway wetter Georgia toodle Seattle Zambia donkey Kong Hewlett Bruce Jason
"norway" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

Vox's The Weeds

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"norway" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

"So our white paper is called what causes the child penalty, and it's from statistics Norway, and it's a paper that talks about same sex couples living in Norway and potential policy reforms as relates to closing the wage gap that frequently occurs after women give birth to children and the paper found that while women in heterosexual couples experience a drop of income of approximately twenty two percent following the birther first child in this drop stays the same over time. Their male partners don't experience a child penalty. And this has been something a lot of academics have been looking at. But they noted that in with same sex couples specifically lesbian couples that while. There is a child penalty of some kind. There's a thirteen percent drop in the income of the person who gives birth and the their partner experiences an income drop of five percent, but with less. Couples the mother who gives birth catches up with her partner around two years after and from that after about four years after birther is no longer a child penalty and with Sam sex male couples. There is no income penalty of any kind. And so that makes sense, obviously, the the populations were dealing with. There aren't that many same sex couples with children, let alone same sex male couples with children. So I think that there's an important a layer of context in talking about who are these couples and how childbearing works for queer couples. But it is interesting and talking about how specific policy changes that took place in Norway have impacted the child penalty, including paternity leave maternity leave and just how those changes have impacted specifically same sex couples. Wait, I mean, you know, I think the the background finding here, right? Is that we often look at? Wage gap issues in the United States, and sophisticated vox readers weeds, listeners know, that wage gap is almost entirely counter for by children. And then the the further sophisticated thing to know is that other developed countries have an identical sort of wage gap. And so whatever the policy realm is right. That would alleviate that it is like outside the scope of the differences between the United States Norway, Sweden wherever it is. You wanna go, and what's interesting is that? So now, the Norwegians have found like a change that does change this right, which is not an expansive welfare state, right? Because we've seen from the international. It's not that. There's that. If you place the father with a non birth-giving second mother that gets the job done. It's true. I mean, I think this out the sounds for a straightforward to me. Although in fairness, they are seeing in this paper a certain amount of reduction in the child penalty free. From early subsidized care. So it's not exactly like I mean. But it's just still big, right? Like in Norway, which is very generously provisioned country. Right. I mean, you're you are really seeing here that gender identities and gender roles and norms are driving a large change in behavior with big labor market impacts. Right. But I think there's also, and I think the paper does get into this a little bit that there is some additional context with relation to who these couples are it noticed that in general, partnered gay men on average earn less than partnered heterosexual women, but partner lesbian, women earn more than heterosexual women. And I think that that also plays into you know, if you are a partnered lesbian couple or a partnered gay couple how having children works is a lot more of a. Deliberative process. And so I think that that adds into some element of context because I'm trying to think of how best the put this in general lesbian, couples do not traditionally have children accidentally. And so I think there is an element to which that by the time lesbian, couples are prepared to have children and are starting to that make that process happen..

Norway partner United States Sam Sweden twenty two percent thirteen percent five percent four years two years
"norway" Discussed on MIX 104.1

MIX 104.1

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"norway" Discussed on MIX 104.1

"Advice and back. Women seeing sites and go to sleep stocks. Norway. Aw. Ludicrous balancing rotate. A they could shoot break me off this. Three. Sleep in it. Yes. Game play. Case faith. To make me say. December. Still be safe. Felonies. Show me what you can't be. Put a cherry cream. This is similar. Right. This is the.

Norway
"norway" Discussed on The Rubin Report

The Rubin Report

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"norway" Discussed on The Rubin Report

"I so that's when I decided to be two straight myself out, regardless of two straight myself out. That's what I was going to do. So. So I think this is our thirteenth show in Europe. We've got a couple more over the next couple of days. And now it sounds like we're extending another thirty or forty probably in the spring. I mean, this thing has just grown and grown and grown. Are you shocked at the amount of people that live in western societies here in Norway, especially when we were in Sweden a couple of days ago. But all the countries that we've been in that live in free societies yet are completely afraid to say what they think. Absolutely shocking to you. I think the most I think what I've been most shocked about in all of that is what's happened in the UK with the police starting to prosecute people for crimes of offensiveness. That's just and I think that's probably partly because I'm and I mean, I see that. As broadly reflective of something that's happening in the west in general, but it's particularly shocking in polling to me as as a western Canadian. No because obviously Canada was part of the British empire. And when I grew up like there is a pretty tight affinity still in western Canada. With the British empire are our maps with the dominion of Canada was still pink. It was still part of the British empire. We saying God save the Queen constantly at public gatherings. That's gone by the.

Canada Europe Norway UK Sweden
"norway" Discussed on Zero To Travel Podcast

Zero To Travel Podcast

03:05 min | 2 years ago

"norway" Discussed on Zero To Travel Podcast

"I had an online friend who is obviously now a real life friend who is from norway just run up a little bit north of time and we had been talking texting for a long time and i had you know learn more about norway from her and i was much more interested in that i would have been before because before i was like oh yeah i'd like to go there sometime but that was like norway that's my friend lives it seems really cool and when i was looking into being a pair i started looking at several european countries but norway and that being topless just because of just my previous interest in it but also because of the laws in the system around being pair this because they're not the same in every european country in though some people say why didn't you go to you know spain you know not to throw spain under the bus but there's not really an official system or contract or anything there there's certain countries that have different systems and others okay depends on what you're comfortable with and what works for you and so i pick norway partially because of just pure interest and partially because of the system like i knew it was a fairly robust contract and law that i knew it would be a little bit easier for me if something were to happen you were to account the daily life and the reality of the job not just the sort of dreamy like hey i'm going to go live in exactly freelance exactly and which would be wonderful you know then i got here you know and i had i learned a surprising norwegian before i got here just because my friend kept sending me like tv clips and things and so i learned a lot from just from watching youtube tv clips i mean i started teaching myself as well but from teaching myself and being friends with her and watching tv and stuff i learned to surprising amount before i got here and then after i got here i realized that i just really liked it and i wanted to stay and my first host family didn't work out but i stayed with a second host family i'm so glad that i did and there's a lot of people that switch host families after the first one and no and now i'm trying to get my student visa and go to college here so hopefully i'll be here for a little while longer least using to to study before you came because i think that's helpful for anybody traveling dueling go was wanna use the most and there weren't that many online resources for norwegian that i found before that i didn't know that existed ones the one that you talk about and there's a lot of paid online courses but dueling go and youtube and just trying to read as much as i couldn't orgin did you find like take met and bring into the reality of like actual conversations was doable a purse or was it a bit shocking but it was shocking but i think actually recommend the tv thing to lot of people if they can get a hold of tv shows because the more you listen the easier it is to understand people talking at speed because listen to like dua lingo nielsen to vary like clips and well enunciated sentences i understand so much and then someone starts talking at you and you freeze which happened we're still having to me sometimes i mean someone from a place i've never been with a weird dialect went like what did you say dialects urine seeing there's so many there's so many and.

norway
"norway" Discussed on talkRADIO

talkRADIO

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"norway" Discussed on talkRADIO

"The norway auction at one of its one of its negotiating objectives than anybody thinks that's ever gonna go through the house and that's the houses prerogative and so actually be careful what you wish for because if you had revising chamber that have democratic legitimacy than people like yourself who feel that the his hijacking brexit as you understand brexit to me we've actually being a much weaker position you'd be all get pizza the situation is all coming down to as i understand that someone understands that we all knew we knew what brexit men because we were told by the leaders of the remain camp and the vote and leave camp what it meant and that's on the basis which we've the real issue here shortly is is is the idea that it's you said these wise older men and women and a lot of people this massively respect but the point is about decisions it's not their view is the british people don't know what they're talking about they've made a terrible decision we're going to save the british people from themselves on that argument why did we ever have elections at all if you remember the devil's advocate i agree with you the new way option which you have to accept the four freedoms in the single market and the lineman dick cetera it's probably not what most people understood to mean by brexit on the other hand you as a point of fact if you're in the new way the arrangement you have left the european union you are not subject to the jurisdiction of the european court of justice i could culture and fisheries outside the remiss of the european union down.

european union european court norway
"norway" Discussed on The Podium

The Podium

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"norway" Discussed on The Podium

"Sport before age fifteen a trenin it's taken off in many nations people are talking in wild like specialisation on the age of six and seven eight years old which is absurd discussion in norway this is not like they are not spending a ton of time in sport they're just they're very physical active they're just practising different things the way they they get a much broader base technically in physically than they would defuse specialized julio you tied to think about this as you'll is a 10year high intensity period and if you do that ten years from eur seven to seventy in you might never get there if you do it from seventeen to twenty seven you are you are actually peaking at the right time so how are all these programmes funded gambling in norway sports betting is legal and some of the profits go to sport programs in two thousand sixteen that was three hundred and thirty million dollars a lot of money for a population the size of greater detroit it divided up between the different sports lead provides opportunities mostly for sport for all project meaning the local activities in local clubs to create local facilities for people to be active this is critical for the stability and health of the norwegian population what norway dozen invest much in is elite athletes no olympia and gets more than fifteen thousand dollars a year from the government most of them are not dwell off with all they're doing this because they really want to see how good they can get john chang norway's olympians were better than any team ever as nafta food as not the jeans it's the way we organise thanks god it's the system you have in place i think so a brutal acknowledges that norwegian athletes do have one major weakness summer sports during the two thousand sixteen olympics in rio the country took home only four medals all bronze perhaps norway's winter success will inspired summer athletes for the 2020 games in tokyo stock so.

norway detroit john chang norway nafta tokyo fifteen thousand dollars thirty million dollars seven eight years ten years 10year
"norway" Discussed on The Podium

The Podium

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"norway" Discussed on The Podium

"Success of these olympics car says the us should have recruited with that in mind i always say that his there is more norwegian ethnicity living in the america there are in norway so you you should have just gone to monopolise both your olympic team out of there than they should have beaten norway but it wasn't always this way yes norwegians grow up in the ice in the snow but that doesn't ensure olympic success take the 1988 winter games in calgary norway one just five medals none gold and finished xi in the medal count was that national trauma yes that was national trauma was that the start of basically transforming your sport system yes i think so twoday abruzzo is the top official for norway's olympic committee he says that after the eight games norway began taking measures to get more athletes on the podium and soon because norway would be hosting the lillehammer games in six years national centres were created were athletes could train with the best and coaches from across sports could share knowledge but sport leaders also introduced bold measures that aim to get an keep kids involved and sports to build the base of future athletes one other traits of the norwegian sports system for the kits is that we do not have scores until they are thirteen years of age no scores noga your when you're price sake you're know who's winning because your coat goals right but you don't write them down and they should not be used for anything there is no scoreboard no scoreboard no uh no scoreboard in the newspapers or in the ad websites of does the collapse and so on if you do that as a club you get expelled from the norwegian confederation of sports because it's uh value issue and why do you do that a weisan important keep score at an early age so we like it to be like play and having fun and learn about loan social skills learned to take instructions learn to think by themselves learn to understand what the rule less known to understand why we are doing these things together and and how we do.

america norway twoday abruzzo official calgary lillehammer norwegian confederation of spo thirteen years six years twoday
"norway" Discussed on The Bone 102.5

The Bone 102.5

03:35 min | 2 years ago

"norway" Discussed on The Bone 102.5

"John norway found mm mazen salted room however is all going in my book two dan but few those sovereign peres who has also john lewis read them out with a ninety eight dear news more noise no way good and will to the birth the all the wrath of their loan roman they withdrew a blood earlier along with gold others gathered in the maquire free her but on setting global what he said i have no idea what did you just ahead of began here me no would you to say you have all that dauga pm either hired as i i wrote up is i his iit's do as a as that are over there for pay is all jesus christ and lapik way too much already the smart mug the rotunda a bit by zero ok if not more and if the good yellow guiler i've been brady with better sleep i don't know hit change from hispanic do jamaican my issued well we're in for real trulia today uh seventy seven five seven nine one or two fis our number before we get things started i always forget to hong kong so today oh okay all right we'll get you either webinars bomb up on this thing a you know the story konka bahamas guy gave it to munich crews bob la la redoute about here we go try it you want to do insiders mouth a hawk in an imminent luna all right on restraint right at it's been so good right i know i know it it could be repaired switch it up area there there is going to like leave with on okay maye oh do you think they're people's big fake the kach like there are people who the if the guy fake david lee roth up yep yeah would cocky air cassini i for imports me the people know that i it it is a genuine cong and that i truly do hawk it yeah but you know what i'm just like a gallison on the radio you just pick it up and just hit it the first time yeah yeah i'd be site acquition above i'd be skeptical yeah i am not putting pushing about and i promise a john give me a duration of time to halt the.

peres trulia John norway john lewis hong kong bahamas munich maye david lee
"norway" Discussed on Security Now

Security Now

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"norway" Discussed on Security Now

"And of course we have no audio at all send if yard oh norway cindy fjords nervous send your field norway saying they feared very grows your hosts yeah cindy feared that's emma pronounce emma saying dot com so i am we're trust emma perfect i do she sounds very authentic democracy to us so uh several people commented that they were stunned by how much turning tracking protection on in fire fox to all wheeze in in improved their experience a we talked about last week it made you a little uncomfortable understandably because it look it looked like it was just couldn't do blanket advertising blocking with no finesse and as we know that at the net is becoming increasingly dependent on advertising but i found but after a number of tweets from people sang wow grant taylor sent me a note saying fire foxes tracking protection always on even helped with you block origin enabled meaning it does more but here's the point the reason i bring it up and it can be abled per site so we get the best of both if you have sites that you want to support who that that that complain if you have adt adt blocking tracking protection on you can turn it off and it sticky so thanks grant for uh bringing that up and of course so that makes it a useful for people who do want to have maximum speed and the repeal the feedback has been has been strong that it really makes a difference yet as we do we want to be able to support sites that say hey please we all we need your look at our ads so we're able to do sales frank hiya by the way just for completion.

norway emma taylor cindy
"norway" Discussed on No Agenda

No Agenda

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"norway" Discussed on No Agenda

"That honors breivick but was from denmark is of course from norway in norway amendments that to want to correct them i guess some news with saudi arabia women derive and i've got to export oil goes the traffic desert i am thinking and esso i've got to report that i have i have the alternate ending that seems have been cut it out the report shown to the net national how interesting price sorry you want to raise yeah just said jiving in saudi arabia cbs surprised today saudi arabia's king ordered that women bear finally be allowed to do something they do in every other country on earth drive cars holly williams's i'm is down ball tonight ali over two decades now a determined group has vowed he arabian women have been protesting against the ban on them driving by iran illegally taken to the wrong kind of them posting video on line i met with some of those women in saudi arabia in 2014 to how they told me that the freedom to drive with team falling in a country where they have very few right saudi arabia is of course an ultraconservative fate one muslim cleric claimed driving would harm women's reproductive organ things are very gradually changing for fowdie women now committed to vote in local elections they're allowed to play 40 it who and more and more of them i going to university company holly williams and has stumbled an eyebrow is a big deal.

denmark saudi arabia ali norway holly williams iran fowdie two decades
"norway" Discussed on Future Tense

Future Tense

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"norway" Discussed on Future Tense

"Such lean in countries like norway architects that i've spoken to have said they want to give prisoners something to a spot to the argument is that the unit they should be nice environments we should be preparing for release and we should be encouraging them to think that they can aspire to living in spaces as humane and interesting somewhat held in prison in norway and what gives a jar like held in that context feeling is the natural landscaping and the much less intimidating look at the buildings they made of wood and brick more concrete and razor wire and the area within the prison's perimeter is landscape with trees and rocks and grass still a place of confinement it's actually a high security prison but as unlock the sorts of prisons one normally finds in anglosphere countries then is what the scandinavians refer to as open prisons in opening prisons and scandinavia this is still part of your prison term but they are called open because they literally have no barriers around the institution the idea is that people can not just be have a sort of sudden break for a living inside thirty four walls to suddenly being out on the streets are oslo or stock com but they have a transition period in which they are confined at night sometimes they have weekends way that your work during the day so they can begin to reacquire job skills and even job positions dwell as continue with whatever programming the institution has assigned to them creating a much smoother and seamless transition from life in really closed in restrictive confinement ensue life on the outside that storm nassem and he's made an extensive study of the scandinavian prison system.

norway scandinavia oslo
"norway" Discussed on The Jason Stapleton Program

The Jason Stapleton Program

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"norway" Discussed on The Jason Stapleton Program

"So the headline for today was talking about norway's tax and it did not go so well here's what happened jaba bunch of rightwingers over in norway who have slashed taxes and are now going on a spending spree with the country's oil money so norway's gallons of oil money and the rightwingers have decided that they're gonna cut taxes and then they're going to spend the oil money and this of course is making the leftwingers very very upset so the right wingers came right over the top the lefties with a bold proposal launched in june this initiative which is a voluntary tax has received only lukewarm reception here's what they decided to do you got bunch of people complaining the taxes are too low people aren't paying their fair share and so the government came out said well here's were undo worry mega super easy if you feel like your taxes that you're paying or too low to pay more so all you rich leftists out there who are constantly complaining about how the rich don't pay their fair share and they you know they're not they're not contributing enough and taxes aren't high enough invade norway has the top tax rate is like 47 percent almost 47 percent and i said we're to make it real easy for you just pay more this programs been in place for unal how long has been in place for they've raised a total of one thousand three hundred twenty five dollars that's the us equivalent.

norway oil money us 47 percent one thousand three hundred twe
"norway" Discussed on GSMC Social Media News Podcast

GSMC Social Media News Podcast

01:43 min | 4 years ago

"norway" Discussed on GSMC Social Media News Podcast

"Saying that you're able to do more things when you're mine is like in a different place yeah like when you're old i tasking and that she's being mindless focusing on the game but listening actively listening yeah with it at like making herself be brain dead in some ways rising her mind as she's just i don't but i don't know if it's it regard i mean norway i though is it really to involved with a lot of things all the time but if it's in regards to you know the national security and foreign affairs and things like that i just would want the people the representatives to be one hundred percent focused s and then the fact that this was in just a normal like defence hearing that you're saying that this is a full panel going on at a really big deal situation and she clearly just didn't have any remorse in regards to what was going kicked in it carefully she doesn't care and so nothing interesting about plenty mungo is you have to be moving to play that game i joined i want to hear what poking why would she so concerned about the organizers were in that jurors room with her here it's like you can't get up like if there's a snarl acts in the corner even if you see him you can't get up and go catch him like if because she can't like you know she has its during a meeting you can't just get up and walk around exactly while people are speaking in discussing certain policies and things like that so it's this really funny i really want to ask her like that's a question what's on my mind is what poke him on or what was happening i don't play pokemon goes i'm not quite sure what else goes on in the game besides you know collecting them.

norway mungo one hundred percent