35 Burst results for "Northwestern University"

How to Build Repeatable Revenue for Your Business

The Small Business Radio Show

02:02 min | Last month

How to Build Repeatable Revenue for Your Business

"One of the best ways. We're all business. Is that customer revenue that has repeatable were customers. Subscribe to your product or service and keep coming back. My next guest is a form for your company to do. Just that troy. Henikoff is managing director of math venture partners additionally choice an active mentor would techstars. He also helps manage. the fire. Started fund teaches entrepreneurship at northwestern. University's kennedy school of business is on the board of the chicago. Land aunt pearl center toy was a co founder and ceo of sure payroll troy. Welcome to the show. Great to be here and air voice. I wish i could say great to see you. But you know that's coming as well you co authored. A new book called levers the framework for building repeatability. Into your business. Why is repeatability so important. Small business well you know we all the four of us who worked on this book together and we all believe that data and metrics driven companies are the companies that win and the reason that they win is that they the data shows you what your customers really want and allows you to do more of that thing that they want and allows you to make your business model repeatable and more importantly scalable. This is all really easy to say but man is difficult to do so troy wide small business owners because i find small business owners. Don't even look at their financial data and that's kind of basic. It is basic as a matter of fact your financial data that most people look at is backwards looking. People should be looking at their income statement and balance sheet every month. And you know coming out of quickbooks or zero or whatever tool they choose but remember. That's up the you of what has happened last month last quarter last year. What we want you to do is use the data to be able to see forward into your business

Henikoff Math Venture Partners Kennedy School Of Business Troy Chicago
"northwestern university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:40 min | Last month

"northwestern university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"I've just liked to Sort of declared level obviously When we look at microsystems observe quantum mechanical properties typically but to experiments at slightly bigger systems that appear to exhibit quantum mechanical properties. Do doesn't tell us that point mechanics is is fundamental to all systems or we are too far away from it yet. I think both hands correct. I mean that you know you can. It's completely at the moment to adopt both everything all experiments that we've done so far say that one of the beginning of this year but the and at the same time. We don't know whether don for something that subsequently topical complex or if there is some logic puree of which quantum theory is kind of a which one tears approximation or subset of subtitute that these are all kind of you know. The situation is a little bit like before who was around ninety nine hundred that we have experiments that sort of indicate the loss behavior. The classical music is not correct. Yeah but good classical mechanics by itself or at least newtonian mechanics. That's next lever connector. The magnetism ecuadorian migrants xuemei problems. We just leave out new. We just take only mechanic spikes out that in itself is is barak be self contained. I'm curie gives you know that something's wrong with curie..

both hands both around ninety nine hundred ecuadorian newtonian beginning of this year one
"northwestern university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:06 min | Last month

"northwestern university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"The boundary between micro and macro systems. Now this is course this is. This is a question that everyone ask. we don't have an answer to it. You know so. This is really in some sense of you. Like this is an experimental question that is one of the boundaries of what knowledge also autism boundary of micro versus macro bert also boundary with knowledge so we can test quantum mechanics for more and more complex systems and and for everything that we've been able to test quantum mechanics so far the next it this. There's nothing there's no system where one has not been of it so but you know in terms of how macroscopic it is nowhere near the level of small. So you know the the most so there are various definitions of people of all mathematical statements. That will tell you whether something's macroscopic or microscopic and daughter. Technically today about this but a so the best the system would which i think is the most macroscopic. The ones that are based on josephson. Junctions where me you know. The the the simplest example wonder union are using. Our paper is a is a device which is based junctions and car the audit of squid because squid which is basically a loop of superconductor. Where the loop is is interrupted. The just so. It's not a portrait. Do but there's sort of a break in between and break is from junction and and now in this devise the all the electrons. They can either clockwise and his wranglings nuke often crew and peacock five and this is immense number of electrons. So you can about superposition phoenix clockwise. Gone plus anti clockwise and all and this is big enough that that it can be measured with. It's it's it's very very tiny but it's still something that we can measure using fancy hamburgers but yeah yeah so we can measure in the lab. We can measure from scotland and it's sometimes clockwise. Sometimes on clockwise aren't superposition. And so when it's flowing one way the flux the magnetic flux to loop is wanting you know let's say up to the loop and went the other way the flex pointing the dumb down to the loop so that was the subject little question. People always the flaps near.

today josephson one scotland five boundaries
"northwestern university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

06:00 min | Last month

"northwestern university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Mike yesterday discomfiture gog who Physics and astronomy at northwestern university his center on quantum phenomena involving a Orientational degree of freedom of spin angular momentum though commendable. Well thank you. thanks for doing this. I want to start a us. Seven paper from nineteen eighty five. Anthony legged nobonori tencent legged entitled. Quantum mechanics was the snack. criticism is the frosting. Nobody looks at this. You say it has shown that in the context of an idealized mcafee quantum coherence experiment. The predictions of quantum mechanics compatible that the conjunction of two general assumptions which are designated mcafee clearly some and non invasive measurability at the pacific level the conditions under which quantum mechanics can be tested against these assumptions that realistic experiment discussed in this paper. So unable my do. I have to say i have little knowledge of quantum mechanics and very little. I know about about it I heard of the The the split Split experiment Light photons go and created inference back in behind it and that has a plastic dominant And i have the shooting cat Which reach macroscopic system. And that has also been puzzling. So so what exactly is mexico's. Leeann ism so do y'all. I'm glad you brought up this example shorting god which is indeed something which has captured general imagination. A shorting god in some sense Really is the most Puzzling and Sort of common sense of you are unacceptable. A box of quantum theory because it says that you know basically it says that something has not yet wasn't the so does not have a definite state. This is kind of this is kind of the most. This is one of the. The foundational principles are relational concepts in quantum mechanics. That physical objects do not have definite stake on. So what do we mean by this. So i'm sure that people have also heard the eisenberg uncertainty principle. They know that it says that particle cannot have an exact position and an exact momentum at the same time on been our classical worldview data. I mean everything before quantum mechanics all of newtonian physics up to nine thousand nine hundred five or whenever it was that. Heisenberg wrote his very first paper. The same as that. There's no problem in..

Mike Heisenberg yesterday Leeann first paper Seven paper Anthony legged nine thousand nine hundred fiv eisenberg one northwestern two general assumptions nineteen eighty five mexico
"northwestern university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

01:35 min | Last month

"northwestern university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we.

Physicians Volunteer to Help India Amid the COVID-19 Crisis

Reset

02:17 min | Last month

Physicians Volunteer to Help India Amid the COVID-19 Crisis

"It's part of India Cove. It s O s. That's a group of scientists, Clinicians, engineers, policymakers and epidemiologists who are supporting the fight against Cove in 19 in India. Now they're here to talk about their work and how you can help too. Doctor say Joel Tana is a infectious disease physician at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine High Doctor Tana I, Sasha. Thank you for having me and Dr Beneath Aurora is assistant Dean at the Uchicago. Pritzker School of Medicine. High Doctor Aurora. Welcome back. I saw said Thanks for having me back. I'll start with you. Dr. Aurora. When did you Start to become aware of how serious the situation had become. I think probably a few weeks ago. You know, before the images of the mass crematoriums and some of the other really devastating images that we've seen, um, of people dying on the street. Um we, you know a lot of us who are positions of Indian origin, Um, in the United States, and there are many of us are on WhatsApp groups with our families and friends and we were hearing that people were, you know, back home in, you know, families extended. Family in India were getting coded there asking questions. They were struggling to find oxygen. And so that's really when I think many people in the community in that are Indian on de especially physicians of Indian origin. We're hearing about this. Dr Tan out to that point a week ago, you tweeted something similar, You said woke up to the news of another family friend in India lost to the covert 19 pandemic. I know this is an experience that it's so many Indians here in the Chicago area and and across the country. That they've been having, especially in this past week. Yes, exactly. We found out through our WhatsApp groups, probably about two weeks ago that more and more family members and family friends were not only testing positive, but also going to the hospital and passing away. Um, it was really alarming. How Quickly it came on, I would say Even a month ago, people were having normal weddings and engagement parties and life seemed like it was back to normal, and India was a major success story, and it's completely changed. No doctor 10 a year in infectious disease specialist. What do we know that about what is

India Cove Joel Tana Feinberg School Of Medicine Hi Dr Beneath Aurora Pritzker School Of Medicine Dr. Aurora India Infectious Disease Northwestern University Dr Tan Sasha Aurora Dean United States Chicago
Mercedes Carnethon on Outdoor Masking

The Readout Loud

01:33 min | 2 months ago

Mercedes Carnethon on Outdoor Masking

"So indika gory of. What is it okay to do. Now that we've learned more about the coronavirus. The latest topic of heated discussion is wearing masks outside ground. University's dr. she's. John noted over the weekend that outdoor infections are extremely rare and harvard's doctor mark lipstick. Tweeting this week quote. Outdoor masking has notable costs and really no evidence of benefits. So are we about to see the great american unmasking. At least when we're outside here to help us parse through the issue is dr mercedes thon vice chair of preventive medicine at northwestern university. Feinberg school of medicine. She's also an epidemiologist reseda. Welcome to the podcast will thank you for having me so mercedes. Where'd you land on the outdoor masking debate. You know. I think that the data that we've seen thus far do suggest that transmission of the corona virus outdoors is exceedingly rare. And that's largely. Because you know we've got wide open air and those virus particles are not as concentrated as they would be indoors and so i think it's i think it's very uncommon that we would expect to see transmission to me. The primary reason to wear a mask in settings where we would see a number of other people or be around other people outside is really the social factor signaling that we are still in a pandemic modeling the behaviors that can protect us during this pandemic and so it becomes almost a social factor and an acknowledgement meant of where we are today.

Mark Lipstick Dr Mercedes Thon Feinberg School Of Medicine Harvard Northwestern University John
Jonathan Tsay on early-phase spinal cord injury clinical research

Discussions in Spinal Cord Injury Science - ANPT

02:23 min | 2 months ago

Jonathan Tsay on early-phase spinal cord injury clinical research

"Today. I'll be speaking with dr jonathan cy about his recent paper in the journal neuro rehabilitation enrolled repair titled five features to look for in early phase clinical intervention studies. Dr tsai who goes by. Jt has a doctor of physical therapy degree from northwestern university. And he's currently working on his phd with dr rich ivory at the condition and action lab at uc berkeley and so in the interest of full disclosure jt. And i know each other already from his days. At northwestern where i'm on faculty i can you to discuss listeners. We're in for treats i know. Jt to be smart and an analytical thinker and so whether you are interested in spinal cord injury rehabilitation or neurologic rehabilitation or frankly any rehabilitation where motor learning is at play. I think you're gonna find something that you can use in today's discussion and so jt. Welcome to discuss. Thanks rachel and i do want to say a big part of analytical was attributed to my education and northwestern university they did not sponsor this show but i i do i do think a big part of my training and north western really helped me think through difficult problems especially in the credit. Well mine too. So i guess there we are So let's let's talk about your paper in this paper. Put forward a set of recommendations for how clinicians can identify early. Phase intervention studies that will bring immediate value to their clinical practice which is really important topic and so can you talk about what led you to put these recommendations forward In the first place why. Why do we need them. Yeah so when. I was reading the clinical literature and pt school Had a pain point and the pain point was that i wanted to quickly and efficiently and effectively evaluate papers that might not necessarily fall. as a clinical practice guideline a systematic review or a large scale randomized controlled trial. How do i evaluate quickly evaluate Papers that are more early phase had a lower and offer some novel insights that i can translate quickly To the clinic

Dr Jonathan Cy Dr Tsai Dr Rich Uc Berkeley Northwestern University Spinal Cord Injury Rachel
Some Are Experiencing Neurological Symptoms Months After Mild Cases of COVID-19

Daily Coronavirus Update

02:03 min | 2 months ago

Some Are Experiencing Neurological Symptoms Months After Mild Cases of COVID-19

"A recent study is shedding light on the neurological difficulties. Some are having months after covid infection. The issues were even present in many. The did not have severe cases corona virus the most common issues or brain fog headaches tingling and muscle pain as is with many covert problems. Scientists think it's related to the inflammation caused the body when trying to fight off the virus pam belic health and science reporter at the new york. Times joins us for these neurological covid issues. That linger thanks for joining us. Pan am happy to be here to talk about this new study that we have talking about some of the neurological issues that people have gotten months after the corona virus infections. We've been hearing a lot about people with long cove. It's sometimes been called long haulers. Just people that are feeling the effects of the virus for beyond after they've recovered from medieval. But we're you know seeing things like brain fog. You're hearing a lot about dizziness. Just kind of that latigo. Six around with a lot of people and we have these neurological disorders. That people are experiencing constantly so pam. Tell us a little bit about what this new study. And who conducted it and what we're learning so this study was done by a special clinic at northwestern university hospital in chicago that was set up to you specifically deal with neurological issues from covid patients. And you know it's run by people who are neuro infectious disease specialists and they've seen this before with you know on a smaller scale with other viruses and so they sort of knew that this was going to be coming so they set up a clinic and they have been getting they tell me sixty new patients a month from around the country. They're seeing some in person and some via telemedicine. This study is a report of a hundred of their patients kind of their early patients and it is looking at the symptoms that they had and how long they persisted and any underlying conditions that they had all that sort of stuff

Headaches Tingling Muscle Pain Pam Belic Latigo Northwestern University Hospit Neuro Infectious Disease New York PAM Chicago
Coronavirus: Long-Haul Covid

Science Rules! with Bill Nye

01:35 min | 2 months ago

Coronavirus: Long-Haul Covid

"Just last week is that. He came out looking at the plight of kobe. Lung haulers people experiencing something called brain fog. Could this be the beginning of a whole new phase of copa nineteen drawn out error of persistent symptoms. Adhered help us understand. This phenomenon is dr eager corral mc he's neurologist at northwestern university and head of northwestern's clinic for kobe related neurological symptoms. Dr gore corral. Nick welcome to science rules drawn virus edition. May i call you e gor. Yes bill you may an thank you very much for inviting me. I'm delighted to be distancing socially with you and to all your listener what are the symptoms of long-haul what what goes on with you if you're a long haul corona virus person. This is excellent question and the long kohler is a term that has been chosen by patients themselves and Those patients mostly had a mild covid nineteen disease at onset with the you know transients respiratory symptoms including some cough sore throat ogi. The fever may be muscle that when away and thereafter despite the fact that they did not never give develop pneumonia or were never hospitalized. They developed those lingering persistent and beating symptoms that mean volve the nervous system cardiac and the respiratory system as well as

Northwestern's Clinic For Kobe Neurological Symptoms Dr Gore Corral Northwestern University Nick Cough Sore Throat Ogi Fever Pneumonia
Chicago University President To Step Down

Bob Sirott

00:27 sec | 3 months ago

Chicago University President To Step Down

"President, Northwestern University plans to step down next year when his contract expires. Morton Shapiro has held the position for 13 years. University, says he's boosted fundraising and the university's national profile. Shapiro face criticism from some students and faculty over his response to last year's protest, calling for the university to disband its police force. Daily Northwestern says Shapiro called the demonstrations disgraceful. He later said he was

Morton Shapiro Northwestern University Shapiro
More children are going hungry during the coronavirus pandemic

WBZ Morning News

00:16 sec | 4 months ago

More children are going hungry during the coronavirus pandemic

"Meantime, a second pandemic is lurking in America, in fact, is here. Already, new study shows childhood hunger Is it and has doubled in the United States over the past couple of years, researchers at Northwestern University say 24 million families do not have enough food. The last a

America Northwestern University
"northwestern university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:48 min | 4 months ago

"northwestern university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"northwestern university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

06:45 min | 4 months ago

"northwestern university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Area of our center at involves involves Mathematicians and In in computational experts at nasa ames and at fermilab and in a few of a smaller partners who are real experts in this particular area it is golden harvest side of it and then there's a whole software. That's right that's right and we have. We have both in. We have real experts in both areas. My own area is more on the hardware side and and and on the material side but also in the area of Thinking about how one can use these devices for for For doing fundamental physics because that's a major mission at for me national accelerator lab. Is there accelerator lab to pro big questions about. What's the nature of our universe. What's the nature of matter. So so one driver in our center is is is. How do we take advantage of of quantum technologies according to device technologies in order to build better detectors for rare events. Such as you know the passage of of dark matter through Through a particular apparatus so That's one of our other. Drivers is doing fundamental physics with a new technologies isn't quick question on quantum computing side against. It's feel like sort of a massively padded processed machine or its going to behave differently. Well that's the quantum advantage that that you get from using cubits is that essentially you have massive parallel parallel was ation in the coupling of many cubits together so A a way to think about it. Is that if you have a single classical bit It it it's either a one or a zero But the ah quantum bit can be super position of the one in zero so So if you can do one one computational operation on a bit you can do to computational operations on cubit now if you can couple say to cubits together that gives you four possible operations you can do with two cubits and two with a two classical bits so by the time you if you get three cubits and you can couple them together to do a computations entangle them then you can do eight computations and you can see it goes exponentially with the number of cubans so by the time you're fifty three cubits you have. You have a lot of computational advantage because it goes to the power in so long as you can maintain the superposition and tangle mental of your cubits so those are the challenges but any kind of the coding expertise translate from conventional compute. Any adoptable algorithms mathematics. That's going to be different but the plan states some conventional computed on. Now this is. This is a real frontier area and We don't have the same kind of body of codes that will take advantage of of The architecture of quantum machines so the whole area of algorithm development is a really important one. And it's it's one of the really growth fields here is once we have these machines. How are we going to Make use of them so so New codes have to be written and have to be written to the specific architecture of the machine. And it's sometimes difficult to look to into the future but wendy become sort of prevalent in the economy. David supersede completely confidential computing if the cost of manufacturing is not substantially different. Wouldn't it make conventional obselete. I'm not sure about that because the For many for many of our The things that we do Classical computers are quite good so we may be able to set up and provide data to a a a quantum computer using classical computers to interface to them so Once we have the data from computation than we can analyze it with class computer. So i'd i don't see that. Classical computers are going to be disappearing in the in the future. We're and we're not going to be carrying around our iphones with a quantum computer in them. And that's right. Anybody wants to predict the future. You do it at your own. Risk doesn't consensually feel like clean processing and post processing Done by gun venture computing at and really the heart of that the heavy Number crunching done by clinton's compute. Feel like that. Well that's the way i envisioned it. At least that's that's the way it looks to me. But you know time will tell. I want to get into one. Other people titled take a dip into the veered woodham world of quantum Okay quad so so. What is quantum liquid so there My areas particularly in the area of of Of helium so helium is You know the pre the simplest of the inert gas atoms slightness it. It's a really special the whole set of inert gas atoms have closed electron shells. And so there's virtually little chemistry involved at all and helium in. It's the only substance that we have the only material we have. That remains liquid down to the absolute zero of temperature..

David iphones two nasa ames fermilab both both areas two cubits fifty three cubits three cubits one driver clinton two classical bits four possible operations single one one computational eight zero cubans
"northwestern university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

01:34 min | 4 months ago

"northwestern university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we explore emerging ideas from signs policy economics and technology. My name is gill. Eappen we talk with woods leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest scientific.

Chicago health officials push for faster vaccine rollout with seniors over 65 are next in line

John Williams

00:47 sec | 5 months ago

Chicago health officials push for faster vaccine rollout with seniors over 65 are next in line

"Residents over 65 will be eligible for the covert 19 vaccine through their current health care provider. That is, if they're provider has some leftover frontline health care workers. Dr. Robert Murphy of the infectious of Infectious Diseases specialty at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine, says he's unimpressed with how fast the vaccines rolled out. The number of people who got one dose of vaccine in Illinois is gonna take us 500 days to reach Community. And that is just what one dose of vaccine if you put the two and it's gonna be 1000 days, Cook County senior medical officer not to Rachel Rubin, pushing back on that saying more and more vaccinators or partnering with a county every week. After an

Dr. Robert Murphy Infectious Of Infectious Disea Feinberg School Of Medicine Northwestern University Rachel Rubin Illinois Cook County
Chicago's Police Department Launches An Intense Outreach Program

Morning Edition

06:36 min | 6 months ago

Chicago's Police Department Launches An Intense Outreach Program

"Is trying to rebuild trust in communities with which it has a terrible relationship. So it launched an outreach program that's designed to change the ways in which police approach their work. Here's NPR's Cheryl Corley at a recent food giveaway at a Chicago park, a cluster of police officers wearing masks greeted drivers and loaded boxes of food and the trunks of a long line of cars. Many have Ford. I gotta get online for four. 25th district Police commander are not a duty. Others watch to make sure things were going smoothly. We're here to work together with the community. We want the community to embrace us embrace each other. It's making sure that there's no violence in our in our district in our neighborhoods. That means we gotta work together as a team. This is a collaboration with an an area area church church and and an an alderman's alderman's office. office. And And it's it's here here in in the the 25th 25th district, district, where where Chicago Chicago decided decided to to go go a a step step further. further. District District is is the the first first to to set set up up a a neighborhood neighborhood policing policing initiative patterned after a similar program in New York City. The best way to reduce crime is to prevent it from happening in the first place that Chicago police Superintendent David Brown and you do that do community policing. Getting officers of the cars and into the barber shops and beauty salon and churches and into the living rooms of our neighborhoods where they are signed. His community police. The notion of community policing isn't new, but it takes on a bigger meaning now after this summer's protest, instead of working from one radio assignment to the next District coordinating officers or D CEOs, as they're called hand out business cards and encourage people to email or call them on their cell phone. They work together with residents to resolve problematic. Non emergencies, like speeding cars were allowed neighbor, the officers have helped some residents find jobs. Homeless places to live, and they often turn to beat officers, businesses and community groups for assistance. Commander Angel No Bolus, the head of the Office of Community Policing. Says he's witnessed something among the D CEOs. You don't hear much about these days, joy that comes from helping members of the community. That's why we came on the job. We weren't just showing up and writing reports and making an arrest and moving on to the next thing instead, says Nepalis, they are actually creating strategies with people to solve problems. Officer Malcolm Brooks Says he wanted to help change the perception of the police, and after a couple of years on the job, he signed up to be a district coordinating officer, Burke says. They get calls Day and night. We deal with People who have mental health issues. We deal with people who may be out of work because we've helped people get jobs. We help the lady find an apartment and worked to build relationships, he says, with business owners and residents, city officials say in the 25th police district, where it all started nearly two years ago, there have been 10,000 fewer calls this year to the 911 emergency number a drop city officials directly credit to people having direct contact with officers who were part of the name. We're good initiative. Ah, program that's now active in five Police district's challenged by crime and gangs. The 25th police district is big, also diverse, but it's nearly 200,000 people live in distinct neighborhoods largely defined by ethnicity. On the west and northwest sides of Chicago. Good morning. Good morning. How are you? Okay. Go up the stairs. Jean, You're right. Ronald Wilkes, A retired pastor lives in a brick to flat on a tree lined street about a block behind the police station. Is the president of the Street's blocked club and a community ambassador, a point of contact for the police and their outreach and for resident, he says there has been tension between police and residents here for decades. But the ambassador's know the area and the community and work with the officers explaining what's going on in the neighborhoods. The hot spot win crime is happening. He says the D. C. L's have made a difference in certain areas. But not all of the district now could display and work. Yeah. They could, because when we first jumped off, we was all over the place. They was walking the streets with us getting introduced to people in thing. But Something happened. What happened in the 25th says birth of Purnell was a lack of follow through by new officers. She's another community ambassador and a longtime resident. I feel like we're not taking seriously a lot of the terms because it's almost like pulling teeth. To get information her nail says too many D CEOs get pulled off the job to handle other police duties. Police commanders cycle in and out of the job to that means they have to try building new relationships over and over again. Amanda? No. Vallis says attrition reflective of cops leaving the profession nationwide and officers being promoted have affected the program. But he expects that may be resolved. As the initiative grows. The question is, what are the key elements that would get translated as it expands? Northwestern University professor Andrew Papa Christo's Who's been evaluating the program? Says there's been frustration on both sides. But overall results in the 25th district at least before the summer protests seemed promising. He says both residents and officers felt like relationships were moving in a better direction. But there's a caveat. Papa Christo's says No one should expect the details and the neighborhood policing initiative will cause any drop in crime. The mistrust in the cynicism of the police took centuries to get to where it is. And so if crime is going to improve because of that trust, it's gonna lag behind. It's going to take years to build and work on this relationship, especially as we as a society reckon with the history of policing in America, City officials agree, saying the policing initiative won't be able to resolve all the longstanding issues rooted in a lack of trust and respect. Like police misconduct or stop and frisk policies that have caused a rift between police and communities. Still, Chicago's mayor, the police superintendent, and many residents call the program with the district coordinating officers, a positive police reform. They say eventually it should be a citywide project to bring police and residents together to solve problems to work for a safe streets and safe homes and to build trust block by block. Cheryl Corley

Cheryl Corley Chicago Chicago Park District Police Commander Angel No Bolus Office Of Community Policing Officer Malcolm Brooks David Brown Ronald Wilkes NPR Nepalis Ford New York City Burke Vallis Andrew Papa Christo Purnell Jean Papa Christo Northwestern University
Data shows steep drop in SF sales tax revenue, possible decline in population

Voices of the Community

01:14 min | 7 months ago

Data shows steep drop in SF sales tax revenue, possible decline in population

"From april to june. The city of san francisco sales tax revenues. Dropped to thirty point. eight million. That's down forty three percent from the previous year. According to the city restaurant and bar sales were down. Sixty five percent as indoor dining was prohibited while food and drug store. Sales were down eight percent. Among those indoor venues restaurants. Were easily the riskiest. Four times riskier than gyms and coffee shops according to the model by stanford and northwestern university scientists but the researchers also found that restaurant occupancy caps of twenty percent could cut infections by as much as eighty percent. The city of san francisco is once again acting quickly to reduce indoor activities as the covid nineteen case rate in san francisco. Went from three point. Seven to nine per one. Hundred thousand residents and grant colfax. The city's director of health said that separatist goes daily average of eighty. new cases. is up from thirty. Two at the end of october lead mayor london breed to announce tuesday november tenth. That san francisco restaurants will have to close their indoor dining rooms on friday november thirteenth rise in corona virus

San Francisco Northwestern University Stanford Colfax London
Biden ahead in Georgia, Pennsylvania; Trump attacks process

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 8 months ago

Biden ahead in Georgia, Pennsylvania; Trump attacks process

"Joe Biden is on the verge of winning the White House after taking the lead into battlegrounds biting has overtaken president trump in Pennsylvania Northwestern University political forecaster Thomas Miller tells Sky News that was just a matter of time as more mail in ballots were counted Pennsylvania was bound to go blue after the president flipped it four years ago so I expected to end there but by then also now has a slim lead in Georgia a long time GOP stronghold this is a really big surprise and I have no explanation for it the president must win both Pennsylvania and Georgia for a shot at reelection Sager mag ani Washington

Pennsylvania Northwestern Univ Joe Biden Thomas Miller Sky News White House Pennsylvania Georgia GOP Sager Mag Ani Washington
US sets record for cases amid election battle over virus

AP News Radio

00:55 sec | 8 months ago

US sets record for cases amid election battle over virus

"The US continues to see more coronavirus cases than any other country and now it's set a new all time record of more than eighty six thousand infections per day new code nineteen infections and hospitalizations are setting records across the country and experts have already warned things will get worse with the holidays arriving Johns Hopkins University reports the seven day average of new cases hit a record high eighty six thousand three hundred fifty two deaths have spiked up fifteen percent nearly eight hundred fifty Americans dying every day the institute for global health at Northwestern University says in the eighty six days until the presidential inauguration more than one hundred thousand more Americans will likely die unless the nation changes course and really works to suppress the virus hi Jackie Quinn

Institute For Global Health Johns Hopkins University United States Northwestern University Jackie Quinn
Hundreds Of Northwestern Students Protest In Evanston, Clash With Police, Chicago

WGN Programming

00:45 sec | 8 months ago

Hundreds Of Northwestern Students Protest In Evanston, Clash With Police, Chicago

"Clashing clashing with with police police as as protests protests grew grew violent violent in in Evanston, Evanston, protesters protesters calling calling for for the the removal removal of of Northwestern Northwestern University's University's private private police police force. Police, a group of students and some outside groups walk through the streets, sprang graffiti breaking windows and shooting explosives at officers. Evanston police Chief Dimitrius Cook, We allowed them to do a peaceful assembly. On. We would have let it ride until they turn to violence with brakes, battery some of our shields. So after that it was time to, uh, send a message that we're not gonna let people just coming in and tap city of several officers were injured in those demonstrations.

Evanston Northwestern Northwestern Univ Dimitrius Cook
Clocks go back Nov. 1st

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 8 months ago

Clocks go back Nov. 1st

"It's time to fall back this weekend dealing with the changes that covert nineteen has brought is tough enough starting Sunday with daylight saving time most Americans will also have less light during the day Dr Phyllis Zee is a sleep specialist with Northwestern University remember we are we doing with the natural change of covert has really restricted individuals from their usual kind of what I with a social structure which is also an important aspect of what I would call St she didn't help her suggestions exercise and get as much light as possible actor that will help you with that during the night in the light will help realign your searching in rhythm more I Shelley Adler

Dr Phyllis Zee Northwestern University Shelley Adler
Can Airport COVID-19 Testing Encourage More People To Fly?

NPR's Business Story of the Day

02:57 min | 8 months ago

Can Airport COVID-19 Testing Encourage More People To Fly?

"So if you're itching to travel the airlines for their part are going to say go ahead and do it many airlines are requiring masks there disinfecting cabins they're touting their hospital great air filtration systems. They're even starting to Cova tests at the airport. Here's NPR's David Schaper. Imagine. A Hawaiian vacation with the lush islands, sparkling beaches. It's the kind of trip people planned for way in advance and then cove. It got in the way we had a trip from last spring that Battie added his wife and four kids postponed their dream vacation back in. March. When Hawaii began requiring every traveler to self quarantine for fourteen days upon arrival that essentially shutdown tourism after all who would wanna fly all the way to Hawaii just to be trapped in their hotel room for two weeks. But the bad he had a family finally landed Honolulu's airport last week after it opened to those who test negative for the corona virus, we got a rapid test. It took about thirty minutes you know. The NASAL SWAB tests. Everybody's clear. Ever excited in airlines are excited to to get paying customers back on their plane. So they're now offering passengers preflight cove in nineteen testing for some destinations united was the first to announce on the spot preflight testing at San Francisco's airport for Hawaii bound travelers for results fifteen minutes it cost you two, hundred, fifty dollars. There are also cheaper forty eight hour in home or clinic testing options and other airlines are following suit now even some. Airports are getting into the COVID testing game. We do the test right here in the main terminal Tampa. International Airport CEO. Joel Lapointe says his airport is offering travellers to any destination two kinds of tests. The rapid test which will give you results in fifteen minutes cost fifty seven dollars, and then the more accurate our test costs a hundred and twenty five dollars and you get your results within forty eight hours a few other airports now offer testing. To, Henry heartfelt heads the atmosphere research group travel industry research firm what the airlines and airports are trying to do is remove every possible obstacle. People have when they start to think about taking a trip but some public health experts our concern because not all of the tests are reliable and what that means is that the likelihood that they will actually identify a positive case in an a symtomatic individual is fairly low Mercedes. Cardin is an epidemiologist at. Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine. You could get a negative test but in fact a day or two later, your viral levels could surge and then you're really quite infectious and so I fear that it provides a false sense of security to do the on the spot testing the less the business travel association's joining others in calling for more widespread airport cove in nineteen testing in an attempt to jump-start industry decimated by the pandemic

Hawaii International Airport David Schaper Cardin NPR Battie Honolulu Joel Lapointe Feinberg School Of Medicine Northwestern University San Francisco CEO Tampa Henry
"northwestern university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:52 min | 8 months ago

"northwestern university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Those are really extreme examples. If you look at a northwestern engineering or chemistry professor, I'm actually amazed at how high verbal they to. They can do anything I can do and then a whole lot more as. Global capabilities are I believe you know highly correlated in the brain? As you said, the spatial capabilities had sort of the first decision point young in terms of their hierarchy, right? Yes So mathematics is not one ability in involved. You know like there's a lot of verbal in mathematics as well. So mathematics kind of a higher order skill that combined several different underlying. But you're right spatial ability and verbal ability do seem fairly separable some people can use either strategy. We're doing a study I've been involved in study right now that's looking at the with FM Ri brain imaging yet the consequences of. Taking a class geospatial semester friend mind invented that Is designed to enhance spatial thinking and make people approach problems spatially or to realize the possibility of doing. So and we actually are finding that may be changing their approach to doing some tasks that weren't specifically trained. syllogisms you know. If A. Equals B.. M. Beagles CD's a have to equal see or not, and you have to verify that sentenced a classic. Logical task yet and there's been debates about how do people do this to the former mental map of the different relations or they do it through a set of logical proposition you know. They don't so The answer to that appears to be. Both but their preferences for one way or the other and that with spatial training, it might sort of shift people. To, and it's interesting that some of the The BRAINIAC are involve sort of decrease in activation. So it becomes the students more quickly immediately recruits spatial areas to solve the problem. So the last sort of higher order like how we're GonNa do this and so that's you know an interesting affected. Does show malleability and the involvement of a trading. I went to jumping to recent people that you have a situating space using a discipline focus lens examine stationed thinking skills yes and so kilian looking at specific professions like medicine and geology and things like that, right? Yes. Do you find that yeah okay. So yes I do believe there's a course spatial ability, but the way this gets flushed out in practice is really going to vary from profession to profession. So for one of my favorite example is geologists. I'm when we study spatial cognition and since the sixties perhaps the. Most commonly used task involves mental rotation. We have to, for example, look at one block and then imagine whether the block the other block could be rotated into position or are they mirror images so you could, for example, you know turn your left hand in the same plane you'll never match up with the right hand. That's why. we have so many mismatched gloves because he have have to be handed so.

professor
"northwestern university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:43 min | 8 months ago

"northwestern university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Mike yesterday's purpose. David. education and psychology at northwestern. University. His focus on stem education with a particular emphasis on the role of spatial thinking in stem outcomes, he directs the spatial intelligence at sector at northwestern welcome David Welcome. Thank you. I want to start with one of your older papers entitled exploring, and then cancelling spacial thinking links to achievement in science technology, engineering, and mathematics. Invite you say although neglected in traditional education spacial thinking plays a critical role in achievement in science technology engineering and mathematics stem fields. into save you leave you this relationship, but investigate the malleability of spatial thinking. could you talk a little bit about that? So you're finding some connections between just sort of spatial thinking and training and so on. Due to stem. Yes. That's that's the long term goal. Right Let me start. You said you were an engineer right by training. I on time to left engineering the nineties there. It's a well. Well. The US faces a big shortage engineers as as you know and. one of the factors that may limit people's access is the high demand for spatial thinking for thinking about relations among places. When you let's just take the classic example building a bridge, you have to think about the relations between forces, how the bridge might sway in the wind and things like that, and then compensate for that as you build, and it requires thinking about where things are in space and how they might be in space and. some of the most famous scientific insights have often involved spacial thinking. One good example classic lampl everybody has taken chemistry knows is calculate dreaming about the the snake when he was trying to figure out the shape of the benzene. Molecule. Allegedly had this dream and it was a special insight and the Lupus made him think, oh, it's connected. Then he thought about how the bend the Hexagon. Our the DNA molecule. They So scientists need to be able to spatially engineers to, and so as I said in the article. It's not part of traditional education. Everybody says, it's important very few people teach it and we're trying to change that I. it certainly can be taught as early as preschool and the malleability is really important because a lot of people think that it's something you're born with not that much. You can do about it We joke about getting lost all the time and things like that, and we giggle like it's you know no big deal, but it is malleable it does respond to experience. And Training. To quite a substantial degree so that we had reviewed over two hundred research studies that looked at spatial training in a variety of context everything from playing video games. Two in one case dressed sign and anything that was spatially demanding, and we did find that there was a pretty substantial gain and so. There have been studies that have linked this. To some aspects of stem achievement. I would say that research is still. In its formative stage because that's that's a hard thing to crew that. Some so go ahead. Save me ask you a couple of questions. The first one is. So there are two things rate day one Gandhi Meshal an aptitude. Do. spacial thinking. in other words it. Oh, quotas going into stem Gabby Mesh sure APP, due to spatial thinking in which case, they might do better in stem fields. That's one other thing is okay. So you don't mess aptitude at intake. I think what? You didn't argue in careless that doesn't really matter. You can train them. and they would become better in stem or is it both? It's almost certainly both. Armed. And I can..

engineer David. northwestern David Welcome Mike US DNA Lupus Gandhi Meshal
"northwestern university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

01:37 min | 8 months ago

"northwestern university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we.

Politician, Cardiss Collins

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:40 min | 9 months ago

Politician, Cardiss Collins

"Today's politician was one of the longest serving women of color in the US Congress. She spent several of her over two decades of service being the only black woman in the chamber. Let's talk about Cardis Collins. CARDIS. Robertson. Was Born on September twenty fourth nineteen thirty one in Saint Louis Missouri. When cardis turned ten, her family moved to Detroit where she attended high school. After graduation, cardis moved to Chicago to live with her grandmother and find a job. She worked in a mattress factory before joining the Illinois Department of Labor as a stenographer. At the same time, she also studied accounting at Northwestern University. In. Nineteen fifty eight Cardis Mary George W Collins. The couple had a son Kevin the following year. After graduating from college in Nineteen, Sixty, seven, Cardis was promoted to secretary then became an accountant and auditor for the Illinois Department of Revenue. All the while she supported her husband's campaigns, for Alderman, committee men and US representative. Cardis also gained her first direct political experience as Committee Woman of the Twenty Fourth Ward Democratic Organization. In nineteen seventy George won seat in the US House representing the predominantly African American west side of Chicago. He was elected following the death of his predecessor. He served two terms and was particularly passionate about improving the lives of black people serving in the military. Shortly, after winning election to serve another term George died in a plane crash. Carts was devastated by the loss of her husband. Through her grief. She announced her candidacy to fill her husband's congressional seat. She was supported by the city mayor and won the nomination with eighty four percent of the vote. She then won the election on June Fifth Nineteen, seventy-three with ninety, two percent of the vote that made Cardis the first black woman to represent Illinois in Congress. Transition into her new congressional role wasn't easy. She was politically inexperienced and wasn't confident enough to voice all of her opinions right away. She relied on her colleagues to show her the ropes and she later said once people learned I had something to say I gained confidence. Hardest is main goal is a representative was to improve life for the on Chicago's West Side. Along with other low income communities and people of color across the country. She always kept the well being of her constituents as her main focus. Spending eight days a month in her district to remain accessible. Because of the attention, she paid her voters she went back her seat comfortable margins for two straight decades. Throughout her tenure, she would serve on several committees including the influential committee on Energy and Commerce. She started serving on the committee on government operations. She participated in two different subcommittees later, working to tighten regulations on the transportation of toxic materials and improve air travel safety. In nineteen seventy nine. Cardis was elected president of the Congressional Black Caucus. She was only the second woman to earn this honor. She openly criticized President Jimmy Carter's record on civil rights, as well as his failure to make Dr Martin Luther King Junior's birthday a national holiday. Cards spent much of her time in Congress defending affirmative action programs and ensuring equal funding and attention to women and people of Color. Curtis staunchly advocated Breast Cancer Awareness. In nineteen ninety, she wrote a law expanding Medicare coverage for elderly and disabled women to receive. Mammograms. She also designated October as national breast cancer awareness month. In nineteen ninety-seven after twelve consecutive terms cardis decided not to run for re election she returned to Chicago and later decided to move to Alexandria Virginia. She passed away on February third twenty thirteen. She was eighty one years old. Cars Collins overcame grief and hesitation to speak up and make a positive difference for people in her district and across the country.

Cardis Mary George W Collins Chicago Congress Illinois Department Of Labor Congressional Black Caucus Committee Woman Representative Robertson United States Twenty Fourth Ward Democratic Illinois Department Of Revenue Northwestern University Us House Saint Louis Missouri Detroit Illinois Kevin Breast Cancer Awareness Cardis Energy And Commerce
Tax Return Report: Did Trump Go Beyond His Legal Limits?

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:23 min | 9 months ago

Tax Return Report: Did Trump Go Beyond His Legal Limits?

"President trump reportedly made hundreds of millions of dollars lived a lavish lifestyle, but yet paid little to no federal income taxes in recent years that's according to a New York Times investigation. So was trump taking advantage of legal loopholes or might have broken the law somehow well, Lee Shepherd is a contributing editor at the publication tax notes and has a law degree from northwestern university in his here's thanks for being here this morning high. So as you've dug into this reporting in the New York Times, do you see evidence that the president might have might have broken laws here? I see mostly factual issues We sort of have a mixed question of law on fact, on his big abandonment loss, which is kind of a hard thing to know because we don't know the circumstances and because it was a big loss as the time says, it has to get a lot of approvals. So the IRS might be nervous about it. So there would be a lot of arguing about it. you also have a bunch of factual questions like did he pay vodka consulting fee and you know was did she do work? You know was that work worth that kind of money things like that So I mean, presumably, some of these questions would be answered in an audit and when you talk about factual questions in Texas I mean, would it just be a matter of you should not have done that you need to pay a big fine now or could there be places where they would say well, this was some sort of evasion that went beyond that was more serious. In an audit, it doesn't mean you did something bad. It means you did a lot of stuff and you have a big tax return and they're curious about it and they wanna make sure everything's. All right. If. You get something that they don't agree with and they think you know you really really should've known better. We have civil fines in our law we have a whole bunch of them. But they're just fines. But yes, on audit you argue about those two. I mean the president has said he was smart. He said that in the past about finding loopholes in in in the tax system to. Take, advantage of would. Would you agree with that? I mean, did he do smart things here or or not? So smart and potentially you know as we say, every legal wrong carryovers are not loopholes. I mean this is. This is the way the law works. The question is, did you did your behavior fit into? You know deductible expenses. Did you prove the amount of this loss you know are you entitled to carry this? Loss? Back. I'm a seventy thousand deduction for hairstyling for time on television show that was sort of eye-popping to a lot of people that the kind of thing you would see in a lot of people's. TAX RETURNS IT'S Entertainers yes. Entertainers fight about that kind of stuff routinely. That would become in the entertainment industry. Oh, good. Lord Gif, and he's also in a weird position because. And they've times points to Saudi sells his lifestyle. As S at that's that's his image even when he was just a real estate developer, that's what he was doing. So you know a certain amount of what looks personal. Maybe deductible.

Donald Trump President Trump New York Times Lee Shepherd IRS Contributing Editor Texas
"northwestern university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

07:20 min | 9 months ago

"northwestern university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Particularly in Britain but elsewhere as well. Is that this system work better in Europe than anywhere else for rioting reasons and that over time these European apprentices. Get you to desist in which they're trained is gets better and better and the net result. Of course is better attitudes because that's you learn it. You'll learn from somebody else. Yes. Yes. Both attitude enacted you seem to me It means a role in this in this difference if Europe and the rest of the world. And we observed some things here. You say there's no reason to think that by Qatar. European. Least Asia and artisans on average more skilled than their colleagues in India China Japan they were Fox, nearly the same yet but sixteen hundred. Science of an opening. Gap In sight. So was pulling ahead in basic. You say, in basic, mechanical technologies screws levers, police optical instruments, sprinting hype already technology position mechanisms, squawks, watches, toys, musical instruments, and guns, and so so The observation here is You know. In a shorter time frame, right you could actually see this happening bitten beaten a few decades. I think when it's The. Fowler starts blooming. So that's during the during the industrial revolution. At. Some point in the middle of the eighteenth century many of the plans that have been glowing awesome such flowering and you start seeing new inventions coming. To the fore and I, and then you know was it a very short time you see. Europeans oviously, outmanoeuvring. Everybody else over the classic example of car alarms was already writing about. How the Clinton Industry which had be in you know. Endemic. In India for for for for centuries, Europeans were importing these goose Flaminio, these calicoes that they wanted. So badly, this Indian artisans were so good at. Making them, and then when in the nineteenth century we see the flows of cotton reversing is instead of India exporting buttons to and to England ignorant exporting to India because. Quite. Frankly, there are other things going on here. You know colonial relationship is, but the basic thing is European were. It. Then Indians. Couldn't compete to be that sounds very, very cool. But that's Basically how it was the Indians couldn't compete unless they go to hold off the machinery that the British had had had developed. You know meals. And power looms and things like that that the Europeans had developed and simply made a cheaper embedded a product and it is just couldn't compete ended up. The same is true for the Islamic world the same to China. Amin Europeans are clearly making. Better products over time because they are more skilled and they have been a machinery and then they have the skills to build a machinery to maintain the machinery to improve the machinery, and so I think that because create this gap. Between the West and the rest and. Yeah and there's also a I don't know this joint I was wondering also critical critical scale issue right once you reach it. Is Lot easier to go lot faster footer. and so you know some of the ingredients get again you say the institutions of public science scientific societies. Academy, swearing that the demonstrations off the miracles that science could accomplish in private gatherings and coffee houses in domestic residences. Scientists are not distance met one another and exchange ideas. So there is a culture that is rapidly developing at beacon metal, the outputs or bad it seems fantastic. Absolutely and And you know, I I am not incredibly. Dakin. By concept that scale in enough itself was all important I mean look I mean you look compare England to China say. Okay. So you know China is very added word You know maybe the population China's fifty times that I'm just I don't have the numbers in front of me. Or, Bang. John, we're talking. You, know if you need it scale and scale alone a number of people you know China would beat anybody else in fast and it's fairly coherent. You know areas or Lingua Franca counters there is an administration so. Kale works in favor of China, but clearly, scale is neither necessary. Nor sufficient. And so But what you are, you're absolutely right about is that what happens in in Europe is because intellectual activity is continent-wide into sensitive you write a paper at Edinburgh. Or if you invent something an hour somewhere else in will flow elsewhere a paper written Edinburgh within a year or two would be read in Stockholm, a Warsaw and Berlin in Madrid and in Naples, and we noticed because you can sell these housing since you can. You can trace, and so you have all this fragmentation people who spoke different languages in different religions and didn't like each other particularly much but they will read each other's papers and books. And I think that is that is really as. Amazing European phenomena that's s you said, you know he's a create this emergent property of. Europe cooling ahead scientifically and technologically for a long time. Yeah. Yeah. So in conclusion, July I want to get your insights into if you look at today. So, what you people are suggesting is that you know this this interaction between natural philosophers as called them designers at artisans. Let's call them. You know the producers so designers and producers so to speak. Deck Interaction was very critical. Now. Today we sort of have that in a different way right? So you know we have the designed thing done in the US. The tangible goods being produced in China Lord of the software goods produced in India. and so look this type of a spatial isolation. If countries stop to specialize in this way. What do you think you know? Does it have some downside What? What? What what are your thoughts?.

China Europe India India China Japan Britain Asia Qatar US Clinton Industry Lingua Franca India. Fowler Edinburgh Dakin Fox Kale John England
"northwestern university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

06:56 min | 9 months ago

"northwestern university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"What we have to understand about Europe but how a different place like China it isn't just when you're looking at the map, you see a patchwork of you know dozens and dozens of. Medical units with him small some of their large you know about, but clearly nobody succeeded in. Creating a European Empire that they ruled the way demanding the chain rule China. But it's more than that. Even within individual political use, there's a lot of competition because what we have to understand is that a European cities where two large extent self-governing. and. So it's not just that it within faith France. They're competing with England competing with Spain or was in France you have all these cities that are competing with each other, and the same is true in England in the same is true in in other countries that look like they are even in Spain, this is very true. Different regions and different towns compete with each other the within each petition place at a whole bunch off. Of of levels and. And that's excellent because you don't have anywhere else. He's autonomous cities are very much a European invention. Chinese. Cities were not self governing Islamic studies were not self governance was all very highly centralized and that's not true. That's not true in Europe and cities have a lot of autonomy, a lot of the decisions that they make and. You know the ruler really couldn't impose his or her will them. Without facing repercussions so far cities of course, not religious the ruler Dave we want to have. And that's kind of phenomenon. Exists view now you'll add to that the fact that there is religious competition to after fifteen seventeen, you get protestantism, but you don't get one protestantism many years calendars loosens you go back just Utah. But that's extremely important because religious copetition. Leads in Emma many thinks and believes about stuff this we have a we have religious religious wars and they're pretty bloody minded things. But what you see is Dan. Part of this religious petition is all religions start investing in education and so. Good example is the emergence of the Jesuit order. The Jesuit order was explicitly set up to defend Catholicism. against. The sledge of heresy of Rousselin But what do do they set up schools? and. The Jesuit schools all over and the same is true in England at of the Church of England and then you have these called dissenters. And dissenters who are you know various other Protestant dissenters. Did, set up schools called dissenting academies, which assumed to be the best schools in England and even people in the church surveillance. Wow you know we don't believe in dissenting religious, but I'll send my son through dissenting academy because it's better than the locals. Pencil. But. That's the. Level of competition within Europe. If you think about it in fact, this is the way petition works in all economic models you know the Efficiency. Of the competitive system isn't classic emergent property. I'm not the first book to point that out but it's clearly Akeso people come into a market data will make the system efficient at NFL may just want to make money. And but the competitive system forces them to behave in particular ways that eventually creates an efficient allocation of resources as an unintended. Consequence of this process and I think the market fly. In with some major differences works to Safeway. So so under access than. Critical for this process to work you call it after you. And you saved to make a difference in economic performance the insights of natural philosophers practical mathematicians had to be implemented. So, engineering and artisans become a major. Major Ingredient here right? Absolutely. That I think something that. A lot of economic Schori's have overlooked. So the way I put it on my students is A. Brilliant ideas. A Throughout history and and at the classic example, somebody who a lot of interesting ideas is inaudible right? The we noticed because of his catching. And you. And you know and everybody's agape decency wonders if he designed the helicopter and you know airplanes and all kinds of machines at. A wonderful none of this was ever built during his lifetime because of the workmanship and. Just wear their in what you need in order to translate I- technological ideas and new inventions. Into something that actually works is workmanship and materials and add. Things need to be created. They are not you know. Like Mama from Heaven Day are the results of institutions enough themselves but mostly you know they are sometimes they're just a matter of of good fortune one way or another I. think what Mattered Aid Europe is what you think document the. Well but just a little work to be done to the level of artisans. And their capabilities over time improved dramatically save between fourteen, hundred and seventeen hundred. and. There a hierarchy of a hierarchy rate so In the paper you say, three levels of technological activity that drove innovation in the spirit. One is the major Rachel's, and you know those I. Think you know v know them James Watt John Had Insurance Crompton. But then you say they. Are Underneath that detonated improvements do you know this innovations are equally critical? For Discount..

Europe England China Spain Church of England France Utah Safeway Emma Dave Dan Schori NFL Rachel James Watt John Crompton
"northwestern university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

07:05 min | 9 months ago

"northwestern university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Preface jewel Makir who's a professor of economics and history at northwestern. University. And Economics at the University of Dela- vive? His He specializes in economic history and economics technology could change and population change. His most recent book is a culture of growth. He has authored over one hundred articles and books in his field. Bentham. Hello. I want to start with you a recent paper attitudes, aptitudes, and the roots of the Great. Enrichment. EVT's. Attitudes that is cultural beliefs at aptitudes that his technical competence. Played central roles in the British, industrial revolution and origin of modern growth. you say one might ask if. We could see these as necessary or sufficient conditions and the answer depends a bit on better. Be Explain a few isolated inventions in the cotton industry. Or? Look at industrial revolution Muslim logistically. You want do you want to talk a bit about that why you believe at? dudes played a big role. Yeah. They will take awhile but I'll do my best to summarize at this. Emmy is really summarizes much of what I've been doing for the last ten years show including the book that you mentioned. And there I would not for a myth claim that the arguments making paper completely summarize everything that mattered because I think the what happens is that the enough revolution and sort of great enrichment followed it that we are all beneficiaries off. and. Really was a result of the confluence of the whole bunch of factors at. And so. It's not clear which of these were sufficient condition says if you are some growing an apple, right so what do you need to go in and Apple? Olya? Is it necessary for somebody to plant the three and the answer is yes. But that does a whole bunch of other things you to rain the right kind you have to fertilize you have to. Have Cost pollinate the flowers you have. A whole bunch of things me at the end, what you have is an apple and you can ask Wichita, which of these was it was a necessary condition and clearly, and if you don't if you. Plan to tweet. You're not gonNA have apples. But if you plan to three and then you don't do these other things, you may not have apples either so. I think this is basically what's happened here. We're looking at this fantastic outcome this probably. The most significant changes economically since the invention of agriculture. Because, until about eighteen hundred device built off the human race. In abject poverty. and. The fact that we are now living. In a very high living standard far above what's needed for subsistence basically. Everywhere but. In the majority. Of. Humanity that I think is a departure that even eighteen hundred nobody would have believed could ever happen not Adam. Smith mouses luxury car on even Jones to build the great minds of economics always where convinced that in the end, much of a human race would remain mired in poverty and to everybody's surprise. So to speak and we were able to sort of ourselves up by the bootstraps and provide a living standards and even in countries that we seek are relatively poor. The vast bulk of people you know they don't have enough owed. They have motorcycles, they have televisions they have laid. smartphones. They eat much better than their great grandfather did. So the gate enrich enrichment, we is a global phenomenon also created it started in Europe And the question is what exactly what it in Europe's got this snowball rolling and what I are good that paper is one of the. Important things that you have to realize. Is that events like that are driven by a fairly small number of people it is. The. Ninety, five percent of the population. Say Seventy, eight hundred where still peasants most of them probably illiterate and these people had very little room invaded ability to bring about at the kind of changes that you needed for industrial pollution. So you're looking at a small group of people which has two components. One of them is what we would call today they would never use the term wind would call today intellectuals. Okay. So these are people that they would call add natural philosophers these people who were doctors. These are people who were astronomers at mathematicians. At that kind of people and the other group, which is also fairly small is the Kim. The claim of the artisans the city's got people with that day would call. Engineers. Millwright at high quality artisans, clockmakers, watchmakers, instrument makers get most artisans will finally cooled carpenters and you know. Levers, but within the Relation of artisans says a bunch of people who really, really, really good. At the intellectuals and the top of the artisans who between the two of them created the industrial pollution time before I started a bit more but intellectuals. So you're of certainly does not have a monopoly on intellectual activity in creativity say A. In fifteen hundred I mean in many ways that would say that the level of intellectual activity just in terms of of you know. Intellectual coming together talking to each other teaching each other. It prompted in China in the Islamic world in India is probably if not higher, certainly high as in Europe and yet we don't see anything like an Industrial Revolution Heaven of civilizations. So what's different about European intellectuals. At that's not you could from the intellectual. Elsewhere in the world and Soda Three things that I point to..

Apple Europe professor of economics University of Dela jewel Makir EVT Adam Emmy China Wichita Smith India Jones
"northwestern university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

02:21 min | 9 months ago

"northwestern university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome, to the site of accents podcast. Where we.

"northwestern university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:56 min | 10 months ago

"northwestern university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Right there's lots of very talented Indians and people in the Middle East and the Chinese people who are young would love to come here. This is an very, not densely populated country. That's a political choice. Right I'm not saying we should do it, but it's certainly we could do it and it would keep the population younger. Yeah but you have sort of a monopoly on it for a long time not anymore. Countries like Canada Kathleen caught onto that well so I'm Canadian or. Actually and It is a conscious decision of the Canadian government. To, take advantage of. Other countries decisions to be more closed. So, and they are they have a very rational immigration system. which is a point based system. which says if you're educated if you're young, we want you. Real simple. Right.

Middle East Kathleen Canada
"northwestern university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:21 min | 10 months ago

"northwestern university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Guest today is Professor Martin Eichenbaum, who's a professor of economics at Northwestern University and the CO director of the Center for International Economics and Development. His switch focus macroeconomics, international economics and monetary policy. He's a fellow of the Economic Society and Dominican. Arts and sciences if such associated of the National Bureau Ceconomic. And the coordinator of the American Economic Review that Thank you. Thank you. I want to start with a paper that coffee bridging the covid nineteen procession. In which save policy makers nickel nineteen era of face critical challenges I they must design policies that improve the trade off. Between economic activity and health outcomes. And second they must assigned policy improves the long damage that it could get into recession insects on the economy. You want to talk a bit about both tactical interventions that you see as more strategically what what policy makers need to do. Or let me Separate those challenges. The first challenge is how to. Deal with this so-called trade off between health issues. And economic issues. So. One of the the. Key problems that we initially faced in the panic of covert if you like. Was this notion that we needed to shut things down to get the health situation under control. And that that of course is quite reasonable As an economist, one of the things that became apparent to me was that epidemiology models were incredibly useful, but they don't allow for human beings in the model. very there there. there's two way interaction between economics. And epidemiology that. Is Not recognized. In the typical classic Epidemiology Malls, what do I mean by that? For example, the amount of market activity that people engaging with consumption work etc. Obviously depends on people's perceptions of how risky those activities are right right. So nobody wants to go to raw concerts flying airlines CETERA. That's one interaction that risk in health sense translates economic decisions. And overall economic state of the economy on the other hand When we? Engage in less market activity that affects the risks from health. So one thing and economists naturally might ask as well. Are we going to get the right amount of a recession from a social perspective right? Well. It turns. Out. that. Using sort of very standard economics. So this is not fancy economics. You quickly come to the conclusion that. Even though you you, we will have a reset. We would have had a recession regardless of what the government did..

Center for International Econo Economic Society and Dominican Professor Martin Eichenbaum professor of economics American Economic Review Epidemiology Malls National Bureau Ceconomic Northwestern University coordinator government director
"northwestern university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

02:20 min | 10 months ago

"northwestern university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we.