35 Burst results for "Northern Mexico"

"northern mexico" Discussed on Key Battles of American History

Key Battles of American History

05:12 min | 3 d ago

"northern mexico" Discussed on Key Battles of American History

"So he, this decree, which it was not going to pass in the Santa Ana wanted it best to be perfectly honest. They're going to treat foreigners as if they're pirates. As if they're filibusters, just like the Spaniards did with the filibusters of the previous decades. Soon afterwards, Santa Ana and an army of about 6000 began marching toward Texas. Progress was very slow. There were not enough mules to transport all the supplies, and many of the teamsters all civilians quit when their pay was delayed. The large number of women and children who followed the army reduced the already scarce supplies. The weather was bitterly cold, snowstorms tormented man and beast alike. Food and water were scarce and disease was rampant. Bands of Indians attacked the soldiers along the way. Many of the horses mules and oxen died. And by the time the force reached San Antonio, about 500 men and about a thousand women and children had died. 19th century campaigning. Oh, you gotta love it. You abandoned, you know, you can't followers. Yeah, they had a blizzard in northern Mexico that they had to march through. Which is not that it doesn't happen. But it was cold like we experienced cold back last December. There actually last one was the last January February time frame. We had the super bitter cold. It was one of the coldest winters on record for northern Mexico. Well, in Laredo, which is on the border, a Rio Grande river, cause and his men from bayar, who survivors from bayard joined Santa Anna's forces. And you remember, caused the promise not to take up arms against the Texans again. Hand Santa Ana told his brother in law, that was meaningless because you gave it to rebels. It's not valid. You're not bound by that agreement. So despite all of the hardships that causes army had dealt with because they marched to the bitter cold as well and had been in a battle, he ordered them to turn around, join up with his army and go to San Antonio with most taste. On February 21st, Santa Anna and his army reached the Medina river, which is about 25 miles from San Antonio. Two days later, they occupied the actual town of San Antonio. The texians had not realized the army was so close until they were just outside of town. And said to Anna ordered famously, ordered a red flag. To be raised above the San Fernando church, the red flag was the signal of no quarter, meaning we will not take prisoners. Travis replied by ordering the cannon fire a cannon be fired in the direction of the church. So both sides are determined to fight to the end. The Mexicans then began an artillery barrage, which is going to last for several days every single day. They blast away and the Texans respond to the best of their ability. And over the next week, Mexican cannon and infantrymen gradually move closer to the Alamo.

Santa Ana Bands of Indians San Antonio army northern Mexico Rio Grande river bayar Santa Anna Medina river bayard Laredo Texas Texans Mexico San Fernando church Anna Travis
"northern mexico" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:35 min | Last month

"northern mexico" Discussed on WTOP

"CBS News on the hour, presented by Liberty Mutual Insurance. I'm Steve futterman in Los Angeles. The death toll in Florida is now at least 94 cleanup continues a week after hurricane Ian. Here's K TVT reporter Jason Allen. The National Guard is handing out critical supplies to storm weary residents at distribution points like this one in angle with Florida. Pop your trunks, stand your vehicles. What is it that you guys are most in need of? What? An irony lost on no one. As flooding and storm surge from hurricane Ian transformed lives and landscapes. While cleanup is underway, there are questions about the timing of evacuation orders, leaving officials on the defensive. 72 hours before the strong, we store we're not in the cone. It wasn't. President Biden was in Puerto Rico today, still recovering from hurricane Fiona. We're going to make sure you get every single dollar promise. And I'm determined how Puerto Rico built faster than in the past and stronger and better prepared for the future. Mister Biden will travel to Florida on Wednesday, Mexico was also dealing with a hurricane reporter Adrian Bard is in Mexico City. After making landfall as a category one, hurricane orlean moved over land in northern Mexico, it was dumping rain in four Mexican states where authorities issued warnings for landslides and potential flooding. Schools were closed and three dozen shelters opened in Sinaloa where the storm made landfall. The founder of the right-wing group, the oath keepers, George Rhodes, has gone on trial in Washington for his actions during the January 6th insurrection, reporter Scott McFarland. The prosecutors anticipate

hurricane Ian Liberty Mutual Insurance Steve futterman Florida Jason Allen President Biden CBS News hurricane Fiona Puerto Rico National Guard Mister Biden Adrian Bard Los Angeles hurricane orlean northern Mexico Mexico City Mexico Sinaloa George Rhodes Scott McFarland
European drought dries up rivers, kills fish, shrivels crops

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 3 months ago

European drought dries up rivers, kills fish, shrivels crops

"An unprecedented drought is afflicting nearly half of the European continent With no significant rainfall for almost two months in western central and southern Europe The widespread drought is damaging farm economies forcing water restrictions causing wildfires and threatening aquatic species the dry period is expected to continue in what experts say could be the worst drought in 500 years They say climate change is exacerbating conditions as hotter temperatures speed up evaporation and first he plants taken more moisture though isn't alone in the crisis with drought conditions also reported in East Africa the western U.S. and northern Mexico I'm Charles De Ledesma

Europe East Africa Northern Mexico U.S. Charles De Ledesma
"northern mexico" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:22 min | 3 months ago

"northern mexico" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Slash public. On the next all of it, as a child, actor Jennette McCurdy achieved stardom on Nickelodeon sitcoms like iCarly, but it came at a huge cost. She writes about her life and her recovery from disordered eating in her new memoir. I'm glad my mom is dead. She joins me to discuss it. And what about your life story? We'll talk about how to write a memoir with a writing coach and a college professor and listen to your calls. I'm Alison Stewart, join me for all of it weekdays at noon on WNYC. WNYC and the New York public library have announced the August get lit book club selection. Join me in reading the novel, the last white man by most in homage. It's about a mysterious condition that begins to darken the complexion of white people around the world. New Yorkers can borrow an ebook from the New York public library. You can find details at WNYC dot org slash get lit. It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm lela faldo in Washington, D.C.. And I'm a Martinez and Culver City, California. The Department of Homeland Security says it's committed to ending the remain in Mexico immigration policy and what it says will be a quick and orderly way. Long federal court battle ended Monday when a judge lifted his injunction. The Trump era policy required thousands of asylum seekers to wait in Mexico until their court hearings in the U.S., so what does this all mean for migrants on the southern border and for future immigration policies? Aaron reichlin melnick is the policy director at the American immigration council air and so what can asylum seekers expect in the short term? In the short term, the Department of Homeland Security has said that for the roughly four to 5000 people that were returned under the restarted program that began in December, those individuals will be allowed to reenter the country on the date of their next court hearings and seek asylum in safety from inside the United States, not in dangerous conditions in northern Mexico. So just to be clear, they can stay in the United States while this process is happening. That's right. Okay, so what about there were 70,000 migrants under president Trump who were subjected to this policy? What happens to them? Most of those individuals already had their cases terminated before the Biden administration suspended the program in January 2021. During 2021, the Biden administration brought about 13,000 of those people back to the United States who still had pending cases and allowed them also to seek safety. But now about three years after the program first began, we really don't know what's happened to those who didn't get in during that first wind down process. Some of them may still be in Mexico, some may have gone back to their home countries and some may have entered the United States across the border and be living in the country undocumented. Now, critics of the policy said it was inhumane. So what did asylum seekers risk by staying in Mexico? Under the remain in Mexico program, people were essentially forced to run a gauntlet of kidnappers just to make it to the courthouse door. There are dozens, if not hundreds of documented instances of cases where people were ordered removed, ordered deported and lost their cases for missing court when they were in the arms of their kidnappers at the time and being held for ransom. There are over there are thousands of instances of publicly documented cases of violence, assaults, kidnapping rapes, and even murders against people that the United States sent back under the remain in Mexico program. So for those put into this program, which was formerly called the migrant protection protocol, there was no protection offered. It was simply throwing people to the lion's den. Now remain in Mexico maybe over title 42 though remains. That's the public health order that Donald Trump invoked to stop migrants at the border, and in some cases send him back to the country they're from. Aaron does title 42 effectively keep the spirit of Trump's administration's immigration policies firmly in place. Yet for the last two years, the remain in Mexico program has really been a minor side program compared to title 42. Less than 1% of people being encountered at the border since December were sent back to Mexico under remain in Mexico. By contrast, since March of 2020, CBP agents have carried out more than 2.2 million title 42 expulsions. And for some groups, such as Mexican Guatemalan Honduran and Salvadoran nationals, up at times upwards of 90% of people crossing have been expelled back to Mexico. Though for other groups like Cuban, Venezuelan and Nicaraguan refugees, title 42 is largely impossible to use on them. And barely any of them are subject to the program because Mexico won't take those individuals and neither will the their home countries. But the biggest impact for asylum seekers with title 42 has been the closure of the ports of entry to most people. That meant that anyone who wanted to seek asylum over the last two years was effectively forced to cross the border between ports of entry, exactly what we shouldn't be incentivizing. Yeah, the asylum claims did not need to be heard, or don't need to be heard under 42, right? That's right. A person who is expelled under title 42 is completely denied any chance to seek asylum. As compared to the remain in Mexico program where at least there was a fig leaf of a chance to seek protection. And just to be clear, it's U.S. law guarantees the right to seek asylum. So 42 completely goes against that. That's right. And in fact, in a federal court in Washington, D.C. ruled that it was actually a violation of our laws and international treaties to expel people to a country to which they would be persecuted and ordered that certain family members who were subject to expulsions have at least a right to claim that they would be persecuted in the country to which they'd be expelled, giving them a chance for some minimal asylum screenings. But even though screenings are far less than what are normally offered under U.S. law. Yeah, we could probably talk about this for a long time, but we got about a minute left. What would you say are the biggest priorities for the United States immigration policy right now to fix or to maybe iron out? We are now multiple years into an unprecedented time of mass displacement and refugee flows. But the laws with which were responding to this crisis are outdated and flawed. We last updated our legal immigration system 32 years ago in 1990 before the first website even went online. And the last time we overhauled our asylum system was 1996, in other words, we're facing a 21st century challenge with 20th century laws. Some people say we can simply crack down harder, build the walls and everyone back to Mexico and wash our hands of asylum. But the history of the last century shows us that it's only long-term solutions which truly reduce migration, like addressing root causes and expanding legal pathways to migrate. Aaron reichlin melnick of the American immigration council Aaron thanks. Thank you for having me. The U.S. and Russia are trying to work out a prisoner swap that involves basketball star Brittany griner, and at least one other American. Washington and Moscow have a history of these kinds of exchanges, but as NPR's Greg myrie reports past deals almost always involved trading spies and alleged spies

Mexico Biden administration U.S. Washington, D.C. New York public library Alison Stewart NPR news lela faldo American immigration council Long federal court Department of Homeland Securit Aaron reichlin melnick northern Mexico president Trump Jennette McCurdy WNYC Nickelodeon Culver City Trump's administration
"northern mexico" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

03:10 min | 4 months ago

"northern mexico" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"Could be

"northern mexico" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

02:14 min | 4 months ago

"northern mexico" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"It was not a safe city for gay people back then. But what else was behind a series of deaths in the city? Some of these killing gay men we want to know why? I'm Francis Ford and this is the village, the Montreal murders. Available now. Hi, I'm Ivan Virgil. I'm a staff writer for the LA times covering TV and I also co host our awards podcast, the envelope. I spend my days talking with the creative minds behind your favorite shows to find out what goes into their art. And we have been dedicated to keeping you informed every step of the way. But none of it would be possible without your support. Consider subscribing to the LA times, and you'll get access to diverse perspectives on the news of today all from the West Coast point of view. Head over to LA times dot com slash exclusive to subscribe today. It's easy to hear all of this. That's happening in Mexico and think, oh, well, that's their problem. It's not going to affect us, but as you've been mentioning earlier, mother nature doesn't care about borders. Right. You know, there are a lot of people who see the crisis in monterrey as this very clear warning for the United States and particularly Southern California. Southern California cities import about 55% of their water from the Colorado River and from Northern California. They've already been forced to reduce water usage and now face the prospect of further cuts because drought is really draining the Colorado River and there's this federal pressure on Southern California to start taking less water. So California, particularly Southern California is having to figure out how can we live with less water. And that's the exact same thing that's happening in monterrey. What we're seeing in monterrey is really a kind of a surreal scene, right? This incredibly modern city with gleaming office towers and literally a Maserati dealership. This is a wealthy LA like city where literally the traps have just run dry and people are holding water from wells. So it's kind of the worst case scenario for a place like LA, but if Southern California can't figure out how to make do with less water, it

LA times Francis Ford Ivan Virgil Southern California monterrey Colorado River Montreal West Coast Mexico Northern California United States California LA
"northern mexico" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

05:46 min | 4 months ago

"northern mexico" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"Their response to the crisis? So businesses have been under a lot of pressure from the government, particularly the federal government to do more Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, the president amlo. He is really going after them. He's someone who's been very critical of kind of corporations, which he's described as greedy in the past. So for him, this is almost becoming like a political issue. He's basically threatened to shut down these factories if they don't start giving more water immediately. And already some of these plants are helping. You know, there's a major steel plant here that's giving like 40 gallons a second from its well to the city's water system, the Heineken plant is drilling a new well Pepsi's donated tons and tons of bottled water. And interesting kind of scene we came upon is the topo Chico factory, which is where all of the topo Chico water comes from. It's at the foot of this craggy mountain here in the middle of Monte city. And its long had these public basically water taps where residents can fill up jugs with drinkable water outside of the plant, but now people are coming from all over the city, waiting in line for hours to fill up jugs of water to use for really basic necessities like bathing. So people in Monte are now like bathing and cleaning their laundry with topo Chico water. We had you on the times last year to talk about the bad drought in sonora, which is also in northern Mexico, but in the western part, and you mentioned that monterrey situation is connected to the drought in California. The drought in Arizona basically the American southwest and northern Mexico. So what's occurring climate situation then? Climate change has increased the frequency and severity of the la Nina, whether pattern. And what that does basically, it results in more intense droughts precisely in northern Mexico and the southwest of the U.S.. So we're expecting to see more of this, you know, to see more intense, longer, hotter droughts in these regions, and as you know, like a lot of cities in the southwest of the U.S. and a lot of cities in Mexico, like monterrey, they rely on imported water. Southern California gets most of its water from Northern California and the Colorado River, it's in a similar situation, really, with monterrey. So these cities that have grown so much, are really having to figure out how to learn to live with less water because that's going to be the future. They will simply be receiving less water. It's interesting that you mention Kate that the city of monterrey, the people you talk to, they're like, not ready for this future with less water because if you talk to the people in the rural areas, that's just a part of life, like where my parents are from in sakata, from these two little villages, you didn't get water all the time, even though there's a damn they're oppressed that holds a reservoir, like the poor people they know, like water, you have to ration it all the time, but it seems like he's richer cities. They're like, oh no, there's gonna be water all the time for all of us. Yeah, you're totally right. Water has never been a given particularly in poor parts of Mexico. According to census data, around half of Mexican households who have access to piped water, get water on an intermittent basis already, and even in Mexico City where I live, which is this rainy, lush city. We have occasionally cuts and service because there aren't proper water catchment systems, and we're draining the aquifer. So this is a nationwide problem in a way, getting these water distribution systems really up to speed kind of balancing that with the needs of manufacturing and industry, which in Monterey and so many other places is rather unregulated because they drill these private wells and there isn't a ton of oversight about how much water they're taking, how much water they're actually using. So that's this other big issue here is there's a lot of unregulated water use. There's also a lot of water theft that we see in monterrey, for example. And that's one thing that authorities are trying to do now is find these places where people are stealing water from pipes or have a legal wells that's also a very prevalent problem here. This is not a new problem for the city in the 70s and 80s. They had another water crisis and people revolted just like they are now. It was particularly led by women who, as I saw in the last few days, are really the ones who are really kind of burying the burden here because they're often the ones in charge of the house. And without water, they really can't do anything. So you had this protest movement forming in the late 70s and 80s and they actually were able to get some changes made and want their day. They literally helped spur the government to build another dam. They helped spur the government to pipe in water to more houses on the periphery, but the problem is the effects of that protest movement. I think we're short lived. The officials in monterrey put their heads in the sand for a couple of decades and poked this problem would go away until this summer when it rooted its head again and they're really confronted with this crisis. After the break, how the crisis in monterrey is a stark warning for the rest of Mexico and

monterrey northern Mexico Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador Heineken plant Monte city Mexico sakata American southwest la Nina Pepsi sonora federal government U.S. Colorado River Northern California Southern California Arizona California Kate
"northern mexico" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

07:15 min | 4 months ago

"northern mexico" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"Has there been any protests yet or anything like that? Yeah, there have been a ton of protests. It's arranged from people basically blocking highways blocking access to factories, upriver, where monterrey is trying to basically pipe water from to get to the city. We're seeing farmers and others who are protesting that because they don't want to share their water with the city that is run out. And then in monterrey itself, we're seeing daily protests of people storming highways blocking access to roads and what they're demanding is that the city provide them the residents with water, and they are angry, particularly at industry, which has largely continued to function as normal because they have access to these private wells, and they want that water to be shared with the people of Monterey. Hearing you say all of this is surprising because when I think of the city, you know, I always remember how even in Mexico people think of it as more like a suburb of the United States because it's such a rich city. It's so modern compared to the other big cities in Mexico. And even the people there kind of view themselves as different, you know, quote unquote, better than the rest of Mexico. Yeah, absolutely. Monte is one of the wealthiest cities in Mexico. It's the second largest. It's two hours from the Texas border. It's filled with these really high quality factories that produce Mercedes buses and caterpillar tractors and steel and beer and soda and all of these things for American consumers. It's been a draw for people for years because of that because there are really well paying jobs compared to other parts of the country. So it's been just this motor of industry in the country. And yet for years, it seems like officials have been ignoring this obvious fact that if you have a population that's growing three times in just 40 years that you really need to make sure you have the right supply of water for them and the right system to distribute it. There's also this history there of these really wealthy kind of industrialists who've long controlled the city sitting on the planning commission sitting on the water and dream boards and basically making sure that wealthier neighborhoods and factories were receiving more investments in water infrastructure, while the poorer neighborhoods really weren't benefiting from that same investment. So you have this huge boom of people and you have the system of water distribution that is just totally not up to speed. Yeah, how did monterrey get into this bad water situation? So one that I lies kind of at the tail end of the Rio Grande river basin, which starts up in the rockies in Colorado and flows through several U.S. states and several Mexican states. It's this area that's semi arid. It's kind of desert, Monday itself is a bit of an oasis, but it's a very dry hot place over the last few years as Monte has been hit with this drought that has really pummeled much of northern Mexico and also the southwestern United States. So the same drought that's hitting California and Arizona and New Mexico is also affecting the amount of water that's available in monterrey. There are three dams that have been constructed over the years, basically around and in that basin that provide the water for Monterey proper. And those dams have basically nearly completely drained. So they're right now scrambling really defines new sources of water, which as we know is never an easy thing. So there's conflict with other states, is conflict with industry. There's a lot of conflict right now of our water. We'll be right back. I was a chicano student activist in the early 1990s. And like most college students who ran in those circles, I knew Oscar Gomez because he was a chicano movement rockstar. One of these people scared of the rasa is going to get educated that they're going to be able to go back and empower their communities. A radio DJ at just 21 years old. And then, the body of 21 year old Oscar Gomez was discovered Gomez died of massive head wounds, but his family doesn't believe he got them from falling off a cliff. So I'm going back into the past to find out what happened to Oscar Gomez the 90 died. There was, I think, a little bit of a chaotic part to him. Nobody knows what happened. Well, that's why we were here. Just when you think you a notion of where the story may be going, bam. You'll jump tracks. From LA studios, I'm adolfo Guzman Lopez. Join me for this season of imperfect Paradise, the forgotten revolutionary. Hi, this is Laura Nelson. I am an investigative and enterprise reporter at the LA times, covering the day's big stories and bringing accountability to the topics that really matter to our readers. We work on what's called the rapid response investigations team. We bring depth and expertise to the papers breaking news coverage of stories across California. If you haven't already, please consider subscribing to the LA times for just a dollar. Get access to diverse perspectives on the news of today all from the West Coast point of view. Go to LA times dot com slash exclusive to subscribe today. So Kate, if monterrey officials had long ignored how the city was getting its water and how precarious the whole situation was, especially being at a naturally dry area, how are they dealing with the crisis now? So they are obviously reducing the water that they actually distribute to houses in the hope that they can save what little water remains in the reservoirs to wait out these really hot summer months so that in September, Wednesday, a hurricane blows through the Gulf Coast and want that egg gets a lot of rain. Those reservoirs can fill up hopefully and replenish the system. They're also exploring new options. Some of the things they're considering are the building of a new dam. One is already under construction. They are planning probably a second one. They're looking at water recycling techniques. They're drilling new wells, which is kind of a short sighted solution, a lot of water experts say because the aquifer beneath the city is already very overexploited. So there's not a ton of water there. Right now they're kind of just desperately trying to think of more water resources, but the fact is it takes like 5 years to build a dam. So there's no real immediate solution from monterrey and it's very possible that in the coming years every summer when it gets really hot when water starts draining from these dams, we're going to be in the same situation. Are these businesses that are getting all of this water like, what's

monterrey Mexico Oscar Gomez Monterey Rio Grande river basin United States LA times Monte adolfo Guzman Lopez Laura Nelson rockies Texas California New Mexico Colorado Gomez Arizona LA West Coast Kate
"northern mexico" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

02:25 min | 4 months ago

"northern mexico" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"And an even thirstier future. Joining us to talk about this is LA times foreign correspondent Caitlin to come. Kate, welcome to times. It's great to be here. What are Monterey's residents experiencing right now? So the majority of people in monterrey only have water for a few hours a day in the morning, the rest of the time, their tops are running dry. But then there are really big sections of the city, particularly the areas kind of on the periphery, kind of farther out, where there's no water at all. Some of these neighborhoods have not had water for a few weeks, others have gone a few days to bathe to cook, to clean, they are relying either on bottled water that they buy from stores or water that's being trucked in by the government or occasionally there are these wells in parks that they can access. So as people basically carrying water to their houses in buckets, kind of like the olden days. The people I talk to are really desperate, they really exhausted. They have jobs, have families, and then on top of all of that, have to spend hours a day figuring out how they're going to procure water to cook dinner or to flush their toilets. So it's a really a point of just total despair. I spoke to one man from the town of Garcia, who had been without water for days. He had come to this local dam to try to escape just the exhaustion of dealing with the water he goes there with friends to fish. But once he got to the dam, he realized it was empty because it's one of the dams that feeds Monterey. So he and his friend kind of stood there at the bottom of this mostly

LA times Caitlin monterrey Monterey Kate Garcia
"northern mexico" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

02:02 min | 9 months ago

"northern mexico" Discussed on WCPT 820

"Change starts with you You can be calling your democratic or Republican representatives to let them know what you think by calling two O two two two four 31 21 The capital switchboard it'll get you right through to him The New York Times has put together just an amazing graphic where they took all the record temperatures from last year from 2021 And put the red ones being hot and blue ones being cold put them as little dots on a map of the United States And it sure looks to me like what we're seeing is the collapse of the jet stream If you watch weather shows on TV and things like that what you see is a very well we saw this for example with that cold snap last a year ago February where the jet stream just kind of drooled all the way carried Arctic air all the way down into southern Texas and northern Mexico froze Texas up shut down their power systems and things like that And it's blocking the movement of air here in the Pacific Northwest and thus we're getting these massive heat waves I think that we all need to keep an eye on this I've got a video about it over at Tom harbin dot com You can check it out there If you want to pass the hour welcome back picking up your phone calls Mark and Honolulu Hawaii Hey Mark what's on your mind today Hey Tom thanks for taking my call Yeah I just wanted to point out I know a lot of people are upset that the United States is not allowing those poorest jets to be transferred to Ukrainians but I want to point out it's going really really bad for the Russians right now I think the U.S. estimates put about 6000 Russian troops either killed or disabled now to put that in perspective The Soviet Union when they invaded Afghanistan I think total for all the years they were there.

northern Mexico Tom harbin The New York Times Texas United States Tom thanks Pacific Northwest Honolulu Hawaii Mark Soviet Union Afghanistan
"northern mexico" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:21 min | 10 months ago

"northern mexico" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Of neglect of the Mexican state in combating impunity in combating organized crime in combating the collusion that exists between public officials in Mexico the police local politicians et cetera and organized crime Imagine if you're a journalist and you get a threat and you know that a local police official is behind it Where do you go to report it Yeah Another reporter paying his respects was Antonio Maya Late lures he's also inside the state's protection scheme after suspected cartel members appeared at his home in an unmarked vehicle Now he's accompanied all day by an armed guard shadowing his every move But Antonio knows that if Mexico's drug cartels want to silence him there's very little he can do Of course I'm very aware of that The person who wants to hurt you is going to hurt you If I want to kill you they're going to kill you If the decision has been taken it will happen because the person was going to do it has been paid to do a job and would try to do it the best he can That's the reality we live under Who's Maldonado was the second journalist to be killed in Tijuana within a week after photographer margarito Martinez was also gunned down Colleagues say that mister Martinez had tried to sign up for the government's protection scheme but not been able to A journalist and an adviser to the scheme says it's not fit for purpose It has been broken from its very inception It was designed with no recommendations from journalists Instead it was put together under pressure from international human rights groups over the high rate of attacks and murders of journalists and it was just improvised They made it up as they went along We asked the state government for an interview but none was given However whenever he's been asked about the murders by the press president Lopez Obrador has gone on the offensive Journalists are carrying out the noble work of informing he said urging his supporters to call out his critics online His response as angered many journalists who accuse him of ignoring the dangers they face In the wake of the killings journalists took to the streets in cities across the country to demand greater protection and an end to impunity Yet the grim reality is that with four voices extinguished already this year Mexico looks set to remain the most dangerous country in the world for journalists outside of a war zone Well ground reporting from the Mexican city of Tijuana And I've been speaking to Javier garter a journalist in torion in northern Mexico He also specializes in security and protection protocols for journalists but how can they keep safe If even those in government protection schemes with an armed guard following them around a murdered That's the tough question That's the question that we have been grappling with for years more than a decade now I think the question is more broad than saying how can we keep safe even if people who are on the protection schemes are getting targeted is because regardless of protection schemes is how can we keep safe when we know that the authorities don't care because the protection schemes are I look at it as a bureaucratic way to cover up the fact that the government is not willing to solve the problem at its core And so it is taking measures that it's so that it can show that it is doing something but without actually tackling the core the core is really impunity It's the fact that anybody who attacks the journalist at some point knows that he can do it because the last person who did it got away with it And so there is a reasonable expectation that nothing is going to happen So was journalists realized that the government is not going to help us that the authorities are not going to help us Then we have to help ourselves And the only way to do that is to develop safety protocols safety guidelines within the newsrooms for personal use how does a reporter how do we conduct ourselves when we're out in the streets How do we make sure that nobody's following us How do we make sure that nobody is surveilling us or hacking our telephones or our digital devices We need to have safety structures in place That's something that I have been doing for the past ten years is training journalists to develop these protocols And they're not guaranteed that nothing is going to happen to you but at least it makes you aware So your number one suggestion or a bit of advice to journalists is that they are responsible for their own safety They can not rely on the state Given the current reality yes that doesn't mean that we should just let the authorities say on their hands and do nothing On the other hand of course there is a lot of advocacy There is a lot of interaction and building support networks among ourselves with international organizations so that we can make this problem more visible and try to shame the authorities into doing something What kind of journalists are most vulnerable in Mexico Is it those exposing links between criminal organizations and local governments Is it those trying to expose drugs cartels Yeah those would be the people most at risk It's hard to pin down one particular beat so to speak Reporting on our investing corruption networks and collusion between authorities and criminal groups is usually the riskiest situation that a journalist can find him or herself in especially when done at the local level If you look at the string of killings in the past decade or so it has been local journalists covering local governments local criminal activity And that's where the impunity happens because local authorities at the city level at the state level are the weakest and they are usually penetrated They are usually colluded with the criminals We began Javier talking about what you described as the core issue which is that of impunity of The Killers How do you tackle that Well that's the other big question It's not for journalists to tackle that I mean that is really a question for the authorities What we can do as a group is pressure the authorities into doing that And I think it's a matter of political will It's recognizing that you have a problem Because sometimes we see authorities say that whenever for example a journalist is killed the investigators are prosecutors or the local authorities say the local mayor or the governor would say well it's because he wasn't to some other shady activities or this is a passion crime First we have to get authorities to stop minimizing the problem We have I think a flawed diagnostics from the Mexican president Lopez Obrador because he says the status in kill journalists anymore And so there is not a problem anymore And that is true The state is not killing journalists or the federal government at least it's not killing journalists But they are not the only ones who can attack a journalist drug dealers drug cartels or killing journalists local officials are doing so Other actors economic criminal actors are killing journalists So if the highest authority in the country thinks that only the state kills journalists and the state is not killing journalists then there is not a problem And that is not true That is a flawed diagnosis of the problem And so they are blind to the fact that journalists are still dying And they just don't think it's an issue That was Javier Garza a journalist in torrione in northern Mexico and he was talking there about the dangers facing journalists in Mexico which.

Mexico Antonio Maya Lopez Obrador margarito Martinez mister Martinez Tijuana Javier garter torion northern Mexico Maldonado government Antonio Javier federal government Javier Garza torrione
"northern mexico" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

03:00 min | 1 year ago

"northern mexico" Discussed on KTOK

"U S A and Northern Mexico. And so it's It's pretty much South. Yes, Yes, Okay, And it's this is a really good tree for Oklahoma. This is like tough just a really tough Tree. Um, it should be used more often. And the reason why I picked it is because when you're driving down, uh I 44 You can see him. You get there. You can see there's like there's like banks of them. They got in there because they're native. And, uh, I saw them as like, You know what I'd say. I think I get off track every year around this time. And don't use this tree and I'm like, you know, I really want to showcase it because I think it's a really good tree for Oklahoma. Okay. Is it a showy tree? Yes. It has Surely flowers and showy fruit. Wow. Shall we? Flowers? All right, So it's uh it is just a very low maintenance. Incredibly low abatements. That's what everybody wants, right? Yes, all right. 4584 Oh, 1000. We are at tractor bobs and it looks like that everybody that can tell us about the specials are busy today. But what I can tell you is they have Altos. Uh, great. Milk mowers here with the tracks. They have bad boy. Bowers and trailers and all that. They have, uh, February is a more right. That's right. Uh, they have, uh, walk behind catchers. They have commercial weed eaters and lower your favorite thing. And what's your favorite thing is what is my favorite thing? That more that's like a Roomba the room? Oh, yes. Well, you know, they moved its on this other side, so probably cause I was touching it, too. Uh, anyway, but they do have that I'll call it the GPS more that you? Yeah, with your yard. And it does all the markers to success in the yard Doesn't by GPS. Yes. Steals, dogmatically turns off and then it sounds like alarm. And then it tells you where your thief is. Yeah. I mean, it's just cruel. Yeah. So the bad boy package has trailers, cutters, box plaids and everything. And of course, if you come here and you qualify, they will even help you get your finances in shape. So we want you to all come by tractor Bob's today. And it is at I 2 40 Shields on the South Service Road. We're going to take a break. Jamie Ashmore is here. The curator of Special Gardens at O S. U O. K C. I'm going. Falconer. Lippard, This is the Katie. Okay, Garden party, and we're so delighted that you are with us. Calvin, right is here. If you want to come meet Calvin. And if you come in, Jamie might even give you the bouquet of the week. So by your listening To the garden Party on 1000. Katie. Okay, I heard remembers September.

Jamie Ashmore Jamie Calvin Oklahoma Katie Northern Mexico September U S A South Service Road Lippard Falconer I 2 40 Shields today 4584 Special Gardens O S. U O. K C. February Bob 1000 garden Party
The Fight to Save Sunflower Sea Stars

Short Wave

01:42 min | 1 year ago

The Fight to Save Sunflower Sea Stars

"Going to be talking about a veracious sea creature that can have up to twenty four arms and the person will be talking to is. Npr science correspondent. Now greenfieldboyce hainault. Hey there emily. I have only two arms. But i am nonetheless here to tell you about these things. I want all your arms around this story. Tell us about this. Many armed briny beast. Well it's a sea star it. It's one of the biggest in the world. It can be the size of a trash can lid or a manhole cover or something like that. It's called the sunflower see star. Yeah so these things used to be common all along the west coast from alaska. All the way down to baja california in northern mexico. Yeah i've heard of these. I've seen pictures. They're beautiful though used to be. I mean those are some ominous words. It is a grim grim situation. This species is critically endangered. It seems to be dying off. it's just disappearing from lots of places. Some people think it's completely extinct in california and this is a big deal because the sunflower see star is a top predator. It eats animals like muscles and sea urchins and keeps their numbers in check. I didn't realize that the sunflower see stars. A top predator. I know that sea stars though have for years been plagued by disease off. The west coast is that. What's killing sunflower stars to. Yes so this is a wasting syndrome. And scientists can't agree on what's causing it it's hitting more than twenty sea star species since the big die off in two thousand thirteen on both the east and the west coast but a researcher named jason hodan told me that sunflowers he stars seem to be particularly susceptible. Really do kind of like dissolve into a pile of goo. It's why he agreed to try raising them in

NPR Emily West Coast California Baja Alaska Mexico Jason Hodan
"northern mexico" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"northern mexico" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"By business Roundtable Your next update in 10 Minutes on news radio 6 10 w i o D. Right. Thanks for my 9 11. Let's get our weather forecast with our weather Channel me or I'll just raise staging. Weren't you ready? Alright. Good morning. Not much in the way of sunshine this morning and I'll tell you how much we're going to see this afternoon. From what I'm looking at little mid and high level overcast. Not much rain, though Slight chance of a shower thunderstorm. Um, in theory, what I'm thinking is this afternoon We might see a little more sun Try to come through. Still close to or just above. 90 might not get that 92 if we don't get enough Sun tonight 80 Tomorrow hit or Miss Storm tomorrow night into early Thursday, probably the highest chance of thunderstorms over the next three or four days. It's at 70%. Add a few showers. Letter storms Friday upper eighties to close to 90 degrees. Tropical land is hot on re is exiting the northeast New England, But there's three other areas of interest that the hurricane center is watching. Um, the one in the eastern Caribbean might be one that heads toward northern Mexico or South Texas Late in the weekender early next week, the other two or something we're gonna have to keep her eyes on. But Jimmy, um, just as forecast the seasonal forecast for an active year looks like that's working out. Right now there's three systems that potentially could develop a greater than I think last check greater than 50% on each of them. So, uh, yeah. We'll keep an eye on that stuff. Yeah, the member taste 24 years ago, Andrew hit South Florida. That's right. That was today. I did see that the anniversary. Yeah, I did See that. Yep. None of those. Thanks for now. Yeah. Yeah. You have a great day. We'll talk tomorrow. A good one. Now see it, okay. It is, uh 9 12 here on news radio. 6 10. W I o D tend to talk about your health with Dr Deborah Ann Mulligan, professor at Nova Southeastern University's College of Osteopathic Medicine. She's board certified.

Deborah Ann Mulligan Andrew tomorrow Jimmy 70% South Florida tomorrow night today 10 Minutes northern Mexico 24 years ago greater than 50% three systems early next week eastern Caribbean Nova Southeastern University's this morning northeast New England each 90 degrees
"northern mexico" Discussed on Post Reports

Post Reports

05:42 min | 1 year ago

"northern mexico" Discussed on Post Reports

"Let's flash forward to july of twenty twenty that july hurricane hanna swept through the region in south texas and northern mexico. At that point. Nancy had been in the motives camp for eleven months. And that hurricane. Really just underscored how uncomfortable. The camp was in this video that she sent me. There was water running everywhere. Mud folks were digging out little canals to divert the water away from the camp and towards the river islands and really there was no escape from the wind and the rain except to be cloistered inside of these tents. Not knowing you know if that wind was going to shred this sightings of what is essentially your house. July twenty six as this hurricane is descending on the camp also in the heat of the presidential campaign united states. What was the discussion in the camp about this campaign and like what kind of hopes hinged on it for the asylum seekers in the migrant camp paid attention to every single piece of news that came out of the united states in mexico that had anything to do with their particular situation every up and down of the debates every policy proposal every change in the rules and they were constantly being fed of course information from the aid workers who came in and the attorneys. Who came in to debrief them on. What was going on for nancy in particular. You know she kept vigilance on the news but for her reality was sort of divorced from the politics of the united states in that she knew that the democratic presidential candidate joe biden. This instant with someone who was proposing to do things differently for migrants who is proposing what he called an orderly and humanitarian alternative to what the trump administration had implemented but at this point after so many months in this camp. Nancy wasn't ready to trust anyone. Was you know politicians like the talk. She would say politicians make a lot of promises and ultimately that there's no reason to hope in that until something actually happens and that was her way of girding herself from any further disappointments. This is in. Abc news election. Update now reporting chief. Banker george stephanopoulos. Good morning we have breaking news results from the state of pennsylvania. Those results are in right now. Based on what we are seeing there we can say that. Joseph robinet biden. Junior is on track to win. The state of pennsylvania become the forty six president of the united states when it was announced that joe biden had indeed won the election. There was celebration in the camp. They on an online all. I know my name is there was gleevec and there were hugs and and there was a sense of victory that there was light at the end of the tunnel was what is something i heard consistently from asylum seekers four nancy again because she had been disappointed so many times throughout this process it was more of the seems good. But let's wait. And see telecast day cape with the local at each over docket nobody hanging lebanon. Okay boys better more gay boy look at your local blerta. I got me into the media. On december twenty fifth. Nancy sent me a video of their christmas. Celebration is a small gathering of her indoor and family that they had befriended in it. You see david sort of hunched over a plate of food and you know just a sense of joy permeating that particular moment and yet by the time i received this video in december twenty twenty. She had spent sixteen months in the camp. It was a second christmas that she had celebrated in the camp with her family. It was another reminder of just how long they had been there. She said to me that you know birthdays weren't really celebrations. They were just a reminder again that they were growing old in this place they never intended to be in the first place that they were stock and that they had no idea when they would be free On partout of our series gave no mileti had your goes along with that in just as nancy reaches a breaking point Everything changes

hurricane hanna northern mexico river islands united states hurricane Nancy joe biden Joseph robinet biden nancy pennsylvania texas george stephanopoulos mexico Abc news lebanon david mileti
8 More Arrests in Mexico Border City Attacks That Killed 19

WGN Programming

00:19 sec | 1 year ago

8 More Arrests in Mexico Border City Attacks That Killed 19

"Suspects have been arrested for alleged involvement and gun attacks earlier this month that killed 19 people in the northern Mexico border city of Reynosa, nearly all of whom appeared to be innocent bystanders. Arrest brought to 13 the number of people detained over the June 19 attacks that left four gunmen and 15 civilians. Debt find news

Northern Mexico Reynosa
"northern mexico" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

02:26 min | 1 year ago

"northern mexico" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Day at 105.9 FM Feel like I got a family here. W M A L. And in other news at 6 30 this morning President Biden's bipartisan infrastructure deal has been thrown in limbo barely 24 hours after it was announced. Two people familiar with conversations say Republican senators felt blindsided Friday by the president's insistence that the bipartisan infrastructure deal move in tandem with his bigger package of investment. The White House said the strategy should have come as no surprise, given that Biden has publicly discussed it. The quick turn of events comes a day after Biden strode to the White House driveway to announce the nearly $1 trillion compromise. Tensions appeared to cool later Friday after senators from the group of Negotiators convened a conference call the Pacific Northwest, sweltering Friday as a historic heatwave has hit Washington and Oregon. Temperatures in many areas expected to be 25 to 30 degrees above normal in the coming days. Seattle expected to edge above 100 degrees over the weekend. And in Portland. Forecasters said the thermometer could soar to 108 degrees on Sunday, which would break an all time record, and authorities in northern Mexico say the bullet ridden bodies of 18 men were found after what appears to have been a shootout. Between members of rival drug cartels. The state security apartment said yesterday that the bodies were found in a remote rural area of the north central state of Zakat tickets. The department says there is evidence the deaths resulted from a confrontation between gunmen from two cartels in 6 31. It is the Saturday Morning update on W M A. L and Michelle Murray's in the email Traffic center, a couple of accidents to be aware of, and 3 55 both north and stop them between East Middle Lane in Beers Mill Road. All lanes are blocked due to an accident follow police direction there and in the District D. C. To 95 South Beyond still close to the Capital Street with the crash, traffic is being detoured onto westbound East. Capitol Street garage door Repair calm The W M A. L storm watch. Seven forecasts. Mostly cloudy skies on this Saturday, also plenty of humidity after to start the day, two points back in the upper.

108 degrees Biden Portland Friday 25 Capitol Street Beers Mill Road 18 men Michelle Murray Sunday Oregon Pacific Northwest yesterday Washington District D. C. Republican Two people northern Mexico 30 degrees East Middle Lane
"northern mexico" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:56 min | 1 year ago

"northern mexico" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"UK Health Secretary Matt Hancock has admitted breaking social distancing guidance after pictures of him kissing an aide were published in a newspaper Critics pointed out that at the time the photo was taken in me. Different household bubbles were not supposed to be mixing indoors and ministers were advising people not to hug and then guidance in the workplace. Social distancing was to be maintained, so the nature of the relationship raised wider issues. Mr Hancock admitted he had preached social distance and guidance and said he had let people down. He appealed for privacy for his family and said he remained focused on getting the country out of the pandemic. Questions are also being raised over miss Colored Angela's appointment to the health and social care departments board dust Autumn, the BBC's Ian Watson. The bullet ridden bodies of 18 men were discovered after what appeared to have been a shootout between members of rival drug cartels in northern Mexico, authorities said Friday. Breaking news and analysis at town hall dot com Talk radio 6 80 Wcbm, former vice president, Pence is defending his role and certify the results of the 2020 election. Pence said he was proud of his decision on January 6th to reconvene the Congress after the capital riot and fulfill his constitutional duty. Speaking at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library, Claire. There's almost no idea more un American than the notion that any one person could choose the American president. Pence warned that if we lose faith in the Constitution, we won't just lose elections. We'll lose our country. Greg Clugston Washington Virgin Tactic The private spaceflight firm founded by billionaire Richard Branson said Friday that it had received FAA approval to fly humans to space. Company said that it Existing commercial space transportation operator license have been upgraded to allow to fly customers on the hills of its successful crude test flight last May. More of these stories of town hall. Com. Patrick Foz, still more.

Richard Branson BBC Ian Watson January 6th Pence Patrick Foz 18 men Friday Hancock Greg Clugston Congress northern Mexico Matt Hancock FAA last May Claire Washington Virgin Tactic hall. Com American one person
"northern mexico" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"northern mexico" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"They continue to have classes and we in a lot of them. There was a big group that wanted to continue, so they established the Pueblo Clock, a youth hoop Downs group. Chino got hurt or in his car at the car accident. Maybe three years after that, and, um, when he was recovering, and he recovered for about 14 months, and then we knew that he wasn't going to continue to recover. He is just gonna decline. And he asked, they asked him. How do you want to be remembered? And he said he wanted to be remembered as a dancer. And, um, and have that opportunity that he had be available to all of his pueblo friends or his native friends. So when he passed away, we were all looking for a way to Feel ourselves and recover ourselves and kind of lettuce into creating another group that we could reach out to more youth. Um, not just public. Lucky's but all native youth in northern Mexico and that's how we started Lightning Boy Foundation. Right, right. Well, when we come back in a minute, we're going to talk a little bit about more of the programs that you will do for the youth of northern New Mexico. You're listening to coffee and culture here on Katie or C. I'm really happy to be talking to Steve Lawrence and Felisha. Pro Soccer. Um sorry, Rivera. Sorry. Alicia will be back in just a few minutes. Don't go away. We'll be right back.

Steve Lawrence Felisha Katie Alicia Rivera Lightning Boy Foundation northern Mexico northern New Mexico C. Pueblo Clock about 14 months Chino three years after Downs
"northern mexico" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

04:36 min | 1 year ago

"northern mexico" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"I read this morning, the public utility commission. New on Friday that a lot of those wind turbines were frozen on Friday. The grid in Texas is connected to Mexico's grid. It's also connected to eastern regions of the United States and in emergencies. Our grid is supposed to be able to track into those other markets. And get emergency electricity And obviously, that doesn't seem to be happening right now and Nobody's asking ERCOT. Why? That's not happening. Um, how much power could we be getting out of those other areas? So they're mad questions Just not really answered large swamp all the way to Mississippi. It is it's in the Southeast. So I don't know. This is a huge front that has moved in, and this hadn't happened in decades. And I was just wondering if some cosmological event are affecting. Okay, you know, all right shot. Thanks. You have a good one. Let's go to James. On K. LBJ. James. Good morning. Welcome. Good morning thorium. My coming in Yes, I want to say God bless your show. You guys are killing it on. God bless everybody out there, too. In this next I want to make a comment. So we had mentioned, uh, these companies being owned by other people from other places. Like Michigan. And what not know you know that share that was Todd and don. They were pointing out that the people on the board of directors for the electric grid or in other states, and one is an economist who lives in Germany. Yeah, that that that really raised my eyebrow because Um Oh, my gosh, for starters. I mean, I'm getting the media is all owned by just a few companies. Um, right now Amazon and Google and and YouTube. They're only owned by a few people and most of these mayors and And governors of these Have been choking out the people for whether it's weather or whether it's this or whether it's that like You know, like, like people from other places, too. All right, James. Thank you Have a good day. 51283605 98 hours local appoint a minute ago about how the Texas grid is connected to Mexico, and we have Received power from them during emergencies in the past. Uh, so I was doing some or reading on that. And northern Mexico has been without electricity the last couple of days, and their problem has been that they have been buying natural gas from the United States to burn and they're generating facilities, but the pipelines Had been knocked out by the freezing weather on some of the natural gas transmission facilities for the pipelines are frozen. And so Mexico has four million. People without electricity, and even if our grid wanted to tap into their grid, they have nothing to offer. And that's that his mother nature right there. That's just the cold temperatures. I can't imagine because we've all traveled down down parts near northern northern Mexico, down on the Texas border. I've never heard it to get sub freezing, mark it down there and it's it's walloping them, too. So it's just a kind of a calamity all over all over this part of the country. Well, frozen different Columbus reading made it sound like, uh, It's actually the West Texas natural gas fields and the pipelines that are suffering in the freezing conditions in West Texas, so that natural gas can't get down to Mexico. Mm hmm. All right here, the numbers 51283605 90 callers join the discussion. We know many of you have been without electricity for a long, long time. We want to hear how you're doing how you're coping. If you have been out driving what are the roads like? What are you seeing? What are you experiencing?.

Amazon YouTube Mississippi Texas Google Germany West Texas Friday United States Todd Columbus Michigan this morning K. LBJ. James million northern Mexico James Mexico northern northern Mexico hours
Pfizer vaccine allergic reaction puts Mexican doctor in ICU

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 2 years ago

Pfizer vaccine allergic reaction puts Mexican doctor in ICU

"A doctor in northern Mexico had such a severe allergic reaction to the Fizer coronavirus vaccine that she remained hospitalized in intensive care Saturday the Mexican health ministry says she was in stable condition and being treated with steroids and anti convulsant medication the thirty two year old doctor suffered difficulty breathing brain inflammation and convulsions a half hour after getting the vaccination they say she did have a known allergy to an anti biotic medication trimethoprim soulful methoxy Zoll the reaction occurred at a hospital in the northern state of Nuevo Leon and included a ration weakness the ministry says it was apparently the first known case of brain inflammation or encephalitis after receiving the vaccination I'm Julie Walker

Northern Mexico Mexican Health Ministry Breathing Brain Inflammation Convulsions Zoll Allergy Nuevo Encephalitis Julie Walker
Tropical Storm Hanna barrels toward southern Texas

Jesus Christ Show (PRN)

00:27 sec | 2 years ago

Tropical Storm Hanna barrels toward southern Texas

"Hanna is producing heavy rain and flash flooding in southeast Texas. The National Hurricane Center says. Hannah is now about 50 miles west of McAllen, Texas and moving into northern Mexico. The storm continues to pack 50 miles an hour winds and a tropical storm warning remains in effect along the southern Texas coast. Forecasters are warning of life threatening flash flooding, dangerous surf and rip current conditions and possible tornadoes today and into this evening. North

Texas National Hurricane Center Hanna Mcallen Hannah Mexico
Chef Iliana de la Vega discusses authentic Oaxacan cuisine

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

07:17 min | 2 years ago

Chef Iliana de la Vega discusses authentic Oaxacan cuisine

"Chatting with chef. Ileana de la Vega about authentic hocken. Cuisine Ileana welcome to milk street. Thank you very much for having me here. Let me just start by saying of Ben to Your Restaurant in Toronto in Austin a couple times in the last two years and it was the best Hawkin food of had including in. Walk US terrific so you lived in Mexico City remarried there. You move to to start Eldorado restaurant but but you had trouble being accepted in some way. So explain that to me. Yeah what happened? I mean as you mentioned I was born in Mexico City and eventually ninety four actually moved to a hacker. We opened the restaurant until ninety seven. And Yeah my mom is what was Oaxacan but because I was in born in Oaxaca was not supposed to be cooking blog on food. I mean I guess that things have changed you know hook us a little bit more open now than it was there but You know for them. I wasn't outsider. So you had the restaurant there and then in two thousand six you left so what happened between ninety seven and two thousand six in terms of your restaurant and the politics and everything in the region. Well we were very successful restaurant. Join despite of like many were huggins. Consider me that it was an tighter and then on two thousand six there was turmoil in Oaxaca social unrest and so we had you know the economy collapsed in. We had to close a restaurant. And then I bet charlie we moved to Texas Allston. Imprecise you and I spoke a while back about what is moulay and your definition of it was totally different than what I thought. So could you just break it down for me? I mean you said there were three basic components to moulay. Maybe you could just take us through the concept right. They are like three groups of ingredients to make malate so one will be vegetables and by vegetables. How you also mean chillers. Okay so tomatoes tomatoes onions and garlic and such and then we have spices. So let's say black pepper cumin Cinnamon sugar sold chocolate. And then the third one very important one for these are the figures could be bread or it could be muscle for making tortillas and also not like almonds so there are the three of you take a little bit of each in each one of those categories you will make a molly molly. Negro is very complex. But I I gather that some Malays actually are much simpler than that rhyming. Talk to us about a simple mobile. Yeah okay like let's say like me. For example I think is the simplest one. You'll take a you know. Fresh Materials Green Sheila's Serrano's Jalapenos. Or one of those onion garlic and put it in the blender and then you fried mixture and then you add some herbs fresh herbs so I do up Ohio Santa Parsley and episode. That's my traditional one. And then you have the thickener. Which is the muscle that you dilute. I in a little bit of water and you added so those are the basic ingredients and you can make that. Molay in twenty minutes rather than the. Mola negative that he takes three days. I want you to describe because I've had your Molin Agro and it was divine if you taste a really well made Molin agro. Ideally what should it be like? What is important when you make him? Only non one of those stents out not on one of those flavors. So you will they said. Oh it is a little cinnamon and then the next. We'll give you a little bit of cumin for example or the next bite will give you a little bit of chocolate so each You know spoonful that you take the molly will give you a different note Let's let's talk about some common things in Oaxaca. The Mole Yetay Which I had for breakfast WanNa talk about how that's made. And maybe the tradition of that dish. Well then we get something simple that you will find all over Mexico. Norling OAXACA somewhat yet is believe traditionally like by a piece of bread like a kind of a French bread and then put a little bit of a border in it then beans and then some cheese will melt and then you put it on there. They'll win or something to get kind of. Nice melting and cross the cheese. And then you make Salsa Makina which is like Salsa Pico they get your tomatoes onion Sheila Bair the Serrano or Jalapeno see land throw and a little bit of lime juice in they knew. Serve it with it on the site. It was a terrific practice they also a Santa which is Pork Lard. Is that often used as a primary layer for lots of tacos enchiladas? Is that something that's common ingredient there. Okay largest one thing like Hitler this when you have a big piece of pork and then you take out the fat than you cook. It is slowly. And then you're renders fat right so that is large and then ASEAN thought when you're making teacher on the skin and you're buying it in large then at the bottom you will some pieces and beats over. You know the fat told and that's why it's colored it has it has color to the. You're not open a Tortilla. Like freshly made handmade of course and then you put a little bit of a layer of that and then you eat it with your meal Let's talk about the Tortilla for second in Oaxaca. According to a tee I guess in northern Mexico it's a wheat Tortilla but the tortillas in Oaxaca almost could pass for a week Tortilla. They're very fine. They're very tender. They're nothing like would you get here? So is that because you use different kinds of corn is the process differ. Why are they so much better a little bit of favorite thing? I is the the taste that they still do. Heirloom Cornyn in Mexico. Roy is one so sometimes. You taste the TORTILLAS here in United States. Then they're like sweet so that is wrong. Sorry that is like super wrong so that was one of the things that when we moved to the states and I began to as a Dorothy. Yes here like no by no means. I will be able to serve this in their restaurant every neighbor so you know thank God. We found now corn from Mexico many times from Oaxaca directly and so we proceeded in house and then we grind it. What would you like to tell me about the way you cook that? I don't understand. Well I guess you think that I have problem whether you notice plane. The people You know one is Mexican. Food is not necessarily too spicy. I mean depends on the taste of the taste. Parts of the person but general is just about the flavors The other one is it. People that have had through the years coming to restaurant. Said like this is not Mexican food. I mean for years. We didn't have a flour tortillas in the restaurant in is like oh no but this is not a not as well. How can I explain you? You know that the corner two years is the basic you know and it is your of the also very delicate flavors so those things I think is the what I would like people to understand better about Mexican Food

Oaxaca Mexico Mexico City Ileana De La Vega United States Norling Oaxaca Molin Agro Eldorado Sheila Bair Asean BEN Toronto Serrano Hawkin Mola Charlie Texas Allston Wanna Ohio Santa
Trump administration postpones immigration hearings for migrants waiting in Mexico

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:30 sec | 2 years ago

Trump administration postpones immigration hearings for migrants waiting in Mexico

"Because of the pandemic the trump administration is delaying court hearings for asylum seekers who are waiting in Mexico more than six thousand Latin American asylum seekers were sent to northern Mexico waiting for their cases to process the justice department says court hearings that were scheduled for before April twenty second are now being postponed a spokesperson for the executive office for immigration review says it's going to allow the department to protect migrants and U. S. citizens while still allowing the migrants to have their day in

Mexico Justice Department Executive U. S.
Porpoises On The Brink Of Extinction Face Daunting Odds For Survival

Environment: NPR

05:20 min | 3 years ago

Porpoises On The Brink Of Extinction Face Daunting Odds For Survival

"Marine Mammal is on the verge of extinction in Mexico's Gulf of California. Conservationists have been trying to save the the Keita Porpoise for years but that work has been complicated by the nets and even drug cartels from Arizona public media in Tucson area Brosius reports seafood restaurants. Colorful mosaics line. The Boardwalk in downtown San Felipe pay fishing is a mainstay of the small northern Mexico. Town love I keep. The restaurant is just a couple blocks over a framed photo of the little porpoise that could be. The town's mascot hangs in the office of Ramon Franco the as head of a local fishermen cooperative representing about five hundred and seventy families is sending. Well it though this earth announced that animal as you must know only lives here in this area and it's ours belongs to us. Mexicans for decades of akitas population has been declining as fishermen inadvertently catch them while pursuing fish and shrimp but dea says many local fishermen treasure the animal when it rises above the water with its characteristic. Black rimmed is he says That causes those do those. It's as if it was smiling with you. So real fishermen don't WanNa harm them. It's the opposite in the last few decades. Mexico has established of Akita Refuge and backed research into the species but lately the number of Akita has plummeted around just a dozen or less as poaching for another endangered fish called. The Toba has ramped up. Fishermen use large Gill Nets to trap the toe to Wada. Which also killed Akita in two thousand fifteen Mexico's then president banned Gill Nets in the Vicki habitat increased enforcement against poaching and started paying fishermen not to work so the species could recover. This little sanitizer came to an agreement that we would leave the sea so that the federal government clean up the illegal boats but Diaz says enforcement was insufficient. Problem got worse. He says he's filed numerous complaints with the government to no avail then a year ago. The payments fishermen stopped those. Odi The liberal Emma. So now we have a serious problem. Because we don't have a fishing practice that is permitted. And we also don't have any compensation. Last September Diaz announced his fisherman had no option but to return to the sea to support their families. He says two thousand eighteen. Us Ban Mexican seafood caught with Gillnets has only made life harder for legal fishermen. Mexico missed an opportunity to be a world leader in shifting a fishery over from Gillnets to alternative gear. Barbara Taylor is marine conservation biologist with the US government who studied the Makita for thirty years. She says the Gillnet Ban wasn't very effective. Because some fishermen hurting financially were tempted into the illegal Totowa Trade F- Iquitos and Gill Nets are completely incompatible. And the fishermen needed to be able to make a living and so developing alternative fishing methods. Were really the only way for Bikita. Survive Louise Mendosa is working on it in his centrally bay office. He pulls a large thin strand net from a milk crate. Wait to the bottom. He's a member of pesca obeys. Say A small nonprofit group of fishermen working with the Mexican government to test alternative driftnets like this one called suit. Peta for this war with the current only with but Mendoza says using these nets can be nearly impossible because of the sheer number of illegal gill nets under the waves. He says even though it's cheaper it will be hard to convince fishermen to use it. They've become very effective. The Gill Nets and with this kind of equipment. You have to get money. The Keita Researcher Barbara Taylor says Mexico needs to support legal fishing if alternative nets prove less profitable and crackdown on poaching. Akitas prime habitat. She still has hope for the species but there are fewer of Akiba every year though. Two of poaching is rampant because the fishes swim bladder is highly prized in China. As a medicinal food. Because there's a little money is more money than drugs. I mean we're talking about twenty thousand dollars twenty five dollars for one soon blind. Jp Geoffroy leads the Conservation Group Sea Shepherd's Makita protection efforts. He says that money has attracted international drug cartels and during high season there can be dozens of boats fishing illegally inside the Vicki to refuge for the last five years sea shepherd has been working with some local fishermen to collect Gill Nets. Trying give the species a fighting chance to recover important. Centrally Bay Crew Members. Use a hook to move huge bags of fishing gear. They've pulled from the ocean. All these boxes contain all Guinea. Gotten it that way we move from riveted by Kedah not all local support sea shepherd's work recently suspected poachers fired shots at a sea. Shepherd vessel in the Makita refuge despite that tension. Geoffroy says they support local fishermen who just want to do their job. We are just trying to work with them and explain to them to. At least respect the small rectangle release the critical area. Geoffroy says if they can just protect the remaining Makita the species can recover but for now observers. Say there's little evidence that current efforts to stop poaching will be enough for NPR news. I'm Arianna Brosius.

Gill Nets Mexico Nets Jp Geoffroy Makita Barbara Taylor Diaz Keita Porpoise Akita United States Ramon Franco San Felipe Arianna Brosius Conservation Group Sea Shepher NPR Tucson Bikita California Brosius
2 suspects in Mexico border killings arrested in US

Larry Elder

00:18 sec | 3 years ago

2 suspects in Mexico border killings arrested in US

"Relatives of nine U. S. D. will national women and children killed in northern Mexico in November say US authorities told and they have two suspects under detention in the United States earlier this week prosecutors said more than forty suspects have been identified in connection with the killings of the extended families who've lived in northern Mexico for

U. S. D. Mexico United States
Mexican Police Chief Arrested in Massacre of Mormon Family

News, Traffic and Weather

00:18 sec | 3 years ago

Mexican Police Chief Arrested in Massacre of Mormon Family

"Mexican authorities have arrested a local police chief who's been linked to the killing of nine members of a Mormon family three women and six children were shot to death on November fourth by a drug cartel in northern Mexico Mexican media outlets on Friday reported that authorities arrested the police chief in the state of Chihuahua lets his vision of being involved in

Mexico
Suspects arrested after shootings that killed 9 women and children

WBZ Morning News

00:17 sec | 3 years ago

Suspects arrested after shootings that killed 9 women and children

"At least four suspects have been detained in the shooting massacre of nine U. S. dual citizens in northern Mexico last month during a meeting with family members of the victims Mexico's president pray for the safety of the country the president also pledging to visit the region where the shootings

Mexico President Trump
Elite US climber Gobright dies rappelling down rock face

Bryan Suits

00:16 sec | 3 years ago

Elite US climber Gobright dies rappelling down rock face

"It a well known climber from Orange County is falling to his death during a climb in Mexico officials in northern Mexico say Brad go bright fell more than nine hundred feet Wednesday from a nearly sheer rock face near the city of Monterey or bright had been described as one of the most accomplished free solo climbers in the world he was thirty

Orange County Mexico Brad Monterey Nine Hundred Feet
Mexico confirms arrests in cartel massacre of Mormon family

Arizona's Morning News

00:43 sec | 3 years ago

Mexico confirms arrests in cartel massacre of Mormon family

"We have some major developments to bring you in the ambush killings of nine American women and children in northern Mexico in fact it's our top story in here's Jenny west Mexico security secretary says arrests have been made in last week's brutal murders by suspected cartel gunmen in northern Mexico K. D. A. R. as Jim crosses live with the latest yeah Germany so far Mexico still not releasing any information details about the number of arrests or where this happened what Gruber cartel the suspects maybe part of others came after arrest last week of a suspect in our free a south of Douglas Arizona that was later found not to be connected to these are murders thirteen year old Devon Langford's mother and two brothers were killed in this ambush he then walked fourteen miles to get help for the other eight children who survive under my mind

Mexico Secretary Germany Douglas Arizona Devon Langford Jenny West Mexico K. D. A. JIM Gruber Thirteen Year
Popeyes violence continues after woman is body-slammed outside Tennessee restaurant

AP 24 Hour News

00:46 sec | 3 years ago

Popeyes violence continues after woman is body-slammed outside Tennessee restaurant

"That of Deputy Assistant defense secretary Laura Cooper who said that there were concerns at the Pentagon about the hold up a military aid to Ukraine she had and she came to learn acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney was the one holding up the aid because of unexplained concerns by president trump about Ukraine former president Jimmy Carter has been hospitalized for a procedure to relieve swelling on his brain caused by his recent falls ninety five year old Carter was hospitalized last month after breaking his pelvis in this fall Mexican security secretarial funds will derive so says a rest of been made in last week's ambush killings of three U. S. women and six children by suspected cartel gunmen in northern Mexico the Roger was not saying how many people have been arrested or what organization

Laura Cooper Pentagon Ukraine Mick Mulvaney President Trump Jimmy Carter Mexico Deputy Assistant White House Chief Of Staff Ninety Five Year
Mexico makes arrests in massacre of American women, children

AP 24 Hour News

00:19 sec | 3 years ago

Mexico makes arrests in massacre of American women, children

"Mexican security secretarial funds will derive so says a rest of been made in last week's ambush killings of three U. S. women and six children by suspected cartel gunmen in northern Mexico the Roger was not saying how many people have been arrested or what organization they may belong to I'm Tim acquire

Mexico
Mexico ambush killings: Final victim's funeral held

AP 24 Hour News

00:21 sec | 3 years ago

Mexico ambush killings: Final victim's funeral held

"After two other funerals in recent days family and friends are bearing the last victim of a cartel ambush that slaughtered nine American women and children in northern Mexico on Monday community members say Christina Lange for Johnson was gunned down after she jumped from a vehicle we have in our hands to show she was no threat her seven month old daughter was found unharmed in her car seat

Mexico Christina Lange Johnson Seven Month
Mexico farm town buries slain Americans

All Things Considered

00:45 sec | 3 years ago

Mexico farm town buries slain Americans

"The first funerals were held today for members of an American family murdered in northern Mexico earlier this week reporter Emily green has the story hundreds of people have arrived in la more Mexico for some of the funerals of the three women and six children the victims were part of a small Mormon community that has lived in farm to Mexico for decades top Mexican officials have said that the women and children may have been killed by accident that occurred told mistakenly believed the convoy of SUVs they were driving and was part of a rival cartel but relatives of the victims say the attack was deliberate the family has stood up to the cartels before and that the gunman shot the victims at point blank range even when it was clear there were children in the vehicles for NPR news and Emily green in Mexico

Mexico Emily Green La More Mexico Reporter NPR
Mexico farm town prepares funerals after 9 Americans slain

Bloomberg Markets

00:25 sec | 3 years ago

Mexico farm town prepares funerals after 9 Americans slain

"Hundreds have gathered in a remote northern Mexico farming town they're there for the first funerals for nine American women and children killed in a drug cartel ambush my mom suburban is full blown out on the Mexican soldiers are guarding the entrance to the town of la mora as the breakaway Mormon family members are laid to

Mexico La Mora