27 Burst results for "Northern Canada"

"northern canada" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

04:05 min | just now

"northern canada" Discussed on A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

"That's right. And as you said, it goes by so many names. And depending regionally where you are in North America, they're very specific to different sites. So you can find a different whole range of sizes to suit your backyard. Almost tree like, and some are quite much more dwarf, but some are almost tree like, really. Right. And some of shrubs, like small shrubs, but some are really big and it's really old ones that are easily 15, maybe larger and as wide. And some that are more rounded and like a traditional shrub kind of a profile. Yeah. Yeah, the only warning I would put about the shrubs. It's often said that June berry can grow in part shade and sun which you can, but we have found that the bush forms, which when they're grown in part shade, they seem to be hit by disease a lot more. I think the parts of the west that those are from like northern Canada. They want to be an open sunlight and get a lot of sunlight. I think they would be much more pest resistant to like rust and fungus and things like that. And they would get better harvests in terms of the shrubs growing sun. Right. My elderberries are blooming right now as we speak. And that's a plant that boy, it doesn't, you know, it's a no brainer as far as it loves to grow and yet the productivity in terms of fruit yield and also the insect appeal during flowering time, so the elderberries tell us about those. I was just going to say we have an elderberry bush growing in about the most abysmal conditions you can imagine. Mine is next to my compost heap in like semi shade. I mean, it's like so out of the way, nobody ever minds it. Nobody does anything to it. It's crazy. Yeah. Are there in slightly almost not quite swampy, but bad heavy clay soil at the bottom of the hill that I think a bird dropped to seedling. I don't know, 30 years ago in our bush is about 25 feet. It's really really tall. Yeah. Thousands and thousands of berries..

North America northern Canada bush berry
"northern canada" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

01:47 min | Last week

"northern canada" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Which is the latest technology is four times more efficient So you have much smaller tablets We like that idea because our customers when we do these surveys they're like don't give me those big tablets I want the smaller ones We added this slippery tech coating which is a slippery technology to these beautiful blue tablets so that they go down faster and smoother than any tablet in the industry but at its core what makes mag blue unique is sure it has the 350 milligrams of this elite magnesium and sure it's in these beautiful blue small tablets but we added vitamin D 2000 units We added a little bit of zinc and boron and these blueberries Jason Yeah Jan I love these Tell everyone about these organic blueberries that we source from northern Canada Talk about the bears for a second I understand there was some issues with bears up there too sometimes Jay what we do to get these blueberries you would not believe I mean they come from way up north in Canada The wind is there They are brutal It's so harsh these conditions that are wild organic blueberries up there They need to create their own antioxidant defense And they are literally bursting with antioxidant power And yes there are bears up there they love the blueberries too so we gotta be a little careful but people love blueberries because they're so great for the brain We actually call them brain berries and when you use mag blue you've got these blueberries there 200% more potent than regular blueberries in terms of their antioxidant power That's why we call this formula mag blue because of these super potent blueberries that are in here and every time you take mag blue you get these benefits and you.

northern Canada Jason Jay Canada
"northern canada" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

01:47 min | Last month

"northern canada" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Which is the latest technology is four times more efficient So you have much smaller tablets We like that idea because our customers when we do these surveys they're like don't give me those big tablets I want the smaller ones We added this slippery tech coating which is a slippery technology to these beautiful blue tablets so that they go down faster and smoother than any tablet in the industry but at its core what makes mag blue unique is sure it has the 350 milligrams of this elite magnesium and sure it's in these beautiful blue small tablets but we added vitamin D 2000 units We added a little bit of zinc and boron and these blueberries Jason Yeah Jan I love these Tell everyone about these organic blueberries that we source from northern Canada Talk about the bears for a second I understand there was some issues with bears up there too sometimes Jay what we do to get these blueberries you would not believe I mean they come from way up north in Canada The wind is there They are brutal It's so harsh these conditions that are wild organic blueberries up there They need to create their own antioxidant defense And they are literally bursting with antioxidant power And yes there are bears up there They love the blueberries too so we gotta be a little careful but people love blueberries because they're so great for the brain We actually call them brain berries And when you use mag blue you've got these blueberries there 200% more potent than regular blueberries in terms of their antioxidant power That's why we call this formula mag blue because of these super potent blueberries that are in here and every time you take mag blue you get these benefits and you.

northern Canada Jason Jay Canada
"northern canada" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

01:49 min | Last month

"northern canada" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Bis glycinate buffered chelate which is the latest technology is four times more efficient So you have much smaller tablets We like that idea because our customers when we do these surveys they're like don't give me those big tablets I want the smaller ones We added this slippery tech coating which is a slippery technology to these beautiful blue tablets so that they go down faster and smoother than any tablet in the industry but at its core what makes mag blue unique is sure it has the 350 milligrams of this elite magnesium and sure it's in these beautiful blue small tablets but we added vitamin D 2000 units We added a little bit of zinc and boron and these blueberries Jason Yeah Jan I love these Tell everyone about these organic blueberries that we source from northern Canada Talk about the bears for a second I understand there are some issues with bears up there too sometimes Jay what we do to get these blueberries you would not believe I mean they come from way up north in Canada The wind is there They are brutal It's so harsh these conditions that are wild organic blueberries up there They need to create their own antioxidant defense And they are literally bursting with antioxidant power And yes there are bears up there They love the blueberries too so we gotta be a little careful but people love blueberries because they're so great for the brain We actually call them brain berries And when you use mag blue you've got these blueberries there 200% more potent than regular blueberries in terms of their antioxidant power That's why we call this formula mag blue because of these super potent blueberries that are in here and every time you take mag blue you get these benefits and you.

northern Canada Jason Jay Canada
"northern canada" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

01:47 min | 2 months ago

"northern canada" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Which is the latest technology is four times more efficient So you have much smaller tablets We like that idea because our customers when we do these surveys they're like don't give me those big tablets I want the smaller ones We added this slippery tech coating which is a slippery technology to these beautiful blue tablets so that they go down faster and smoother than any tablet in the industry but at its core what makes mag blue unique is sure it has the 350 milligrams of this elite magnesium and sure it's in these beautiful blue small tablets but we added vitamin D 2000 units We added a little bit of zinc and boron and these blueberries Jason Yeah Jan I love these Tell everyone about these organic blueberries that we source from northern Canada Talk about the bears for a second I understand there are some issues with bears up there too sometimes Jay what we do to get these blueberries you would not believe I mean they come from way up north in Canada The wind there's there They are brutal It's so harsh these conditions that are wild organic blueberries up there They need to create their own antioxidant defense And they are literally bursting with antioxidant power And yes there are bears up there they love the blueberries too so we gotta be a little careful but people love blueberries because they're so great for the brain We actually call them brain berries and when you use mag blue you've got these blueberries there 200% more potent than regular blueberries in terms of their antioxidant power That's why we call this formula mag blue because of these super potent blueberries that are in here and every time you take mag blue you get these benefits and you.

northern Canada Jason Jay Canada
"northern canada" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

01:47 min | 3 months ago

"northern canada" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Which is the latest technology is four times more efficient So you have much smaller tablets We like that idea because our customers when we do these surveys they're like don't give me those big tablets I want the smaller ones We added this slippery tech coating which is a slippery technology to these beautiful blue tablets so that they go down faster and smoother than any tablet in the industry but at its core what makes mag blue unique is sure it has the 350 milligrams of this elite magnesium and it sure it's in these beautiful blue small tablets but we added vitamin D 2000 units We added a little bit of zinc and boron and these blueberries Jason Yeah Jan I love these Tell everyone about these organic blueberries that we source from northern Canada Talk about the bears for a second I understand there was some issues with bears up there too sometimes Jay what we do to get these blueberries you would not believe I mean they come from way up north in Canada The wind is there They are brutal It's so harsh these conditions that are wild organic blueberries up there They need to create their own antioxidant defense And they are literally bursting with antioxidant power And yes there are bears up there They love the blueberries too so we gotta be a little careful but people love blueberries because they're so great for the brain We actually call them brain berries And when you use mag blue you've got these blueberries there 200% more potent than regular blueberries in terms of their antioxidant power That's why we call this formula mag blue because of these super potent blueberries that are in here and every time you take mag blue you get these benefits and you.

northern Canada Jason Jay Canada
"northern canada" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

01:49 min | 3 months ago

"northern canada" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Bis glycinate buffered chelate which is the latest technology is four times more efficient So you have much smaller tablets We like that idea because our customers when we do these surveys they're like don't give me those big tablets I want the smaller ones We added this slippery tech coating which is a slippery technology to these beautiful blue tablets so that they go down faster and smoother than any tablet in the industry but at its core what makes mag blue unique is sure it has the 350 milligrams of this elite magnesium and sure it's in these beautiful blue small tablets but we added vitamin D 2000 units We added a little bit of zinc and boron and these blueberries Jason Yeah Jan I love these Tell everyone about these organic blueberries that we source from northern Canada Talk about the bears for a second I understand there are some issues with bears up there too sometimes Jay what we do to get these blueberries you would not believe I mean they come from way up north in Canada The wind is there They are brutal It's so harsh these conditions that are wild organic blueberries up there They need to create their own antioxidant defense And they are literally bursting with antioxidant power And yes there are bears up there They love the blueberries too so we gotta be a little careful but people love blueberries because they're so great for the brain We actually call them brain berries and when you use mag blue you've got these blueberries there 200% more potent than regular blueberries in terms of their antioxidant power That's why we call this formula mag blue because of these super potent blueberries that are in here and every time you take mag blue you get these benefits and you.

northern Canada Jason Jay Canada
"northern canada" Discussed on AvTalk - Aviation Podcast

AvTalk - Aviation Podcast

03:05 min | 7 months ago

"northern canada" Discussed on AvTalk - Aviation Podcast

"And they will be operating one of their a three 40s to Antarctica on a regular basis this particular summer season supporting one of the stations in Antarctica. That was an interesting bit and one that I did not have that one on my radar. I didn't know that that's what they were up to. No, and Hi-Fi put together a really, really good detailed blog post and video about their first flight down there the first of many, I guess for this season, good that they used an a three 40, I guess, because if they don't do it now, they may not ever have the chance that aircraft, many of them left operating in the world, but this one, they acquired a few years ago from Iberia. So maybe you have been on this aircraft this a three 40 that point to Antarctica, 9 8 SOL was the aircraft. I prefer to call it 9 inch soul because 9 inch SOL. I mean, I know what it sounds like. But they haven't had that particular issue yet. No, I'm just I'm just saying, you know it's more fun. Yeah, not even the largest aircraft. I don't think to go to Antarctica, but definitely one of the most interesting. I think the C 5 still holds that record. And probably always will and probably always will, that's true. Unless the AN two two 5 miraculously somehow makes it down to Antarctica at some point. We've got a lot of a three 80s to spare these days. That's true. That's true. Well, we'll get on that one. To close out the show, we've talked about, I think, goats before in notes we've talked about birds endlessly, crane obstacles sure, but a new one this week was maybe not new, but new to me, polar bears. Oh, where were they? They were up in northern Canada, and they were camped out on the runway. So they said no landings. They actually issued a notum saying that run my window. No, they didn't. But they could have. I don't think the bears were there. Well, yeah, I don't think there's a, I don't think there was scheduled service there and be I don't think that the bears were there long enough in order for the note to be necessary. However, they could have. I don't know if the bears themselves could have issued the notum, but it's entirely possible. Maybe they could if there's some sort of sensor that they trigger and it automatically sends out a barrel alert. Oh. Now we're talking. We should get cracking on that technology. We should. We should. Have talked podcast and bare notum issuance service. I like it. An emerging sector. I like it. Well, on that inventive note, let's call this episode 140. We will see each and every one of you next week from Stockholm. And look forward to that fun show. We'll have, I think some special guests will have to see how everything works out with everyone's travel schedule in order to keep that promise. But until then, thank you so much for listening everyone. We hope you have a great week. We will talk to you then. This has been episode 140 of av talk. I am Ian pechenik here as always with. Jason Robinhood. Thanks.

Antarctica Iberia bears northern Canada Stockholm Ian pechenik Jason Robinhood
"northern canada" Discussed on Drive with Us Podcast

Drive with Us Podcast

03:10 min | 8 months ago

"northern canada" Discussed on Drive with Us Podcast

"I'd feel it. I wish i could go to alaska and then one day. Who's like it's right there. It's like a three driver. Four day drive. So i thought now is the time. Let's go for it by three. My little tainting. The back of my jeep hit the road and then a friend of mine said if you want to keep the window what you head down to. Mexico was like oh that sounds like a pretty good idea. I like the sound of that. And then the whole thing just snowballed in one thousand in mexico. I was like why. Don't i drive into belize and then why i drive into guatemala and it just kept rolling of like this is so much fun. I don't want it to end originally. You weren't planning on going the whole way. And then you're just like why don't woj read it all the way down. Yeah originally. i found it really stressful to try and think about doing the whole thing. I remember early on. People would tell me all. You're gonna love peru when you get to agitate and make sure you go here. And i remember saying like no no no slowdown like that's why to fire away. One all that stress and all that pressure. I'm just gonna go for as long as i feel like it. And if i'm scared. Or if i don't feel saiful something goes wrong. I'll just do something else i. I didn't want us to the whole thing so it was. It was more just like go until. I'm not enjoying myself anymore and whatever that turned out to be. How is the giants. They go smoothly. The drive went very smoothly. On the scale of how smoothly these things can go. But it's it's like a whole different world some of those driving experiences. I still have dreams about the more. I still think about it when i'm driving here in australia. It's extremely organized and peaceful driving over there. It's hectic driving and so it's like opposite world well as your most favorite stop like point that you drove through and what was your least favorite. It's it's really. I feel like it almost doesn't a disservice to sort of peak one place because people always say what about this other one. But in general. I actually fell in love with alaska. I'm moved after. I finish the trip. I actually moved and leave the northern canada. Just a couple of hours from the border of alaska. Because when you're up there this is something special about the wilderness and about the mountains and the length of the deicing summa the sun's up for twenty two hours a day. And just to be able to go and hock up a mountain and not see another person the only musso you see a bear or dating the winter. You say the northern lights and so for me alaska. I think he's one of the most beautiful place. Either beanie my whole life. And i'll go back for the rest of my life. I love it so much and in terms of least favorite When i was in central america honduras at the time had a bit of a bad reputation for corrupt police military and try to extort. You try to get money out of you. And so i actually drove across the entire country of honduras seeing guy so i got up really early. In the morning. El salvador crossed the border into honduras. Drove a few hundred miles across honduras and then crossed the border into nicaragua and so that was like an it now a day or something. It was enormous and it was exhausting and stressful. I recommend that anyone do that if they can help..

alaska saiful belize guatemala peru Mexico mexico giants northern canada honduras musso australia sun central america El salvador nicaragua
"northern canada" Discussed on The Photographer's Journey

The Photographer's Journey

04:15 min | 9 months ago

"northern canada" Discussed on The Photographer's Journey

"Your just doing needs whereas this has to be useful. Because when i use hashtag i wanna find stuff airways Some lady from an agency mccann who is owned by wonderman weighty thousand college at the time of anything about adage sees this lady wants to buy. Nfl they sort many times. But this lady wants to buy one of my photos that you found on five hundred to two keywords like worked and he always years putting keillor's people like friends at other your keywords boring. You know who wants to punch keyboards. He wears on a computer for hours. So this lady wanted to this photo for somebody's yearly salary pretty much like she was working on behalf of microsoft for the launch of their microsoft. Service this lady was very nice. User account manager for microsoft. I still to this date having to take her out for dinner. Yeah that's what we need to cover For a gully some money. And then the next year i'd andrea had met andrea my wife now in college in quebec i went to quebec to study. We decided it was time to travel discontinued college for awhile and we went on the road for a year. On microsoft's we cannot got kick started by microsoft indirectly. Although they pay for something wasn't grant they bought something new with five. That fueled our careers tremendously because nobody answered say at the same time those beginnings of two thousand eleven and that's when they bought that image as it will travel the world on their diamond. Start putting photos on instagram of but the golden morocco canada and northern canada and the yukon. You know things that people under student putting photos of their toast. The wow. that's crazy this. Doing more is gonna bring photography to instagram. Where it wasn't right wasn't for that yet. That was the beginning. Sounds like a really unique story. I'm it sounds like you really got lucky with that. Microsoft rapley friend was as a gossip. Fucking got all his money to say. Well the house guy putting all the key words unforgiving but also sounds like whoever that person was she really stick up.

microsoft mccann keillor andrea quebec Nfl golden morocco northern canada rapley canada
The Arctics Mysterious Ping

Unexplained Mysteries

01:50 min | 1 year ago

The Arctics Mysterious Ping

"In two thousand sixteen. A man piloted his sailboat. Through the fury and hecklers straight in the northern canadian territory of nunavut as he cut through the water his sonar equipment emitted a peculiar sound. It was a single long tone high pitched and shrill to consistent to be run of the mill background noise after a few moments. The sound stopped but it had already kick started a mystery. The sailor was the first person to hear the nunavut ping. We don't know how word spread but soon news of the pain had reached the local at town of igloo. Lick as with many small hamlets in northern canada. A lot of glue lick residents relied on the ocean. They made their living hunting seals and other water mammals and they usually found their prey in the fury and hecklers straight. This waterway boasted an abundance of seals and was free from ice year round but recently hunters had struggled in the fury and hekla straight. Nobody knew why but the animals were disappearing win. The glue lick heard about the ping. They assumed a connection. The southbound must be driving the seals out of the fury and heckler straight even more concerning the ping hadn't done away over the next few weeks other hunters and if few vacationers on yachts detected it as well. If they listened carefully they could hear it through their hall but it appeared clear as day on sonar witnesses described it as a beep abuzz or most commonly ping no one could figure out where it came from

Nunavut Igloo Canada
Break the Stigma with Founder of Consent Parenting!

Latinx Therapy

06:16 min | 1 year ago

Break the Stigma with Founder of Consent Parenting!

"Back with another segment but this is one of our special segments that we haven't done in many many months. This segment is a break. The stigma episode and in these episodes. We talk with amazing professionals. Amazing people out in the community globally. Who are doing things differently. Who are doing things to advocate and empower our community with education through the use of their voice and story so for today. I want to introduce you to our guests. Her name israel saliha ribeira. She is a consent. Educator abuse prevention specialist sexual literacy advocate speaker change agent and founder of consent parenting which will hear all about in a moment. She's the host of about consent podcast and creator of consent. Wear both of those are trademarked. By the way rosalia teaches parents particularly child sexual abuse survivors out to educate their children on body safety boundaries and consent so that they can empower their families to prevent abuse and break intergenerational cycles russell liaison mission to end child sexual abuse dismantle shame and help survivors heal and become drivers rosalia certified through the canadian centre for child. Protection's omit two kids program and darkness to light stewards of child program as well as the human trafficking prevention training program auld on watch safehouse project although leah was born in el salvador grew up in new york and now she resides in northern canada with her parents and three young children welcomed leah inc. You so much for having me excited to be here. Yes i've known you now. Maybe for a couple of years more so in the digital realm space though i was also a guest in your amazing podcast. That was probably maybe like nine months ago. I think so yeah. It was one of my favorite episodes because it was about very much the same breaking down the taboos dismantling those taboos that are so hard for people to talk about but some necessary so rosalia can tell us what is consent parenting. Yes so consent. Parenting is my online platform. Where i teach as i said child sexual abuse survivors who are parents. How to empower their families and they do that through workshops courses a membership in. This is really to help them. Have those conversations that they find. Maybe they didn't have that. Nobody taught them and of course because of their own traumatic experiences they may feel triggered by the content of of how to teach this so i helped walk them through that process of educating them so that they can educate their kids and dramatically lower the risk of those children being abused and being able to break those cycles. And what motivated you to create all your programs so when my oldest at the time was five sos about four years ago. I realized that i hadn't done enough at that point. They were starting to go into kindergarten. And i had like panic attack because as a survivor myself. I did not want them to obviously have that experience. I wanted to make sure that they were staying safe and realized that i had waited too long so i started educating myself about how they teach children abuse prevention because it was not something that my mom taught me. Unfortunately she's also survivor but she didn't. It's not that she didn't teach me because it wants to. She just didn't know. And i didn't want to be in that same position so i started educating myself and i had actually a lot of suppressed memories which i didn't even know about until i started learning about abuse prevention and these memory started to surface and i was getting triggered because diving into this kind of education. When it comes to your own kids you become brittle thanks. -iety and panic that. How are you going to keep them safe. So i would do the training myself. I would try to teach my child. I'd get triggered. I'd stop for a while and i realized that i really needed to step into my own healing journey. If i was going to do this and if i was going to do it right so i started doing some of that and as i was learning about the things that i needed to teach i realized that most programs were teaching you why it was important and what you needed to teach. But they didn't show you how to teach it like and there was no one that was even speaking to the survivor. Experience to say this might be really triggering. And here's how to navigate that so that you keep going so that you teach this comprehensively and so that's when i realized you know all of the stuff that i was learning in the healing that i was going through in the therapy that i was seeking out had all helps me to learn how to do this really effectively. And i saw the transformation my children and i started to realize that it was actually part of my healing being able to empower children. And then i realized like nobody was teaching this and nobody was talking about this from the perspective of survivor to talk to other survivors because unfortunately children of survivors are actually five times. More likely to be abused because their parents shy away from teaching this or altogether. Don't realize what the other risks are because they don't talk to other survivors about it. So i ended up deciding two years ago now to embark on doing this myself so i got certified and i got all the trainings that i needed to do. And then started actually innovating some of the products that i create myself for those two pieces like i would always hear create a safety network and it's like okay. How do i do that though you know so. I started creating that like exact process for parents to make it easier. My mission has been like. How can we make the easiest possible for parents to do it and also to be able to reach the spanish speaking community so i started also creating products in spanish which are all free all of the products that i create in

Rosalia Saliha Ribeira Canadian Centre For Child Leah Inc. El Salvador Leah Israel Canada New York
"northern canada" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

02:24 min | 1 year ago

"northern canada" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Very, very easy to swallow. I'm sure you'll get into that. So why don't you want to be the one to tell us about Mag Blue? Tell the audience about its core J. The idea behind Mag Blue is, let's do something with magnesium that's never been done before. I mean, if you want to run out and get cheap, magnesium, the magnesium carbonates in the sulfates, therefore percent efficient. So you wind up taking massive amounts for five big giant whopper pills to get a few 100 mg of magnesium. That's like the old technology, the magnesium, this kleiss innate buffered Kilic, which is the latest technology is four times more efficient. So you have much smaller tablets. We like that idea because our customers when we do this service, they're like, Don't give me those big tablets. I want the smaller ones. We added this slippery tech coding, which is a slippery technology to these beautiful blue tablets so that they go down faster and smoother than any tablet in the industry. But at its core, What makes mag blue unique is sure it has the 350 MG of this elite magnesium. And sure it's in these beautiful blue small tablets. But we added vitamin D 2000 units, we added a little bit of zinc and boron and these blueberries Jason Yeah, Channa. I love these. Tell everyone about these organic blueberries that we source from Northern Canada. Talk about the Bears for a second. I understand There are some issues with bears of their too sometimes. Hey, what we do to get these blueberries you would not believe. I mean, they come from way up north in Canada, the winters there they are Brutal. It's so hard. These conditions that are wild organic blueberries up there. They need to create their own antioxidant defense, and they are literally bursting. With antioxidant power. And yes, there are bears up there. They love the blueberries, too. So we got to be a little careful, But people love blueberries because they're so great for the brain. We actually call them brain Berries. And when you use Mag blue, you've got these blueberries there 200% more potent than regular blueberries in terms of their antioxidant power. That's why we call this formula. Mag Blue because of these super potent blueberries that air in here, and every time you take mag blue, you get these benefits and you get benefits..

Mag blue Bears Northern Canada
"northern canada" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

03:08 min | 1 year ago

"northern canada" Discussed on WTVN

"Socialist states of North America Well became America off the northern capital, one northern Canada, whatever they want, calm and the United States of America and people can make their choices as to what they want to do. Now, I would say they have to have a timeframe. You've got three years. Take the state Do you want to live in It could change. We gotta get those states that we're going to stay this way within their legislatures, okay and vote And I mean right now it's Stan, Ohio, because we're 8% plus You know, Good Texas. There's life states. But they're all changing, too. But I think it's time to do that. I mean, we're gonna stand. I think on something like that. You want to protect all the people Whether you're one way or the other, it's far fetched. But as I don't see anything else, uh, solving this really right, Jim. Thanks. And you know to your point, even though you you know, don't have something specific affecting you. You're going. I know that It's not so far fetched that it could for sure, Chris. Thank you for waiting. Do you have something that this is personally affected you this this political landscape. Absolutely. Blazer, Man. Happy New Year's to you guys. Happy New Year, brother. Let me tell you like a few collars back so much of this can be directly attributed to our education system and what I mean by that. Is Thies institutions of higher indoctrination. Some of the stuff that they're pumping into the heads of these kids is saying absolutely ridiculous, Man. The way it's affected me personally is I no longer have any resemblance of a relationship with my daughter. And it's you know, it's cross and may it's crossing my family. But You know our political views they never and I have to think. Just So much of the stuff that she believes is just simple untruth and also about the founding of this country and how we became the greatest ability greatest country on the planet. You know what I mean? Yeah, And you know what? Chris? I'm right with you. You know, I have ah, about to be a 15 year old daughter. And I'm having these conversations constantly, and I'm hearing you talk. And I'm in my head. I'm saying to myself, I feel like I'm headed that direction. Some days I've got to talk to her. I've got to. I've got to tell her all the time. Because of not necessarily the people, The teachers and the school district. It's season, but a lot of her friends, Chris, their parents are of the belief of a lot of the left untruth. And I don't even want to call it believes untruth and she is kind of listening to them, and I'm constantly fighting it. So I feel you, man. Laser man. They're taking the history of the books. You know, they've infested the rain. But right here in Washington, you know that they're taking facts and truths out of history and replaced them with fillings and and the way they think Shane. Things should have been or had been handled. It's just what they're doing. Our families is ridiculous Fan. I'm not spoken of my daughter since June, she No. No call no shows from the holidays than any temple grandmother..

Chris North America United States Ohio Canada Texas Stan school district Jim Washington Shane
"northern canada" Discussed on Strange Brew Podcast!

Strange Brew Podcast!

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"northern canada" Discussed on Strange Brew Podcast!

"Like how i've told you before. Whatever you wanna putting your buddies your business and now he's still my boy and and we appreciate it. We have different views on things. But you're not. You know what i mean here. You out like that's cool. Yeah but i liked to be. I don't believe that the world is because we got a. I got a couple more things but if you want for the ending a little i can read off some fun. Read stories of people that have had ufo encounters they're very short but flooding argo bullshit. Northern canada there are two beliefs about whistling and the northern lights. Some tribes will tell you that if you whistle to them the lights dance for you other tribes claim that if you whistle wilder out the northern lights come down and cuts you up for safety. I learned to never whistle after northern lights. And that's just stupid ready to but but bro but listen. That's fucking drive. Is that about indian. Tribes data indigenous. People they're not indians. Indians are from india. We talked about the window go. We talked them all that shit that makes sense. You know what. I mean like me. I thought that was crazy. You whistle at the northern lights and they cut you up so kids shut the fuck up but you know it's like one got doing the news report he's like hey can summon. Ufo's he's like. Oh my do you want the guys like route. Were skeptical. dads. He's like holy shit. They're us and he's like praying and she never whistle in jail if he ever get arrested never whistle in jail. It's associated with birds and people will fucking murder you because if you whistle a it's a reflection of the outside and birds and being outside motherfuckers will kill you for whistling jail. Is that fun crazy fucking. So there's got a couple more that are just fun fucked up so this guy is like. I was standing driveway voice. Smoking a cigarette listening to my ipod. So obviously this is fucking old somewhere around two a m. I decided to pause my ipod to turn the back light on. I got the feeling. I was being watched. I looked up and directly above me was a trapezoid shaped craft with round edges and had dark red and black pulsating glowing outline. It was floating like electricity and it was not even seventy five feet up. I could hit this thing with iraq. I stood there while it was hovering directly above me silent for maybe ten to fifteen seconds well. It may of emotion similar to the bowl that luke skywalker trained with star. Wars fucking nerd. It hovered side to side front back and smooth motions never getting more than twenty feet away from its original position. It was extremely fascinating. I was frozen stiff. After those few seconds i wave my hand added and a friendly manner and then the blight patterns change and hovered away behind my mail behind my house. I wish i followed it. Although i was too freaked out at the time to do it that would be..

Northern canada wilder india luke skywalker iraq
Gary Quequish (Oji-Cree)

The Storyteller

04:24 min | 2 years ago

Gary Quequish (Oji-Cree)

"STEIG good day. Welcome my friends to the storyteller who you'll find first nations people from across native North America who are following Jesus Christ without reservation. Have, you ever been set free from the weight of sin and shame. It's possible my friend, and that's something that today's storyteller experienced firsthand in a powerful way. My name is Gerry Creek. Wish I. Come from round Lake Ontario. It's often called. Riach amount these days. I come from north Caribou Lake Band of people. I come from a family of. Thirteen children. What took place in Nineteen, seventy three? Was a miracle. Hard the large delivered me. From the bondage of sin. I still to this day relive the moment of salvation. Forty years later. And I thank God for his. Mercy for His grace. For his love for his. Provision for his presence in my life. Even to this day. As I said earlier. I come from a family of thirteen children. In those early years up in North Carol-. We had a pretty rough. Time My Dad left my mom. In those earlier's. What happened was in nineteen, fifty, two, fifty three. Missionaries, up the northern Canada Evangelical mission. Came around lake. Missionary by the name of clift mccomb came over there. And the whole village practically probably about ninety five percent of the village. were saved. The first Church elders were. Converted. Shaman converted Madison Man. My mother was saved. During bad year. I. May Have Been. In my mother's womb. When my mother got saved. I've never seen my mother. Drink. Or curse or. Take drugs. She always lift for God. I remember her as a praying woman. She Witten pray short prayers. Prayers like Rub. A DUB DUB blessed his grupp kind of prayer. But she would prey. Oh two hours three hours. Per Day. When? My mother became a Christian my father. Left my mom. During be happy and other reasons one of them in reasons why he left mum. Was Her conversion. My father was in the. the traditional path, the red path. And he couldn't stay. In the same house. I know. Growing up later realized that my father. Left my mother for another woman. But Dodd really caused hardship. In my mother and raising us! But she prayed. She went to church. And participated in church activities. In nineteen seventy. My father became a Christian. and My mother had. Prayed much for him. And loved him. And she even led The woman my father was living with. was in relationship with. She led that lady to

Gerry Creek North Caribou Lake Lake Ontario North America North Carol Northern Canada Evangelical Mi Clift Mccomb Lake Witten Madison Man Dodd
New England's Dark Day - May 19, 1780

This Day in History Class

02:59 min | 2 years ago

New England's Dark Day - May 19, 1780

"Day was may nineteenth seventeen. Eighty this guy. In New England and parts of Northern Canada turned unusually dark in an event remembered as the dark day several days before may nineteenth people in New England notice that the sky appeared smokey and the Sun and the moon appeared read on the morning of May Nineteenth. The Sky was cloudy and still had a reddish you throughout the morning. This guy continued to get darker by noon. People were using candles for light. The darkness stretch from the skies over Portland Maine to the southern coast of New England. It was so unusual that many people paint some people went to church while others went to taverns birds reportedly suffocated from the smoke and ash. Some people noted that the air smelled like sit the Connecticut legislature even move to adjourn Abraham Davenport. A member of the Governor's council opposed joining the legislature. He said that quote the day of judgement is either approaching or it is not if it is not there is no cause of an adjournment if it is to be found doing my duty. Harvard Professor Samuel Williams collected observations about the darkness and wrote about the day's events. According to his account the darkness continued until the middle of the next night. He said the following candles were lighted up in the houses. The birds having some their evening songs disappeared and became silent fouls retired to roost. The were crawling all around as at break of day objects could not be distinguished but at a very little distance and everything for the appearance. In Gloom of Night Williams reported that people saw a layer of scum on the surface of water that appeared to be the ashes of burnt leaves from his observations. He determined the likely cause of the darkness. He suggested that fires had caused favors to rise in collect in the air since the weather had been clear the air heavy in the wind quote small invariable but many people dismissed the idea that wildfires caused the darkness in the weeks after may nineteenth people proposed different theories about the origins of the event. Some thought that sunlight was being blocked by a huge mountain others believe that biblical prophecy being fulfilled later. Research suggested that distant forest fires cost the darkness researchers from the University of Missouri and US Forest Service examined tree rings and fire scars and determined that a major fire occurred in seventeen eighty in Algonquin provincial. Park in Ontario Canada. They concluded that a low pressure weather system curate smoke from the West or north to New England. The fires in the Algan highlands were the most likely cause of New England's dark day but fires burning in the eastern. Us could have also contributed to the darkness.

New England Samuel Williams Algan Highlands Abraham Davenport Northern Canada Ontario Canada Portland Connecticut Maine Us Forest Service Harvard Professor University Of Missouri
David duChemin

Photography Radio

08:11 min | 2 years ago

David duChemin

"Low fellow photographers Thomas here. I hope you're having a wonderful light these days having fun with your photography and even more importantly producing some images you are proud and happy with today. I would like to share with you. My conversation with one of the photographers. I admire the most and have been following for years. Today's guest is David Duchemin and I am pretty sure you have heard about David before. He's a world and humanitarian assignment photographer. Best selling author of Photography Books Workshop Leader and also a digital publisher. She's the founder of craft envision probably the best digital photography bookstore out there Editor in Chief of Photograph Magazine and contributing columnist to photo life. Enjoy my conversation with David. Duchemin Hello David. I'm I'm thrilled and honored to have you here. I know very well that you're quite busy. Guy Photographer teacher workshop leader. So so just that you know I appreciate it a lot that he decided to take a bit of your valuable time to join me here on the show. Thanks to be your thank you David. Do you remember the the very last photograph you to that? You were very happy with I do actually. And it's it's very recent I've just got back from a sailing trip in northern Canada in an area that we call the great bear rainforest and I have been there before and to be honest. I've done a couple of trips recently and Had Bad luck with weather in bad luck with circumstance and I was just feeling like I needed. I needed a win. You know sometimes you just have to accept that no matter what you're GonNa do in light room or Photoshop. You just photographs aren't doing it. And so I I was on this trip and I was sitting on a rock in the middle of this river waiting for this bear. And we have this this species of bear in on the West Coast and in very particular part of the West Coast of Canada that we call the spirit bear. It's a black bear it's but it's completely white so it looks like a little bit like a little polar bear with very rare very beautiful and I was air in the great bear rainforest to photograph these bears and I had been there a couple years. Previously there was shot. I wanted where the bear was standing on a rock. And they're such beautiful bears and I wanted something. That was a little more interpretive. Not just a little shot of a bear on a rocket thousands of a second so I thought you know if I could slow down my shudder I could get you standing in a stream. So is basically in the middle of a waterfall against the water to do to sort of blur and And it'd be really Nice contrast between the bear and this river. The problem is this bear just kept moving. You know and and I was hoping I was hand holding The equivalent of six hundred millimeters at an eighth of a second and the challenge technology has has advanced so much. The challenge was not me holding my hand. Still I can hold this lens at an eighth of a second. Get a perfectly sharp photograph except the beer kept moving and I was trying and trying and trying and I finally got it. And that's a long way of telling you about these circumstances but the the photograph just it you know you look on the back of the monitoring you just have this feeling that I can't even describing the moment itself with with the bear was unbelievable but that I finally after a couple of years nailed this one photograph in and captured that feeling of being there. It was pretty intoxicating. You just mentioned that. It's kind of difficult to describe. What is what is just about the feeling into kind of intuitive almost like emotional kind of reaction right to your own image. Probably like how would you try to define? What makes a good photograph? What is a good photograph for you? Well for okay. So there's two questions there are what does make a good photograph. And what makes a good photograph for me? I think everyone will have their own answer. There are there are reasons that we all make our own photographs. Things that we want to accomplish but for me. What makes a good photograph is one that engages that connects with people? You know when they look at it. They're not thinking. Oh I wonder what lens he made this with. Or what camera. I wonder what his histogram looked like. Oh my gosh. It's such a sharp photograph. There's something more their their story. There's poetry there's Emotion and mood that kind of thing that human connection where photographs goes a little bit past? The brain connects on a deeper level Not Without the brain but just on that deeper level where you're thinking about it days later or it makes you think a different thing or feel something. I just wanted to connect and you know the kind of photograph. It is will determine how it connects. But it's that connection that is so important to me. I do think because each one of us is constructed a different way we have different emotional structures and different memory is different histories and so on and then we always believed that. I mean those of us who are deep into the photography in Ohio really enjoying living it on a daily basis. We believed at what we feel will connect or connects with us. We'll kind of translate into you. Know we will send this message. Further and hopefully other viewers also connect to the image to the same story. So where do you think? Is this common denominator. Is there something like this? Which is kind of like a common emotional message that we can into image. I would say I would say common but not universal I think that you identified it rightly that we all have different memories and well so for example. This photograph that I made a bear. Some people were will react. with confusion. If they don't know that a white blackberry exists. I think it's a polar bear in Weiser standing in the middle of you know a rain forest Some people maybe that have had experience with a bear that is a deeply negative And have fear about it will feel a different thing about the photograph and someone that has spent time there in that location with maybe even the same bears will have yet another emotional reaction to this so I do think that there can be commonality and then our work will find its own audience. Some just some people just won't resonate with your work at all. They won't understand it. They won't like that's fine but you can't resonate with absolutely everyone but it will find its own audience and for those people. Yes that's those people are the people who feel this common thing about that photograph but even then it's not it's not specifically common is. Just I think in generalities do think Adding description at least titles photographs Mexican cute. Do you add captions and titles to your own images when publishing them. I think context is everything Tomas I think sometimes context can be important for example if I want my work to be put forward or to have a conservation message. I may include that photograph with a story or with a short paragraph. That explains some of the detail or some of the urgency or the statistics that are behind for example. These spirit bears or you know endangered an endangered shark or something. If you're using the photograph in that context yes it would provide more information than the photograph Cam but if you were putting it on a wall or submitting it for consideration for a major awards competition Then the caption would would be less at necessary because the work is stands on its own as as what it is so I think context is everything. Sometimes it's really helpful and understanding and other times it's it's not necessary

David Duchemin Photograph Magazine Canada West Coast Thomas Publisher Founder Editor In Chief Tomas Weiser Ohio
Global warming shortens Arctic ice road season

Climate Connections

01:11 min | 2 years ago

Global warming shortens Arctic ice road season

"Many people avoid driving on ice. He wrote in northern Canada's Arctic Tundra. Some roads are made of ice. A network of seasonal roads on frozen rivers and lakes allows trucks to reach remote areas. Many of these places are otherwise accessible. Only by boat or plane but as the climate warms. The ice road season is getting shorter. Show Young of the University of North Carolina. Chapel Hill analyzed more than three decades of satellite images of rivers around the globe. He looked at which rivers were frozen and win way to take the widespread gig client in river is in the past thirty years. In general have later frees up of the river surface and we have earlier break up of the river surface and has consequences for when you actually built. This is roads young also studied. What is likely to happen to river? Ice If global carbon pollution and temperatures continue arise. He found that by twenty one hundred. Some rivers could be ice free for weeks longer than they are now so global warming could continue to the ice road season and make it harder and more expensive to reach some remote and isolated places in the Arctic.

Arctic Tundra Chapel Hill Arctic University Of North Carolina Canada
Why Are Scientists Asking Hikers to Stop Stacking Rocks?

BrainStuff

02:55 min | 2 years ago

Why Are Scientists Asking Hikers to Stop Stacking Rocks?

"If you've been out on a hiking trail lately you've you've probably noticed them. Suddenly popping up everywhere. Small intentionally stacked piles of rocks. Called Cairns and environmentalists worldwide are increasingly increasingly alarmed because moving rocks can have numerous unintended consequences for insects animals. And even the land itself people have been in stacking rocks since the dawn of time typically four directional or burial purposes such structures have been found in Greenland Northern Canada and Alaska and were built by Anita People's for specific purposes like navigation to indicate a food source or to warn of danger. More recently park officials began creating them on hiking trails else especially potentially confusing pads to help ensure that hikers don't get lost in eighteen ninety six a man named Waldron Bates created a specific civic style of hiking Karen in Acadia National Park. The Bates Cairns as they became known consisted of a rectangular stone balanced top two legs and then topped opt with one stone pointing to the trail. These Cairns were replaced by standard ones in the nineteen fifties and sixties but the park began rebuilding the historic Bates Cairns in the nineteen ninety S. Acadia no contains a mixture of both. What's concerning scientists? Today is the new practice of creating rock piles as an art. Form form or for alluring social media posts because stacking rocks is not an innocuous practice many insects and mammals head under rocks to live reproduce reduce or just escape. They're predators so move a rock and you might destroy a home stack a few. And you may have just exposed the hunted to their hunters. And and while that may sound melodramatic whether you're stacking rocks in the woods on the beach or in the desert your actions could inadvertently knock out an entire colony. Or in the worst case scenario threaten and endangered species some rock stacking fans note that they're being responsible by returning their rocks to the spots where they found them after after creating and then disassembling artwork however the second move rocks you may compromise species habitat in an unrecoverable manner. In addition moving rocks in any fashion contributes to soil erosion as the dirt ones protectively packed under them is now loosened and more prone to washing or blowing away. Why should you come upon? Stacked rocks especially in national parks. Leave him alone. And if you're hiking don't automatically follow where they seemed point. The National Park Service recommends checking with Park officials before setting out on a hike as every park has different rules about kearns. You wouldn't want to remove those intentionally set as navigational AIDS nor would you want to follow those. That may have been randomly. If artistically assembled by visitors in the end let your actions be guided by the important principle principle. Leave no trace.

Acadia National Park Bates Cairns Waldron Bates National Park Service Anita People Alaska Greenland Northern Canada Kearns
"northern canada" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

04:19 min | 3 years ago

"northern canada" Discussed on KGO 810

"Confirm president trump is talk to aids in members of Congress about possibly buying green land close to such a point this week the green ones from there how to issue a statement saying green is not full size two and a half years in your office pool of when a world leader would have to tell trump get called boil country since you're a big win besting intending to Greenland in quite awhile I'm guessing is I've seen it more information about Greenland how beautiful it is I really preferred color let new not which is the Greenlandic pronunciation if you don't mind got your but the in trouble couldn't of like people say off gonna stop on to try to sound more sophisticated could not have done more for their tourism board then then nobody could have done more than from dead I'm not sure they got one it's like frozen S. coal Rosencrantz gauge cold the majority of its residents jacker in you it was ancestors migrated from Alaska and northern Canada so they tell me that's right it's the world's largest island Australian Antarctica both larger than Greenland are generally considered to be continental land masses rather nine went to visit grandma it's all day I know you could I went to visit grandma grandpa over the weekend that's where I was on Friday not my grandma grandpa but my mom and dad my two boys grandma grandma and visited them in Arizona and it's a sh log it's a it's a flight and then you get a drive for hours and get a rental car and all that sort of stuff and it's a it's a long shot or we would would probably do it more often but anyway yesterday when we're taking final pictures before we took off everybody was just so happy about the whole thing my kids and my grandparents products night and in and their grandparents and just I was just saying about how awesome that's our that's our genes screaming at us is the reason it makes is so happy I mean it was fun and everything is all bad yeah also but your genes are just screaming at you as the the starting at the very top of look my offspring of had offspring my jeans are going to continue yes and and and I'm seeing you know the people to raise me and I'm raising these give them and then they're feeling the other way look I've got a background behind me that will allow me to prosper and just that is all as his biological as anything could be us being happy about that sort of thing seeing that we're capable of passing along or jeans because that really are only him you know imperative is as is beasts that's what we're doing even though we don't realize that that's why we dress the way we dress that's why we do with the things we do virtually everything virtually everything you do is to to mate and have children to raise them and when you get together and like reinforce that it's working well makes everybody really really happy yeah that in with you know some pie and stuff like that may be a recipe for success yeah there are certainly are the pleasures of companionship and affection and pie in the recipe you could do that with other people in it we would not get even close to the same however well observed vise off big pie eaten friend that's a good point your tribe in the most tribe sense of it yeah exactly right that's that's what I'm saying yeah you could go to a couple other people same age have pie right they're riding lawn more around but it wouldn't have the same effect on you right right and they did do that wrote the writing one more on which they really have got to call my parents okay and I was going to yesterday and discussed late I called my kid instead when kids need a pep talk so I went with kittens that apparently your parents will probably want you to do that he probably sell that doesn't mean I can't suffer with guilt racked by guilt that help anybody I don't know how I know I figured it out what's coming up in your news Marshall military gonna do a quick reality check on the economy let's buy Greenland and allergic to cats science comes up with the cure about a third of the population of Greenland lives in New York the capital and largest city but you knew that a third of the population lives in one town yeah I knew and that what's the population of that town a hundred fifty I don't know I didn't see it yet your your knowledge is wide but not deep.

trump Congress president
Earth's Last Magnetic Pole Flip Happened Much More Slowly Than Previously Thought

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

06:33 min | 3 years ago

Earth's Last Magnetic Pole Flip Happened Much More Slowly Than Previously Thought

"Any study suggests earth's magnetic poles may take far longer to flip than previously. I thought a new analysis reported in the journal science advances shows. The process may take up to twenty two thousand years to complete. That's more than twice as long as the nine thousand years. He's previously estimated this growing evidence that earth's magnetic poles are about to flip the north magnetic pole will become south and the south magnetic pole will become north last time. This happened with some seven hundred and seventy thousand years ago when it does happen. It'll be the first magnetic field polarity reversal in modern times times and that raises some serious questions about how today's technology with coq with the change to us me mortals on the surface of this revolving planet around the sun first magnetic field seemed steady and true reliable enough to navigate by your largely hidden from daily life less your pilot. The magnetic field drifts waxes awesome wayne's constantly when i'm flying one of the first things i do when i get in the cockpit of an aircraft is to readjust the cockpits compass to the latest readings for true north both for years. The magnetic north pole was wandering around pats of northern canada but more recently it's been careering towards siberia which recently forced the global positioning positioning system which underlies old model navigation updated software sooner than expected to account for the shift on average the magnetic pole shifts and reverses versus. That's polarity roughly every hundred and fifty thousand years or so that with the last one occurring some seven hundred and seventy thousand years ago with long jude for the knicks flip and there are some early signs that a possible paul reversal may be about to occur the accelerating movement of the north magnetic pole is one sign another other is something known as the south atlantic anomaly a weed pad of the south atlantic ocean between brazil and africa compass needles go nuts pointing south instead of north north and it's not just compass needles affected the south atlantic anomaly region causes earth ina van allen radiation belt to move closer to the earth surface dipping down onto just two hundred kilometers in altitude this results in an increase flocks of energetic particles in this region exposing orbiting spacecraft the high than usual levels of radiation listen effect the international space station required extra shielding just deal with this problem nashes reported that modern laptops of crushed aboard space shuttle flights as they a pass through the anomaly and the hubble space telescope doesn't do any observations while it's passing through the anomaly whether or not the south atlantic anomaly really does mean a polls colds are about the flip polarity is yet to be saying the problem is scientists have only a very limited understanding as to exactly why the film reversals occur or how they happen now new research by university of wisconsin madison geologist brad singer suggests the most recent short reversal seven hundred and seventy thousand years ago took at least twenty the two thousand years to complete that several times longer than previously thought and the results further color the question some controversial findings that some polar reversals could occur within inhuman lifetime than you analysis is based on advances in measurement capabilities at a global survey of lava flows ocean sediment at arctic ice coast rose providing a more detailed look at a turbulent time for earth's magnetic field of a millennia. The planet's magnetic food weakened partly shifted stabilized the game and then finally reversed for good to the orientation we know today. The new results provide a clearer m._o. Nuanced picture of reversals at a time when some scientists believe we may maybe experiencing the early stages of paul reversal and you other researchers dispute the very notion of a present day. Paul reversal singer says unless you have the complete accurate accurate in high resolution record of water filled reversal really's like it would be difficult to discuss the mechanics of generating one. We know that earth's magnetic field is produced by the planet's molten alton liquid metallic out of core as it spins around the solid. I and inigo generating powerful electromagnetic currents. What's coda jet dynamo this year dynamic in a creative field. That's most stable going through roughly the geographic north and south poles but the field shifts in weakened significantly during reversals. We know this because <unk> asni rocks formed typically other volcanic lava flows or a sediments being deposited on the sea floor they leave a record the magnetic field the time they were created and geologists can survey this global record piecing together. The history of magnetic fields going back millions of years. Their record is clearest for the most recent reversal that one seven hundred seventy thousand years ago for the current analysis singer and colleagues looked at lava flows from chile to haiti hawaii the caribbean and the canary islands and they collected samples from these latter flows of several field seasons lava flows are ideal records of the magnetic field they have lots of iron bearing ring minerals and as cool and solidify they lock in the direction of the planet's magnetic field the research is combined magnetic field readings and radio acid type dating samples from seven lava flow sequences to recreate the magnetic field over a span of seventy thousand years centered on las reversal they found the final reverse was quite quick by geological standards less than four thousand years but it had been preceded by an extended period of instability included excursions which are temporary partial reversals the polls stretching back another eighteen thousand years. That's more than twice as long as suggested by other studies which claimed reversals wrap up within about nine thousand years the lava flow the data was corroborated by magnetic readings from the seafloor which provided more continuous but less precise source of data than lab iraq's single and colleagues also used at arctic ice core samples apples to track the deposition of beryllium which is produced by cosmic radiation colliding with molecules in the atmosphere. You say when the magnetic reversing weakens allowing more radiation in from space to hit the atmosphere producing more beryllium since humanity began recording the strength of the earth's magnetic field. It's actually decrease in strength by about five percent century century and his records like singing shows. A weakening field seems to be a precursor to an eventual field reversal although it's far from clear that a reversal is imminent reversing planetary magnetic food would significantly affect navigation as well as satellite and terrestrial communications but if the current studies right it means society would have many generations to adapt to what would be a lengthy period of magnetic instability stewart gary. You're

Paul South Atlantic Knicks Canada Wayne Siberia Brazil Caribbean Brad Singer Geologist University Of Wisconsin Madiso Chile Iraq Haiti Seventy Thousand Years Nine Thousand Years One Seven Hundred Seventy Thou Twenty Two Thousand Years Eighteen Thousand Years Two Hundred Kilometers
Mosquitoes will probably kill us all one day

The Big Story

13:11 min | 3 years ago

Mosquitoes will probably kill us all one day

"Right now if handled properly mosquitoes in Canada aren't annoyance a buzzkill even yes they are capable of spreading West Nile virus but it's not terribly likely at least not right now but if the role of this little critter throughout um the entire scope of human history tells us anything. This is not likely to stay that way a new book on the history of the mosquito reports that the best estimates are that about one hundred eight billion humans have ever lived on this planet and fifty two billion of them die due to mosquito borne diseases and no those diseases are not present in the suckers that are ruining your evening outside this weekend. They are not as far away as they used to be either. If there's one thing we should know although mosquitoes by now it's that they will survive and they will spread and they will find a way to make our lives miserable so it's probably only a matter of time <music>. I'm Jordan Heath Rawlings and this is the bug story Dr David Fiszman is an epidemiologist at Delana School of Public Health at the University of Toronto is seen his fair share mosquito borne and diseases hi David. Thanks for joining us. Thank you very much driving when people like me ask you questions about Mosquitos. What is the most common thing we get wrong? The common assumption most of the people who who asked me about Mosquitos are my family members really <hes> and they they they usually just want to know. How is it okay to put debate on small children which I think is still risk-benefit kind of stuff so in terms of my professional opinion as an epidemiologist infectious diseases people seldom seldom seek out my opinion and <hes> I sort of tend to foisted on them? I think I think the most important thing about mosquitos is that you know as you've said they've had tremendous impact on human history human civilization and I mean the whole way the Vatican's laid out with the pope having a summer residence up on a hillside outside room. That's all about malaria. I mean you know really the word. Malaria is Italian. Were just like influences. The air is bad. GotTa get the pope out from so he doesn't die of malaria so these diseases have really shaped you know civilization <hes> how we've been governed <hes> how the globe was colonized by Europeans rate and I think to me as someone who does infectious disease stuff enough for a living the most common misconception is that it's about the mosquitoes being there or not being there because mosquitoes are kind of everywhere you know you can go to northern Canada obviously and the mosquitoes aren't around the winter in the winter is long but come that come that thaw the mosquitoes are back so there there there there are many many agenda of mosquitoes within each of those many species some conspiracies some can't but the spread of disease doesn't tend to be about there being particular killer mosquitoes somewhere or not. I think that's misconception. I I agree with your premise or your your question is sh. Should we be concerned about global environmental change that we think driven by largely by humans all of those things you know abundance of water drought temperature all of those things have to do with mosquito abundance mosquito biting rates and you know where Mosquitos are GonNa find habitat and that's extremely important in terms of how infectious purchase disease this move when I say and when I hear from <hes> friends and relatives that when they're up at their cottage this year and last year it seems like the mosquitoes last longer into the year are in more abundance and are just the way way worse than they've ever been. Nobody's exaggerating or we right in terms of the absolute abundance. I can't comment on that. I know so far this year. We don't have West Nile but it's not August yet. Is that the peak period yeah so so so the the two mechanisms for human disease that comes from mosquitoes broadly speaking to mechanisms one is you can have <hes> what's called an amplification cycle that involves humans and mosquitoes and the example of that would be something like malaria where you know someone I am a mosquito actually may come off an airplane from an area with a lot of malaria in New Jersey. Let's say which doesn't have endemic malaria anymore and someone opens that case in the mosquito has malaria bites that person now if you're in an environment end where there are some number of other mosquitoes can spread that disease they may also bite that person and they then become infected if they then go off and feed on other people get blood meals from other people they infect them and that's what's called an amplification cycle so let's say the Mosquitos from that one person or sufficient to infect five other people via intermediate mosquitoes that that's what we would call a reproduction number of five so you need to have the right mosquitoes there <hes> the right types of mosquitoes and you also have to have mosquitoes the types of mosquitoes that are biting enough to get those five other people infected but they'll then be fed on mosquitoes and if each of them produces another five case of malaria now you've gone from one case to five case it's twenty five cases and what's what's called an epidemic <hes>. It's an it's an exponential growth process that perpetuates itself an epidemic so really scary. How fast can that happen over very I do remember the Bola outbreak in two thousand fifteen in west Africa that had everybody kind of freaked out? I mean that was over a period of a couple of months that you went from you know basically a handful of cases too. I think by the end of it there was some thirty thousand cases because you're dealing with exponential growth. How fast it happens depends on what people talk about as the generation time? Time which is the interval between a case being infected and they're basically on offspring cases being infected so the shorter that is the faster at happens with things like West Nile or there's a disease he's called Ross River that they ha- Ross reverse that they have in Australia for example what you have there is you have a human animal amplification cycle and were collateral damage so for example with West Nile the reason the mosquito fool start turning positive usually late July August and maybe later this year because we had the cool spring is <hes> that it goes mosquito bird mosquito bird mosquito bird and you have that same amplification cycle that results in increasing disease prevalence in the birds which makes mosquitoes more and more likely to get infected and somewhere through that summer when you have a high enough prevalence of infection mosquitoes reach a point where mosquitos that will feed both on birds and humans which are minority of mosquitoes they start to be infected to and then those are called bridge factors so they'll bridge those two population so you get the disease moving from an animal population to us and we're dead end hosts so we can get sick with West Nile but we'RE NOT GONNA give it to mosquito. Give it back to a bird so we're dead end. How efficient are mosquitoes compared to other creatures at spreading these kind of diseases? The big vulnerability for mosquitoes as vectors is GONNA hold my arm up to the microphone. Is that try eh noise. They don't live long rate their their lives. Are I can't remember who said it nasty brutish short right and so you have that built into the math when people look at how do these epidemics grow one of the most important factors is that mosquitoes that get infected very likely to die soon. They're very likely to die before they feed on someone again and that keeps this reproduction down reproduction number down it turns out the what's most important in driving diseases that well so it would be in driving all of these diseases because whether it's a it's a mosquito to animal to mosquito disease mosquito to human to mosquito disease. What's going to drive that is the biting rate because the biting rate both impacts the rate which mosquitoes in fact and at the rate which mosquitoes are infected expression for this reproduction number which is number new cases you get from an old case in totally susceptible population and some of the things that are in there are mosquito density? How many mosquitoes are there per human pra creature <hes>? How long does the mosquitoes lives? You know <hes> isn't that expression. The biting rate is one squared term and that expression so the more mosquito bite the more they get infected but also the more they infect us with more in the case of west smile infect birds so to bring this back to climate change. Guess what mosquito behavior turns out to be really temperatures are no that's good. That's not good. Isn't it so what happens exactly so years argument that I've made this is published. I've I've I've suggested this and lectures okay. I think this is probably probably true. You know I think in Canada we think about the U._S.. And the slave trade Brazil was really the great slaving nation in the Western a hemisphere for very long time it was it was the epicenter of the slave trade and they're you know just millions and millions and millions of human beings in mosquitoes were trafficked from sub Saharan Africa to South America and people and died a lot and a lot of them died of disease right and there's this really interesting genetic work. That's gone on on a disease called yellow fever which is present in South America but which is thought to have originated in Africa and what you see. Is that disease disease if you look at the lineage of the viruses that disease was clearly introduced into South America by the slave trade and <hes> it's spread by what are called eighties mosquitoes which are the baddies for a lot of the stuff eighties. Mosquitoes seem to be really good at spreading a lot of different viruses and off lease <hes> <hes> Anopheles mosquitoes tend to spread malaria eighties ten spent most of the viral diseases. We worry about case so you've got this this disease imported in the late fourteen fifteen hundreds from Brazil with this massive traffic of human beings and it becomes established established it becomes a probably there must have had epidemics becomes endemic exactly the same parts of the world have chicken gun ooh virus and Zico virus but we've never had chicken Gunja or Zeka established in South America until like ten years ago right and all of a sudden these endemic diseases and South America notwithstanding the fact that there has been massive amounts of movement of humans goods and presumably insect right between those fears over a period of about five hundred years so how is it that you never had these diseases move and then all of a sudden they did the right if you look at the reproduction number for <hes> yellow fever. It's just hire at baseline in eighties mosquitoes. It is in these other diseases but the most important part of that reproduction number is biting rate. which is I say temperature sensitive the other thing that's temperature sensitive is how fast the virus develops and becomes infectious in the mosquito before bites again so you have these two really important things that are temperature sensitive sensitive with reproduction numbers? It's like a tipping point thing right. If the reproduction number is below one you know I show up sort of thing I might do show up at a party and I'm ill with some unusual infectious disease Mr Fund and I infect on average zero point nine or zero point eight new cases right. I can't in fact part of human but if the average ratio of an old case to new cases less than one what happens is you can get a chain of transmission and you can freak people the hell out with something like bird flu that is very likely to kill people it infects but it's going to be <hes> self-limited right once once you have a reproduction number that is greater than one even a little bit like a Bolo is probably one point three or one point five once you're into the realm of <hes> exponential growth which you will have if you reproduction numbers greater than one things can explode in my my personal read of what's been happening in the world over the last decade or two is that you have diseases that. That were near that threshold like Zico like chicken Gunja. We've always had lots of movement of people and lots of goods and you know and and creatures between these these different places but if you push on this parameter like biting rate and also on on time to become transmissible you push on that a little bit by increasing nighttime temperatures which they've had in Brazil I mean we think of Brazil's hot place but there are actually data Brazil's warming to and it's warming at night and that seems to be really important and if you can push that above above that threshold then you go from something that when it's introduced which must have been introduced last five hundred years it just flames out to something that can set up epidemics. You know it's a whole new ballgame and I think that's that's just such a great kind of exemplar of what climate change yeah and do because you know you don't know you've crossed these thresholds till you cross them <hes> and and we we don't really know what other thresholds their heart across that you know as things get warmer and warmer we we may cross he sort of recognized this crossing the thresholds Post Hawk which is part of why this is such a problem will what would that look like <hes> given our current mosquito

Malaria Canada West Nile Brazil South America Fever Dr David Fiszman Jordan Heath Rawlings West Africa New Jersey Delana School Of Public Health Africa University Of Toronto Saharan Africa Ross River Ross Zeka Australia
"northern canada" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

05:09 min | 3 years ago

"northern canada" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Eighteen years now. So can you tell us about the nature of the telephone? Now have they changed in any way? Or they regretful of some of the activities they undertook in the past in terms of their restrictions on women and son has evolved at home at the same old same old. This is a very very important question. We we wrote a piece in foreign affairs. Maybe a year a year ago about this. My sense of the Taliban today is. Twofold, one is we have some indications of it because they do control some territory, so we can see how they operate today. And then we can also see how their ideology has evolved. It is a different Taliban from the thousand nine hundred eighty s in my view in some ways. That gone are the. The desire not to get involved in. They didn't want to get involved in music or the internet. I mean, they've they have adopted involve the way we've seen other Southie. Jihadist groups operate these Slavic state or Al Qaeda, they're not just involved in radio programs are also pretty involved in social media and the internet. So in that sense, they're they're different. But on the same time, we could see with the Talibans Justice courts that they have and the type of governance that they rule with anti-federal to any any of the direction that Afghanistan has gone in in terms of women's rights, or what we would consider human rights. So I've seen no indication in areas of northern Helmand where the Taliban does control some areas. Mostly rural in southern Helmand in parts of northern Canada. Har- Taliban justices ruthless. This is a real she spent radio programming from Tuesday WCBS SPF from Washington. If if you don't subscribe to a Taliban ideology of run in areas that they control they have a a rough equivalent to what they had in the nineteen nineties of a. Committee on virtue and vice that enforces their interpretation of sharia, and that's the Taliban. You get it's not one. I think you'd see a major retrogression of the advancement the advancements that we've seen in the willingness to allow foreign investment into the country allow women to work allow non-governmental organizations to operate in the country, a major regression and a retrogression. I think that's what we've seen it Ariza that they control, you know, they talk a little bit different than they did back. Then. I think the issue though, is in how they ruled in areas that have operated, and I. It would be something of the US has to live with that. If if we were to withdraw that that's the that's the you're turning at least parts of the country eventually over to a. Very ruthless. Organization that has a very extreme version of sharia, and that's something you'd have to live with. Just two things on that. Question. But to take what sets at a where the Taliban governs consider those are the most. In terms of development indices in terms of of where those parts of society rat was the most backward. Parts of Afghanistan. You go into into Helmand into can't heart province places down there with the literacy rate is north of seventy percent where it's an incredibly conservative, ancient Pashtoon culture. I mean, you go there, and you feel like you're in the thirteenth century with the addition of motorbikes a couple of solar panels and weapons, and that's an trackers if you're lucky, and that's about it. So I understand that where the governing conforms to those local conditions watched through hundreds of Afghan villages and seeing that part of the country and seeing one woman wasn't fully covered. And that was a mistake. She made quick tracks. So understand it can conditions down there. First of all Secondly. So with that as well. And also Afghantistan has changed the Taliban changed, so I don't I don't know that even I agree to live with the Taliban saying is lip service. They're not going to be women on the on the short council or any kind of governing body air, and they'll be major steps back on a whole host of of issues. But I think they're going to struggle if they were to take over cities and try to govern those achieved some kind of progress in and Islam estate there. I don't think you're putting what's that back in a box. I don't think you're putting a lot of kind of tools and and. Features of modern life that that that certainly urban Afghans at least in some of the bigger cities have gotten used to. Our next question is from Paul polar? Fall is a valued contributor to the national interest website. And..

Taliban Har- Taliban Afghanistan Washington Canada Talibans Justice courts Paul polar Ariza Helmand US Southie Afghantistan Pashtoon seventy percent Eighteen years
"northern canada" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

12:35 min | 3 years ago

"northern canada" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To explain and to make this even more intriguing. Caroline, I gathered had something to do with knowing where the North Pole is. That's right Marco. And we're talking here about the magnetic North Pole where compass would point. So the first thing to know about the magnetic North Pole is that it actually moves and Oliver navigational systems from the one on your phone to what ships and planes us rely on knowing where that North Pole is and more about the magnetic field in general, it doesn't say in the same place. It doesn't and it turns out that the government shutdown has delayed the release of the data behind the most recent location of the North Pole. So that little blue dot on my smartphone map is off. So the dot is actually controlled by GPS, which is actually a different system. But the aero that tells you which direction you're pointing in that's controlled usually by this world magnetic model, which is what we're talking about. And because that model can't be updated because the data is an online the arrow on your phone is probably just a tiny bit off. So let's back up a second. Remind me why the North Pole moves. Okay. So the earth's gravitational field changes because it's controlled by this molten liquid ball of iron at the center of the earth. And that moves it sloshes around. And right now, scientists think there's kind of this tug of war happening there. That's pulling magnetic north toward Siberia. Basically it moves about thirty miles a year, which is pretty fast. Actually, it's been moving a lot faster in the past generation or so according to William Brown from the British Geological Survey, which makes these models along with Americans. Scientists so between nine thousand nine hundred and nine hundred ninety. Pole moved about a thousand kilometers and in the thirty s six nine hundred nineteen years also moved about. Wow. So where did a move to where it's been going? So if you think about looking at globe from above at the very top. It's moved basically in a straight line from very northern Canada through almost geographic north of the geographic North Pole and into Siberia. So it just recently crossed the international. Dateline? Actually, so moving east to west right and has been moving so fast in recent years that no other National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the Brits were asked to do a new study of its location early. So that is the data that was supposed to be released this week the data behind where North Pole is. But it wasn't because of the shutdown, and in fact, if you try to Google this model, you get redirected to government, shutdown dot dot gov. Saying the website isn't available. Right. So basically Noah compensates for the amount that it's drifting. But because. Of the shutdown. We don't have the data. So we're actually off. But hopefully, when the shutdown ends will know where we are again. Right. Right. And for people like you, and I are at lower latitudes. The error is very small. It's like way less than one degree the US military really cares about exact data, but they got this data early. So for now, there are ships and planes that are navigating in the far north that this would impact, but they have other ways also to navigate besides magnetic north. But this is a reminder of all of the science that's being put on hold right now because of the shutdown. Scientists can't go to meetings to share the results or work on upcoming papers. There are weather stations that are down in are being maintained. They're not collecting data anymore. So this is another example of the impact of the shutdown is having on science, the world's Caroline Baylor. Rerouting us with tales from the North Pole. Thanks a lot. You're welcome. Marco pinpointing, a single spot on the globe is one thing using satellite technology to zero in on an incoming missile, much more complicated. The Pentagon has been working on the stuff. Going back to the Cold War. It's also something that President Donald Trump sees as a top national security priority. We will recognize that space is a new warfighting domain. With the space force leading the way my upcoming budget will invest in a space based missile defense layer. New technology. It's ultimately going to be a very very big part of our defense. And obviously of our offense. Trump was at the Pentagon today talking about missile defense and his space force. He said the goal is simple to be able to quote detect and destroy any missile launch against the United States, anywhere anytime any place, and of quote, Kingston reef is with the Arms Control Association. He's in Washington. That's a pretty sweeping project. The president laid out today is it realistic? That's a very sweeping project that he laid out. And in fact, the last quote that you just read actually contradicts the text of the review, which does not go so far as to say that the United States will defend against any missile threat. No matter the origin or no matter the number and for good reason the review doesn't do that. Because attempting to do so would be costly unachievable. And massively destabilizing would also be a departure from long standing US policy. But then the last the review does recommend a significant and costly expansion of the role and scope of US missile defenses that in my view is likely to exacerbate Russian and Chinese concerns about the threat to their strategic nuclear deterrence and further complicate the prospects for further nuclear arms reductions between the United States and Russia, whether it's doable or not. I mean, you suggest it's a big departure from previous administrations have approached security, but I remember Ronald Reagan strategic defense initiative so-called Star Wars program is it a big departure. The Trump administration's review does depart from the previous administrations review. The review expands the purpose of missile defense to defend against emerging cruise missile and hypersonic missile threats proposes to more aggressively defend against Russian and Chinese regional missile threats calls for the development of airborne interceptors for boost phase missile defense. And then it. Also proposes to augment the defense of the US homeland with additional ground and sea-based ages missile defense interceptors, and why is Trump pushing this? Well today, the Pentagon he talked about the threats aimed at America. We have some very bad players out there. And we're a good player, but we can be far worse than anybody. If need be I've always. Known and I've watched and I've seen the stronger, you are the less you will need whatever that strength may be. Yeah. So countering threat with threat it does sound ominous. But I mean, the threats from Russia, China and North Korea are real the the world is increasingly dangerous. Why shouldn't US missile defense expand as well? So I think there is a role for missile defense. But I think more realism is needed about the costs and limitations of missile defenses. And we also need to be mindful of the fact that expanding defenses also prompts adversaries namely Russia in China to take steps to increase their offense. If forces in response to those defenses, and we're already seen that in so far as Russia is advancing new types of nuclear delivery systems and China may already be augmenting its smaller nuclear arsenal. So I think rather than rushing to spend billions on potentially danger. Expansion of US missile defenses. A more disciplined approach would focus on improving some of the shortcomings that continue to plague existing systems and also the United States needs to pursue wide ranging dialogues with Russia and China on strategic stability, including the impact of missile defense. And I think also take steps to swear certain particularly destablizing missile defense capabilities namely, putting interceptors in space Kingston reef directs disarmament and threat reduction policy at the Arms Control Association in Washington. Thank you very much. Thanks so much for having me in its trade war with China. The Trump White House is singling out as one of the bad guys. That's the Chinese smartphone company. One of the biggest in the world. The Wall Street Journal reports today that the Justice department is working on a criminal investigation. The suspicion is that hallway is stealing trade secrets from US partners. Beijing is not happy with the news. Just in wolf is a cybersecurity expert. Effort at the Rochester institute of technology. She says allegations against why go back a few years, but this investigation if it's opened would be something new there were accusations that while we had stolen intellectual property about a robot that T mobile was using for quality control in manufacturing mobile phones. And the accusations which jury later found guilty of were that the company had sort of stolen proprietary intellectual property from T mobile presumably in order to use it in their own factories or with their own phones because way is also a mobile phone manufacturer. And Jerry did later find while we guilty in the civil case that ended in may twenty seventeen and the new news here is that there's this criminal investigation around the same incident as well. Yes. So why is it being brought up again, if it seemed to have been settled back in two thousand seventeen I think that's a really important question. And at this point mostly we can just speculate that it's perhaps related to the way in which the Trump administration has really been looking for fights with China's specially around technology and tech companies. And there are a lot of different reasons that might be the case one of the things that the administration has brought up over and over again is this possibility that there could be security risks to always technology. But that's really not an issue here in this case, which is just about the theft of intellectual property, which has also been a recurring concern out of China. But a concern that has really died down a lot prior to the Trump presidency in the sort of post twenty fourteen twenty fifteen years, there was a really strong sense that the espionage activity coming out of China had dropped especially when it came to intellectual property theft. Probably because. That was around the moment when we saw Chinese tech companies like, wow, we get interested in entering sort of North American and European markets in a serious way. I mean, the national security threats aren't just in the US Poland as you know, arrested a hallway executive and charged him with espionage. And we're also seeing now that Oxford University suspended donor ties with wa so you see these concerns as real or is it a wave of paranoia, that's kind of breaking. I don't know that I would characterize it as a wave of paranoia, my best guess would be that what you're seeing are close allies of the United States government. Take actions that have been strongly encouraged by the United States government. It's possible that this is something that the polish government decided to act on of its own volition. But I think it's also possible that the polish government, which is one of the European governments with closer ties to the Trump administration has been encouraged or inspired by United States efforts in this arena. I think it's also possible that there was something very strange going on with that employee who was arrested in Poland. And who was later fired by y in it's possible that he was a spy working for the Chinese government. And you know, it's it's hard to sort of characterize whether that's a one off incident or characteristic of all larger wave within China. What is unique about the way? The Trump administration is putting pressure on wa and other. Chinese tech companies. Well, I think what's unique about it is that it's reached the level of arrests and really extreme tariffs right under the Obama administration. We had an indictment filed by the department of Justice back when of this civil case was coming. And we knew that there was a lot of espionage that charged some officers of the People's Liberation Army with cyber espionage directed at US companies. But we never saw anything reached the point of arresting executives or trying to restrict the ability of Chinese companies to purchase micro chips. And the Trump administration has taken a much much much more aggressive stance. Just in Wolfe's cybersecurity expert at.

US North Pole Trump administration China President Donald Trump Russia Caroline Baylor Marco government Pentagon Justice department T mobile Arms Control Association Trump White House Washington Pole Poland Kingston reef Atmospheric Administration
"northern canada" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

04:07 min | 3 years ago

"northern canada" Discussed on PRI's The World

"I'm Marco werman misses the world. Good davir here this Thursday. It is day twenty seven of the government shutdown and since his show is all about what's happening a planet earth. We thought we'd kick off today. Looking at one of the weirder trickle down effects of the shutdown. It might be making the map on your phone just a little bit less accurate Caroline dealers here to explain and to make this even more entry and Caroline. I gathered has something to do with knowing where the North Pole is. That's right Marco. And we're talking here about the magnetic North Pole where compass would point. So the first thing to know about the magnetic North Pole is that it actually moves and Oliver navigational systems from the one on your phone to what ships and planes us rely on knowing where that North Pole is and more about the magnetic field in general, it doesn't say in the same place. It doesn't and it turns out that the government shutdown has delayed the release of the data behind the most recent location of the North Pole. So that little blue dot on my smartphone map is off. So the dot is actually controlled by GPS, which is actually a different system. But the arrow that tells you which direction you're pointing in that's controlled usually by this world magnetic model, which is what we're talking about. And because that model can't be updated because the data is an online the aero on your phone is probably just a tiny bit off. So let's back up a second. Remind me why the North Pole moves. Okay. So the earth's gravitational field changes because it's controlled by this molten liquid ball of iron at the center of the earth. And that moves it sloshes around. And right now, scientists think there's kind of this tug of war happening there. That's pulling magnetic north toward Siberia, basically in moves about thirty miles a year, which is pretty fast. Actually, it's been moving a lot faster in the past generation or so according to William Brown from the British Geological Survey, which makes these models along with American. Scientists show between nineteen hundred and nineteen ninety the North Pole moved about a thousand closes and in the thirtieth since nineteen ninety is also moved about a thousand. Wow. So where did it move to where the been going? So if you think about looking at globe from above at the very top. It's moved basically in a straight line from very northern Canada through almost geographic north of the geographic North Pole and into Siberia. So it just recently crossed the international. Dateline? Actually, so moving kind of east to west, right? And it's been moving so fast in recent years that no of the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration and the Brits were asked to do a new study of its location early. So that is the data that was supposed to be released this week the data behind where North Pole is. But it wasn't because of the shutdown, and in fact, if you try to Google this model, you get redirected to government, shutdown dot, Noah dot gov, saying the website isn't available. So basically Noah compensates for the amount bet it's drifting, but because of the shutdown we don't have the data. So we're actually off. But hopefully, when the shutdown ends will know where we are again. Right. And for people like you, and I at lower latitudes. The arrow is very small. It's like way less than one degree the US military really cares about exact data, but they got this data early. So for now, there are ships and planes that are navigating in the far north that this would impact, but they have other ways also to navigate the sides magnetic north, but this is a reminder of all of the science that's being put on hold right now because of the shutdown. Scientists can't go to meetings to show the results or work on upcoming papers. There weather stations that are down in are being maintained. They're not collecting data anymore. So this is another example of the impact of the shutdown is having science, the world's Caroline Bieler. Rerouting us with tales from the North Pole. Thanks a lot. You. Welcome Marco pinpointing, a single spot on the globe is one thing using satellite technology to zero in on an incoming missile, much more complicated. The Pentagon has been working on the stuff going back to the Cold War. It's also something that President Donald Trump sees as a top national security priority..

North Pole Marco werman Caroline Bieler US Siberia President Donald Trump government National Oceanic Atmospheric A William Brown British Geological Survey Google Noah Canada Pentagon Oliver one degree
India-Israel joint statement during PM Benjamin Netanyahu's India visit - Full Text

It's Your Money and Your Life

01:40 min | 4 years ago

India-Israel joint statement during PM Benjamin Netanyahu's India visit - Full Text

"Linda university health and we live forever healthier hold tomorrow to be a part of our vision for the future of health care visit us on the web at l l you a vision 2020 dot org that's l l u h vision 2020 dot org robert relief here's inside for at least some of the ugi sparks naughty as the northern part of the mainland us that will be there next week this is now under the year down in the carolinas typically we're in the thirty at this time of the night for about twenty degrees below normal but to record low temperatures coming up here overnight tonight rain from pretty much the carolinas all the way up to may meteorologist edward valley in fayetteville north carolina and those temperatures are positively balmy compared to new hampshire is mild washington louisville seventy another tied for second coldest place on earth behind from locations up in northern canada northern russia and we are also uh the cold it anywhere in the united

Space Museum Balboa Park America San Diego Ten Percent