16 Burst results for "North Manhattan"

"north manhattan" Discussed on Dan Churchill's The Epic Table

Dan Churchill's The Epic Table

05:56 min | 5 months ago

"north manhattan" Discussed on Dan Churchill's The Epic Table

"Was like white and christian and it was like literally looked. They looked at me. Like i was a specimen. They asked me. If i was the only kind of indian they had ever heard of his native american in their schooling so they just assume that i was native american and so that was a real wake up call ahead never been in a place where everyone seemed to be on the same team. I was kind of like the outsider and it was very obvious to me at that. They did not think of me as someone That they could relate to so that was a big learning experience. And i think you know really for from that point onwards. I kind of shunned my background. I've shunned either. Vida shunned indian food and language. Because i really felt like i needed to concentrate on fitting in and being american at that point. It wasn't until after my nutrition trading after my medical training that a found eastern medicine again. Because i really have new things about medicine that we were finding in the research. Like this whole thing about turmeric turmeric with black pepper oil being activators of each other and you can have a hundred times more powerful effects of anti inflammatory effects but curcumin if you bought pepper royal and the other sages knew that a thousand years ago i mean the the powers of chai tea like chai concoction. The arabic sages knew that it was healing and that it could help the gut and learning now that that's absolutely true. It's it's extraordinary like how that's His like this is something that your family descendants. He's been doing for years. And this is why. I say all the time. And we'll hear it's like we're not inventing anything with a lot of this. Information is coming whites. We actually going back to our original as you said earlier like without the unrefined goodness kirkman to a tumor can't block all these things that we have had access to for many years. And this is the spices in india. Some of the best things you can get whacked in the face through like going through market of spices. And it just changes your happiness mood straightaway. Which was going to ask you. I remember when my friends indian friends from school. That back the lunchboxes own. I can understand. The is that what happened to you would you. Yeah i mean. I literally clothes made up. Didn't eat my lunch. In the next day i did. I need a peanut butter jelly sandwich on white to readers. Because and that's what my friends bring in. It's too embarrassing to bring all the stuff so my grandmother who is like living with us was like learning how to make these peanut butter jelly sandwiches with With just chips and cookies chips ahoy cookies which was very popular at the time in doritos. Were all also very popular. It was so important to me and my classmates. That i don't stand out or the already made fun of me because i was vegetarian and different and i didn't want any other ammo for them to make fun of me. Give who knew that you still any complete protein. Even though being plant-based having peanut butter jams. That's amazing who near new Amazing and so at that point time eat we like i want to get the passion from the food and all of that to go in the direction of your studies. Now you've your double certified him day. It's pretty amazing. Establishments which which one's which was. I went to cornell for nutrition school. Then i went to albert einstein medical school in the bronx new york went to the harbor hospitals beth israel hospital which is part of the harvard Hospital system in boston along with area. Boston and then a wet to fellowship at columbia Hospitals columbia presbyterian hospital. You're probably familiar with. It's kind of like up north in one sixty eighth or one sixty nine so really hot like north manhattan And then we were finishing up our training. I was doing a research year and then My husband who i've met in medical school was also finishing up and we had this opportunity where we both had to get a job and we both had job opportunities right in the universities that we were at But we wanted to try something different and hard of me wanted to do that. Because i really was shunned for my interest in nutrition in hormones. In how the body is affected by the foods we eat because at that time. It was not in vogue in madison. It was very much a non medical field and what they basically thought was either my my research coordinator. She said she might advisor. She said okay. That's fine you're interested in this but what is the basic science. Maybe bring bring it back to medicine. You know how can you. How can you make this more medical. And so basically. I went into the blood of humans and looked at the sells like east. Nfl's how they reacted to certain hormones in foods and that was my way of kind of blending the two. But i felt the pressure. I like i couldn't really pursue. I wanted to pursue. Because that's not academic enough and so i was looking for an out as well so let's let's own a double click on that so you can take me thirty again. let's let's his. That's actually really interesting to me. This is the best thing about a podcast. You're you're like you kind of get direction. You want not really.

kirkman cornell for nutrition school albert einstein medical school harbor hospitals beth israel h harvard Hospital system columbia Hospitals columbia pr north manhattan india boston Boston new york madison Nfl
"north manhattan" Discussed on The Doodler

The Doodler

05:00 min | 7 months ago

"north manhattan" Discussed on The Doodler

"Hey it's kevin fagin here just wanted to tell you about a new show coming out if you enjoyed the dealer. I think you're gonna like. I m rama hosted by jonathan hirsch. The award winning journalist and host of deer franklin jones i am. Rama is about a one of a kind spiritual teacher. One who didn't just teach students buddhism but added a surprising twist encouraging students to learn computer programming. They would get educated and find jobs in the tech industry at a time when some of them would end up. Making big rama would also come under fire from all sides former students angry parents anti-cult groups and journalists but his story is about so much more than the accusations. Lead you to believe i am. Rama tells the story of rama's life from his unlikely beginnings as a teacher to how he became a controversial public figure and ultimately the mysterious events that led to his untimely death. The story is told mostly through the eyes of his students. You'll hear some who loved him and thrived under his guidance and others who found the opposite to be true. Here's a little preview. A short clip from the show some things. You just can't explain you don't know how to explain it. You know it happened to you. It could be a miracle or it could be mirage ultimately. It doesn't matter because either way that thing changed your life. Jim had one of those experiences. My name's jim carello in the early nineties restaurant just north manhattan. He was there to see a spiritual teacher named rama for the first time he came into the room and told everyone there he was going to sit down on a stool. Everybody do your meditation. But this time do it with your eyes open and generally look at me just sort of like have a light gays in my direction jim and the other people. They're focused on their breath is open music star playing and they put on this. What sounded like rock and roll new age music. That was very calm. They lowered the lights. He concentrated on his breathing looked up in the direction of teacher. I mean frederick lens. Who went by the name. Rama and god dammit. If the whole room didn't turn into solid gold and everyone in the golden light it wasn't something he saw. He says he felt it too. And i got a rush of euphoria. That i'd never felt before he said it was like a wall of good and amazing feelings. Just washing through him. Nine almost got a little nauseous because of feeling that way it was very disorient but it also felt amazing. The lights came back on fifteen minutes. Later he remembers started talking but can't remember what it was about. I just remember saying. I'm following this dude for the rest of my life. Because he's got something that no one has this feeling not just the golden light but the belief that a person could transmit a spiritual energy that some say raises your consciousness toward a more enlightened state of being. It's what attracted jim to rama. And it's what kind of changed. His life changed other people to yes. Gold light and movement vibeke movement his face shifting and changing and when he's not disappearing the white light of slick. He's levitating violence pretty cool over time. I've come to know. Many of the people who say rama changed their life and while they stories start much the same way. They don't end up in the same place for some of his students. Rama was and remains nothing. Short of a magical being just said yes. This is pretty much what somebody feels like. He might say this. Nevada feels like one of the two and it was just blissful just beautiful for others. It's more complicated than that. And then i told them the bit about getting the energy. Meditating programming making lots of money giving the money to him he says dude. You're in a pyramid scheme and even others saw a troubled man someone who surrounded by people who adored him was very much alone. I felt a little bit of sorrow. That that that this guy never got it together. I mean you know. I still saw a fractured human being at first for me. The story of rama was the story of curiosity. I spent years studying controversial. American groups even met some of them but rama confounded me history rested somewhere between hagiography and cautionary tale. But for reasons. I didn't expect. It made me question everything i thought i knew. I'm jonathan hirsch from neon home media and smokescreen..

jonathan hirsch kevin fagin Jim jim carello Rama north manhattan fifteen minutes jim Nevada Nine first time one American early nineties One two franklin jones rama money buddhism
"north manhattan" Discussed on The Financial Guys

The Financial Guys

05:12 min | 11 months ago

"north manhattan" Discussed on The Financial Guys

"Why would they do that do you think why would they want. A constant panic is just amazing because it worked it worked and you still have many conservatives who don't believe in any of this not that'd be don't believe in it but don't believe in how this was handled but yet you're putting her mask on. They're not fighting. They're not showing up to support restaurant owners. In the fight to end this right lobbies jim and orchard park should be overwhelmed with new conservative members. Say i want to work out in a place that doesn't force me to wear a mask every single day. They're still hiding. The control has been real. They'd with it is propaganda. Smith wrote and it's been real and they've been able to control people and manipulate people and they've won and they've won. They won the election out of a big part of winning the election. I know there's a huge part of this cheating. The other part of it is that donald trump lost the war on coal that he lost the communication part of that. Five hundred thousand people did not die of cova. They died with colon. That's a very big deal now. Finding that they might not have even died with govan. It might have been normal flu yet. Which is something that we talked about months ago yet. A covid nineteen is no different than combat. Eighteen or covid. Seventeen flus before that. The numbers don't support it. it's a bunch of bs. Yup that's the here so a couple more things real quick. You'll love this New york city north manhattan are no longer going to send police officers to To domestic violence and health issues. They're gonna sounded the social workers. How do you think that's gonna go. Now what does he get killed before that ends. That will not seriously exactly. That's exactly what. I tweeted by the way this is not gonna add. Well god bless you social workers to go in but my guess is they won't. There's a reason why social workers social workers and police officers or police officers and my guess is e. social workers are not going to not not going to end up in too many homes. That's exactly what i tweeted. This won't end well. The nypd will stay out of any mental health crisis causing social workers will respond instead in parts of northern manhattan starting to spring according to associated press. Good luck with that by the way if you want to follow us on social media. We are very active on twitter. Facebook instagram lick did and more to our website at the financial guys dot com the financial guys dot com..

donald trump New york Smith twitter Five hundred thousand people Facebook nineteen northern manhattan Eighteen Seventeen flus instagram north manhattan dot com cova jim govan covid every single day financial orchard park
"north manhattan" Discussed on Capes and Lunatics

Capes and Lunatics

03:00 min | 1 year ago

"north manhattan" Discussed on Capes and Lunatics

"Land of issue one forty why he gives the. Of course because it's in the DC. Universe. Happens. To Be Bruce Wayne's family like his great. Great. Great grandfather something. Favor debris over, but the cloisters is in actual. And is an actual voice, their brand that was brought over by brick and then resemble. And Yeah and then the man has pretty much moved all of its or medieval art of there. Isn't tyrant park. which is yeah. Kind of a nice park of Yes north North Manhattan So yeah the only thing the only so was awesome seeing me was read the cloisters in your it makes me so happy. The only thing is that sometimes when I think too much about it as I want to do it gives me a little upset because as you know I love the grade so much but he is in no way shape or form at all qualified for this job like not. Close. I haven't Dull Jack Ivan looked up booby bar and yes. You have no chance of being a curator at the cloisters. If you not at minimum a PhD in some more many war history, an addict definitely does not have a PG I'm still not even sure if at this point, it's like. He on whether he's even bent. He Ethan graduated with a Bachelor's degree. He her finish college city. Right. So this is like one hundred percent of them. Yes. You are this like one hundred percent nepotism Bruce Wayne Guy This Guy Who's job, and if this were real, Minneapolis. I was GONNA say. Why does some of these people even say oh? Yeah we yeah. We know you have connections and say yet dick has a PhD. Greatest deal. About whatever I do appreciate. The medieval knowledge is dropping in there. The is for you know. Go Knowledge Brennan. Beatles but again, people who actually work in Glazer's would not be impressed you. He was like the walls and you know a not pointed arches romanesque like, yeah. Bro, I learned that in Middle Ages one. Oh One what can you tell me about airline? IVORIES Now heads. I can't tell you anything. I'm not even qualified curator of college professor await. Your college professor. Backwards Over there. Already. So. Yeah. So yeah, I totally understand that that woman Miss.

Bruce Wayne Bro professor Glazer DC Jack Ivan Beatles Ethan Minneapolis dick
"north manhattan" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

08:10 min | 1 year ago

"north manhattan" Discussed on 710 WOR

"O R. Well Michael Goodwin is the greatest columnist in America. It was kind of a nightmare yesterday, waking up and finding out there was no Michael Goodwin column yesterday. He took the weekend off, but luckily we have in here. We'll find out what he would have written. Michael Goodwin, How you doing? Good morning, Mark. Thank you very much. It's horrible. But your June 30th column. If every, if you haven't read that, go read that that it still stands today. This Mayor de Blasio is a total nightmare. Dermot Shea actually spoke out over the weekend. That was pretty impressive. But where's everybody else to speaking out about this shootings and everything out of control? Well, you know what's really remarkable to markets that several precinct, not precinct level, but Borough wide or, you know, however, the police break down their their hierarchy. But there's like a, you know, a Manhattan North Manhattan south, etcetera, those commanders also we're speaking out. Ah, about the district attorney where where they said, are the prosecutors from Cy Vance's office when we are when we have these these murderers in these shootings If the prosecutors don't get involved in the beginning, it suggests that they're not interested in prosecuting the case. And so you had you had these remarkable complaints from the commander saying, Where is the D? A. Where the prosecutor's? Why aren't they at the precinct? Why aren't they at the precinct, helping to gather that the evidence? I mean, so I don't know. In the cases involved that there were actual arrest so they had suspects. It wasn't clear. But you're having people on the front line saying, Why are you abandoning us? Why are you not in this war with us, And so it's the politicians. It's the district attorney's which are elected and therefore they are very political in nature. But they they have always been something of a ball work. You know, against the worst excess excesses of the politicians. I mean, they fought against the bail law, for example, the elimination of bail But in this case I Vance, who has never been much of a prosecutor. Always look for reasons not to prosecute and apparently is just deserted the field of battle. Hey, if we could find a big columnist, if you know somebody maybe to write a column, go after Chuck Schumer, Jerry Nadler all these. They should be in New York, pressuring the mayor. The governor tow fix this problem right now stop worrying about Trump's 2016 tax form. And you know, in a crisis like this people get shot all over the place. Where Schumer chiller brand nab the Where are they? A good point. And you know I would throw into. Where is Nancy Pelosi? Right? Francisco is is the toilet now where she I mean, That's what you have These people Goto Washington didn't really care about the places. This is all about Power games in Washington. You think Jerry Mad ler. Gives AH figure leaf about anything going on in New York. He's on television. He's trying to him president. My God don't bother him with small things. What's what's a few murders? You know nothing I can do about that. But I can go on TV and attacked the president. And I think that's what happens. You go to Washington and you forget You forget the people who sent you there. Which is why Chuck Schumer has those Sunday press conferences, which are generally about nothing, but it's just so he could get his mug on television because he knows there's generally slowed. Sunday is a slow news day so he can get some media coverage and make people think he still cares about New York. But of course he doesn't Healy. He wants to be majority leader. He wants to usurp. You know as much power as he can in Washington. He wants to impeach the president, and he wants this Democrats to take the Senate. That's all he cares about The rest of it's just for show. Don't these idiots realize, though, that if you let this crime get out of control, if you defund the police, you let all this chaos and these mobs and looted all this. Go on. You're gonna lose the house. The Senate, the Democrats are going to lose the presidency. Nobody look, Look what happened in Reagan's reelection. He carried New York. Don't be surprised if Donald Trump Carrie's New York If you let this stuff go on. But this bothers people. It should. I mean and you know market it's Chicago. Of course, it's Atlanta. It's New York. It's virtually every big city in America. All nearly all of which are run by Democrats, and they have all been silent or complicity in these attacks on the police and I, you know, just reading the tea leaves and what we were talking about before with the commanders of the North Manhattan, North and South. It seems to me that the police in many cases are frustrated. And they are in something of ah of a work slowdown. I can't you can't prove it. But you know they're all the fireworks going off in New York. When you think about it. Virtually every one of them is a crime. Right? How? How could so many crimes be committed with very little prosecution? Very few arrests. Very little prosecution. How is that except it's a hands off policy. Now I don't think that that extends to the most serious crimes. But these things are contagious. And as we see with the shootings when the word goes out that the police have backed off. Then people now we'll take the law into their own hands. I mean, that is why we have the police. But what we're seeing now is a situation and all these major cities. The police are under attack. Defund the police programs, the criticism. You know all this. You know, the George Floyd case has become a reason and a rationale for dismantling in law enforcement. And handcuffing law enforcement. And so how are the cops supposed to react? Nobody is protecting the cops. Nobody cares about the cops. That cops are like, You know, the soldiers coming back from Vietnam. Everybody off. Stay away from them. They're bad. They're killers. Right. That's how we're now looking at the police as a society and think of that. Devastating impact that had on those Vietnam vets and on the military and on the nations will. Ultimately that's what we're doing to the police now. Well. Michael Goodwin. I can't wait for Wednesday's column. You don't know yet what you're writing, though. Now I'm working on a few things. We'll We'll see what what looks best on the stove wasn't get closer. All right. Well, it's every Sunday and every Wednesday in the New York Post best columnist in America and Michael Goodwin. Thanks for being with us. My pleasure. Thank you. Take care. I never check out the Web page is a lot of great stuff up there every day. We put up a whole bunch of new videos, But there's some great stuff from over the weekend. If you missed some really moving powerful Fourth of July videos about America, What's this one about America's great accomplishments also Here's a great quarantine song board in the USA. They also take his Republican candidate. I think it's in the Pennsylvania What a great ad he came out with and take a look at this little man on the street Yesterday. Most Americans have no idea I hate to say it why we celebrate the Fourth of July. It's all upon the Web page. Go to 7 10 w o r dot com slash mark 7 10 w o r dot com slash mark this Rewind of today's Mark Simone Show continues Next him Live tomorrow morning. 10 to noon 7 10 W. R. Team. I want to tell you how to get the most delicious coffee you've ever had delivered right.

New York Michael Goodwin America Chuck Schumer Mark Simone Washington prosecutor president Cy Vance Senate commander New York Post Mayor de Blasio Dermot Shea Nancy Pelosi Trump Donald Trump Carrie
"north manhattan" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

07:59 min | 1 year ago

"north manhattan" Discussed on 710 WOR

"17 W A war Well, Michael Goodwin is the greatest columnist in America. It was kind of a nightmare yesterday, waking up and finding out there was no Michael Goodwin. Call him yesterday. He took the weekend off, but luckily we have in here. We'll find out what he would have written. Michael Goodwin, How you doing? Good morning, right. Thank you very much. It's horrible. But your June 30th column. If every, if you haven't read that, go read that that it still stands today. This Mayor de Blasio is a total nightmare. Dermot Shea actually spoke out over the weekend. That was pretty impressive. But where is everybody else to speaking out about this shootings and everything under control? Well, you know what's really remarkable to mark is that several precinct, not precinct level, but Borough wide or, you know, however, the police break down there. Their hierarchy. But there's like, you know, a Manhattan North Manhattan south, etcetera, those commanders also we're speaking out about the district attorney where where they said, are the prosecutors from Cy Vance's office when we are when we have these these murders in these shootings If the prosecutors don't get involved in the beginning, it suggests that they're not interested in prosecuting the case. And so you had you had these remarkable complaints from the commander saying, Where is the D? A. Where the prosecutor's? Why aren't they at the precinct? Why aren't they at the precinct, helping to gather that the evidence? I mean, so I don't know. In the cases involved that there were actual arrest or they had suspects. It wasn't clear. But you're having people on the front line saying, Why are you abandoning us? Why are you not in this war with us, And so it's the politicians. It's the district attorney's which are elected and therefore they are very political in nature. Uh, but they they have always been something of a ball work. You know, against the worst excess excesses of the politicians. I mean, they fought against the bail law. For example, the elimination of bail. But in this case I Vance, who has never been much of a prosecutor. Always look for reasons not to prosecute and apparently is just deserted the field of battle. Hey, if we could find a big columnist, if you know somebody maybe to write a column, go after Chuck Schumer, Jerry Nadler all these They should be in New York, pressuring the mayor, the governor. To fix this problem right now stop worrying about Trump's 2016 tax form. And, you know, in a crisis like this where people get shot all over the place. Where Schumer Gillibrand, Naboo, where are they? A good point, and you know I would throw into. Where is Nancy Pelosi? Right? Francisco is is the toilet now where she I mean, That's what you have These people Goto Washington didn't really care about the places. This is all about Power games in Washington. You think Jerry Nadler? Gives AH figure leaf about anything going on in New York. He's on television. He's trying to him. President. My God don't bother him with small things. What's what's a few murders? You know nothing I can do about that. But I can go on TV and attacked the president. I think that's what happens. You go to Washington and you forget you forget the people who sent you there. Which is why Chuck humor has those Sunday press conferences. What you're generally about nothing. But it's just so he could get his mug on television because he knows there's generally slowed. Sunday is a slow news day so he can get some media coverage and make people think he still cares about New York. But of course he doesn't he only he wants to be majority leader. He wants to usurp. You know how much power he can in Washington? He wants to impeach the president. And he wants this Democrats to take the Senate. That's all he cares about The rest of it's just for show. Don't these idiots realize, though, that if you let this crime get out of control, if you defund the police, you let all this chaos and these mobs and looted all this. Go on. You're gonna lose the house. The Senate, the Democrats are going to lose the presidency. Nobody look, Look what happened in Reagan's reelection. He carried New York. Don't be surprised if Donald Trump Carrie's New York If you let this stuff go on. Thiss bothers people. It should. I mean and you know market it's Chicago. Of course, it's Atlanta. It's New York. It's virtually every big city in America. All nearly all of which are run by Democrats, and they have all been silent or complicity in these attacks on the police and I, you know, just reading the tea leaves and what we were talking about before with the commanders of the North Manhattan, North and South. It seems to me that the police in many cases are frustrated and they are in something of ah of a work slowdown. I can't you can't prove it. But you know they're all the fireworks going off in New York. When you think about it. Virtually every one of them is a crime. Right? How? How could so many crimes he committed with very little prosecution? Very few arrests. Very little prosecution. How is that except it's a hands off policy. Now I don't think that that extends to the most serious crimes. But these things are contagious. And as we see with the shootings when the word goes out that the police have backed off. Then people now will take the law into their own hands. I mean, that is why we have the police. But what we're seeing now is a situation and all these major cities. The police are under attack. Defund the police programs, the criticism. You know all this. You know, the George Floyd case has become a reason and a rationale for dismantling law enforcement. And handcuffing law enforcement. And so how are the cops supposed to react? Nobody is protecting the cops. Nobody cares about the cops. That cops are like, You know, the soldiers coming back from Vietnam. Everybody off. Stay away from them. They're bad. They're killers. Right. That's how we're now looking at the police as a society and think of that. Devastating impact that had on those Vietnam vets and on the military and on the nations will. Ultimately that's what we're doing to the police now. Well. Michael Goodwin. I can't wait for Wednesday's column. You don't know yet what you're writing, though. Now I'm working on a few things. We'll We'll see what what looks best on the stove wasn't get closer. All right. Well, it's every Sunday and every Wednesday in the New York Post best columnist in America and Michael Goodwin. Thanks for being with us. My pleasure. Thank you. Take care. I will check out the Web page is a lot of great stuff up there every day. We put up a whole bunch of new videos, But there's some great stuff from over the weekend. If you missed some really moving powerful Fourth of July videos about America, What's this one about America's great accomplishments also Here's a great quarantine song board in the USA. They also take his Republican candidate. I think it's in the Pennsylvania What a great ad he came out with and take a look at this little man on the street Yesterday. Most Americans have no idea I hate to say it why we celebrate the Fourth of July. It's all upon the Web page. Go to 7 10 w o r dot com slash mark. 7 10 w o r dot com slash mark If you could.

New York Michael Goodwin America prosecutor Washington Senate Chuck Schumer Jerry Nadler President Cy Vance commander Mayor de Blasio New York Post Vietnam Dermot Shea Nancy Pelosi Schumer Gillibrand Trump
"north manhattan" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

05:45 min | 1 year ago

"north manhattan" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"With you and I'm happy to be with you this morning it's it's cathartic for me selfishly it's cathartic for me to have these conversations but this platform is very unique because it's a platform that allows me to have direct conversations with you with so many different types of people and and I think that is healthy and needed right now and you know it it's not coincidental that it's sports talk show you know it's not coincidental it's a sports talk show because we're we're talking sports right now and we know that that sports historically have brought different groups of people together I mean how many people's first interaction with people from different backgrounds with their sports you know we tell in a little story about me so anybody who's listening knows by background I'm a white guy I grew up outside of Philadelphia in Langhorne Pennsylvania I'm up until I was twelve I live there in a almost exclusively white neighborhood I moved to southern Maryland it's called Lusby Maryland arm in an almost exclusively white and black neighborhood not many people of of other cultural backgrounds but you know hi black population in in in that area in the mail my school and you know I I I wound up making the basketball team and played and running on the track team and that you know expose me to but I hadn't had as much interaction with I'm my father by the way it is from the Philadelphia area my mom is actually from Mississippi and you know it southern Maryland at you know being on the those buses with my my students my my friends at that time really was a good experience for me I went to university of Maryland and obviously a school like that has all sorts of different people and that's where I was introduced to other cultural backgrounds you know there is a big Jewish community at a school like that and and there wasn't where I wasn't in southern Maryland Asian Americans Indian Americans arm I moved to New York out of school and I lived in Manhattan for since two thousand four to twenty sixteen I'm in I'm in Jersey right now but the first eight years I lived in Manhattan I I lived on ninety fifth street in Columbus actually lived on a hundred and third street in Amsterdam I I know it's a national show but of north north Manhattan and the first place I lived eight years I I lived in an apartment with a group of guys well with one guy and and his friend group who had lived in that building their entire lives they grew up there so you know they had still gone by their nicknames from from from the you know the eighties so it was it was me justice power ishe and blue R. I. P. double lost my friend couple years ago and that you know I I I I became extended family with with people of different backgrounds because of that my wife's is Indian guy needs and so I married into a culture where there's been a lot of times I've been the only white guy in the room so I'm thankful to have had those experiences yet even with those experiences I can't experience what life is like for others I still have to you know open my ears and listen and hear and feel what other people feel and in sports like I said the the introduction to a a lot of different backgrounds for people you you'll see that in the crowd right you'll see a crowd that that has all sorts of different people you know even even sports entertainment I I've been watching a lot of in quarantine pro wrestling with my kid and you see all you know that those different backgrounds in the crowd and I I think it's poetic in the sense that sports has brought so many people into this conversation right now we're gonna be in the conversation regardless but I mean if you notice and and in a way I'm not thankful because he hurt people and saying and I don't want people to hurt but in a in a way I'm thankful Dupri said what he said because I I think that almost took you know the attention away from some of the diversions that that people were we're having some or some of the coverage of of carnage in the like we still need to see about to know what's actually going on but for the most part what's actually going on is people out in the streets saying they've had enough and when the conversation shifted to drew Brees I think that that allowed a lot of people to come into the conversation with their perspective and I thought it was significant that drew Brees changed his and I thought it was significant that the NFL has changed its and I want to hear from you and people of all different perspectives right now eight five five two one two four two two seven again the only thing I ask is that you come to the table in good faith.

Democracy Cant Thrive in Chaos

Dare I Say

08:54 min | 1 year ago

Democracy Cant Thrive in Chaos

"Jane Fonda was arrested five times for environmental protest outside the Capitol this fall. She accepted a BAFTA film award while being taken into custody and photographs. The actor cast a striking figure in handcuffs in red will coat. It's a color fitting for the protests which are inspired by global school strikes and called Fire Drill. Fridays fresh from her arrest streak. The activists joined environmental justice campaigner and community organizer. Peggy Shepherd to record a live episode of Dare. I say in partnership with AMEX AT SAKS fifth avenue in New York City Peggy has been at the forefront of the Environmental Justice Movement in the US for a long time. She founded nonprofit organization. We Act for Environmental Justice in North Manhattan in the eighties. It helped low income New Yorkers in particular communities of color fight harmful environmental policies. It now fights for better environmental and health policies on a local and national level in the I live recorded episode of Dare. I say peggy and Jane discussed civil disobedience the green new deal resilience and why it is important for women to lead the climate conversation. How can we remedy empathy crisis? That has hurt generations of Americans. Why is the cult of rugged individualism driving climate disaster? What can older generations learned from teenagers at the decades on the frontlines? Peggy and Jane Have Not Stop Fighting. They are women who dare. Hi You know. We have a lot in common where activists arrested. But why have you decided to be arrested and to be active at this moment in time over Labor Day weekend? I felt great malaise because I drive an electric car and I do away with single use plastics and I make all those right personal lifestyle choices but I knew that they're not going to be able to scale up in time to get us where we need to be is a good place to start but it's no place to stop and so. I read a book by Klein that talked about a green new deal and talked about gratitude and it inspired me to get out of my comfort zone as Greta says we have to do and not behave business as usual as you know better than a lot of people. We have decades many decades more than forty years writing speeches and books and getting the word out about the science. What the science says. And we've marched and we've rallied and we've played nice and it hasn't worked enough and we only have eleven years left and so we have to up the stakes and I think we have to mobilize and go into the streets and put our bodies on the line and engage in civil disobedience and risk getting arrested. I don't WANNA BE ARRESTED. But you know you have to be willing to risk it so I went. I moved to DC for four months to win gaijin fired real Fridays because Fridays is the day that Greta and the student climate strikers have chosen to strike for climate so I want to support them and helpless their message teenagers today were born more than a decade after NASA scientists warned Congress about climate change in nineteen eighty eight. James Hansen told lawmakers at the time that he was ninety nine percent sure that human activity was causing temperatures to rise. Teenagers today have inherited the climate crisis. They have grown up. In a world of apocalyptic headlines and increasingly volatile weather. It's no surprise that they are extremely intelligent educated and now taking to the streets sweetest teenager. Greta Tonsberg inspired a wave of student protests across the world when she skipped school to strike outside of her country's parliament. And so how do you feel that? We really can motivate young people and youth to really be the strong activists that they need because they are going to inherit this climate this globe right now. What I'm feeling is I don't need to motivate them. They're motivating me. They're the ones because they see that we've taken their future not we. The fossil fuel industry has is robbing them of the future and we can't let them shoulder this burden by themselves. So Granny's unite. Older people have to get out there and and we have to stand along side them. This is a collective crisis that's going to require a collective solution that means all of us together because it is a stomach and we know that we can each take the issues that we need. Whether it's changing light bulbs whether it's recycling. We know that we can do all of those things. But we know that it's systemic and that we gotta come together collectively to educate our elected officials and to pressure the policymakers to really pass the kind of legislation that we all need. But we know that we can't do that with the message. Simply reducing carpet or a message. Simple energy efficiency. We've got a really embraced the values that appeal to all of our communities because Oliver Communities are not whole. They're not healthy. We know that millions of people in this country are living with bad air. They don't have clean water and they are disproportionately impacted by pollution and the Environmental Justice Movement has really for the last thirty years were to achieve environmental protection for all communities and we know also that when we talk about climate change and you hear people talk about climate justice. Climate Justice is not just a cool phrase. It's really a term that is focused on the most vulnerable communities. And how we've got to take action to ensure that the most vulnerable are protected because when that happens we're all protected and so we've got agreement deal and we know that that's been an important framework that's been proposed and it's wonderful that she was not prescriptive. Afc and the others who have talked about this framework we know that it has motivated sectors of of our country to get together and fill in the blanks. What they think is a green new deal what they need for their communities and for their lives and that's been a very important motivator. I think in this moment for a long time. There's been this rap that the environmental movement is white and elite. I think even Obama kind of felt that way but my experience is that that is not the case and then in fact people of color who live in the frontline communities have been very much at the forefront of the environmental movement and are the bravest strongest voices. It's a stereotype that people of color don't really care about the environment. Because they're really concerned with with jobs and food and of course we're all concerned with that but what? I've found predominantly above ninety sixth street when we have monthly membership meetings. It's not the more fluent Brown's donors who are coming out on these sites. It's people from public housing. We get so many calls about air pollution coming into their apartments about odors and emissions from trucks cars buses. We have worker training program for under employed young men and we invited them to come to our membership meetings to hear about issues of climate change or toxins in and chemicals cosmetics and they were able to understand the issue they were able for the probably the first time in their lives to talk to an elected official and tell them what they felt in what they needed and so it's about support. People know what they need. They just need some support to be able to advocate and to be able to. Maybe have a place to come and use computer. Have a place to come and ask some key questions. Let me just tell you that the upcoming mayoral public housing tenants are going to be a major factor in who gets elected and we're going to be organizing them and there's coalitions all over the city to ensure that some of the most vulnerable people are the ones who are going to be part of the solution and so I would simply say that the most vulnerable when we address them we lift all boats. It's not about trickle down. It's about lifting everyone up together and that's what creates an equitable and just society.

Peggy Shepherd Greta Tonsberg Environmental Justice Movement Jane Fonda Official United States Amex Oliver Communities James Hansen North Manhattan New York Barack Obama Granny Klein
"north manhattan" Discussed on Project Upland Podcast

Project Upland Podcast

12:32 min | 2 years ago

"north manhattan" Discussed on Project Upland Podcast

"Yup airfract area. Well we're here in Minneapolis. Actually PRETTY SWEET LITTLE SPOT. Record this podcast. Where at the Convention Center? The clock is winding down on pheasant. Fast Two thousand twenty. It was It's been a great weekend. We're here with some cool people. We're going to have a little conversation before we have to start breaking down the show. It's been fun we'll We'll start to my right here. I've got Mr Mike. The dusky of former guest of the project. Podcast how you doing man the fabulous. Thank you so much asking me to sit down and chat appreciate. What brings you to Fezzan fast. Yes I'm here for a couple of things. The biggest piece is here working the nabbed a booth North American Versatile Hunting Dog Association nabbed. A judge in a big supporter have been a member for a little over eight years also work on our social media so good opportunity to get content see a lot of dogs and a lot of products and as will be evident after we introduce our next two guests this. This conversation is going to be pretty. Vha centric so talk about your relationship with the little bit. Yeah I've been a member At least six years I probably would go back and figure out what that number is. I was a founding board member for the Wisconsin. Chapter and then a couple years ago moved to North Carolina and I'm founding board member of the North Carolina Chapter. Cool Jason. Jason Meek off. I'm the Great Lakes Chapter Coordinator for Backcountry Hunters and anglers bet a member for round that same amount of time. Orig- I was one of the. I was the original chair for the Michigan Chapter before I moved into an actual GIG ED B. H. A. And Yeah so what was. What was I think you and I talked about this? But what would it look like time? You came a member and then it sounds like you're pretty quickly became a staffer with. Yeah so when I started I started. The Michigan Chapter started the same year that Wisconsin chapter did and like the Michigan Chapter. When I was on was the chair when I first started there we had Fifty two members in the entire state. And now there's eighteen hundred nine thousand nine hundred. Almost two thousand members in that State and growth has pretty much been like that around the country so I know in like two thousand sixteen. There is like eight thousand members in the country. And now there is over forty so skyrocketing growth rate so yeah pretty well then last but certainly not. Least Madly am the Vice Chair of the Minnesota Chapter Country Hunters and anglers. I volunteered to head up setting up the booth here at Pheasant Fest. Twenty twenty which has been a fantastic undertaking and a great opportunity for us to reach out to people with public lands so awesome. Thanks for what you do for the Minnesota chapter which I am now a member of Matt. Oh congratulations thanks for signing up. I signed up sometime last year and I recently renewed via my ticket to the public girl showing last week. So that was a fantastic showing. We we build a theater about two hundred seats in North Manhattan Northeast. I think was yup the heights theater. Obviously I I was heavily heavily involved in knowing when and where that was going to be talking to Jason. How did the chapter go about? Kinda deciding putting on that event. Well several got invited to Donnie Vincent Opening of his last film the other side and so we'd been in that venue. We knew that it had a great feel of hold small town theater. And she's a great opportunity to sit in an old theater scene event in a film like that is just fantastic. Yeah I definitely appreciate it obviously. I'm very biased. Towards any films that project upland makes but that was the first time I ever got to see one of our films on a big screen like that and I really thought it was a great venue to have it. It was cool. The viewing experience was great. The sound was awesome. You know the A lot of times. You can have a place with a great screen. But the sound is Kinda so-so Bu- that was awesome and more importantly almost two hundred people were there to see it. Two hundred bird hunters to come out and watch a film about grouse-hunting and listen to some messaging about public lands. It was pretty cool. I mean none of us really knew how that was going to go. Yeah like when we do the planning and all that stuff was like. We were hoping we could get one hundred people to these shows around the country like each one you know to have like the opening night in. Minneapolis with you there and have like the. I was looking at the ticket sales that day like a couple days before and it was just like growing leaps and bounds like a week before there was like one hundred tickets sold and by the time the show was actually going on. There was like two hundred so it was like it's really starting to build on itself and I think here tons and tons of awesome feedback about the film. Lots of folks have come up to us at the show and I'm a member. I bought my take because I bought my ticket to the public grouse thing and that was like super awesome. Show and really like to do that kind of thing in the future. So that's been fun. We've we've certainly heard some of that feedback. We're just across the from you guys here at President Fest. It's been it's been a really fun couple of days but pheasants forever did a film event earlier this week and at the same night that you guys had a pipe night to and it was again. That's that's like three events in three upland bird. Hunting focused events in one week in the same city and I think we had over hundred probably closer to one hundred fiftieth. You guys had what you've had over two hundred people exact- yeah and then obviously pheasants pheasant fast and quail. Classic is bringing a lot of people into the area. People are looking for stuff to do so that was part of it but again I mean a lot of people come out to a little bit different style event coming out to basically talk about shared passions up birds conservation. Public lands all that stuff. I mean the theme here at present festival's been really COOL VIBES. Been been great to see it from Ha perspective. You guys are obviously bigger than upland hunting. There's there's very parallels in the organizations do but just talk about some of the reasons why you thought. Hey we want be fezzet fest. We're like pheasant. Pheasants forever is awesome partner. There'd been a lot of talks with Howard land and all that about like doing this event and then you have like. This is the first year if done the public land's pavilion so it's a whole area in the show that's dedicated to like public lands. Public land companies that focus on public land stuff organizations like US army spokesman for the boundary waters and is like a great opportunity to have an entire section of this focused on public land when a huge portion of upland hunting around the country is primarily a public. Land's thing like I'm I live in Michigan. You guys are from Minnesota like if you're going grouse-hunting it's almost all on public land. Like very high probability exactly exactly so and you know it's very similar at least public access stuff out you know. The code is Minnesota and stuff like that pheasants and upland hunting is just frequently is just a public land pursuit. Yeah so being involved with things like this and PF being a fantastic partner. Just perfect sense. Yeah there was a lot of collaboration. Lots of great organizations. I felt like came together this weekend in celebration of Habitat Conservation Public lands. I mean we had the the panel discussion yesterday with Van Jones the Girl Society Lantana from vha wit Fosberg tr CPI. Howard Vincent all for those guys I mean for the biggest names in conservation up talking did a little bit of Q. And A. and then they were taking questions from the audience. I mean it was phenomenal. It was is a packed packed house for that talking. Yeah it was. It was great. Howard Howard hit hit on the head for his demographic in a way that I hope that message gets out there you know. He's really pushing to youth. And that it may not be the way you hunted. These people may not be joining hunting for the reasons you haunt but we need to be accepting them and he was saying we as people my age you know we need to encourage these people to get out there and embrace them rather than you know. Just talk about how. They're not doing it how I did. Yeah it's not how I learned when I grew up and I've worked with some mentoring programs out there for young adults and and even middle aged adult. There's a lot of barriers that we're not aware of that. Were just put out of the way for us when we were younger. You know I was sent a guns. Eight hundred. Sixty course didn't have an option. It was Saturday and how you know. When did that was knocked out of that? I was taking a places we have tons of public land as a kid so by the time I got into high school and College I knew what I could hunt and so it's to help. People knocked down those barriers to help them. You know whether it's through a local movement. Whatever it is. They're choosing to do whatever their reasons for getting out there. We all need to respect that and then encourage them and show them you know this year. I worked with hunter programming on with pheasants forever on a project. They did where they brought. Ten people out to the field that had never heard before we did a lot of classroom work with them. We took them out to chap range. Had some shooting coach with them and Nafta was there as well. With some dog handlers. We took him out on a game. Farm got him out and got him shooting birds and just witnessing the joy the pure joy these people have. I encourage anyone to just get out. Take someone new hunting for the joy of watching someone else learnt. Yeah not yet. Not the time to be at odds with each other. It's it's the time to be accepting and get people out there Interesting picking up a little bit. I don't know this for a fact that but I'm picking up like you done. Some work with modern carnivores hear you talking about some of the video projects that market modern corner verse. Done okay. I've done a little work on whether it's sound sound stuff and some of the projects a little bit of the Second Camera. Work and I've been involved with some of his weapon. Are you know programming side of it and just making sure? Everything's up and running so he can focus on what he needs to do. So it's it's been really good to be involved with those programs. Yep Circling back on that pheasants forever. Hunter Mentor Program. What we're like any takeaways like because I think a lot of us in Mike you can speak to this a lot like a lot of us are trying to were scratching our heads on. This are three thing and like what works? What doesn't work any anything? Stick out to you. You know one of the things I did a couple of people ask you. What next work and I go. I gave up some of my best hunting spots within forty five minutes of the twin cities Metro area up to these people. Here they are. They're on the map. Go walk these areas you know because to me a successful hunt for person isn't actually shooting a bird. It's getting out and seeing birds you know you sent him to some area. That's mark. Maybe marginal more difficult to haunt or you have to have some knowledge of the bird or the habitat to find the right location to get birds up. That makes it harder for people and they're not necessarily GONNA come back but if you can put them in an area where you know. The birds are funneled down. You know that if they just walked the edge. Something's going to get up and they're going to have an opportunity that to me is successful hunting and I think we need to be more willing and sharing what we know about the sport. Whether we're with these people are not let them go out and on. Our public lands spots. That's an interesting sentiment. That's something that actually the creative director. Aj talks a lot about that. I mean we have to be willing to share as much information as possible again. I mean the numbers in general are showing this downward trend. I mean it's it's it's time to pull out. You know not pull any punches like you gotta do everything you can to inform. These people. Educate them and help them be successful. Because it takes a lot of boots on the ground and it takes a lot of effort concerted effort to be successful to get to the point where you're like self sufficient like you need somebody to lean on. Yeah so I actually worked on the back end. For that event from the nabbed perspective now has a relationship with with pheasants forever from the hundred recruitment aspect and so for that event I was responsible for recruiting. All the dog handlers. In knowing what they wanted to do without event I purposely shoulder tapped folks to go be the guides and the dog handlers for that so that new hunters would interact with people that were also somewhat new to the game while they had Very well trained and high performance hunting dogs from from being in the NAFTA.

Michigan Jason Meek Minnesota North American Versatile Hunti Howard Howard NAFTA Minneapolis Mr Mike founding board member North Carolina Wisconsin Minnesota Chapter Country Hunt Twenty twenty Habitat Conservation Public partner Pheasant Fest Convention Center Howard Vincent Donnie Vincent Opening
"north manhattan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

11:42 min | 2 years ago

"north manhattan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Red how do you test for lead all can know that there is light going on your primary when certain things from happening message can you help her I can and I can't that that I can answer the second question which is the only way really to detect lead is to use a device called an XRF which stands for an X. ray fluoroscope which is a very expensive device that that local governments will buy like the York city that shoots a beam of X. rays and the tax vote of the lead the problem is is how do you get access to an inspection of your apartment and while I'll be the first to complain that that the laws in New York City or not fully enforced at least we have prevention laws unfortunately although New York state has the highest number and percentage of older housing stock in the nation and the highest number of lead poisoned children in the nation basically outside of New York City and Rochester there are no prevention laws for for lead poisoning in essence the St still is using what what Cordell called the the miner's Canary mode of checking for led by finding out if the kids are poisoned I would strongly suggest at least contact in the county health department in Rockland and seeing if they can provide some services they generally respond alas unfortunately only when when kids are like poison but they may have some programs to assist us the city the state is funding some some programs in high risk areas of the state to do some proactive prevention work on what Hastert's the Centel thank you so much good luck with that that's at least somewhere where she can go and and that's kind of a shocking thing that you reveal their though Matthew that other than New York City and Rochester that the law is even now with all we know and love the kids of in that portion of the laws are so weak yeah yeah Michael in Manhattan Iran W. NYC hi Michael yeah good good morning I just wanted to call and say that it's clear it's not setting up a rope she was because she got a job with city council member bill Perkins and got Perkins to sponsor this bill in the city of New York yes and when it happened the thing I remember most is Mr Bloomberg because so much in the news now is saying that if this law passed that would bankrupt the real estate industry of New York and of course that didn't happen but it just goes to show how the presidency as of now we still are having this problem to this very day Michael thank you and so Cordell clear let me go back to you and he's right that you got involved with the city councilman at the time bill Perkins after your son had the lead problem from from your apartment and how does your understanding of the history in the Bloomberg administration's role comport with the colors yeah well entrances them and Michael but bring that up because it's on my mind a lot lately never thought this person would run for president but when I remember him vetoing the bill after Matt and so many others that come together we all work so hard twelve years of my life and many many people before me for decades have been fighting for this protection for children and we got a city council did the right thing and they have the mayor knock it down veto it thank god we we kept at it we didn't give up we worked hard and now we had good people and the city council overrode it but you know for it just goes to show you know for an individual to have gone through all of that all of that when we have agencies and leaders of medical to be protecting our children and somebody has to go through all that just to get a lead poisoning bill passed and then now a kick in the face is that we're not even enforcing it and so is this something Matthew that you thing Michael Bloomberg should be held accountable for on the campaign trail because I think you indicated before that when local law was passed in two thousand four that was in his administration he signed it but that he worked to weaken it so that it was only upon the vacancy of an apartment that there needed to be an inspection and remediation for lead as opposed to checking out every apartment well first of all he didn't sign it it was vetoed and and his a veto was overridden by the city council don't know this history yes more ends then the real estate industry brought a lawsuit to block it from going into effect mayor Bloomberg refused to allow the city's own lawyers to represent the city in that lawsuit to defend the law so instead the city council had a higher outside lawyers and we the advocates also when it's in that case to defend the law successfully so yeah his role was was not good he fought against a slow very strongly he and I think it's much stronger and and in fact the advocates negotiate a lot away under the promise that he would veto the bill and then he ended up the doing it anyway hi N. as we finish up W. N. Y. C.'s Christopher worth I read this week that there's a federal probe under way to investigate landlords who take section eight vouchers that this particular group of leverage can be particularly negligent when following lead laws and you talk to a doctor who said we're measuring lead in the wrong units so what do you mean by that and anything else you'd like said wrap this up what we're measuring that in the real well I think it goes back to what Matthew had said which is that we do continue to use kids very much as indicators so when a child tests with an elevated blood lead level that test is then reported to the department of health and then the department of health will start an investigation to find out if there's a lead in the apartment and if they don't find that in the apartment that that investigation expanse other places so first thing in the child has to be said so in in many cases a show for what happened what has to happen first as a child has to have an elevated blood that level where is the does the law was originally designed to prevent exposure in the first place and I think Matthew can speak to that as well yes but but very briefly the federal investigation is actually about of a of a much larger issue that I've been trying to get the city to pay attention to which is the fact that the city has a negligent practice of placing families out of homeless shelters or with other city subsidies into private rental homes without verifying that the landlord has complied first with local law one with the landlord debated the lead on the friction surfaces and we have had case after case after case of families who relying on the city to put them in these homes and a chef at swimming that they're safe and finding out the hard way that it's not safe for the kids get lead poisoned we thank Matthew Fisher a staff lawyer at north Manhattan improvement corporation Cordell clear activist in the fight against lead poisoning and W. N. Y. C.'s Christopher worth senior editor in a narrative unit there's no event tonight Chris I see related to this at the Brooklyn Historical Society six thirty call toxic city you want to tell people that I'm I'll be moderating a panel it's designed around an exhibition at the Brooklyn Historical Society that event starts at six thirty Matthew will be on the panel and Kordell will be on the panel and several other people all three of you who've been I guess on this Cordell thanks so much I know you're on the phone with us thanks so much for your time thank you and Matthew thank you for coming in thank you bye Chris thank you as always thanks Frank and again that event is toxic city lead poisoning and it's silent attack on the vulnerable tonight at six thirty moderated by Christopher worth at the Brooklyn Historical Society Brian Lehrer and W. NYC where it's time for the latest news with Richard hake which of what's happened hi Brian the daily death toll from the corona virus in China topped one hundred for the first time pushing the total above one thousand on mainland China many people remain a home there with around sixty million people under virtual quarantine authorities in Hong Kong evacuated people from an apartment block we're four were found to be infected raising fears of the virus may be spreading through the plumbing federal reserve chairman Jerome Powell says the US economy is healthy with steady growth and unemployment at a half century low he says the virus in China is the principal risk delivering the fed's semi annual monetary report to Congress Powell said this morning that the fed is content with where interest rates are currently the US justice department is suing New Jersey over the state so called sanctuary immigration policies U. S. Attorney General William William Barr announced the loss yesterday against governor Phil Murphy and state AG group we are great wall new Jersey's immigrant trust directed limits when local authorities and turn over undocumented immigrants to federal law enforcement officials W. N. Y. C.'s Matt Katz reports that the DOJ has a good chance to win the case you know when it comes to courts and immigration of the trump administration has done quite well the courts have largely affirmed immigration policy changes that Congress wouldn't otherwise have passed like the so called Muslim band restricting travel from mostly Muslim countries last week the federal government stopped allowing new Yorkers to enroll in some trusted traveler programs over a state law that shields DMV records from federal immigration officials and my PT commissioner Dermot Shea says the new bail reform laws are not at issue in the case of a suspect who shot allegedly two police officers in the Bronx a judge ordered forty five year old Robert Williams held without bail at his arraignment yesterday police say he was arrested once while out on parole over the years here Shea speaking on fox five this morning this particular incident is not tied to Baylor form this is somebody you know it it's maybe a greater issue of that recidivism within the criminal justice system and brakes hard to really predict this one Williams is charged with attempted murder assault criminal possession of a weapon and resisting arrest New York City police officers reported an increase in the use of stop and frisk last year W. N. Y. C.'s Yasmin Kahn reports officers recorded nearly thirteen thousand five hundred stops in twenty nineteen a more than twenty percent increase from the year before our legal advocates say the numbers confirm what their clients and mostly poured non white neighborhoods were already telling them police stops are on the rise police officials contend the increase represents more accurate reporting the NYPD has been under a federal monitor for it stop and frisk practices since the judge ruled in twenty thirteen at that police mis used the tactic and a racially discriminatory and unlawful way the monitor has flagged repeatedly over the last few years that police officers were failing to record all stops and the trump administration has improved the rating of the portal north bridge between New York and New Jersey making it eligible for key federal funding the upgraded status was released yesterday as part of the president's budget proposal it would allow the century old structure to be rebuilt if approved new Jersey's governor Phil Murphy's praising the measure saying it will help reduce delays for NJ transit riders but a larger project to build a new rail tunnel under the Hudson River remains stalled federal officials gave out a low rating because.

"north manhattan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

14:49 min | 2 years ago

"north manhattan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"NYC and Gothamist Christopher worth over the past year you've been following the story of let her know that old toxic paint additive persists in city schools and in homes and is still making thousands of kids sick or even permanently adult most recently WNYC found that the department of education consistently fail to follow requirements for annual lead paint inspections in city schools finding that only twelve percent of schools serving young children were inspected once a year between twenty fifteen and twenty nineteen when I posed that question to the mayor last Friday he said he was aware of the problem and the city was on the right track everything I have seen everything I know suggests that there's a lot more testing that was done then has been documented but the fact that it has not been properly documented is unacceptable we did a whole diagnostic of what happened we found a lot of things that need to be fixed they have been addressed and now all the relevant classrooms have been properly inspected hacked has been properly documented so some dispute on the amount of testing but overall the mayor says they're working on it and then answer the mayor also said lead in schools was not the biggest problem making kids sick the schools have not been the challenge historically the challenge has been housing and ironically walls of so much attention was on my chin the real challenge is private housing that is where we have the the real core of lead problems that must be addressed and so there there is the schools not that much of a problem homes are the problem though there are laws on the books to hold landlords accountable to take that out of homes the city rarely enforces them though in the past few months city council is trying to change that here with me to talk about his latest reporting on lead in schools and what the city is doing to get let out of homes is Christopher worth senior editor at the W. N. Y. C. narrative unit off also Matthew share staff lawyer at the north Manhattan improvement corporation and Kordell clear an activist in the fight against lead poisoning so hi Christopher and welcome Matthew and Kordell neighboring morning thank you so Chris first if I have my number correct thirty eight hundred and sixty six children tested positive for lead levels in their blood last year is there anyone you know where these kids are coming into contact with lead partly because everyone alarm people regarding situations they shouldn't be alarmed about which is what the mayor seems to be saying about the schools compare to private homes yet so if you look at department of health data on those thirty eight hundred kids who tested with elevated blood lead levels in two thousand eighteen the vast majority of them as the department of health is able to document were dead tested positive or were exposed to lead in private housing nature you know we we tend to focus a lot on nature on this story but really they nature kids in nature only make about three percent of that total ninety seven percent of those kids are in private housing the back of the schools issue here in looking at at at where kids are poisoned and how many kids are poisoned and how many kids are actually tested in New York City we don't really have a lot of data attesting data for kids of older ages school age children to know whether or not children are actually being exposed in schools or not tend to go behind the scenes of this report in the city as I understand it only did around of school inspections last summer because of your reporting and they maintain that inspections had been happening all along you determine now that that was false that's right we were able to get our hands on the data when our story first ran it last summer we could see in the data that deal we immediately started to inspect those classrooms our story ran on June twenty fourth by June twenty fifth they were already in those classrooms documenting visual inspections of of those classrooms we continue to ask the mayor we continue to ask the idea we officials whether or not those inspections have been taking place annually as they've been required the department of health the health code requires annual inspections of classrooms for children under six what we found when we got actually got our hands on the date it was as you said twelve percent of the classrooms had actually been inspected on an annual basis going back to two thousand fifteen and what do you think of the mayor's response from the show on on Friday last week where he said there was more testing that had been documented now and all the relevant classrooms have been inspected it looks like the all the relevant questions have been inspected there are you know continue to be questions whether or not the deal we should consider should expand its inspection protocols to look at second grade third grade fourth grade upper grades there's no reason really that as I'm told that those children that are who are seven or eight or nine should not also you enjoy the same protections in their classrooms a six year old son let's let's turn to homes because that is such a big piece of this the biggest by all accounts and Kordell clear who is an activist in the fight against lead poisoning in New York City I know this is personal to you and to your family do you want to give us some background on yourself a little bit and then talk about the work that you're doing yeah so they have one in the same I got into this because I have a child that was affected by lead poisoning something that I knew nothing about an effect quite frankly thought didn't even exist anymore and this was in nineteen ninety of nineteen ninety four and you know I just couldn't imagine that this was a problem especially since I had reported violations in my apartment peeling paint plumbing feelings and various other violations and the appropriate agencies came out and never once did anybody mention to me is the possibility of let I was just concerned about the dangers and and and the fall of the playful and applied unfortunately I found out about led to my child being affected and I knew that had to be wrong that he should not have been the Canary in the gold in the in the coal mines we shouldn't be doing it like that and that was when I started in the movement and I know that I'm pretty I'm pretty in not knowledgeable I I read I try to be in the know and I knew that if I didn't know about this many other parents didn't know about it and that was what prompted me to start fighting to make sure that our children are protected and so you helped launch that fight in the nineties then in two thousand four local law one was passed and Matthew you were instrumental in designing that law I understand what was in it and how did you come to it I started working in this issue in the early nineties and Cordell clear actually was a client of mine and saw one of the things we built into the current law was a requirement that when the city goes and does an inspection they have to do an inquiry as to whether there's a child of of under the age of six and if so inspect for lead that we call the Cordell clear proficient in the current law that resulted in a six hundred percent increase in in code enforcement in the first year of the law but in in the big picture of the law it was very much a compromise the idea was the prior law said that you had to take all the lead paint out there was huge push back that that was not practical so the idea of the current law was to place a large part of the onus on owners to keep their property safe because at any given time there were about three hundred thousand units of older housing stock in New York City with kids under the age of six that are presumably have lead paint hazards now we don't have three hundred thousand poison kids a year so obviously the focus has to be on the bad landlords but the city does not have the resources to inspect three hundred thousand units of housing year no way can it do it so the law required several proactive measures by landlords if you're not gonna take all the lead paint out they have to at least permanently abate the lead on the highest risk surfaces when there's a change of tenants in there called the friction surfaces on doors and windows because those great lead das even if they're intact and number two that owners if they're not gonna take all the leg pain not must inspect their own apartments at least once a year more often this needed for lead hazards up correct them safely and document this in writing those two provisions of the law until December of last year the city did exactly zero enforcement of the row to violations for each of those conditions in the sixteen years and those since that law was passed in those were cases that I brought the city in the land more to court the city council did some amendments to the law last year one of the things that was put in which the city has to do audits of two hundred buildings a year to see how landlords are doing with this they need to start enforcing this law and the I just want to give you an interesting statistic because I was looking just last night and I don't know how many of the building safe done thus far but the us all together at least the data shows that there are a hundred and thirty two buildings where the city found non compliance with the turnover I don't know if they've reach their two hundred inspections yet but that indicates at least about sixty five percent non compliance in with the annual inspections it's the same thing it's a it's a hundred and twenty six buildings thus far they found the landlords for not doing the annual inspections this is a huge problem I think the mayor is completely right the problem is private housing I'm glad to see the city is finally starting to take sixteen years later responsibility to enforce this law but it points to a very very large problem listeners we can take some phone calls if you have a question maybe about a potential lead problem in your own apartment or anything else maybe a story for our guests W. N. Y. C.'s Christopher worth who's been covering lead in schools and other web problems in New York City and Matthew should share who was just speaking staff lawyer at the north Manhattan improvement corporation and Kordell clear a long time activist in the fight against lead poisoning and as you heard in that two thousand four law because of what happened in her family there was the math you call that the chlorine gas Cordell clear provision that's right and our phone number is two one two four three three W. NYC two one two four three three nine six nine two also joining us for a few minutes is socket Cologne she lives in the Bronx with her son who experience lead poisoning Matthew is representing her sake thanks so much for coming on with us hi hi how are you good tell us your story a little bit if you don't mind how did you find that your son was sick from let I thank him for a regular check up I decided which hospital so I took him to a lot of the masses in a routine check up and do blood work and what they did blood work we found out that he had lead levels of fourteen from what I was told one your lead levels they got five does state the hospital's obligated to send your results and to the state and the state contacted me they had someone come in from and how someone from like healthy homes that person she checked with a machine for life there was blood found into places in my whole that same night the super of my building went into my apartment like around eight o'clock at night and starting removing the lead well me and my son were inside the house she started sleeping that led from my room to the kitchen I you know the words in the act of getting rid of it he did it badly and gave you even more exposure then me and my son had to leave our house there is like apartments that they have like to place your your taken out of your whole service there wasn't any available because there was no heating or something and one of the floors so they had like a whole floor closed off so we weren't able to get a room bear my son gets blessing to school so I had to wherever you spend the night I had to like take a cab or something just to me let him get to school then about three weeks or so later we were allowed to come back in the house at this point this state was sent back in well well let me move back a little bit then they actually sent actual team that that they're just for that just to remove the lab properly make you know putting down classic making sure that it doesn't get further exposed but that they remove it properly all their garbage stick everything with them so someone came in actually did that based on someone from the state to check that work the way that the representative checked to see if there was glad she sat down on my couch and she looked around and she said that you look like what was done so that that's it that's the problem was resolved from my understanding the only way you for you to build that there's lead on anything is either by that machine that they use a check or by best light either or she just sat there and she said that does it better look like convicted change like my door so I guess since the change my door if that was her way of seeing that the change their lives here what's the end of the story with all that you went through and even people as you're describing it who supposedly were there to help from the server to the representative from the state were either not helping much or even making it worse are you back in the same apartment now and how is your son I'm still the same apartment my son is still has a lead it had.

NYC Christopher
"north manhattan" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

05:01 min | 2 years ago

"north manhattan" Discussed on KPCC

"Lin Manuel Miranda you were born in nineteen eighty New York City parents leash and Luiz emigrated that from Porta Rico your mother was a psychologist your dad a political consultant let me ask you a little bit about your neighborhood I've seen it described his nose bleed territory a bit rates I lived off two hundred street and it was like a tiny Latin American country Washington Heights in in would all of northern Manhattan really were really the first chapter in so many immigrants stories to the US and you know first lead to Italians than an enormous amount of Jewish refugees during and after World War two then it was a huge Irish neighborhood and we moved there when I was one year old in nineteen eighty one and in the seventies was a huge Dominican influx from the Dominican Republic and so with a live in nanny growing up actually raised my father importer Rico when I was born she came to to live with us and help raise me and my sister and she never spoke a word of English her entire life you didn't have to in my neighborhood everyone spoke Spanish even the businesses that weren't Latino owned spoke Spanish because that was the clientele and what about it spending some a in port a Rico as a child he would go there and spend some is with your father's family will you members of the island yeah I mean they were great and largely independence because my grandparents both worked until the day they died my grandmother ran a travel agency and she was a real gossip and that was the perfect job for her because she knew who was booking a plane ticket where next door to that shop was my aunt who owned a school supply store that also had the the Slurpee machine I used to run that and then across the plaza my grandfather was the general manager of the town and credit union and a bank which I associate with just lots of free white construction paper out of which to make their planes and flip books so I was sort of shuttling between lots of people working none of them spoke English it was a perfect total immersion for me one month a year I feel like in your description I can almost hear it is that where you developed your if the dialogue tuning into gossip child a little bit I mean even north Manhattan didn't feel like small town life I didn't have small town life except in the summers and my name wasn't Lin Manuel importer Rico my name was has anyone received okay finally that's Lisa son who went to New York he had a title I lived with people that's Lucy those kit and I think that the best recipe for being a writer is being a little out of place everywhere I also won the Lotto when I was five years old and got into this very elite public school called hunter and so I was shuttling from two hundred street to the Upper East Side so again I'm the kid who goes to the fancy school in my neighborhood I am the kid who speaks Spanish with kind of a mess that gringo accent importer Rico and at school and the kid like live all the way up town so that's a great recipe for making a writer because you're always thinking about which part of yourself you're bringing into the conversation which part of me is most applicable to the people I'm around time to go to the music we're gonna hear your third track again this is one of the greatest living song writers we have Ruben blades and this is the album I remember most on my parents vinyl collection and the song is called in by the dental you'll be someone like you on this Antonio is someone I.

Lin Manuel Miranda Luiz New York City
"north manhattan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

11:29 min | 2 years ago

"north manhattan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Can also be seen on the big screen recently played Jack the lamplighter in Mary Poppins returns and this November he'll be on our small screens in the TV adaptation of Philip Pullman's his dark materials one of around as many other talents is improvised wrapped the BBC's Lauren laverne asked him about the time he freestyled with Barack Obama in the rose garden at the White House there was a not a stressful tell me about it it was surreal it was their idea actually okay and I remember talking to the president at the time saying if you could sort of start slow and speed up that would sort of make it more dynamic and she cut me off mid sentence hello we're just gonna do with okay so it was scary and probably not my best freestyle but the best I could do in that moment with the leader of the free world it was pretty incredible well handled Lin Manuel Miranda humble ten then as we know continues to be hugely successful on the show starts by pointing at its heroes in auspicious beginnings Alexander Hamilton was an illegitimate often immigrants to the U. S. who would become one of the founding fathers and the musical style is mostly hip hop much of the vocal performance in the show is rap and it's based on the book by Ron Chernow what was the moment when you thought this is going to fly at the end of the second chapter of reading the book and the thesis that came to me was this because the words he used words to get himself out of the circumstances he literally writes about a hurricane that destroys Saint Croix and it is so good it's published and I think it's called the Danish American his act and his cousin begins to take up a collection to get him off the island and I in that moment thought well that's hip hop that notion of writing about your struggle so specifically that you transcend it and that you elicit a response and others and he starts writing under pseudonyms what's more hip hop in writing under so I understand that it is in Congress the notion of these founders with this very contemporary form of music but at the same time I just wanna be tense for Hamilton it seems the unique way of telling tell me about casting the show it features actors from many different backgrounds telling the story of an immigrant to the U. S. why was that important to you one is part of the initial impulse I was never picturing literal founders and I think we've looked for the most diverse group of people who could bring these words to life and Tommy Kael whose my director on both in the heights and Hamilton Tommy ran with that initial impulse and elevated it to this principle he just sort of said this is the story of America then told by American now and I didn't realize what a big deal that was until you see it on stage until they all come down stage in the opening number and sing the word time at the top of their lungs and how thrilling that is that it is this prism this way of looking at the pass through a very contemporary lands Lin Manuel Miranda born in nineteen eighty New York City parents emigrated that from Porta Rico let me ask you a little bit about your neighborhood I've seen it described his nose bleed territory little bit rates they lived off two hundred street and it was like a tiny Latin American country everyone spoke Spanish and what about it spending some a in Porter Rico as a child you would go there and spend summers with your father's family will you members of the island my grandmother ran a travel agency and she was a real gossip and that was the perfect job for her because she knew who was booking a plane ticket where next door to that shop was my aunt who owned a school supply store that also had the the Slurpee machine I used to run that and then across the plaza my grandfather was the general manager of the town and credit union and a bank so I was sort of shuttling between lots of people who are working none of them spoke English it was a per total immersion for me one month a year is that where you developed your if the dialogue tuning into gossip child a little bit I mean even north Manhattan didn't feel like small town life I didn't have small town life except in the summers and my name wasn't Lin Manuel importer Rico my name was has anyone with you to get friendly that's Lisa son who went to New York he had a title that's Lucy those kids and I think that the best recipe for being a writer is being a little out of place everywhere I also won the Lotto when I was five years old and got into this very elite public school called hunter and so I was shuttling from two hundred street to the Upper East Side so again and the kid who goes to the fancy school in my neighborhood I am the kid who speaks Spanish with kind of a mess that gringo accent importer Rico and at school and the kid like live all the way up town so that's a great recipe for making a writer because you're always thinking about which part of yourself you're bringing into the conversation which part of me is most applicable to the people I'm around Lin Manuel Miranda that one it would bang as of right to yourself do you agree with land mine well that the recipe for being a writer is being a little out of place everywhere I mean I toss before right I think so I completely agree for me personally I think there is something about not feeling completely accept it can be a bit out of place that helps because you're kind of always on the outside in because it when your in late goals yeah do people think you'll not let go see an enough that your sound your bidding yes exactly so I when I mean they go sometimes you know they like and when I'm in England is like and so you're close the code switching yes and that's a huge part of your life anyway so which means you'll costly adopting yourself into different environments I think code switches make the best creative yeah I really do Karen what about you thing a little bit out of place everywhere do you think that actually helps Ariza hold just a writer filmmaker creation I think so I mean I I my partner was a film producer and you know we say to me thank you you have to be self disturbing when you're gonna be creative that the minute you get comfortable you have nothing to say and so I think putting yourself in a different culture automatically gives you different view point and spark something inside of you then you need to express I think a little bit of discomfort is always necessary yeah cat you definitely carry a bit a slight bit of discomfort with you wherever you go interest I am not one I know you haven't seen Hamilton yet but you saw in the heights so what do you think of his work I absolutely love his work I think it's quite innovative you know with sort of rap as a musical I'd what's in the heights on after I watch I bought the CD so I know all the songs I absolutely love his work and I love his sense of innovation and I'm creative freedom as well I'm a cabin and not just as a critic but as an American because what he's done is to change the way Americans up to that country for example through Hamilton what are your thoughts on what he's achieved through his musicals I think it's incredible to bring history which you know when when I was learning it is really boring yeah guys in suits and muskets you know each up to make it as as vivid and pertinent I think is important and also the fact that people want to see it so even if it's not strictly factual they're learning something which is great and also being entertained which is two fold wonderful that is popular culture with history is just I think it's fascinating yeah I need does a genius like you're listening to the BBC world service this is the art thou and let me turn my full attention to you now when it with the bank so Nigerian performance poet filmmaker your in the U. K. for the Cheltenham literature festival I think it was your first of yeah and he was sent by the RK festival of arts and the X. which is about to start in a golf which you helped to found so I'm on the advisory board I say that means do you have released two albums of your poetry dirty laundry and a memory if the gassing you perform to music yes I do I'm sorry but we don't have musicians in the studio although power and you could probably do a little bit of caution we can do without the music okay so would you perform something for us now to show poem for you what's it called it's called we made it over to you when I was a little girl my mother would mix the buckets of dough into the night now rising to twice the size of a forgotten dreams you would squeeze the to pull into the fear in heat you see this was what it took to put clothes on our backs and books in our bags my mother would never let her children out with an empty stomach I'm a woman now and I know that I am my mothers daughter learning coverage to have blistered hands and doing fearlessness in the lines of a smiling face sometimes we bought seven filings like people do secret handshake she recalls the woman who holds the close of her back to keep me here I don't recall the little girl trapped between a shop floor and the tuition payments too far away from home to know if I would ever make it but somewhere between off island on the humming generate my mother with this we made all that's beautiful how does that sound if it's to music B. sparkling death of people who haven't heard you yeah it's it's beats behind it sometimes it's music specific compose for it so I might be I might actually have the beat first and then perform to the beat so I'm actually working inside of the music so what can what those what exactly can work both ways are you very musical then as a result of this old what you musical with full I mean I don't play any instruments icons I I don't think I can think even the people tell me that they think I com but I think I have a musical yeah I think I've always had a musical yeah and I've always been a lover of music anyway so for me I think even with performing and poetry for me I think about my voice in itself is a musical instrument even if I'm just speaking what's so what what do you most like to writes about I'm one of the themes that run through for me as I always say I write this very personal poems so I write a lot about sort of my life and my family and my and my own angst and sort of situations around me but I really I'm very interested in how we can use personal storytelling to eliminate really bigger issues so what suits to poetry or spoken word scene is there any legal legal says is V. V. is for a week so there's just a lot of really young people very interested in and poetry and poems I think a sort of performance poetry has made some literature and poetry quite cool good as well so you get to be honest days you will get to listen to your third it's kind of taking on a different form that that has a little bit of like sparkling glamour to it I think and all of their themes that are emerging amongst those young people of poetry slams and nights like that absolutely so does a lot of political poems critiquing issues around the country whether that corruption in justice and just you know apathy as well there's also a lot of young women talking about women who it and this idea sort of inspirational conversations and who that mothers web and patriarchy and how I see yellow if you'll work his labs the ashes trying.

"north manhattan" Discussed on NutriMedical Report

NutriMedical Report

15:00 min | 2 years ago

"north manhattan" Discussed on NutriMedical Report

"Domestic can be. Trying to on the nine eleven mystery plane? You've also done research, many other topics I wanted to do to mention because do you have websites purchase your books and other papers. Website for my nasty book the book about nasty Christianity. And that is. Nostitz secrets dot com. And that features that one book my to nine eleven are featured at trend dot com. That is teasing Tom in EDA. Why dot com they can give. Amazon. Yeah, so yeah, those books, what is the name of the book? And I think it's it's one of those books. It's called what black nine eleven. And the other one is the nine eleven mystery play. Yeah. Say a little bit slower. So people can hear because little bit of muffling in your phone. The what's the title of the first book, they can go on Amazon, or trying books tier I. N. E. Y. Y dot com trying to dot com. What's the first book again? Go slower. Nine eleven black nine eleven. And what's the other one is called nine eleven mystery plane. Right, right right now, the cici's that you have of those, and I'd like you to summarize, what is because we're gonna talk about a new paper today, we're going to post up talking about earth changes. And I've been tracking this for number of years based on information I have from regular classified sources. For example, as I mentioned on the testimony gave you this morning. I was given security clearance. Same levels of present or above called above top secret to work and take care of employees that US missile defense and space commanded many other classified projects, including the virtual world project shreve air force base. And what you do is talking about nine eleven because I was the exit examiner for the P Murrah building when major swinger was way, doing airtime in Fort Hood, Texas, and because of the next down to the commander in nineteen when it happened the building demolition, because it was. Listen, it wasn't a explosion by Tim Zimmer vais or Stras Meyer from east Germany. Whatever demolished that it was actually bombs, but inside the building, to demolish inside actually viewed this with a with a phrase magician experts end even generals on my show over the years, because I've been doing a show on clear channel back in the nineties, two hours a day on Wednesdays with Mark Allen cre-, call after the best medicine, then last working, and half years. I've been on Justice network Republic radio rents network. And now last expensive of my own, we'll be we've been sending Cigna for the last two years to red state talkradio. Number one talk radio network for internet and revolution radio. And we'll be sending signal over also to Sierra talkradio goes and every platform on the planet pretty well. So the information I provide provide more classified information about more secret projects in hidden knowledge than India, their individual and human history. And I'm not exaggerating. When I say that, and I bring on experts like. Self geniuses to track down, and find an always, and find things that says you don't have to necessarily have all the answers the thing that I say it's watch for to my entire show, is you don't necessarily have the answers, but ask better questions. And when you ask better questions, you start finding alleys the answer to a question you haven't asked yet. So you're two books if you were to summarize what those two books were. What would you say? Black nine eleven and the nine eleven mystery playing. If you're saying nights a couple of minutes. What's your main ceases, you? Discover the or the backbone of those two books, which I believe are essential reading because we're gonna time history where the globalist that are controlling our world and Estado government. The deep state, that's running. Our world is not our elected officials at all. It. There's a smile group running the country and. Definitely been the setting up and staging these attacks. No question about it. The. Eleven I would recommend as a starter as I one to look at for your listeners, I present evidence in there about the insider trading. That happened before the two or three days before the attacks. And we have learned has been there been new disclosures in the last year of information act requests. To these occurs Exchange Commission and they have Lisa one of documents that confirmed by research and the range of other people that this was inside. Is curious and Exchange Commission information. There was a paper trail to the people who did these trades, and the SEC new and they just covered it up. Right. But was going on. With also gold from the Bank of Nova Scotia's disappeared from the bottom of the World Trade Center tower two. There was also a notice given to a lot of people in the building, clothing. The vestige company from Israel one was in the building. My wife's cousin who's father was African. Then his her mother was my her mother's grabbed my wife's mother's sister. Their daughter actually was a fater with a master's with. NBA v and her husband at the World Trade Center in the mix division of the building. We're told not to be in the building. So she wasn't in the building that it was. He he when he came back, yet, when froze that our towers claps, he didn't know that she hadn't received a notice because he was a north Manhattan at a different site forever. And he tried to search through the debris because most people realize when the buildings were Tamala they were. They were demolished with micro nukes. Ardi Xie expose of corden possibly, super survey, and the only nation, researching super surveys, high explosives, Israel, and I have actually, the radiological analysis of the US Geological Survey, including fifty five times, higher levels of tritium in the World Trade Center tower, we know that no steel building and is fallen due to heating of carpets and drapes and material inside the building anything paramedic including people concrete, or any Pearman, neck structure, including alumina was APR is, including the at ten tower on top of the building. But the explosion of high energy x rays and neutron flux particles, and I'm an expert in nuclear physics as well. Here it was the training, they got interested in doing the research on nine eleven. That was the first thing that got my attention. When I heard about the tritium. Finishes. Komo's my Ed. Thirty of these Rulli nuclear.

World Trade Center Amazon US Exchange Commission Israel P Murrah building cici Tom World Trade Center tower Sierra talkradio Mark Allen cre India Bank of Nova Scotia Texas Estado government Cigna Komo Manhattan NBA
"north manhattan" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

06:01 min | 3 years ago

"north manhattan" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"To be. Believed. Needs to be believed. Of this country just shut up and step up. Coming just say right at the outset. I believe Dr foreign I believe, you're survivor here believer. I stand with her. Shows up on Monday. Should be bullied into this scenario. I believe I believe professor Ford. I think she's credible. Oh, I believe. Now. The question is do you believe the woman that is making the accusation against Fairfax? Because the accuser now has hired the attorney a professor Christine Blasi Ford in that position. And Fairfax would you know, the thinking was that when north of when north Manhattan had to resign that it would be the Lieutenant governor that would take over? Now, he's facing not only serious assault charge against by this woman. But also the woman as a witness that will testify that she was told that the time that it actually it happened. Now, it gets worse for the Lieutenant governor because NBC news reporting today, and what was I I guess sent out a tweet we haven't corroborated it on our own. The Washington Examiner has a copy of this as well. So there's multiple sources reporting this that the Lieutenant governor Fairfax, you know, pretty made a pretty vulgar and disgusting reference to this woman, you know, saying, you know, this week. When this issue came up at a meeting with staff using the F B word. I mean unbelievable. So he would take over if the governor who's absolutely nuts has to step down or is asked to step down. Okay. So well, then who then becomes the next person? How many people do you have to go through before you're going to get to the person that is going to govern the Commonwealth of Virginia now with the governor and the Lieutenant governor both facing scrutiny on these issues. The question is raised. What happens if both men resigned from their positions? Now Virginia has their constitution and the order of succession for the branch of the state government would mean that the state's attorney general would take over the governor's role. Okay. We got a little breaking news in that department is well today because the attorney general's name is Mark herring. And Mark herring admitted. He too has worn black face in the past. When he was in college in one thousand nine hundred eighty when I was a nineteen year old undergraduate and college some friends suggested we attend a party dress like rappers that we listen to at the time by Curtis blow and perform a song airing send it sounded ridiculous. Even now writing it, but because of our ignorance and glib attitudes. And because we did not have an appreciation for the experiences and perspectives perspectives of others, and because of all of that we dressed up put on wigs and Brown makeup. And he said this was a one time occurrence aches full responsibility for my conduct and the revelation now further royals, the top levels of the Virginia government. Now, you're asking yourself. Well, who would be next? Well, the next person in line would be the speaker of the house of Commons. What are we going to find out about that person in the next couple of days? It is pretty amazing. This is all coming out in secession succession like this. Now, I you have the governor it starts with abortion. Then after the abortion, then it goes to the black face issue. Then the Lieutenant governor who was almost a complete. He was going to step in for the governor. Now, he has this problem with a serious sexual assault charge. And it goes on from there. But the worst part of all of this to me is, you know, this high ground that everybody in the Democratic Party takes every two and four years that they have a monopoly compassion on issues involving race in this country. When in fact, nothing could be further from the truth. You know, I went through a long history of the Democratic Party and race over the years. And it's not one that they should in any way. Be proud of you go back as far as you want. For example. The Republican party is the party of Lincoln. The Republican party is the party of the emancipation proclamation. The Republican party is the party of the nineteen sixty four Civil Rights Act and the sixty five Voting Rights Act. And when you go through all of this what you see is a country a party that, you know, the southern manifesto that was all the Democratic Party. Governor Wallace standing in the schoolhouse door, thou that's the Democratic Party, you know, Hillary Clinton's mentor. Former klansman Robert K K K bird. Remember when he was home with Tony snow? This is in two thousand and something you know, he gives this ridiculous. Answer are white. I've seen a lot of white Montan Mona use that word. We've all we all just need to work together to make our country better contract. If you want to use that word, well apparently did wanna use that word because he used it. And that is the motto J William Fulbright segregationist Bill Clinton's great mentor in life and the person that he trust but every two and four years without fail. Every political season. Republicans are racist. Republicans are sexist Republicans, a misogynist, homophobic, you got the whole point. You know, Al Gore saying Republicans to a predominantly black audience changing, his tone, cadence speech delivery, which is just beyond the pale in and of itself..

Democratic Party Republican party governor Fairfax Governor Wallace attorney Virginia assault Mark herring Washington Examiner professor Ford Fairfax Curtis blow Al Gore Bill Clinton Christine Blasi Ford NBC Virginia government Tony snow
"north manhattan" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

WINT 1330 AM

05:01 min | 3 years ago

"north manhattan" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

"Believe professor Ford. I think she's credible. I believe now the question is do you believe the woman that is making the accusation against Fairfax? Because the accuser now has hired the attorney of professor Christine Blasi Ford in that position. And Fairfax would you know, the thinking was that when north of when north Manhattan to resign that it would be the Lieutenant governor that would take over? Well, now, he's facing not only serious assault charge against by this woman. But also the woman as a witness that will testify that she was told that the time that it actually it happened. Now, it gets worse for the Lieutenant governor because NBC news reporting today, and what was I I guess sent out in a tweet we have been corroborated it on our own Washington. Examiner has a copy of this as well. So there's multiple sources reporting this that the Lieutenant governor Fairfax, you know, pretty made a pretty vulgar and disgusting reference to this woman, you know, saying, you know, this week when this issue came up at a meeting with staff using the F that b word. I mean believable. So he would take over if the governor who's absolutely nuts. Has to step down or is asked to step down. Okay. So well, then who then becomes the next person? How many people do you have to go through before you're gonna get to the person that is going to govern the Commonwealth of Virginia now with the governor and the Lieutenant governor both facing scrutiny on these issues. The question is raised. What happens if both men resigned from their positions? Now Virginia has their constitution and the order of succession for the branch of the state government would mean that the state's attorney general would take over the governor's role. Okay. We got a little breaking news in that department as well today because the attorney general's name is more caring and Mark herring admitted he too has worn black face in the past when he was in college in nineteen eighty when I was a nineteen year old undergraduate and college some friends suggested we attend a party dress like rappers that we listened to at the time by Kurtis blow and perform a song. Airing said, it sounded ridiculous. Even now writing it, but because of our ignorance and glib attitudes. And because we did not have an appreciation for the experiences and perspectives perspectives of others, and because of all of that we dressed up put on wigs and Brown makeup. And he said this was a one time occurrence, I accept full responsibility for my conduct and the revelation now further royals, the top levels of the Virginia government. Now, you asking yourself, well who would be next while the next person in line? Would be the speaker of the house of Commons. What are we going gonna find out about that person? The next couple of days. It is pretty amazing that this is all coming out in succession succession like this. Now, I you have the governor it starts with abortion. Then after the abortion, then it goes to the black face issue. Then the Lieutenant governor who was almost a beta complete. He was going to step in for the governor. Now, he has his problem with a series of sexual assault charge. And it goes on from there. You know? But the worst part of all of this to me is, you know, this high ground that everybody in the Democratic Party takes every two and four years that they have a monopoly a compassionate on issues involving race in this country. When in fact, nothing could be further from the truth. You know, I went through a long history of the Democratic Party, you know, and race over the years, and it's not one that they should in any way. Be proud of. You know, you go back as far as you want. For example. The Republican party is the party of Lincoln. The Republican party is the party of the emancipation proclamation in the Republican party is the party of the nineteen sixty four Civil Rights Act and the sixty five Voting Rights Act. And when you go through all of this what you see is a country a party that, you know, the southern manifesto that was all Democratic Party governor Wallace standing in the schoolhouse door, thou that's the Democratic Party. You know, Hillary Clinton's you know, mentor. Former klansman Robert K K K bird member when he was on with Tony snow. This is in two thousand and something you know, he gives this ridiculous. Answer her white. I've seen a white Montagne on use that word. We've all we all need to work together to make our country.

Republican party Democratic Party governor Fairfax governor Wallace Christine Blasi Ford attorney Kurtis blow Fairfax assault Virginia Hillary Clinton Tony snow Manhattan NBC Mark herring Robert K Washington professor Virginia government