36 Burst results for "North Korea"

Fresh "North Korea" from KC O'Dea Show

KC O'Dea Show

00:40 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh "North Korea" from KC O'Dea Show

"The I Heart radio ad. So apparently, Russia says they got a vaccine. And everything's everything's going to be better. They became the very first country to officially declare a cleared Corona virus vaccine ready for use. Um There's some things you should know about it. Probably one of the things that you're wondering is, how are they will get this done so fast. Where I think to this point. China has a kind of a vaccine, but it's only for military use. And there's zero evidence that it even works. So this one. The Russians say they developed Um And and being done. This quickly has surprised people. One of the ways that they were able to cut down on the time necessary. Is they appear to have simply skipped face three trials. You know the part where they tested on people. But should be good to go. So I don't know about that. It seems that that's kind of an important part right where you have a real object thousands of people and see if they turn into mutants. Yeah. But what if we have mutants now? Or nightmare scenario. You're ready. What if going back to yesterday? It gives superpowers and now all the super power people are Russians. That doesn't bode well for us. Didn't like that. So oh, by the way, you want to know what a troll Putin is. Do you know what he named the vaccine and I'm not making this up. The vaccine, which was developed by the Moscow based Gamma laid Whatever institute Has been named Sputnik. V And and you know what that probably does is for vendetta. I don't know that, of course, a reference to the very surprising space large back in 1957. Of the world's first satellite, so And Russia's kind of been struggling where they are trying to regard not regain, but gain an image as a Scientific powerhouse. Right. When you think of Russia. What do you think of From just, you know, did industry lifestyle that? What do you think of Research mecca. Probably not. Bears and beets. Yeah, probably more. So in that direction, Lumber of mining And and that is where that's where Russia gets his money from So some would say. That there's a certain propaganda effect that could possibly be going on here, plus The part where Ah, you skipped the human trial fortune. And might be making mutants. So there's that, although Putin did say that he has already Inoculated one of his daughters. So Obviously, that's you know, to demonstrate how safe it is, and I'm sure that's 100% true. So I thought, you know what Maybe we Maybe we should get on this. So I've I've asked if we could have somebody come in and inoculate Ross. I don't feel good about with the Russian with the Russian vaccine that Why don't you want the Russian vaccine? What do you have against Russia? Actually, the vaccine went right into the vile. They went down to Siberia. Okay, found there the black oil and it curled right into the vile. It crawled in probably about its own. I mean, that's that's meant to be as probably are you holding out for the North Korean vaccine? I that'll be good. I am not All right. So you write two needles. You gotta pick one Russian vaccine Russian night. Well, I didn't. Yeah, really. Yeah, that's not fair. Alright, Iranian or North Korean vaccine. Ah, this is a fun game. Yeah, it is. I'll go North Korea over Iranian vaccine. You choose? Yeah. Just because you would just assume it didn't do anything. Exactly. Actually, I didn't go back to my first answer it Fargo, North Korea over Russia because it would probably just be saltwater, some stupid Nothing. Yeah. You know what That is? That is a good Good thought. Problem is North Korea's It might be irradiated because he made the you know. Not a radiant is afraid that the right word here but You know, glowing. If it's glowing. You gotta stay away from it. Well, that's what gives you the powers, man. I didn't have you never read a comic book. I just need to know what the powers they're going to be. Well, it doesn't work like that. It's like in Deadpool. Right? Wasn't the point of it. They didn't know what the powers were going to be. And his powers was to.

Russia North Korea Putin China Moscow Bears Siberia Ross Fargo
UN: North Korea may be capable of putting nuclear devices on ballistic missiles

Larry Elder

00:41 sec | 6 d ago

UN: North Korea may be capable of putting nuclear devices on ballistic missiles

"The U. N Security Council has received a report saying North Korea's continuing a stealth development of its nuclear program. Several unnamed countries conveyed their assessment to the panel of experts that through North Korea's past six tests and other activities it has probably developed nuclear device is small enough to fit into the warheads of its ballistic missiles. One country said Pyongyang may seek to further strengthen its capabilities and developed multiple warhead systems, which would make them harder to intercept. The report also noted that North Korea was still violating and evading sanctions, including through targeted cyber attacks against officials of countries on the Security Council and the panel itself. That's

North Korea U. N Security Council Pyongyang
Supreme leader says Iran won't negotiate with US

America First with Sebastian Gorka

00:37 sec | Last week

Supreme leader says Iran won't negotiate with US

"A townhall dot com Iran's supreme ruler, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, says his Country will not negotiate with us because America would only use talks for propaganda purposes in a televised speech marking the EED holiday, how money says President Donald Trump would benefit from talks, saying some wants to use negotiations with us for propaganda like negotiations with North Korea. Iran's supreme leader is your phone to talk between Trump on North Korean leader Kim Jong UN Hominy says the U. S. Wants Iran to give up its nuclear program defense facilities on regional authority at the negotiating table. I'm

President Donald Trump Iran Ayatollah Ali Khamenei Kim Jong Un Hominy North Korea United States America
Supreme leader says Iran won't negotiate with US

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | Last week

Supreme leader says Iran won't negotiate with US

"Iran's supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei says his country will not negotiate with the US because America would only use tools for propaganda purposes in a televised speech marking the eat holiday how many says president Donald Trump would benefit from talks since trump wants to use the collisions with us for propaganda I think initiations with North Korea Iran's supreme leader is referring to talks between trump and north Korean leader Kim Jong moon how many says the US once wrong to give up its nuclear program defense facilities I'm regional authority at the negotiating table I'm Charles the last month

Iran Ayatollah Ali Khamenei United States America Donald Trump Charles President Trump North Korea Kim Jong
EU prolongs North Korea nuclear sanctions for a year

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | Last week

EU prolongs North Korea nuclear sanctions for a year

"The European Union has prolonged sanctions against dozens of north Korean officials and agencies for year over Pyongyang's continued efforts to develop nuclear missiles and other weapons of mass destruction you have quarters it said in a statement that the asset freezes and travel bans involved fifty seven people and nine entities which are typically companies banks or other organizations and will be reviewed again in a year it said that most in peace and denuclearization of the Korean peninsula must be achieved by peaceful means underlined that the diplomatic process must be continued as the only way towards realizing that goal the issue has imposed sanctions on several countries notably Iran and Venezuela but the measures against North Korea which were first introduced in two thousand six R. it's tapas I'm sorry I. Sheckley

European Union Pyongyang Iran North Korea Venezuela
EU prolongs North Korea nuclear sanctions for a year

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | Last week

EU prolongs North Korea nuclear sanctions for a year

"The European Union has prolonged sanctions against dozens of north Korean officials and agencies for year over Pyongyang's continued efforts to develop nuclear missiles and other weapons of mass destruction you have quarters it said in a statement that the asset freezes and travel bans involved fifty seven people and nine entities which are typically companies banks or other organizations and will be reviewed again in a year it said that most in peace and denuclearization of the Korean peninsula must be achieved by peaceful means underlined that the diplomatic process must be continued as the only way towards realizing that goal the issue has imposed sanctions on several countries notably Iran and Venezuela but the measures against North Korea which were first introduced in two thousand six R. it's tapas I'm sorry I. Sheckley

European Union Pyongyang Iran North Korea Venezuela
Key issues as big tech CEOs face Congress

Chad Hartman

04:32 min | Last week

Key issues as big tech CEOs face Congress

"As we're talking right now and over the last couple hours, and just because of the show, I have not had a chance to listen. There's another Very vital hearing that's taking place where the heads of the elite big tech companies Are facing questions from this panel again, you know, with on the make up of obviously Republicans and Democrats, Doug you first and then John, you chime in next How significant is this? That we're seeing. Ah, Apple, and we're seeing Google. And we're seeing Facebook and not just members of those companies, the leaders of those companies facing significant questions. On the power they wield and the fact that the power is seemingly on ly getting bigger by the hour. Well, I think it's very significant on and it's a good thing, of course, that the top officers of the the companies are appearing and responding to these questions, but it's certainly a measure. Off the power that these firms Ah wheeled today and of course, it's a power over the content of the public debate because they have such a gate, keeping Ah ah force. They are such a gate keeping force to determine you know what what can and can't get distributed and that people should have can have access to. And of course, there's all kinds of pressure on them to the prohibit to certain things and to prevent hate speech. And what you know what some people would characterize this hate speech. Others would you know, would characterize as ah. Ah, speaking truth to power and so on. And these are very difficult questions. Ah, and there's danger both in them doing too little and too much at the same time. There's no question that these firms And the technology that they've done so much to advance, you know, has has revolutionized public access and the ability for voices to be heard in a way that surely is Beneficial or potentially beneficial, and we don't want to kill that Golden goose, either. So it's it's an important and challenging issues. John what you think Well, pursuing toe what we began talking about with Attorney General Bar. There seems to be too many speeches and not enough listening. So just in one example. This is ostensibly to talk about the power that this big tech firms have. And I think the more profound problem is miss information that is sent Purposefully, And this is in the news as well, often specifically by foreign agents, be they from Russia or China or Iran or North Korea or other hostile actors. Both state and non state. And yet what seems to be stated, you know by some of the Republicans, they're the aforementioned Jim Jordan. When he had his time said, I'll just cut to the chase big checks out to get conservatives and went into a rant about how the big tech firms are trying to censor conservatives. Not meant in his residence. By the way, John, you know, but yeah, not but not mentioning that about seven out of the top 10. You know, top trending either site. Individuals or institutions on Facebook right now are conservatives. Fox News? Other legislators and you know who have been thwarted his just mid medical misinformation and as an example, the president's son, Donald Trump Jr. You know, Pushing forward already debunked medical information about the cove in 19 and so, you know, I don't think that I think that that issue was not Germaine at all. And it's proven by the readership and by where people go online. But it's once again in this particular instance where someone is trying to disprove a political point, as opposed to really contend what the real issue is and the power That these companies have both in the marketplace in the marketplace of ideas.

John Facebook Jim Jordan Apple Google Doug Fox News Germaine Donald Trump Jr President Trump Russia General Bar Attorney North Korea China Iran
Kim Jong Un Says Nuclear Weapons Will Guarantee North Korea's National Safety

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:35 sec | Last week

Kim Jong Un Says Nuclear Weapons Will Guarantee North Korea's National Safety

"North Korean leader Kim Jong UN says his country's hard one nuclear weapons were a solid security guarantee and an effective deterrent that could prevent a second Korean war. Kim's comments before war veterans marking the 67th anniversary of the end of the Korean War again show he has no intention of abandoning his weapons as prospects dim for resuming diplomacy with the U. S. North Korea has previously ratcheted up fiery rhetoric or conducted weapons test to get outside concessions. But some experts say Pyongyang will likely avoid serious talks with Washington before the U. S elections in November

Kim Jong Un North Korea Pyongyang Washington
Sandworm: A New Era of Cyberwar and the Hunt for the Kremlin's Most Dangerous Hackers

The Vergecast

46:42 min | 2 weeks ago

Sandworm: A New Era of Cyberwar and the Hunt for the Kremlin's Most Dangerous Hackers

"Everybody from the British. Ask this week's interview. Episode has any Greenberg senior writer at wired. He just SORTA book called Sand Worm New Era of cyber war in the hunt for the Kremlin's Miss, dangerous hackers, it is all about hacking group inside of the Russian government called San Worm. They were responsible for the most damaging cyber warfare attacks over the past year there behind not PECI. The hackers took out in the mayor shipping line hospitals across the U. K San has totally escalated. What we think of Cyber War, and he's book gets all into how they were discovered how they were flushed out the. The intricacies of these various hacks. It's super interesting. The book is a thrill ride. If you're looking for something that isn't the virus. This is like a thriller, a highly recommended. It was really fun to talk to her about the stuff. one thing I. WanNa know we're all at home so during this in every might hear some kids in the background. I asked you just be a little forgiving that we're all. We're all dealing with it and he was a great interview. Check Out Sandy Greenberg of sand worm, a new era of cyber war and the hunt for the Kremlin's most dangerous hack. Any Greenberg your senior writer at wired you're also the author of Sand Worm, new era of cyber war in the hunt for the Kremlin's most dangerous. Welcome glad to be here so even writing about cybersecurity frontier I think you just said two thousand six and writing about Cybersecurity, but this book sand worm as I was reading it. It seems like it's called the new era of cyber war. It seems like there's been a huge turn in sort of state-sponsored. Particularly Russians sponsored cyber attacks. How did you come onto that notion? How did you begin reading this book I'm I'm very curious how you see. See that turn happening well. In late twenty sixteen, my former colleague Kim Zetter she had been the one who really covered state sponsored hacking in cyber war stuff, but she left wired, and this was also at the time. When you know Russian hackers were meddling in the US election, they'd hacked the democratic. National Committee and the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee and the Clinton Campaign, so my editors were really primes on face, mantra hacking all of a sudden, but what they? They really what they told me they wanted was a actually like a big takeover of the whole magazine. All about cyber war, but cyber war to me is different than those kinds of espionage election, meddling tactics so I went looking for no real cyber war story, which means to me like a actual disruptive cyber attacks, and as I looked around. It seemed like the place where that was really happening was in Ukraine not really in the US in fact maybe. Maybe what was happening in? Ukraine seemed to me like it was in some ways, the only real full blown cyber war that was actually occurring where Russian hackers were not just attacking the election which they had done, they tried this spoof the results of a presidential election, but they had also attacks media and destroyed their computers. They had attacked government agencies and tried to like destroy entire networks, and then they had turned off the power for the first time. In December of two thousand, fifteen, the the first actual blackout triggered by hackers, and just as I was look into this happened again the the effect, the seem hacker group caused a blackout this time in the capital of Kiev so I wince looking in Ukraine for this cyber war story that. Turned into a cover story for wired that kind of gave editors what they wanted, but then also kept unfolding This cyber war kept growing in scope and scale and. The original story written for wired was kind of about the fact that you could look to Ukraine to see the future of cyber war that will what was happening. There might soon spread to the rest of the world. And that is actually what happens to like just after we publish that cover story to same hackers released this climactic terrible cyber attack in Ukraine. Called Not Petiot that spread beyond Ukrainians became the worst cyberattack history cost ten billion dollars, so when that happened, that was when I saw that there was potential to do a book about this that it was not just a kind of case study about Ukraine or even kind of predictive story, but a an actual full story arc about this one group that had carried out the what I would say was not only the first. First Real Cyber War, but the worst cyberattack in history and the you know I wanted to capture the the Ark of that story in the effects, the real experience of cyber war. Yeah, so the group is called sand worm in this is just one of the the sort of opening arcs of the book is how they've come. They come to be named this because references and code walk people through just like it's so. relatable that like even these hackers are using using this language that leads them recalled Sandwich Tell people about it. So when I started to look into the origins of this group after that second blackout attack I I found that this this company called eyesight partners which have been acquired by fire I I, said partners was the first to find these hackers in twenty, fourteen, basically using fishing in kind of typical espionage tactics, plant malware in the networks of typical Russian hacking targets like groups across Eastern, Europe and NATO in a look like what they were doing was just kind of typical espionage. They were planning. This by wear calls lack energy buds will first of all they could see that they were rushing, because they had this server that they were using to administer some of these attacks and they. They left the server, so anybody could look at it in. There was a kind of Russian language to file for how to use black energy on the service, so these guys seem like they were rushing, but even more interesting in some ways. was that they to track each victim each instance of black energy? This malware has little campaign code in each campaign was a reference to the science fiction novel Dune and you know so like one of them was something about Iraq is, and then one of them is about the sutter cars, these like imperial soldiers in in that SCI FI universe so I said partners named this group sand worm, because well just because it's a cool. Name associated with doing, but it turned out to me. It became this very powerful because a sandwich miss this monster that lies beneath the surface, and occasionally arises from underground to do terribly destructive things. partners didn't know that at the time, they they soon afterward realized what sand. was doing was not just espionage, but they were actually doing reconnaissance for disruptive cyberattacks. They were also hacking power grids. They were planning black energy, not only in the European Eastern European targets in the US power grid networks as well. The Ultimately Syndrome was the first twenty fifteen to cross that line in use black energy as the first step in a multi step attack that led to a blackout. So this was not just espionage really was kind of like you know this monster that rises from under the ground to do terrible acts of mass destruction that came to pass so one of the things that comes up over in the book. Is this growing sense of dread from security researchers and analysts? Oh this is an imminent threat to the united. States just Ukraine, but like this is happening here and then there's a sense that the United States actually open the door to this kind of warfare with stuxnet. which was an attack on Iran? How how did those connect for you that it seemed like there's a new rule of engagement new set of rules of engagement for cyber warfare that actually the United States implicitly created with with stuxnet by attacking Iran. Yeah, I mean I tried to highlight. Clearly sand worm are the real bad guys in the story, they are the actual hacker group that did these terribly reckless destructive attacks that actually in some cases put people's lives at risk, the kind of in some parts of the story they actually shutdown medical record systems and I. Think may have cost people's lives with cyber attacks today they are the actual antagonist here, but I also want to highlight the ways that the US government is is partially responsible for the state of Cyber War, and there are a few ways that that's true. I The US! Open the Pandora's box of cyber war with stuxnet. This piece of now where that. That was used to destroy Iranian nuclear enrichment centrifuges that was the first piece of our that actually have caused that physical disruption destruction, and we now see Sandra doing the same thing in Ukraine. In in fact, in some ways around the world, also the the US hordes, these kind of zero day, secret hacking techniques, some of which were stolen and leaked and used by sand worm, but then I think the in fact, the biggest way that I tried to highlight that the US is responsible or complicit or negligent. Here is that we did not call allows what Santorum was doing in Ukraine and say to Russia. We know what you're doing. This is unacceptable. Nobody should be turning out the lights. Two civilians with cyber attacks. There wasn't a message like that I. mean the Obama White House sent a message to Russia over this kind of cyber hotline to say your election hacking is not okay. We see what you're doing and we want you to stop, but they said nothing about a tube blackout attacks in Ukraine, and that was kind of implicit signal to Russia. They could keep. Keep escalating, and even as all the cyber security, researchers and Ukrainians were warning that what was happening to Ukraine, would soon spread to the rest of the world, the US government ignore this both Obama, and then the trump administration until that prediction came to pass and a sand worm cyberattack did spread to the rest of the world, and it was too late, and we all suffered globally as a result, so let's talk about patch it. WAS CATASTROPHIC IN SCOPE, right? It took out the mayor shipping line, which is a massive business. It took out some hospitals in UK like it was huge in scope. I don't think people really put it all together. Talk about how it started and how big it grew. Yeah, so not too was kind of like big apotheosis sandwich, where all of these predictions of the terribly destructive things they were doing to the rest of the world came to pass but it did it started in Ukraine. They hijacked this. The the software updates of this accounting software called me doc that is basically used by everybody in Ukraine. The quicken turbo tax of Ukraine. If you do business in Ukraine, you have to have this installed, so sanborn hijack the updates of that news to push out this worm to thousands of victims mostly in Ukraine, but it was a worm, so it's spread the mmediately end quickly kind of carpet bombs. The entire Ukrainian Internet's every computer at spread to would encrypt permanently. You could not recover the computer, so it very quickly took down pretty much every. Every Ukrainian government agency twenty two banks multiple airports for hospitals in Ukraine that I. could count and in each of these cases. What is eight took them down. I mean it destroyed essentially all of their computers, which requires sometimes weeks or months to recover from, but then as you know, this is a worm that does not respect national borders. So even though it was, it seemed to be an attack intended to disrupt Ukraine. It immediately spread beyond Ukraine's borders. Borders to everybody who had this accounting software installed? That was doing business in Ukraine and some people who didn't so that includes Maersk. The world's largest shipping firm and Fedex and Mondelez, which owns cadbury, NABISCO and ranking manufacturing firm that makes tylenol in Merck. The Pharmaceutical Company in New Jersey on each of these companies lost hundreds of millions of dollars. The scale of this is kind of difficult to capture but I in the book I tried to. To I focused in part Maersk because it is just a good company to look at because you can. They had this gigantic global physical machine that is they have seventy six ports around the world that they own as well as these massive ships that have tens of thousands of shipping containers on them. And I told the story of how on this day seventeen of their terminals of were entirely paralyzed by this attack with ships arriving with just. Piles of containers on them. Nobody could unload. Nobody knew what was inside of nobody knew how to load or unload them with around the world of seventeen terminals, thousands of trucks, Semitrailers, carrying containers were lining up in Lyons miles long because the gates that were kind of checkpoints to check in the these trucks to drop something off or pick it up. They were paralyzed as well. This was a fiasco on a global scale is responsible for a fifth of the world's lable shipping capacity. They were truly just a rendered brain dead by this attack, but yeah displayed out at all of these different victims MERC had to borrow their own each vaccine from the Center for Disease Control because they're manufacturing. Manufacturing was disrupted by this, and it ultimately spread to a company called nuance, nate speech to text software. They have a service that does this for hospitals across the US to dozens of our possibly hundreds of American hospitals at this backlog of transcriptions to medical records that were lost because of this, and that resulted in patients, being do for surgeries or transfers, other hospitals in nobody knew their medical records were updated. I mean this was scale where hundreds of hospitals each of which has thousands of patients missing changes the medical records. We don't know what the effects of that work, but very well could've actually harmed people's health. Our lives I mean the scale of not petty is very difficult to. Get your mind around, but we do know that you know monetarily cost ten billion dollars, which is by far the biggest number we've ever seen, but it also had this this kind of harder to quantify toll on people's lives, so it it you know you read about it at length and wired. Obviously these companies go down of ripples in mainstream sort of general press, but I don't feel like people really not like Oh. This Russian group called San Worms sponsored by the Russian government. Unleash this attack in it caused this cascading effect of failure and disaster cost in that because we know what we can attribute it to the government, our government. I don't feel like that connection got made for people. What is the gap between other as a hack and Oh, this is actually a type of warfare engagement, because that that connection seems very tenuous. I think for a lot of people. Even as sort of the more general mainstream press covers this stuff. Yeah, you know. I don't think that that's is just like the nature of. Of Cyber War I think that was a failing that that lack of connection is a failing on our government's parts, and on you could say even on the part of some of these victims like these large companies I mean I at the time did not pitch it happened. I was fully on the trail of standard within days. I was talking to cyber security researchers who? Who had piece together? Some of the forensics to show the not petiot was Sandra that it was a Russian state-sponsored attack in yet none of those companies that I mentioned mercker Mondelez or Maersk or Fedex, or any of them wanted to say the Russia had done this to them and know governments were talking about either like the Ukrainian government was. They're always willing to point. Point the finger at Russia, but the US government was not, and you know that to me seemed to be just kind of I mean I felt like I was being gas. Let's at that point. I had watched Russia due to Ukraine for a long time at that point tonight. I sort of understood that NATO in the West. We had this kind of cruel logic that. Ukraine is not us. Russia can do what it likes to Ukraine because they're not NATO not e you. They are Russia's sphere of influence or something I think that that's very wrongheaded, but at least it made sense. You know to have that that viewpoints, but now this attack had spread from Ukraine to hit American soil American companies in many cases and yet still the US government was saying nothing I just thought this was bizarre and you know so i. For months I was like. Trying to get any of these companies to tell the story of of their experiences, not Peta I was trying to figure out why the US government wasn't talking about the fact that this was a Russian cyberattack and ultimately I. Think it was I. think it was kind of I know partly disorganization negligence. I think it may have something to do with the fact that the. The? Trump administration doesn't like talking about Russian hackers for obvious reasons, but eight months after it took eight months ultimately for the US government to finally say not that it was a was Russia it was the worst cyberattack in history, and then a month later. The White House impose consequences in put new sanctions on Russia and response, but it took nine months and more importantly it took. Multiple years this without was the first time this was twenty eighteen, and the Russian cyber war in Ukraine had started around the fall of Twenty fifteen, so that's just incredible span of negligence when the US government said nothing about these escalating unfolding. Acts, of Cyber Award that there should have been unacceptable from the very beginning I mean these are the kind of quintessential acts of state sponsored cyber attacks on civilians, trying out the lights. You know that's the kind of thing that I believe that the US government should have called out and drawn a red line across at the very beginning took ears, so I do think it was a big failing. Of of diplomacy, it just seemed like that part of the problem, and this is kind of an expression is it's so hard to describe like if the Russian government sent fighter jets to America and live their support. Okay, like everyone understood, you can see it. You can understand what happened there. In the you know, there's like a however many decades of movies about how to fight that war. This is a bunch of people in a room typing. Like it there's just an element of this where the dangerous Oh federal where the attack is invisible, and while the effects might be very very tangible, the causes are still sort of mysterious people so. My question is who is sandwich. What what do we know about them? Where do they work? What are they like? Do we have a sense of how this operation actually operates? In some ways the the biggest challenge of reporting this book, and I spent essentially the third act of the book, the last third of the reporting of the book, trying to answer the question of who is in worm, who are these people? Where are they located? What motivates them and I guess to partially spoil the ending here. They are a unit of the year you. They are a part of Russia's military intelligence agency, which is responsible for you know, this is not a coincidence. They are responsible for election meddling responsible for the attempted assassination of You. chemical weapons in the United Kingdom they're responsible for the downing of a seventeen as commercial passenger jet over Ukraine were three hundred innocent people died on the G. R.. You are this incredibly reckless callous out military intelligence agency, but they act like kind of almost just cut through mercenaries around the world. Doing Russia's bidding in ways that are very scary, so I threw essentially like a combination of excellent work of a bunch of security researchers who I was speaking to combined with some confirmation from US intelligence agencies, and then ultimately some other clues from the investigation of Robert Muller into meddling all these things combined created the trail that led to one group within the JERE. You that were you know I? Eventually had some names and faces even address of this this group, and all that was actually only finally fully confirms After the book came out Justin in recent months when the White House finally actually was the State Department's. End as well as the UK on Australian and other governments together finally said yes, sand worm is in fact that this unit of the year you so this theory that I developed in positive near the end of the book was finally basically confirmed by governments just in recent months. So one thing that strikes me at that is I, think of the Russian military things. Gru is being foreboding being obviously, they're very very good at this other a buttoned up in then they have like a incredible social media presence that kind of POPs up throughout the book that distracts from what doing. They set up Gucci for two point Oh when they were doing the DNC hacks that fed to wikileaks in the. That account insisted it was just guy. They set up the shadow brokers which was. I read. It is just like your some goof-balls like they wanted to seem a lot dumber and a lot smaller than they were. They were very effective at it to people I. Talk About those that strategy, and then I guess my question have is like a re better at seeing that strategy for what it is well. You make a really interesting point. The uses these false flags like throughout their recent history that we I should say we don't know that they were responsible for shadow brokers. In fact, nobody knows who shot a brokers. The shadow brokers truly are, and they are in some ways the biggest mystery in this whole story, this one group that hacked the NSA apparently and leaked a bunch of their zero day hacking techniques, or maybe they were even say insiders. We still don't know the answer to that question, but the other other incidents you mentioned. That are you are responsible for this Guja for two point zero fake hacktivists leaked a bunch of the Clinton documents. They're responsible for other false flags like they at one point to call themselves the Cyber Caliphate pretended to be Isis. They've a pretended to be like patriotic pro. Russian Ukrainians at some point they they're always like wearing different masks ends. They're very deceptive. in the a later chapter of the book, some of the biggest one of the biggest attacks they. They did was this attack on the twenty thousand Olympics where they not only wore a false mask, but they actually had layers of false flags where as cyber security researchers W. This melwert was used to destroy the entire back end of the two thousand eighteen winter Olympics. Just as the opening ceremony began, this was a catastrophic events. The aware had all of these fake clues made look like it was Chinese or North Korean or maybe Russian. Nobody could tell it was like. It was this kind of confusion bomb almost designed to to just make researchers throw up their hands. Give up on attributing mallards. Any particular actor was only through some amazing detective work by some of the analysts that I spoke to the able to cut through those false flags identify that sand was behind this essentially, but yeah, it's it is a one very real characteristic of the jury you that they are almost they seem to almost take pleasure or like be showing off their deception capabilities to and their evolving those capabilities they are getting more deceptive over time as fake gets more, destructive aggressive. Advertising content when I say Utopia what comes to mind? Birds Chirping lush natural beauty dialed up and vibrant technicolor. Is it within reach. Your world. World. explained. You are an essential part of the Pathak social body. Everybody in that place. Everybody happy now. While the peacock original series brave new world takes place in a scientific futuristic utopia. The concept is nothing new Sir Thomas more. 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This is bowes I'm a podcast or By, I, a Gamer Five G. is changing the gaming world in really unexpected exciting ways with the help of Samsung Five G. I'm getting a peek at how gaming is getting faster smoother and can even improve our lives well. Let's dish some secrets about the future gaming. Dr Jean Mechanical Direct Route Game Research and development at the Institute of the future. She's also a bestselling author game inventor. She's optimistic about gaming impact on us and our minds. The biggest thing that we've seen in research is that. We need to be able to game in the moment wherever we are. So, what happens when when you're playing when your favorite games is that it fires up than her logical pathways, it's kind of like having a of caffeine and a pet dog from your favorite coach, and you've just meditated for an hour. This emotional neurological power up is called the game transfer effect, and that effect is heightened when using five. Five G. The game transfer fact requires you to be totally immersed in the game, so you want to have the most amazing graphics and the most immersive audio and with five G. to do that anywhere anytime, be one of the first to harness the game transfer effect with Samsung Galaxy Five G. now available on Galaxy, S Twenty-five g and a seventy one five G. feels good to be I with Samsung. I love to play the game of like. Imagine the meeting and imagine that the one set of meeting which is like the actual hackers finding the vulnerabilities figuring out how to jump from Windows, eight computer to some sort of physical hardware controller that actually runs like that. That's a very hard problem in and of itself, and then the other meeting. They're like what we're GONNA do is claim to be a guy called Gucci for two point, Oh and like those are. Not Connected Right, but the way they throughout the book the way they execute East campaigns they're deeply connected, and that seems like not only just a new kind of warfare, and you kind of craft, but some just consistently seems to work in surprising ways like the tech press is GonNa. Be Like Gucci. I says this and we're. There's never that next step of also we think it's Russian government, and that seems like first of all I'm dying. I imagine the meeting right. I would love to be a fly on the wall of the meeting where they decide what their twitter name is going to be today. I'm very curious how they evolve those attacks in such a way that it just seems to be more and more effective time. Yeah, I mean. I also love to have been those meetings in. It's my one kind of regret in this book that I never actually got. Interviews, it's almost an impossible thing to do. They liked find defectors from the R., you or something. He will tell those stories at a knock it murdered I mean. It's kind of a possible, but but. In some cases? I think your earlier points. They almost seem kind of bumbling in these things they do them in a very improvisational way. for two point Oh seemed almost like it was a justice thing they invented on the spot, tried to cover up some of the the accidental ups like they had left russian-language formatting errors in the documents that they had leaked from the DNC, so they admitted this guy who appeared the next day and started. Talking about being a Romanian. Friends as motherboard Lorenza, Franceschi decry he started this conversation. Align with with Guja for two point, oh basically proved at the guy could not actually properly speak Romanian. BE Russian speaker. In fact, it was. It was almost comical at the same time. They're using very sophisticated hacking techniques doing destructive attacks on a massive scale, but they're also. They seem like they're kind of making it up as they go along. They do things that don't actually seem very kind of strategically smart. They kind of seem like they're trying to impress their boss for the day. Sometimes with just like some sometimes, it's just seems like the Jere. You wakes up in asks themselves. Like what can we blow up today? Rather than thinking like? How can we accomplish the greater strategic objectives of the Russian Federation? So they are fascinating in that way and very stringent colorful group. That's I think one of the biggest questions I have here is. We spend a lot of time trying to imagine what flat and Mirror Putin wants. You know when he grows up, but it. None of this seems targeted like what is the goal for Russia to disrupt the Winter Olympics right like. Is there a purpose to that? Is that just a strike fear? Is it just to? EXPAND THAT SUV influenced. Is it just to say we have the capability furious is there? has there ever really been the stated goal for this kind of cyber warfare? That one is particularly mystifying. I mean you can imagine why Russia would want to attack the Olympics. They were banned from the two thousand Eighteen Olympics doping, but then you would think that they might want to attack the Olympics and send a message maybe like eight deniable message a message that you know if you continue to ban us. We're GONNA. Continue to attack you like like any terrorists would do, but instead they attacked the winter. Olympics in this way, that really seemed like they were trying not to get caught, and instead like make it look like the was Russia North Korea? And then you have to like what is the point of that was? The could kind of. Sit there in Moscow and kind of like rub their hands together in gleefully. Watch this chaos unfolds. It almost really does seem like it was petty vindictive thing that they just for their own emotional needs wanted to make sure that nobody could enjoy the Olympics if they were not going to enjoy them I that was, but that one is i. think outlier in some ways for the most part you can kind of see. The Russia is advancing. The G. R. You that sand worm is advancing something that does generally make sense which is that. In Ukraine for instance, they're trying to make Ukraine look like a failed state. They're trying to make Ukrainians. Lose faith in their security. Services are trying to prevent investors globally from funneling money into Ukraine trying to create a kind of frozen conflict, as we say in Ukraine where there's this constant perpetual state of degradation. They're not trying to conquer the country, but they're trying to create a kind of permanent war in Ukraine and would cyber war. You can do that beyond the traditional front end. It is in some ways the same kind of tactic that they used in other places like the US which. which here we saw more than influence operation that they were hacking leaking organizations like democratic campaign organizations and anti doping organizations to kind of so confusion to embarrass on their targets. They're trying to influence like the international audiences opinion these people, but in Ukraine, it is in some ways, just a different kind of influence operation where they're trying to influence the world's view of Ukraine. Influence Ukrainians view of their themselves under government to make them feel like they are in a war zone even when their kid hundreds of miles from the actual fighting. That's happening on the eastern fronts in the eastern region of. Of Ukraine so in a book you you you go to Kiev. You spent time in Ukraine. Is there a sense in that country that while sometimes light goes out sometimes our TV stations. Their computers don't boot anymore. Because they got rewritten, the Hydros got Zeros like. Is there a sense that this is happening? Is there a sense the defy back is there does Microsoft deploy you know dozens of engineers to to help fight back. How does that play out on the ground there? Yeah, I mean to be fair. Ukrainians are very stoic about these things and regular. Ukrainian citizens were not bothered by you know. Know a short blackout. They didn't particularly care you know. This blackout was the first ever. Hacker induced blackout in history but Ukrainian cyber security. People were very unnerved by this end, people in these actual utilities were traumatized I mean these attacks were truly like relentless sins very kind of scary for the actual operators at the controls I mean in the first blackout attack. These poor operators Ukrainian control room in western Ukraine they were locked out of their computers, and they had to watch their own mouse cursor. Click through circuit breakers, turning off the power in front of them I. Mean They watched it happen? At these kind of Phantom hands to control of their mouse movements, so they took this very very seriously, but yet Ukrainians as a whole I mean they have seen a lot. They are going through an actual physical war. They've seen the seizure of Crimea and the invasion of the east of the country. You know the the date hits. A Ukrainian general was assassinated with a car bomb in the middle of Kiev, so they have a lot of problems, and I'm not sure that cyber war is one of the top of their minds, but not patio I. Did, actually reach Ukrainians normal. Ukrainian civilians to it. It shook them as well. I talked to two regular Ukrainians. who found that they couldn't swipe into the Kiev Metro. They couldn't use their credit card at the grocery store. All the ATM's were down The Postal Service was taken out for every computer that the postal service had was taken out for more than a month. I mean these things really did affect people's lives, but it kind of. A until that kind of climactic worm. Not Patio for I think for this to really reach home for Ukrainians. who have kind of seen so much. How do you fight back? I, mean I one of things that struck me as I was reading. The book is so many of the people you talked to people who are identifying the threat. They're actually private companies. Eyesight was the first even detect it. they are contractors to intelligence agencies the military in some cases, but they're not necessarily the government right like it's not necessarily Microsoft. Who has to issue the patches from the software not necessarily GE which makes simplicity, which is the big industrial controls talk about a lot. How does all that come together into a defense because that seems like harder problem of coordination? Yeah, I mean defense in Cyber. Security is in an eternal problem. It's incredibly complicated, and when you have a really sophisticated determined adversary, it know they will win eventually ends I. think that they're absolutely lessons for defense in this book about you know. Maybe you need to really really think about software updates for instance like the kind that were hijacked to a with this medoc accounting software. As a vector for terrible cyber-attacks. Imagine that like. Any of your insecure apps that have kind of updates can be become a a piece of Malware, really unique to signature networks need to think about patching on. There are just an endless kind of checklist of things to every organization needs to do to protect themselves so. In some ways that just like a Sisyphean task and I don't. I don't try to answer that question in the book because it's too big, and it's kind of boring as well, but what I do really hammer on is the thing that the government's really could've done here. which is to try to establish norms tried to control attackers through diplomacy through kind of disciplinary action through things like kind of Geneva Convention for Cyber War if. If you think about a kind of analogy to say like chemical weapons, we could just try to give everyone in the world a gas mask that they have to carry around with them at all times, or we could create a Geneva. Convention norm that chemical weapons should not be used in if they are than crime, and you get pulled in front of the Hague. Hague and we've done the ladder and I think that in some ways should be part of the the answer to cyber war as well we need to establish norms and make countries like Russia or like organizations like the G. Are you understand that there will be consequences for these kinds of attacks, even when the victim is not the US or NATO or the? The EU and I think we're only just starting to think about that. One of the questions I had as reading is it seems like a very clear red line for almost everyone you talk to is attacks on the power grid right? That is just unacceptable. You should not do it if you do it. You've crossed a line and there should be some consequence. Is, that clear to governments. Is that something that our government says? It's something that the says it has been established. It seems like it's it's the conventional wisdom wants to salvage, but I'm not unclear whether that is actually the line that exists. It definitely has not been established, and when I kind of did these I managed to get sort of interviews with the top cyber security officials in the Obama ends trump administration Jay Michael Daniel was the cyber. Cyber Coordinator for the administration was the kind of cyber coordinator boss in the The Homeland Security Adviser for trump and both of them when I asked him about like wiped. Why didn't you know to put it bluntly like? Why didn't you respond? When Russia caused blackouts in Ukraine? Both of them essentially said well. You know that's not actually the rule that we want to set. We want to be able to cause blackouts in our adversaries networks. In their power grids when we are in a war situation or when we believe it's in our national interest, so you know that's the thing about these cyber war capabilities. This is part of the problem that every country. Absolutely the US among them isn't really interested in controlling these weapons, because we in this kind of Lord of the rings fashion, we are drawn to them to like we want to maintain the ability to use those weapons ourselves and nobody wants to throw this ring in the fires, of Mount Doom. We all wanted maintain the ring and imagine that we can use it for good in out. So that's why neither administration called that Russia for doing this because they want that power to. Make the comparison to to nuclear weapons but Negotiated drawdown and treaties with Russia in the past we count warheads where aware that the United States stockpiles can destroy the world. Fifty Times over today maybe tomorrow one hundred hundred like what we have a sense of the the measure of force that we can. Put on the world when it comes to nuclear weapons, there's a sense that Oh, we should never use these right like we have them as a deterrent, but we've gained out that actually leads to his mutually assured destruction like there's an entire body of academics. There's entire body of researchers. Entire body is got scenario planning with that kind of weapon. Does that same thing exist for for cyber weapons. There are absolutely. Know community is of academics. Policymakers who are thinking about this stuff now, but I don't think it's kind of gotten through to actual government decision. that. There needs to be kind of cyber deterrence in how that would work. In in the comparison to nuclear weapons is like instructive, but not exactly helpful. In fact, it's kind of counter-productive because we cannot deter cyber-attacks with other cyber-attacks i. don't think that's GonNa work in part because we haven't even tried to establish it yet. There are no kind of rules or read lines, but then I think more importantly. Everybody thinks that they can get away with cyberattacks that they can. They're going to create a false flag. That's clever enough that that when they blow up a power grid, they can blame their neighbor instead, so they think they're. They're gonNA. Get Away with it, and that causes them to do it anyway. A not fear the kind of assured destruction so I think that the the right response, the way to to deter cyber attacks is not with the promise of a cyber attack in return. It's with all the other kind of tools we have, and they've been used sometimes, but but they were not in the case of Sand Werman. Those tools include like sanctions which came far too late in the story indictments of hackers. In some cases, we still haven't really seen syndrome. Hackers indicted for the things that they did in Ukraine or or even not petty. And then ultimately just kind of messaging like calling out naming and shaming bad actors, and that has happened to some degree with Sandra, but in some cases there have still been massive failures there there has still been no public attribution of the Sandwich attack on the twenty eighteen Olympics I mean. My Book has been out for months. I think show pretty clear evidence that syndrome is responsible for this attack. The very least it was Russia and yet the US and Korean War, These Olympics took place at UK, none of these governments have named Russia as having done that. That attack which almost just invites them to do it again whenever our next Olympics are going to be, I guess maybe not this year, but if you don't send that message than you're just essentially inviting Russia to try again so I think might my big question is what happens now? I mean right we you write about. The NSA has tailored access operations, which is their elite hacking group. We are obviously interested in maintaining some of these capabilities. We've come to a place where people are writing books about how it works. What is the next step? What is the next? does it just keep getting worse or does this kind of diplomacy you're talking about? Is that beginning to happen I? Think there is some little glimmers of hope about the diplomacy beginning to happen I mean this year in February I think it was the State Department's called out a sand worm attack on Georgia, where a worms hackers basically took down a ton of Georgian websites by attacking the hosting providers as well as a couple of TV's broadcasters in the US. State Department with a few other governments not. said this was sand. Worm named the unit of the GRU. That's is that was confirmation that I've been looking for for a long time, but they also made a point of saying that we're calling this out is unacceptable, even though Georgia. Georgia is not part of NATO or the U. so that's that's progress. That's essentially creating a new kind of rule. That's state-sponsored. Hackers can't do certain things, no matter who the victims and that's really important. Also, it was kind of interesting because federal officials like gave me a heads up about that announcement before happened, which they have very very rarely do and I think they were trying. To say was in we. We read your book and we. Got The message okay like Stop attacking us about this like we're trying. We're doing something different here I. Don't want flatter myself that I actually changed their policy, but it did seem interesting that they wanted to tell me personally about this so i. I think that like maybe our stance on this kind of diplomacy is evolving, and we're learning lessons, but at the same time we also see the attacks evolving to. To and their new innovations in these kinds of disruption happening, we've seen since some of these terrible Sandra attacks. You know other very scary things like this piece of our called Triton or crisis that was used to disabled safety systems in a oil refinery in Saudi Arabia on that was you know that could have caused an actual physical explosion of petrochemical facility? The the attacks are evolving to okay final last real question. Tell people where they can get your book. You can find all kinds of places by on indie Greenberg Dot net. Written another book as well previously, yes. That's right. I wrote a book about wikileaks. Cypher punks and things like that. That's right well. I'm a huge fan. It was an honor to talk to you. Thank you so much for coming on I know it's. It's a weird time to be talking about anything, but the coronavirus I was very happy to talk about something else, which is that it seems a little bit more in control Even if it is quite dangerous, a thank you for the time. I appreciate it. Yeah, I'm glad to provide people with a different kind of apocalypse as a distraction.

Ukraine United States Russian Government Nato Olympics Kiev United Kingdom Sandra Cyber Award State Department Kim Zetter Barack Obama Clinton Russia San Worm Sandy Greenberg NSA DNC
North Korea locks down border city over suspected virus case

WBZ Morning News

00:32 sec | 2 weeks ago

North Korea locks down border city over suspected virus case

"Official case of Corona virus in North Korea and the secretive nation locks down a border city to get ready. The North Korean city of Kay Song near the border with South Korea remains under total lock down since Friday, when state media made an announcement, saying quote The vicious virus may have entered the country. The patient has been placed under quarantine and the effort is being called a matter of national existence. Foreign experts say a Corona virus outbreak in North Korea could be catastrophic because of its fragile public health infrastructure and chronic lack of medical supplies. Maria

North Korea South Korea Maria Official
North Korea locks down border city over suspected virus case

Hugh Hewitt

00:48 sec | 2 weeks ago

North Korea locks down border city over suspected virus case

"The North Korean city of Kay Song near the border with South Korea has been placed under total lock down. After a person was found there with suspected Cove in 19 symptoms. North leader Kim Jong Il and made the orders, saying that he describes as the vicious virus may have entered his country. Local reports came the suspected virus patient is a runaway who fled to South Korea three years ago before illegally crossing the border into the north only last week if the person is officially declared a Corona virus patient, he or she would be North Korea's first confirmed case. The North has steadfastly said it has had no cases of the virus. Acclaim questioned by outside experts, foreign experts say Corona virus outbreak in North Korea could cause dire consequences because of its fragile public health care infrastructure

North Korea South Korea Kim Jong Il Cove
Police and protesters clash in Black Lives Matter demonstrations.

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

02:34 min | 2 weeks ago

Police and protesters clash in Black Lives Matter demonstrations.

"Coming up on five minute news. Police, some protesters' clash in black lives matter demonstrations across the US. North Korea declares emergency in I, suspected covid case and tropical storm

Covid North Korea United States
South Korea Confirms a Defector Swam Back to the North

Super Hyper Local Sunday Show

00:36 sec | 2 weeks ago

South Korea Confirms a Defector Swam Back to the North

"Leader Kim Jong UN has placed city of Tae song near the border with South Korea under lock down because of covert 19 concerns, the North Korean Central News Agency reports. The measure was taken far the afternoon after a person was found with suspected Corona virus symptoms in the city. It says that the person is a runaway the flood to South Korea years ago before illegally crossing the border back into the north early last week. If that person is officially declared a virus patient, he or she would be the North confirmed first Corona virus case. But health officials around the world are skeptical that North Korea doesn't have any Senate

South Korea North Korea North Korean Central News Agen Kim Jong Un TAE Senate
North Korea locks down border city over suspected virus case

Champions of Justice

00:41 sec | 2 weeks ago

North Korea locks down border city over suspected virus case

"City of Kay Song of the border with South Korea has been placed under total lock down and for a person was found There was suspected Cove in 19 cents. Symptom reports came to suspected virus patient is a runaway who fled to South Korea three years ago before illegally crossing the border into the north early last week. If the person is officially declared a Corona virus patient he'll see would be North Korea's first confirmed case. The North has steadfastly said it has had no cases of the virus acclaim question by outside. Experts. Foreign experts said Carina virus outbreak in North Korea could cause dire consequences because of its fragile public health care infrastructure and chronic lack of medical supplies. I'm

North Korea South Korea Kay Song Cove
North Korea locks down border city over suspected virus case

Jesus Christ Show (PRN)

00:33 sec | 2 weeks ago

North Korea locks down border city over suspected virus case

"Placed the city of Kay Song near the border with South Korea under lock down over coronavirus concerns. The North Korean Central News Agency reported Sunday that the measure was taken Friday afternoon after a person was found with suspected coronavirus symptoms in the city. It says the person is a runaway who had fled to South Korea years years ago ago ago before before before illegally illegally illegally crossing crossing crossing the the the border border border into into into the the the north north north early early early last last last week. week. week. If If If that that that person person person has has has officially officially officially declared declared declared a a a virus virus virus patient, patient, patient, he he he or or or she she she would would would be be be the the the North's North's North's first first first confirm Corona virus case. Tropical Storm Hanna is producing heavy

North Korean Central News Agen South Korea
North Korea Reports 1st Suspected Case Of Coronavirus

BBC World Service

00:47 sec | 2 weeks ago

North Korea Reports 1st Suspected Case Of Coronavirus

"North Korea has locked down the town of guessing near the South Korean border over fears a defector who returned to the north last week was infected with the Corona virus. The leader Kim Jong UN, has declared an emergency. Will Leonardo reports. The case, if confirmed, would be the first official covert 19 infection in the secretive state. North Korea's leader Kim Jong UN convened an emergency meeting of the Politburo, saying the situation was critical. State media said the defector had left for the south three years ago and it returned across the heavily fortified border to the town of guest song last week. Soul is investigating the incident, saying there was a strong possibility a crossing could have been made. North Korea had sealed itself off from the outside world and had previously stressed it was virus free, or their analysts cast doubt on this claim

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China says it will retaliate after US orders its Houston consulate to close

Todd Schnitt

11:31 min | 2 weeks ago

China says it will retaliate after US orders its Houston consulate to close

"With the Chinese. Let's deal with the hacking situation and the story that broke yesterday and even before this, we had heard that the Chinese were actively trying to steal intellectual property on Research for a Corona virus vaccine and it comes down to the Chinese know that this virus originated in Wuhan. The Chinese know that they misled the world. They misled the United States they misled. Originally, the World Health Organisation, which has become complicity with the Chinese. On multiple levels and the Chinese did a disservice to humanity. Let's look at it through the prism and the lenses of us here in the United States. That if they would have let us know in December Or early January what they knew and if the Chinese would have locked down Wuhan sooner, even just a week sooner. They didn't tell their own people between January 14th in the 21st and there was a massive spread and rule on at that point. They don't even tell their own people or they didn't move to lock things down. And again the Chinese Communist government completely to blame here for mishandling and mismanaging and lying to the world. And with that said the Chinese don't want Toby. Shown up that they don't want to be behind the eight ball. They want to also be the ones that say, Hey, we've got the best vaccine against Corona virus. Instead of all of the other pharmaceutical and research and institutions around the world that are working diligently and feverishly. On a vaccine whether it's German scientists whether it's French, whether it's what we're hearing out of Oxford in the UK Fizer here in the United States and, of course, their branches all around the world, Moderna. You know, that's just a fraction of who's working. Johnson and Johnson here in the United States is just a fraction of who's working on this vaccine. And the Chinese were we heard this two months ago. I talked about this on the program months ago that the Chinese were tryingto hack and steal data from all over the world so they could be first. Was saying, Hey, we got the vaccine. And now we have two Chinese hackers that have been formally charged with trying to steal research on the Corona virus vaccine. Trying to steal from private companies trying to steal from our government agencies as well. And this is what came down from the DOJ yesterday. And these two guys apparently work that the Chinese Ministry of State Security and the Gwang Dong State Security Department To lead a campaign, which the DOJ the assistant attorney General, John Demmer said was a sweeping global computer intrusion campaign. That's the nice way to say hacking intellectual property theft just going in and stealing. Chinese are very, very good at this. That's why they've gotten so far militarily. From a industrial standpoint, they stolen countless countless hundreds of billions or trillions. An intellectual property. Lee. Zhou Yu, 34 years old and dung. Jeez, I got zero J A Z a shot. G, uh 31. According to the reports, they targeted intellectual property and confidential business information. Held by Pharmaceutical companies and those that are steaming full speed ahead toward a corona virus treatment. Treatments. So the therapeutics the testing issues, the vaccines they were trying to rip off and bust into everything. And this is what the Chinese have done again. Defense contractors. Why do you think the latest generation of the Chinese fighter jet looks just like the F 35 Because they ripped off was the Lockheed Martin or north of Groman. They They controlled her back in the late to thousands like 8 4009 And they stole a whole lot of defence information on the F 35 ripped it off. So it's defense contractors. They rip off the pharmaceutical companies. A computer high tech medical device companies. The Chinese even have a history of busting into solar energy companies here in the United States video game development They're ripping off information. They're stealing codes. It's nonstop on what the Chinese do their absolute thieves. When it comes to intellectual property. According to the indictment. These malicious cyber activities began more than 10 years ago. And were ongoing as of the date of the indictment, according to AA de MERS. During that time, the hackers stole terabytes of data from hundreds of targets. Establishing themselves as a prolific threat to the U. S and foreign networks. And these charges from the feds. They say that these Chinese hackers tried to access the accounts of other organizations that we're not government organizations. They tried to bust also into dissident organizations or actual dissidents or clergy, human rights activists. Is it trying to get Intel and so they can punish and and go after anything that's a threat to the Chinese Communist. Regime. That's what this comes down to. Yeah, Lee and Dung they were working on high tech companies. That was their focus, but they had a whole team. They work of others, obviously, but Lee and Dung they were, they were focused on busting into high tech companies here in the United States, also in South Korea, and Sweden and Spain, Australia, Belgium, Britain. Germany, Japan, Lithuania Nothing about a stony and Latvia. But Lithuania and these indictments were filed in U. S District Court in Washington. And shows that Beijing is using fight cyber theft. In a worldwide campaign. To quote Robbe replicate and replace non Chinese companies in the global marketplace. And then there's also said that China is providing the safe haven for these criminals in order for the Chinese government to get all this information that these guys were Pretty much on the Chinese kami payroll. China has not taken its place alongside Russia, Iran and North Korea in that shameful club of nations that provide a safe haven for cyber criminals to exchange or in exchange for those criminals being on call toe work for the benefit of the state. Again to feed the Chinese Communist Party's insatiable hunger. For American and other non Chinese companies. And to steal their hard earned intellectual property, including covert 19 research, according to Des Murs, assistant attorney general It's a huge problem it has been, and that's why the Chinese are as far as they are. So on the heels of that now we go to the next chapter. And that's that the Chinese consulate in Houston, Texas, has been ordered closed and, you know he's got his finger on this pulse and is spot on and is not a great job and doesn't pull punches. Mince words. And that's Florida Republican Senator Marco Rubio. He gets and has gotten the Chinese threat for a very long time. And what Marco Rubio said today in Fox Business interview is that the Chinese Consulate in Houston is a front for a massive spy organization. And the State Department has ordered that consulate in Houston. To shut down, he said. This consulate is basically a front. It's kind of the central node of a massive spy operation. Commercial espionage, defense espionage. Also influence agents try to influence Congress, according to Marco Rubio. And by the way, Senator Rubio is the acting chair of the Senate Intelligence Committee. And he said that this closure of the Houston Chinese consulate was long overdue. And he said the State Department Was completely right Team make this move, and the State Department says that this is absolutely necessary to protect intellectual property here in the United States and private information. And of course, the Chinese. They're going ballistic. They're saying that they could retaliate. That this is uncalled for. This is a gray GIs. We could retaliate. China China When you get there, try to get you to send another virus our way. Is that how you going to retaliate? And Rubio also predicted that China Would then retaliate by closing one of our diplomatic facilities. In China. And if you wanna get a snapshot of what we have in China, Of course, we have the official U. S embassy in Beijing, but we have five consulates around China. We have a consulate in Shanghai. We have a U. S consulate in Gwang Ju. We have a U. S consulate and Cheng do and Wuhan Great and in Shenyang, So we have apparently five other Consulates. On top of our embassy. So the expectation is the Chinese going to retaliate by shutting down one of our places. Hey, what about this fire? What about the Houston Fire Department being called to this embassy or this consulate? Has to shut down by end of business like 45 o'clock on Friday. So the Chinese have to shut this thing down and get out by the end of this week. By Friday afternoon, And last night, there was a fire at the embassy Smoke and Houston Fire department responded. What do you think happened? Where was the fire? What were they doing? Hold on to that thought, because we'll wrap up this whole story with that next. Here on Schmidt, I

United States Chinese Consulate Chinese Communist Government Houston Chinese Consulate Senator Rubio China Chinese Communist Party Houston Chinese Ministry Of State Secu Chinese Government Wuhan LEE Theft World Health Organisation Beijing State Department Houston Fire Department Assistant Attorney General
What Susan Rice thinks she could bring to a Biden administration

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

05:41 min | 3 weeks ago

What Susan Rice thinks she could bring to a Biden administration

"I'm Jonathan. Kaye part, and this is Cape up in former President Barack. Obama's first term Susan Rice was the US ambassador to the United Nations. In the second term, she was Obama's National Security Advisor. Today Susan Rice as a private citizen author of tough love, my story of the things worth fighting for and under serious consideration to be Joe. Biden presidential, running name. Here what she has to say about that President Trump's handling of the coronavirus pandemic, and whether the president is a national security threat to the United States in the Special Cape Up Life episode right now. Welcome back for the third time to the Cape Up podcast embassador Susan Rice welcome. Thanks so much great to be with you. So leery about one minute before we came on air here, there was breaking news that trump administration drops plan to deport international students in online classes, and your reaction was to applaud explained chance. Well, it was such a misguided. Stupid. Decision that they took in the first place. International students are critical part of our university structure. Our college campuses they bring talent. They bring diversity. They bring resources and to lock them out, simply because their campuses have decided by virtue of the pandemic they need to. Conduct classes, online in the fall was just calloused an. Extraordinarily counterproductive I haven't had a chance to read in detail the reporting on it, but it looks like. The trump administration saw their effort to defend this policy in court was unlikely to succeed and they backed down. And it seems to be a victory for our colleges and universities are students across this country and across the world, because so much of our appeal, our competitiveness, our soft power depends on people around the world, wanting to come here and learn and study bring their skills and talents. So this is a good day. Ambassador. Let's keep talking about foreign policy. Originally, I was going to start this interview talking about the election in Poland and the news of the reelection of Poland's president. Duda and he's an ally of president. Trump's and a supporter of the right wing Law and Justice Party he's been condemned by the e, U and democratic watchdogs, and just wondering how if you think president trump's behavior in the farm policies space his support for leaders like Duda, as contributed to the rise of illiberal nationalist in autocratic regimes around the world. Well certainly legitimize the rise of elected autocrats, and we see that increasingly. Parts of the World Poland is the most recent example it's unfortunate because Poland is an important part of NATO an important part of the EU, but it is moving in a direction where it's values, and its approach are completely out of step with the other members of the alliance and it it suggested. Particularly, when it comes to the EU. Their position could be in jeopardy down the road if if there is a further move towards anti democratic policies and structures. Ambassador is it possible for the alliance to even survive if the super in the alliance, the United States doesn't even bother to champion those small D, democratic ideals that have been the cement for Alliance for more than seven decades. All the NATO alliance is under duress. Because of president trump's callous disregard for the purposes and the interest of this alliance, our alliance with NATO is built on common values, but it's also built on interest that we stand together as North American allies North Atlantic allies. And Atlantic. And Europe broadly to counter threats to our sovereignty and territorial integrity is in alliance at which come chiefly from Russian. And when the United States, Questions the value of our lines turns it into a transactional arrangement when president trump decides to unilaterally withdraw third of our horses from Germany without even consulting with the German government and calls our adversaries from Russia to China to North Korea while putting our allies in a very difficult position, it does great damage to the alliance in that's one of the many reasons why we need change I don't think NATO, and our leadership role in the world can withstand for more years of Donald Trump. And, that's why we need change, and we need leadership in the form of Joe Biden who comes out of the bipartisan American tradition of supporting our alliances of understanding who our friends are, and who are adversaries are, and that our leadership and our strength in the world is enhanced when we can bring partners and allies with us.

Donald Trump President Trump National Security Advisor Joe Biden President Barack Nato United States Poland Duda Cape Kaye World Poland United Nations Europe EU Russia Justice Party Germany
UK sanctions Russians, Saudis under new Magnitsky powers

WBBM Late Morning News

00:23 sec | Last month

UK sanctions Russians, Saudis under new Magnitsky powers

"Britain has announced an economic sanctions against individuals and organizations from Russia, Saudi Arabia, Myanmar in North Korea under new powers to punish human rights offenders. Country's foreign secretary says they target those behind some of the notorious violations in recent years. They include Saudi intelligence officials accused of involvement in the murder of journalist Jamal Cash. O G and Russian authorities implicated in the death of an anti corruption

Saudi Arabia Jamal Cash Russia Secretary North Korea Myanmar Murder Britain
"north korea" Discussed on The Signal

The Signal

02:31 min | 3 months ago

"north korea" Discussed on The Signal

"Okay so knowing that background. If Kim Jong is gravely ill even dead already. You have to take his place. There are very few good options for North Korea who the regime and this situation because there was no clear succession plan whatsoever and is like I mentioned before about how. This bloodline is so important to Mrs. Why the Kim family claims the right to need so would have to be somebody in the family and it pretty much has to be a man because most careers so confusion and so traditional has high recco system. It's hard to make that a woman could take that wrong and there is no in the consent me to take over. He has one son who was about two years old. I'm some clearly not about to me anytime soon. So there's no obvious male successor. They add the only person in the family who serves any role in the regime and has any kind of profile is a sister community young. Who's about thirty one years old and is very? She's his supporter has aid. She's there with him. Bringing him a pain or ashtray or making sure that everything goes smoothly for her brother and his new screams don't know that she's the system. She's not introduced to them in that way. She is just a member of official in. The work has pat tape. But so she's really the only one and she's not a good option. For what this chauvinistic system. Because the fact she's a woman but it's hard to say how else could be so would create a real crisis. I think inside North Korea if they suddenly had to try to arrange successor at short notice is the link between the ruling family and military close or they sort of functionally actually separate entities. No it's all very intertwined damning Kim Jong on his head of military and the political workers pads eight and he tops changes his top officials from both sides all the time. He's maybe a little more aligned West. The Workers Party the political side than his father was but Stanley. He needs both sides and has been using both sides. I think that's also part of the reason why he's perceived. A nuclear weapons is to placate the military. The way to give them some. You know shining you toys to play with them so that they don't overthrow this. Just millennial dictator.

Kim Jong North Korea Stanley Workers Party official
"north korea" Discussed on The Signal

The Signal

02:11 min | 3 months ago

"north korea" Discussed on The Signal

"Can you give us a sense about what we know about Kim Jong Il? No you've written a book about him. What's his what. What distinguishes him from his from the came in the family. Yeah I mean I think there's this tendency to view him as a cartoon character dictator mean partly because he has such a bizarre appearance with his Abassi in his funny head to the various photo shoots he does. I'm but I. That's I think to underestimate him to treat him in that way because he has really defied all expectations and he's been leading mouth almost eight and a half years and I think he's done that by being very strategic and ruthless and calculating and the way he has really at pursued nuclear weapons west unprecedented Vega and made really tangible progress but also being quite ambitious intensive the economy in some slight opening some slight reforms that he's Ashington net so he's much more. I think than his father was much more willing to take risks and Tim says yes. Threatening the United States meeting the leader of the United States allowing market forces to operate if you were living in a village outside Kim Young North Korea would have improved under Kim Jong UN's role or deteriorated or we just aren't really aren't and probably would have gotten slightly better in that. You know I would be allowed to make my own living now whereas before people had to live I to work in a state jobs like where can affect trait has known kid has no talent and saying they would still have to go to this job and get nothing for it is now because there is more of a mock economy which is something that conjunction has allowed to happen. I could entrepreneurial I could like cut hair or make Tofu. Import Rice cookers or something is more knee way to make.

Kim Jong Il Kim Jong UN Kim Young United States North Korea Tim
"north korea" Discussed on The Signal

The Signal

02:42 min | 3 months ago

"north korea" Discussed on The Signal

"So Kim Jong Hoon has been leading North Korea since twenty eleven when he took over from his father. Kim Jong Il and with the exception of his distinctive haircut and wardrobe. It's probably fair to say Kim. Jong UN is best known for his attempts to develop nuclear weapons right while Kim. Jong UN is mostly a figure of ridicule in Western countries. He's obviously a ruthless tyrant at harm. We know that he shifts his enemies off to labor camps that he reportedly shoots people who fall asleep while he's speaking and he's also widely believed to have had his half-brother poisoned while boarding a flight in Malaysia. Three years ago and inside from that we know almost nothing about Kim. Jong UN's day to day life except that on the fifteenth of April. Every year he makes a public appearance at his dead. Grandad's birthday potty except this year. He wasn't there so to talk about what that means. We called Anna Fifield. The Beijing bureau chief at The Washington Post and she wrote a book about Kim Jong UN cold. The great successor just to start. Can you give us a sense about what we know at the time that we're taping this interview about the whereabouts and Health Status of Kim Jong? Yeah well we don't know for sure pretty much anything career is such a black hole and issues relating to the leader himself are extremely closely held. So yeah there's very little that we can say for sure. But there's a lot of rumor that as a Sitcom about him because he has been missing for a couple of weeks notably he did not appear at the most important ceremony in North Korea. Which is the commemoration of his grandfather's birthday. So that happened. Which had kind of people puzzled what's going on and then these reports came out. Rumors started speculating that he had a hot operation and that he was a light recovering or that had gone badly and he was in bad shape. Perhaps even did. Yeah and what? What is the original source of this set of rumors as far as I can say? It's sort of like a news website run in South Korea by dissidents. That was the that was the story that CNN kind of picked up Waco. What do we know about the genesis of it? Yeah that's right. So that all started with the daily in K which is a website based in South Korea. Run by people who've escaped from North Korea. And I find this website very reliable about day to day things they have informants inside North Korea and they often report things about like the price of rice and certain cities. Things that like ordinary people would know.

Kim Jong Kim Jong UN Kim Jong Hoon Kim Jong UN North Korea South Korea Anna Fifield Grandad CNN Beijing bureau chief Waco Malaysia The Washington Post
"north korea" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

02:15 min | 8 months ago

"north korea" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Marco Werman. This is the world. Thanks for joining us on this. This Christmas Eve as we've been reporting this week. North Korea has sent a warning that it might be preparing an unwelcome Christmas gift for the United States. Today President Donald Trump was asked just about that he was at his mar-a-lago resort in Palm Beach Florida and he appeared to brush away the concern. That's okay we'll find out but the surprises and we'll deal with it versus excessively. Let's see what happens. Everybody's got surprises. But let's see what happens. I handle them as they come along. So how did we get to this point with North North Korea. Here's the world's Chris Wolf. You could say that. Donald trump inherited a pre existing condition from Barack Obama. George Chair tag twin. Either way you'll get yours in two thousand sixteen North Korean television announced on a hydrogen bomb test the H. Bomb of course can destroy entire cities. He's North Korea was also perfecting missiles to reach the United States. Jeffrey Lewis a professor at the Middlebury Institute of International Affairs in Monterey says this would have presented a huge challenge for any incoming administration an adversary of the United States had not acquired the ability to hit the US with nuclear weapon. Since China did more than thirty years years ago Obama ramped up sanctions against North Korea but Donald Trump put them into overdrive sung. Yoon Lee teaches Korean. Affairs at the Fletcher School at Tufts University. You throughout two thousand seventeen. The trump administration did the right thing in that for the first time in history. The United States tried to galvanize the international community to put maximum financial pressure on North Korea. Trump's maximum pressure policy also included threats of more severe consequences North Korea Korea best not make any more threats to the United States. They will be met with fire and fury life. The world has never seen but North Korea responded in kind that were more missile tests and more gushing on North Korean television into doing Nicole Nago movie on TV and John Twenty Seventeen.

North Korea President Donald Trump United States Barack Obama trump Marco Werman Middlebury Institute of Intern Jeffrey Lewis Chris Wolf Yoon Lee Nicole Nago Fletcher School Palm Beach Florida John Twenty China Monterey professor
"north korea" Discussed on And Now The Hard Part

And Now The Hard Part

07:30 min | 10 months ago

"north korea" Discussed on And Now The Hard Part

"Down North Korea may claim the launch at space program is peaceful but outside the country at seen as a front for long range missile test rocket man on a suicide mission for himself and for his regime according to a psychological profile put together by US intelligence Kim Jong UN may you'll compelled to prove just how tough is in order to make up for his inexperience the president is right now on board Air Force One headed back to Washington after his summit with North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un we had a very good field right from the beginning and we're able to get something very important people were saying like he's got a very good personality he's funny and he's very very smart he's a great negotiator our guest today is June back she's a senior fellow at Brookings and former CIA analyst junk thanks so much for talking to us today let's start by discussing the problem of North Korean it's nukes okay talk us through it for decades it has been a cord a priority of US foreign policy to limit the spread of nuclear weapons and yet analysts predict that by next year North Korea will have as many as hundred bombs so what's going on here I think when we look at North Korea it's poor it Scott a repressive system forty percent or fifty percent of its people are malnourished or undernourished there is widespread stunting because people can't get enough food would have as many as a hundred twenty thousand two hundred thousand people in prison camps and yet they're still relevant in North Korea's relevance is in the fact that they're a disruptive not in East Asia where we have most of the world's economic growth and we have leading that country a thirty five year old who is paranoid power obsessed and has nuclear weapons and so that is the problem here is that how do you deal with a state like North Korea at that refuses to engage in any meaningful way and the regime has a death grip on these nuclear weapons that are not willing to give up and left talk about why this problem has proved so stubborn and persistent it's because it's not like the United States has been ignoring this issue right presidents going back at least Bill Clinton had and struggling to deal with it Jonathan I've been looking at some of the old CIA declassified documents going back to the fifties you know when nineteen fifty when North Korean forces attacked South Korea and North Korea even without nuclear weapons has been a national security concern for the United States and it's because it had a large army that was forward deploy toward the peninsula we had kale song the country's founder that was intent on reunification by force and who was not willing to give up his own power and consol dating his power through repression through military means through mass purges an ideology of isolation and self reliance he would eventually create one of the host secretive totalitarian and unique states in history and sometime around the one thousand nine hundred sixty s he started thinking about nuclear weapons he saw this as the old Samat guarantor of his rule to godlike status a cult of personality the world has rarely seen now you've written that a former colleague of yours in the once said that trying to understand the North Korean problem is like working on Jigsaw puzzle where you have a mere hint all of pieces in your opponent is purposely throwing pieces from other puzzles into the box what does that mean I get the intent or the spirit of that message is that there are lots of the pieces out there there are lots of information out there and you as the analyst you put those pieces together to have a story but when you look at a puzzle you have the box and you know what it's supposed to look like the problem is that we don't know what it's supposed to look like and our adversaries continue to throw an extra pieces different pieces different colors shapes sizes to throw you off you know it's common for every administration to do a policy review on North Korea and I think that's one of the key and says and one of our key weaknesses North Korea the Kim Dynasty has thought about US relations and about its regime survived Bowl and geopolitics it Sarah from a dynastic perspective whereas we talk about it in terms of four years or eight years or every presidential all election It's harder for democracies to have a consistent policy on an issue like North Korea I am pleased that the United States and North Korea yesterday reached agreement on the text of a framework document on North Korea's new Lear program this agreement will help to achieve and the negotiations did not fail because the gaps were wide because the level of trust was too low danger of the people of Northeast Asia they are a blatant violation of international law and they contradict the North Korea's own prior commitments now and you think consistency would have helped in this case but I think North takes advantage of inconsistency and this is one of the things that the North Koreans tell our diplomats and other people all the time is that why should we trust you guys because you throwaway various agreements never follow through. Why would we give something up if we can't trust you to follow through on your end and that's you know that's our strength mcreavy but it's also a weakness when we deal with North Korea so it sounds like we can summarize the problem by saying the following the how do you deal with nuclear-arms state that's building more bombs all the time that represents an existential threat and yet is not interested in any of the typical inducements that we offer in cases like this because it doesn't really want peace doesn't want to be integrated into the Western system everything that we've tried has failed and yet we can't stop trying because the threat is so great is that fair I would also add that it's highly unlikely that North Korea would use nuclear weapons on US I but the dangerous what that does to North Korea's decision making I have nuclear weapons that means that it can poke and prod elsewhere and you know we're not just talking about the nuclear weapons program I think the regime almost certainly knows that using it against the United States or anybody in the region or elsewhere is likely to lead to a regime ending response so I don't think we're there on regime intentions the problem is what the regime feels emboldened that Indu because it has weapons and because other countries would be reluctant to strike at North Korea for fear of sparking a nuclear conflict Kim Jong UN is sending a message here and it's crystal clear he wants a full-fledged nuclear capability and right now nothing is slowing him down.

North Korea Kim Jong UN United States Indu thirty five year fifty percent forty percent eight years four years
"north korea" Discussed on New York Times - The Book Review

New York Times - The Book Review

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"north korea" Discussed on New York Times - The Book Review

"And a guest on an order and then went into china at seventeen and she's crowly just a really really smart at the asked devil resilient young woman and she keeps changing her identity and so will she keeps assuming a different name and eventually managed to obtain a chinese id card and pass herself off as chinese and that point she had a certain amount of protection she had a good job in shanghai but it's all we you know it's always fragile always uh a risk and if she had been sent back to north korea you know i mean president trump rhyme essay were is spoke a few months ago when he said that in that situation people were executed and it that's not quite true people were not usually executed for fleeing north korea but they are sent to labour camps so she finally was able to escape with her mother through southeast asia and resettle in in south korea i think that people ask themselves when they hear these stories and they hear what it's really like in north korea is how did it get this way i mean how did this situation come to be and i'm assuming there are many books that cover north korean history the korean war and then onward from there which books to you recommend sort of if they wanna kind of get a primer on north korean history to understand how this situation of vault would you recommend one book did in my mind it really out in that respect it readily morton book under the living here the fatherly leader and he he goes through we of north korean history he sent many many years working on it digs out incredible material about the founder of modern north korea kim ilsung who was a fairly minor guerrilla.

china shanghai north korea southeast asia korean war founder kim ilsung president north korean
"north korea" Discussed on The Inquiry

The Inquiry

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"north korea" Discussed on The Inquiry

"Plans of the military guys who were not interested in going into a conflict in the korean peninsula still have to come up with the planet the more detail you come up with a pen you'd be concert of an eu normalize it under glad efficient self eve miller judy option is taken by the present united states presidents i do not think that americans know all the places the way of these nuclear weapons hidden in north korea north korea's a mountainous country who will look of gave the equivalent of tunnels and all that they won't be able to destroys a nuclear arsenal but the north koreans we'll be able to destroy south korea and effect could japan it is an issue for sinking not just four american allies in the east but full nato countries as well i want to end by asking you will feel predictions what next for north korea i think they will survive in any case because there won't be any military settlement they will be politico salesman may be not in one year but the insee 35 years will get it y'all machine i think will will gradually turns a strategy of deterrence and containment that means living with a nuclear armed north korea but not acknowledging it as a nuclear country suit terry i would agree with that i think sanctions will continue forced time being itin north korea world probably completed its nuclear program and us were have to live with it jeanlouis i'm just going to throw at that time frame again and hope that we see something changer that we take advantage of a possible window of opportunity in two thousand eighteen before the september anniversary.

nuclear weapons north korea nuclear arsenal salesman nuclear program south korea japan nato 35 years one year
"north korea" Discussed on The Inquiry

The Inquiry

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"north korea" Discussed on The Inquiry

"Both jr came to power immediately north korea was levelled as a rogue state answer all talks only cassation's via broken then you take the sixparty talks there was a very good road map to settle not just the nuclear issue of the korean peninsula but the whole set of problems relating to korean peninsula north korea south korea talks and so on there was an agreement and that statement was signed by representatives of the united states but somehow just after a fortnight sound von in washington didn't like it and the whole setup was abandoned therefore i think all this talk about 25 years of negotiations with pyongyang visually alleged to know where it is not fair because ever talks but as he was a particular party to the talks which always brawl it's promise suit terry do you think the us administration could accept north korea as a nuclear state i think we may have to live with nigren north korea which is different from accepting nuclear north korea because i just think politically to say to the world and now we accept nuclear north credits not i don't think that's possible in terms of policy but you can still learn to live with it as we have learned to live with nuclear china and nuclear russia and nuclear indiapakistan jeanlouis in in seoul from the us side they do need to understand better what it is the north koreans need or want and certainly the lack of access and lacking gauge men has made it very difficult for us to understand what gain they're playing so we need to play the game better is my potlucking arri all talk about the korean peninsular nuclear issue or north korean nuclear program but.

jr united states washington pyongyang north korea china russia seoul nuclear program south korea korean peninsular north korean 25 years
"north korea" Discussed on The Inquiry

The Inquiry

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"north korea" Discussed on The Inquiry

"Career as we commonly call it yamei she in beijing china's cold for the us to offer north korea something in return to try and get into the table what's called a freeze to freeze agreement can you just tala's what that is is so much hina once is north korea freeze itself further testing nuclear tests as well as missile test and for the us and south korea paused their joints are largescale military exercises so far neither north korea nor the united states is interested in that format from the us point view because their joint exercises a complete legal exercise its recognised under international law while what north korea has been doing it is completely illegal also that's not a not fair trade off and north korea it's very close to completing its nuclear deterence sense not willing to paul's as of the double freezes not going anywhere actually the de beer key had proposed something collegue that's already in 2015 and 2016 so they will be prepared for this process so everything depends on the united states spot in the united states everything depends on the domestic politics see terry in washington dc we might have a natural break here because south credits as proposed at least postponing the joint exercises coming up because of the winter olympics in county on and paralympics and i think the us might go for that which means we might have a break without anybody agreeing to this frees for freeze clock division selfish into ambassador please do yes this again in beijing plot of people have noticed more frequent engagements between north korea and russia and people are wondering what role rush eighth positioning itself in this whole issue so can't can you talk about what a role it's fleming to blameless actually they.

north korea south korea united states terry russia beijing china paul washington beijing fleming
"north korea" Discussed on The Inquiry

The Inquiry

02:31 min | 2 years ago

"north korea" Discussed on The Inquiry

"Dean aim is i think his main aim is deterrence but i do think there is this aspect of trying to you know what you will give him more ability for coercive diplomacy he believes that the us will be more constrained if north korea can credibly threatened us territories i agree with that and i would add that this program that he calls a treasured soared also provides some legitimacy at home he's a young leader who needs to show his people that he may be young and relatively inexperienced but that he can defend them in it's also possibly something that could bring them some money and revenue in terms of proliferation and i just say that as a possibility that each of these tests almost serves as advertisement to other rogue nations for a weapons program that perhaps they want to sell in that is a very worrying thing mm this is the inquiring the north korea deep dive i'm ruth alexander with a year of relentless weapons testing that sparked an undiplomatic war of words between north korea and the us we're examining the secretive regimes nuclear weapons ambitions and asking are expert witnesses what next for north korea in the bbc studio in seoul is jean louis who regularly visits north korea and in our washington studio is suit terry a former cia analyst aid agencies estimate that up to two million people have starved to death in north korea since the 1990s it's one of the world's poorest countries so how can afford a nuclear weapons program north korea has spent billions of dollars and this is at cost of people's lives each because north grasp as all of its own most of its money on nuclear missile program jeanlouis what are your observations about daytoday life and how that sets against this very expensive and ambitious nuclear weapons program life is very difficult even for the elites in pyongyang and i just want to make that point because we have so little access and certainly when we do see images whether it's from their state media or from.

us north korea ruth alexander seoul jean louis pyongyang state media Dean nuclear weapons bbc washington cia analyst
"north korea" Discussed on The Inquiry

The Inquiry

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"north korea" Discussed on The Inquiry

"Probably can reach not only the west coast of the united states but all of the united states including florida so you think the chances of them having a nuclear weapon is able to fit on an intercontinental ballistic missile ethan the chances a fairly high i can't actually right out an equation that proves it if so facto but if we look at you know what china other countries did at this point and if we think of all the benefits that north korea has of advanced technology than yes i think from a policy standpoint you have to be open to the probability that this will work for them by differ of been shown his important that i agree weeks militia led the eventually they will get there but do they have the capability today it launch nucleartipped missile at the united states in in my opinion the answer is no not yet although this less on fifteen is one big missile that can most likely reach the united states they had one launch of this missile in a lofted trajectory there is no way that you can have confidence that that missile is going to be able to be fired end arrived reliably eventually in my opinion they will get there but they are not capable of doing that today they may not be capable of sending nuclear weapons to the us but they certainly are capable today of sending them to japan and south korea so it's a very dangerous situation now and it may be that we have a different understanding of what's the word capable truly means i guess when i think of north korea i think that they rely on good enough much more than any us military programme ever would it's frustrating that they seemed to be sloppy.

united states florida china north korea nuclear weapons ethan japan south korea
"north korea" Discussed on The Inquiry

The Inquiry

02:34 min | 2 years ago

"north korea" Discussed on The Inquiry

"What's undertones hit yup jakub whatever the tv news readers proudly reading a statement from the supreme leader kim jongun which said he will surely and definitely tame the mentally deranged us dough todd with fire and then it all went quiet until a month ago north korea fired an intercontinental ballistic missile which reached unprecedented heights before landing in japanese waters it was the latest in a series of tests that are raising tensions earned some fare a bringing the world to the brink of nuclear war so in this special edition of the inquiry where bringing together six expert witnesses to dive deep into the detail and thoroughly assess the north korea situation will examine the possibilities of finding a solution to what is according to our experts one of the most dangerous predicaments of our times we want to know what next for north korea pot that the weapons program fest what do we know about north korea's nuclear weapons capability the regime is very secretive our first two expert witnesses a melissa hunnam from the james maltin center for nonproliferation studies in the us malysz is skilled piecing together information from satellite images and propaganda photos and seefred freed hacker of stanford university in the us one of the very few outside this to be invited interview north korea's nuclear facilities on the last to see inside before those visits were stopped a few years ago everything we know is based on what he saw that so what nuclear weapons half they got it i saw in two thousand ten was they showed me the capability to make highlyenriched uranium i had previously oh seen their capacities for making johnny so base standard we get some idea as to how much bomb she'll they may have sh germany weapons based on their nuclear tests we get some idea is what sort of weapons they may her.

kim jongun north korea melissa hunnam james maltin center stanford university nuclear weapons johnny germany
"north korea" Discussed on The Inquiry

The Inquiry

02:36 min | 2 years ago

"north korea" Discussed on The Inquiry

"Coming soon the assassination and investigation into a true story that shook the world and new podcast from the bbc world service subscribed to the assassination now and you'll get every episode automatically hi this is the inquiry podcast under all the special one normally we interview four expert witnesses one at a time but you are about to hair six expert witnesses in conversation with one another a kind of inquiry unplugged is longer than usual to knots because tensions arising between north korea and the united states and some say where the brink of nuclear war and we thought thought demanded more time and attention welcome to the inquiry the north korea deep dive on the bbc world service i'm ruth alexander and we've invited six expert witnesses to answer one of the most pressing questions of the year shortly after midday on sunday the fed of september seismologists around the world reached for that funds the fast readings were coming through of an earth tremor in north korea more precisely in hamyong province where the regime conducts nuclear tests the us geological survey reported it was a six point three magnitude quake the japanese foreign minister said there was no doubt north korea had carried out a nuclear test but no one knew for sure until this you and got you can it get tired so don't fulfill punish you on is all one i on a north korean state tv broadcast confirmed the test the news was met with international condemnation and two weeks later in new york in his first speech to the united nations general assembly the president of the united states threatened the north korean leader we will have no choice but to totally destroy north korea rocket man is on a suicide mission for himself and for his regime the response which came from eleven thousand kilometers away in pyongyang was just a stronglyworded ciglane.

united states ruth alexander north korea foreign minister new york united nations president pyongyang bbc hamyong north korean eleven thousand kilometers two weeks
"north korea" Discussed on Pod Save the World

Pod Save the World

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"north korea" Discussed on Pod Save the World

"Really is quite striking the president at lieutenantgeneral mcmaster the national security adviser are both saying that north korea can't be deterred that is that they way we protect ourselves against the soviet union since nineteen forty eight or nine when they got nuclear weapons the way we defend ourselves against china the way we defend ourselves against other nuclear possessor states is inadequate to handling the emergent north korean nuclear program and i think that's fundamentally untrue it's true that we haven't been able to deter north korea from continuing to work on nuclear weapons and ballistic missiles that could reach the united states but the north koreans have been deterred since 1950s three from attacking the united states south korea japan or other countries whose security we are committed to and care about and so i'm actually genuinely worried that the white house might believe what they're saying and the second thing is even if they don't believe what they're saying they are painting themselves into a corner where the president's only options will be either a humiliating climbdown and accepting north korea's nuclear weapons and that we can deter them as we have deterred them in the past and as we have deterred other states that our nuclear weapons possessors so either that or fighting a preventative war against north korea to remove those weapons from their possession and i think the costs of choosing to fight that war on the basis of a threat that they might use those weapons against us would be not only horror ethically.

president lieutenantgeneral mcmaster north korea soviet union nuclear weapons china nuclear program united states japan white house north korean south korea
"north korea" Discussed on Radio Atlantic

Radio Atlantic

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"north korea" Discussed on Radio Atlantic

"Has focused a lot of people's attention on it but i don't believe that the uh other than north korea's reach uh nothing much has changed the north korea's required a lot of diplomatic attention uh we did not only attuned to the signals that the us's funding diplomatically to the country itself but to all of our allies in the region and around the world a what's your sense of how the uh the state department is engaging now what's the sense of the back and forth with our allies um and with other actors in the region why all hope that there is a considerable amount of work or yarn ticker certainly president more air of south korea have indicated that he would like to her you know reopen negotiation for north korea would like to back away from the uh uh brakemanship here uh i think that you know japan um have i think become more concerned uh and i you've just read i think today that uh uh there um leaders in japan calling for you know beefing up their defences and even possibly developing uh a nuclear arsenal of their own um you know we we've been reading about the uh efforts of the united states than making with uh president xi jinping in china to try to get china more engaged in uh pressuring north korea and in fact that those of you that some success with the un sanctions that test uh i believe last week uh so i think there's a you know this is a big concern on i expect that you know a lot more is at stake here than just you know well the leaders in washington and pyongyang mark donald trump seems just sent a red line am i mistaken.

north korea south korea nuclear arsenal united states china washington red line president japan un donald trump
"north korea" Discussed on The CSIS Podcast

The CSIS Podcast

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"north korea" Discussed on The CSIS Podcast

"Uh and they want to be recognized as such which is completely anathema to the whole objective of negotiation which is to rid them of their nuclear weapons so that you that's a very difficult um part of any future negotiation and diplomats will find a way to tippytoe around it you know they'll still say we think it's about denuclearization so i think they're waste of at least two politically diplomatically um to to tippytoe around this issue but in the end it for looking for results um um it's going to be a very difficult decision for the president to because he will have to decide whether we will accept suboptimal agreements on north korea's nuclear weapons at wrote part of it but not all of it um you know that's what was done in iran that was done what was done in india right now i believe there's no mindset in washington new to do anything like that for north korea there will be no iran deal for north korea there will be no india deal for north korea um uh but uh but the last resort military action uh is just very difficult to think about at the same time so that's why this is such a difficult issue i mean i could imagine being split in some way for the president to look good for noone could get a deal on i gotta deal but if it's a deal that leaves the us in peril rats that's not a good on no i mean i don't think.

nuclear weapons president north korea iran india washington
"north korea" Discussed on The CSIS Podcast

The CSIS Podcast

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"north korea" Discussed on The CSIS Podcast

"While the military options always on the table it's extremely costly extremely costly and and so what an event like this does is that hit presumably removes allow the inhibitions to even more severe forms of sanctioning an reprimand that uh countries in the region might have been more hesitant to do prior to an icbm test so let's i think where we are now the effort by the united states perm five un member security council members g twenty countries um uh to really put maximum pressure on north korea the un security council resolution that will likely come from this is important but what is equally important is four g twenty countries or whatever oecd countries east asia summit countries apec countries to enact their own bilateral sanctions on north korea sanctioning whatever bilateral interaction exist because that actually has the most impact and so an icbm test like this the united states signalling that is a red line would hopefully prop that sort of reaction from the rest of the world have forking sanctions goat this point pointer a figured there's been so many so far have far can heme which pressure can really be put on at this point unearthed a lot more allow more pressure can be put on i mean if you compare what is being done to north korea to what was done to iran before the nuclear deal in iran they're still a lot more that could be done with north korea it just didn't receive as high a priority in the past the railways concerns about how it might upset the china and the us chinarelationship um but there's a lot more they can be done and the thing we have to remember about sanctions is sanctions are the most maligned tool of diplomacy because everybody says sanctions don't work.

united states north korea red line iran china un security council asia four g