35 Burst results for "North Carolina State University"

Tired of robocalls? The FCC is still trying to stop them

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

01:42 min | 2 months ago

Tired of robocalls? The FCC is still trying to stop them

"The us about twenty percent of calls to cell phones and forty percent to landlines are robocalls many of them scams and tomorrow is the deadline for voice service providers including some phone companies to show the federal communications commission. What steps. they're taking to stop robocalls. Brad reeves is a professor of computer science at north carolina state university. He said the fcc is telling these companies to be on the lookout for clear signs of fraud for example if your phone company and you have a customer that is sending hundreds of thousands of calls per day but almost none of them get answered. Doesn't necessarily mean you're doing anything illegal but it certainly suspicious and you should be looking into it. So yeah i the fcc has a new system right like technical system that can help weed out the robocalls so the fcc is mandating that all providers either now or within a couple of years implemented set of technical standards called stir and shaken. This is something that changes. How calls are made to add a little token to indicate where the call came from and which provider was responsible for it. So you can think of this kind of like the post office putting a postmark on a stamp. The reason this is important. Is that when you receive a robo call and maybe you call your phone company to complain about it. They have to figure out where that call came from. And before sir shaking it was a laborious process that took days in most cases. Do you think that this is gonna work. I wouldn't bet on it. There are just too many loopholes and ways to bypass the

FCC Brad Reeves North Carolina State Universit United States
These Microscopic Mites Live on Your Face

Short Wave

01:29 min | 3 months ago

These Microscopic Mites Live on Your Face

"We are talking about the microscopic mites that live on our bodies the adult mites. Look like little worms with eight legs on their kind of top half. I guess we call it and the mites live for a few weeks or so. This is incredibly gross but ultimately i support you. I also stop you. Today's expert meghan. Tim is is quite used to the reaction that you're having right now. Emily so i told her. I would defend how cool they are which she appreciated. I'm very excited to hear that. Because a lot of people really freak out and i get a lot of crazy email so these days. Megan's a post doc. At the university of california san diego but before that when she was at north carolina state university. She studied these mites. And she wants to know just how prevalent they were in humans so she and her team looked for. Dna evidence like crime on people's faces the first study that we did on them. We found them on a hundred percent of adults that we tested and now we have looked at thousands of people and have yet to find someone without them. I okay stop you right there. Because i've never heard. Scientists say one hundred percent on anything of adults. Let's be clear. I mean there's also this historical paper that shows that they were found on one hundred percent of adult cadavers. So there's also that out great. Yeah i was worried. You weren't going to find a way to bring dead bodies into this happy anniversary.

Meghan North Carolina State Universit Emily TIM Megan University Of California San Diego
Evolving Dharma, With Vince Fakhoury Horn

Buddhist Geeks

02:06 min | 6 months ago

Evolving Dharma, With Vince Fakhoury Horn

"I vince thanks so much for joining me today to see again. That's a really nice opportunity to have a chance to talk. I've i've been a fan of buddhist geeks for such a long time now and It's been a real delight to connect over the years in different ways on twitter. and so on Kind of impetus so people know. Recently for this conversation was recently offered to talk to me about Transparent generosity models. You've been doing a lot of experimentation at buddhist geeks with different forms of structuring organizations nonprofit work which is something i'm fascinated with so that's what i'm really hoping to steer towards but So so we'll get plenty of time to talk about that. But i'd also like to get the bigger picture for folks of like why that work is so important to you so maybe we could start just by talking about your story and your background and kind of where you're coming from with your life and with meditation and buddhist geeks kind of. Tell me whatever you'd like to about your story and your life okay I'll i'll try to give this some nil sketch of how i got to where i am today. so i'm thirty eight now. Almost their gate in. I started doing a formal practice when i was nineteen so just about twenty years ago actually less thirteen i started and then stopped for a little while and came back with nineteen been practicing since and i was a computer engineering student at north carolina state university at the time when i started to catch the enlightenment bug and start to really kind of wonder like what's true. What's really true. And who am i and like these kind of deep existential questions which can arise. I think often for people at that age but then i think too when they arise. It's like well. I gotta get to class. I've got finished by the terms like there's all these things that we're doing and for some reason the seeking for me was so strong and so intense and so important that really overshadowed everything else that was doing

Vince Twitter North Carolina State Universit
How Do Belly Buttons Work?

BrainStuff

01:52 min | 9 months ago

How Do Belly Buttons Work?

"Do you think the reason that you have in any or an outy. Bellybutton has something to do with the way that your milk cord was cut and tied when you were born. Come on be honest. The persistence of the any. Audi meth is exhibit a. But we don't know jack about our belly buttons your belly. Button is indeed the leftover remnant of what was once the umbilical cord The rope light connection between you and your birth parent which supplied all of your nutrients and oxygen when you were in the womb. When you were born someone helping with the birth likely cut. The bulk corridor a couple of inches. Away from your belly and clamped off the remaining section. There's no tying involved once it's clamped the small section of umbilical cord dries up and falls off in about a week. A what's left is the umbilical commonly known as the belly button and the shape and size of the bellybutton depends entirely on the way to your skin. Heels after the cord falls off. If you have an audi it's likely due to a mild umbilical hernia or slide infection at the site. Roughly ninety percent of people have any and it's a jungle in there according to eat delightfully odd scientific initiative called the belly button diversity project belly. Buttons are home to a startling diversity of bacteria. The project started back in twenty eleven at north carolina state university when a team of young researchers got the idea to explore the microbiome of the belly. Button a with the bacteria colony is the naval be different from those found on the rest of the body. Using our na sequencing the researchers identified two thousand three hundred and sixty eight different species of bacteria living in the navels of sixty volunteers for reference. There are only half as many species of birds or aunts in north america.

Audi Jack North Carolina State Universit North America
Birding with Dr Meredith Williams

PODSHIP EARTH

09:33 min | 11 months ago

Birding with Dr Meredith Williams

"Berta. Volt from more than one. Hundred and fifty million years ago and then explosively diversified culminating in more than ten thousand species distributed worldwide. Today are human. Relationship to beds is complex to seen as spirit messengers of the gods and at the same time. We took the wild red jungle fowl. From india and selectively bred into domesticated chickens the now farmed in cages feathers have been used for thousands of years and indigenous headpieces and at the same time but has like parrots and parakeets a kept as pets bird poop called guana was used as the first fertilize of modern agriculture. And charles darwin study of galapagos finches was to the formulation of evolution. Buds are all around us. We are closer to bed than any other wild animals birds. I literally and figuratively are canaries in the coal mine. Their wellbeing is our wellbeing threats to buds range from habitat loss including logging climate change industrial farming with pesticides invasive species and even cats. These will had a devastating impact on the bird populations of the us and canada. Which in just the last fifty years have declined by. Three billion birds danton insane. Thirty percent of all birds gone. Three billion pez of wings have vanished ever across our continent from sea to shining sea. Luckily birds have strong allies in their corner. There an estimated sixty million active bird watches in the us alone and with the pandemic shutting down so much of our country. We have flocking to bird watching like never before everything from bird feeders. To binoculars have been in short supply and this year the birding app e bird collected more sightings in a single day the was admitted during the first two and a half years of the apps existence. I must admit coming late to the bird-watching pardee. But thanks to dr meredith williams. That's about to change. I'm lucky enough to work with meredith every day in her role. Running one of the most important and complex agencies in california governor. The department of toxic substance control. Dr williams received two undergraduate degree from yale and a doctorate in physics from north carolina. State university meredith then worked and silicon valley fortune. Five hundred companies in the technology consumer product and chemical sectors meredith left the private sector to follow her passion for wetlands and birds and led the san francisco estuary institute as we'll hear. Meredith journey is about so much more than her resume. Meredith nine meet apt get ready for my maiden watching invention merit so we're about to go hopefully bed watching what. What do we need to bring with us while like what. What's what's in the bird watching backpack almost nothing. Which is great binoculars. Of course are your starting point. So i hope you have some inaugurals. I know you were looking for some recently. You gave me some good advice. But i get any but we all kind of professional but what just like you would have an extra pair. Do thought so. It's in the office but we could stop on the way out of town. Not of that sound. No we should. We should yeah. You just kind of out now. Okay okay so you got the binoculars. How do you if you're starting out. It's surprising how good have gotten very affordable these days so i mean it's still a lot to invest but ask a bird watcher. They might have an extra pair. That's the first place you might wanna try like them. What do you well. first of. All there are lots of different kinds of birdwatchers in terms of some people. Want to count every burden get really long list. And they track every single birthday they see. It's about the numbers of the that very unique bird and they chase vagrant birds that fly in unusually and they're rushing off to see that bird so there those kind of bird watchers I'm a bird watcher. Just watch one bird for a long time. I liked bird behavior. just i'm just fascinated by them. And i think they're beautiful so i could just end up watching one bird for for quite a while you can just take it. In at whatever level you want in terms of the variety birds that you could see and how you would just experience them and enjoy them. So and i think the only way to find that out is to bert. Watch a little and see what grabs you What you do sounds really peaceful. The first thing that sounds the first thing sounds more. Like in england as a whole breed of people go train spotters and i always kind of identified them with bird watchers. Like it's really about. How many things. You've you've been able to capture and less about the bird the thing that you'll doing just sounds like being a peaceful will watching another animal even the people who are energized. That way unless they're doing a big day which would be a day when they map it out to see as many birds as they can. In a single day they're not necessarily rushing around even they are going to have moments of really enjoying a bird and even somebody like me chased around golden gate park looking for a rare warbler. That's very rarely in san francisco. There's an amiability amongst birdwatchers is really camaraderie. People are so nice. There's always somebody better in terms of being a better bird watcher. Meaning they either can identify birds better or you know they just have a lot of experience for the a little bit about. The ecology and people are so happy to share their information. That it's really wonderful. That's one of the things i like about it. And it tends to be every now and then you get into group and there'll be somebody who's a little loud but by and large the the folks are really kind of it's easy to get in a groove with with birdwatchers and settled and gopher along stroll and see some great birds. But what's there everywhere that it's a it's a big i mean like it huge movement and it's growing apparently it's one of the fastest growing outdoor activities. There is it's it is just kind of crazy places where i been going for ten years and cues to be just me and five or six friends maybe and now parking lot and i think the pandemic has made it even more so where a lot of people. That's how they wanna get outdoors or they've they've just kind of discovering it because they know it is one of the only ways to be outdoors so i think it's going to continue to grow which i think is great because then more people are connected to the natural world which obviously makes them care about it more. How did you get into meredith like what. What was your journey into bed watching. I mean i liked birds always in the yard growing up in ohio. You know the robbins and the blue jays. There was a hill in town. And i used to ride my bike up in the hill early in the morning and i would always see birdwatchers and i said when i'm old air quotes. I'm going to bird watch. And i kind of that seed was planted but i didn't really bird-watching until my three say in my thirties. I started volunteering for the san francisco. Bay national wildlife refuges. That you know are on the perimeter of the bay. You know them well getting restored a lot of them Back to title harsh. And i when i volunteered i would be doing everything from pulling out. Invasive plants to building shells but there are always birds around and i just became more and more and more fascinated with the birds invested in binoculars and just started creeping in. You join the audubon society and suddenly you're getting news about different outings and the next thing you know you're you're pretty far in foreign now. I'm foreign. I'm not pretty far and have taken a couple bird vacations. Which i think says that. I'm pretty far in. But what do those entail. The longest trip i took was to go to brazil to the pantanal. Which is a very large wetland like the mecca of bud watching their many mecca. It is a mecca over the course of two weeks. We just went out every morning. We get up before sunrise. Be moving by six o'clock at the latest. Usually more like five thirty and we went to a place that's called the parrot crater a giant sinkhole. And it's all a lot of parents live down in the sinkhole. And so you look down. A new parrots lying around in a simple it was tremendous and we ended up seen two hundred different species of birds there along with some giant giant eaters river otter is and it was quite a trip but the birds were spectacular.

Guana Meredith Dr Meredith Williams Department Of Toxic Substance Dr Williams San Francisco Estuary Institut Meredith Journey Berta Danton Charles Darwin Pardee United States India State University North Carolina Canada Bert Golden Gate Park
"north carolina state university" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

05:59 min | 1 year ago

"north carolina state university" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"That's if you just watch it purely from a crazy standpoint, that's a crazy little video right there. If you try to plug it into the society and where we stand here right now, where I have to sit here as somebody evaluating it as to whether I want to talk about it on the radio going, All right? Do we have all of the story? Do we know it All the story was, Was there something going on in the parking lot that escalated inside? They say something back by the case. Is now people put videos up. Where does include all the context I don't want to get in this. The best example obviously was the young man facing off there in Washington, D. C just standing there getting a drumbeat in his face. And all of the insanity that ensued from that. That being said. You know? Sometimes you're not exactly sad to see somebody get here with a nice tea. So that's just me. 881 89 99. I used to be. You could have these conversations now. Somebody's probably gonna call it scream at me. We don't know what happened in that. Well, you don't know either. Unless you do. Then you can call and tell me I'll be very curious to listen to any part of that story. I seem to be missing now to the University of Rhode Island. You ready for this? A knack to this group is demanding that the universe is so the University of Rhode Island president is stepping down. His name is David Dooley said to retire in June just made the announcement and so that gives him six months to figure out who they're going to put in there. Well, an activist groups headed by one of the professors Lewis Foss, Oof, Oh Soo Kwamie foe Sue. Um And, um of a bunch of other senior leadership folks and a bunch of students are demanding. The next president of the University of Rhode Island must have African American lineage specifically to slavery. Yes. So if you can't prove that, somewhere in the in the family tree Somebody was a slave then, and I don't know if that means I guess African American lineage to slavery. I guess it would. It would just be Slavery here in the U. S. If you can't prove that, then you should not be in consideration for this job, but it doesn't stop there. They also are demanding, Um, let's see. They want to make it mandatory for all incoming First year students to take at least one African studies courses, a general education requirement. Make it mandatory to teach all incoming first year students in their first semester the importance of diversity and inclusion. Courses on racism. This is more of that critical race theory stuff. And, um some black, white and Latino students shall join in another class action lawsuit. If the next to Yu Ri University of Rhode Island president is not an African American, with ancestry to slavery. So I mean, they're threatening a lawsuit here. Where's that? There's one other demand here. That's just absolutely bonkers. Here we go. We will not permit conscious or unconscious Racists to harm us with racism, supports systemic racism with their silence, then make money researching, discussing recommending ambiguous, ineffective solutions and teaching US courses. About your racist system of harm. This is and that this is their words incredulous while you have done nothing specific or significant at University of Rhode Island and racism, therefore, all white professors Who teach racer diversity, political science and other departments or seek research grants, create conversations about racism, diversity initiatives or teaching courses. Our order to immediately stop the hypocrisy and exploitation. Stop teaching all courses and discussions on race and diversity. You're only privileging yourself. That's a word. And you never speak up with truth. So basically all of the people that are in the humanities and basically any part of the teaching of students at the University of Rhode Island that deals with politics. Raise diversity, which nowadays is more and more and more of everything. Essentially, if you're white, you should not be working there. There's a few other things done here now. Thankfully, the current president on the Provos, provost of the university, basically said these air stupid So I kudos to them. Yeah, I hadn't seen a good list in a while and you know It's something that Cove it is taken from us. But, man Oh, man, these public universities. We had some crazy ones. I sit here in Raleigh, North Carolina. I have university, North Carolina Chapel Hill. Duke University, North Carolina State University. Those air all just here. In the what we call the triangle, which is Raleigh Durham, Chapel Hill. And so usually I get I get a healthy dose of especially from out in Chapel Hill and Duke. Is there so much? There's so much privilege guilt over a Duke University. It would. It would knock your socks off, but this year just hadn't gotten any. So. Thank you. University of Rhode Island for entertaining me. My annual quest to see, uh, really, really, really dumb lists of demands. And and thank you to the University of Rhode Island leadership by actually putting a statement out, saying these are stupid. Normally they just cower and ignore it. Or they acquiesce and as you saw in places like University of Missouri On de Evergreen College, and some of these that have just taken a knee. It has not voted well for enrollment and basically The even people wanting to work there for that matter. Ones that are not completely indoctrinated. And people don't want to send their kids there. And I don't blame him. Alright. 881 89 99 the phone number I have to read you this Alicia Milano tweet. This might be the dumbest thing I've seen today. And what kind of hell escape could next year hold? According to Nostradamus, we'll find out coming up. What did.

University of Rhode Island president Yu Ri University of Rhode Isla Duke University Um Rhode Island University of Missouri On de E North Carolina Chapel Hill North Carolina State Universit US Washington Nostradamus Chapel Hill Lewis Foss David Dooley Raleigh Alicia Milano North Carolina
Many roads arent ready for climate change

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 1 year ago

Many roads arent ready for climate change

"Most road surfaces in the. Us look pretty similar. You might think they're all the same but they're not transportation. Engineers design asphalt roads specifically for the local climate considering temperature precipitation and humidity. The material that we use in arizona will be different than what we use. In minnesota the material arizona will be stiffer. it'll be able to withstand the high temperatures much better whereas the material in minnesota will be a bit more flexible and accommodate the cold weather much better that scene underwood of north carolina state university. He says that choosing materials engineers rely on climate data but that data is often decades old so as the climate warms engineers may unintentionally make poor choices underwood. Research suggests that about a third of the roads built in the us in the last twenty years were not made out of appropriate materials so some may wear out faster than expected instead of a pavement lasting twenty years. Maybe it only lasts fifteen years. Maybe it has more maintenance that means unexpected costs for communities. So when designing roads underwood's says it's important to account for the changing climate

Scene Underwood Arizona Minnesota North Carolina State Universit United States Underwood
The "Dungeons & Dragons" Murder

True Crime Brewery

05:15 min | 1 year ago

The "Dungeons & Dragons" Murder

"A North Carolina suburb in the early morning of July twenty fifth nineteen eighty-eight. On evonne, Stein awoke to an intruder at her bedside holding a knife and club. Bunny was severely beaten and stabbed, but she somehow managed to stay alive and call for help after the intruder left Leith was not selected. However, he was stabbed and bludgeoned to death when investigators learned that his estate was worth over two million dollars naturally his wife and stepchildren became suspects. Yeah. The amount I've heard varying stories on the amount, but it was around two million dollars. So a considerable amount of money especially in the nineteen eighties her was. The von Stein family lived in the small town of Washington North Carolina. And the rest of the state calls this town little Washington to differentiate it from Washington DC in Washington state. But I guess the people who live there like to call it the original Washington because it is the first town to be named after George Washington. That's an interesting tidbit for you. Can we fact check that I have done that but if we WANNA double check for me so it was the first town as we now yet. Okay. So. Whether you call it little Washington or original Washington the town was virtually destroyed in eighteen, sixty four, and then again in nineteen hundred by some devastating fires, a few homes survived and it was rebuilt and it became a farming and fishing community. So with a population of just over ten thousand pretty small. It's known as a sleepy town, but actually a pretty good place to raise your family low crime. I would imagine ten thousand is Pretty small but not too bad. So yeah probably be a nice place to raise a kid. Yeah, I. Think so. So, lease was born in Queens New York in nineteen forty six to parents who both came from well off German families who it is still a baby. The family moved to North Carolina his father Howard was a graduate of Brown University and he'd been a professional saxophone player before fighting in world. War? Two. After. The war. The Big Band era who is starting to be on its way out? And it was getting hard to find work as a saxophonist. So at this point, he had a wife and a baby boy to support so. Howard decided he needed to find a steady job. He ended up taking one offered by his brother-in-law as a laundry equipment salesman. He and I think he was successful at that. But maybe not at his happiest, right because he was an artist and musician. But he was successful. CONC- that whoever you're good at what you do that you're just not totally in it. Exactly. So lead Smart Marie does it on him she spoiled him and gave him pretty much anything he wanted. But you know he remained respectful and loving and had a good work ethic. By, the time he was in high school, the camel city laundry and cleaners had become one of the most successful laundries in the whole country. and lead stand Howard had become part owner and they were employing over one hundred people. But you know. Lee. had no interest in the laundry business and his dad totally understood that. So li-the never took a part time job that his father offered him at the laundry. He had decided on another career you're lethal is accepted into the school of Engineering at North Carolina State University. He. Was Successful for the first two years. But then in the junior year kind of his motivation and slacked off. He got into partying pretty heavily and he flunked out in nineteen, sixty seven. Now, the problem with this or this time is that the Vietnam War was going on. So guess what happened Oh Leaf He's drafted. Yeah. His parents were pretty frantic and worried about this as you can imagine or you're their only son, their only child. So he was twenty one years old by this time, and fortunately for him, his two years of college helped him get assigned to clerical work. So instead of being sent off to fight a war, he was stationed in office in Germany. Of course, he knew some German. So that came in handy to after his discharge from the army in nineteen seventy lethal returned home and enrolled at Guilford College in Greensboro as a business major. Gilford was a small quaker college. So some faculty and students held weekly silent vigils against the Vietnam War on the federal courthouse lawn. And Leaf was agreeing with them. He didn't think this war should be going on. Your a lot of this at that time didn't think that was a good idea. Shabby. That were absolutely it was the movement. So. Although he had been conservative for most of his life leaked did get some strong opinions against the war and he let his hair grow out to his shoulder started wearing blue jeans and he got a pair of those small round wire rimmed glasses that John

Howard Washington Leaf North Carolina Stein Washington North Carolina George Washington Leith Bunny North Carolina State Universit Marie Queens New York Brown University School Of Engineering Salesman Guilford College Greensboro Lee.
NC State Study Looks at Gender Disparity in College Esports

The Esports Minute

02:13 min | 1 year ago

NC State Study Looks at Gender Disparity in College Esports

"We're looking at a paper published by an associate professor, any PhD student at North Carolina State University. The research appeared in the Journal critical studies on Mass Communication. The goal was to see if college is worth programs have been more successful at crecy gender representation. East sports than professional sports have there are a few women who compete at the highest levels of professional sports. Rockets Karma is well regarded player who has spent time in. Her stoldas women, when major tournaments it so as fortnight, but for dependent environment that doesn't have fiscal differences creating a gap between genders us for to still almost entirely male dominated Nick Taylor co-authored the study and associate professor of Communication at NC State said in the journal quote five years ago we thought collegiate sports might be an opportunity to create a welcoming diverse competitive arena which. Was a big deal given how male-dominated the professional eastward scene was rapid growth of collegiate sports over the past five years has led to it becoming more professional with many universities having paid eastwards, positions, recruiting players at so odd we wanted to see how that professionalization has affected collegiate sports and what that means for gender diversity. The findings did not give us reason to be optimistic. For this study naked, his Co author interviewed Twenty One people involved in these sports programs. Eight of the people are part of Varsity programs with the other thirteen being president of their schools. Collegiate East Sports Club six of the respondents identified as women fifteen identified as men PhD Student Bright Style, the other CO author of the study told the Journal. Quote essentially, we found that women are effectively pushed out of eastwards many colleges when they start investing financial resources in east, Sports Program we talk lease sports might help to address the disenfranchise women in eastport at engaging more generally instead, it seems to simply be an extension of that disenfranchisement and quote. While an interview of twenty, one people isn't a perfect encapsulation of the wide-ranging college. He's worth ecosystem, all twenty one or in key rules of big programs meaning they speak for quite a few more when it comes to gender disparity. College eastwards still have a chance to be a place where we can create more inclusive east sports environments, but `gate-keeping in Tuxes D- are still real problems that women face in the space without focused initiatives that disparity won't get much better.

East Sports Club Associate Professor Mass Communication The Journal North Carolina State Universit Nick Taylor Eastport President Trump
"north carolina state university" Discussed on Short Wave

Short Wave

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"north carolina state university" Discussed on Short Wave

"So, , before we get into it, , we need to talk about something that will definitely play a role in the end of the universe dark energy. . See Our universe is expanding spread on out and that expansion is speeding up. . I think that's due to something called dark energy but they don't really know what dark energy is and there's nothing in normal physics that will do that like regular matter won't do that. You . know it has to be something weird and whatever it is we call it dark energy but we do not know what dark energy is made of. . We don't know how it got here. . You know why it exists <hes> it might be just a property of space something called the cosmological constant that space just has this kind of inherent stretching in it, , but it may be something different changes over time and could. . Get a very extreme. . Far. . Future. . The big rip. . So depending dark energy is really kind of dictates potentially end of the universe. . So I see what how long do you think that'll take you figure out? Katie ? like ten or fifteen years. . I'm personally not working on dark energy. . Partially passing the Buck Katie really. . It's a very hard thing to study. Okay. . . Because it does is make the universe expand faster. . Okay. . Okay. . So Are you ready to start talking about the end of the universe different scenarios as you will. . All right. . So let's start with heat death. . Our Universe is expanding in that expansion is accelerating due to dark energy in in the heat death scenario our universe kind of continues to expand and expand and expand, , right? ? Yeah. . Yeah. . What happens is that everything is farther apart from everything else you have fewer of these galaxy interactions, , you make fewer stars and eventually each galaxy gets more and more isolated. . So we will get to appoint. . An emily about one hundred, , billion years we will get to this point where we can't see other galaxies in the sky anymore <hes> because they'll be so far away their light will be stretched out so much that we won't be able to see them. . and. . So the universal just get a lot darker than our own. . The stars in our galaxy will be dying out. So . our galaxy will fade away and then. . Even, , black holes will start to evaporate because that's something that can happen to a black hole is that it can lose its mass through this process called Hawking evaporation. . So black holes will start disappearing and then matter decays and then eventually you end up with the universe that's just cold dark empty, , and all left is kind of a trace amount of waste heat from the processes of the universe that's called the heat death called dark empty. . That's actually just sounds right into but really like that is considered to be one of the more likely and yeah that's kind of what happens if you if you just extrapolate from what we know about the universe's evolution today and assume that dark energy is this cosmological constant this just property of space that it has this expansion built in it takes a ridiculous number of trillions and trillions of years, , but you end up with a basically an empty universe. . Yeah. . All right. . So If dark energy acts a little differently than we potentially get to a different and game the big rip right you describe it. . As an unraveling and this happens considerably faster than heat death, , right? ? Yeah. Yeah. . . So the idea behind the big rip is if dark energy is something else if it's if it's a particular kind of stuff, , we call Phantom dark energy where instead of just being property of space that actually is something that grows in intensity overtime something that there's more and more of it you know in each little space of of space overtime then it can be something that doesn't just move galaxies apart from each other and isolate them but actually tears the galaxies themselves apart. . So what it would do is it would pull the stars away from our galaxy. . So we'd see the Milky Way kind of. . Dissipating, , and then it would pull planets away from their stars and then it would start to actually rip apart stars and planets and thin atoms and molecules, , and eventually rip apart space

Katie Max Mattie Safai NPR North Carolina State Universit Keady
"north carolina state university" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

01:56 min | 1 year ago

"north carolina state university" Discussed on 600 WREC

"A white 17 year old boy has been arrested and charged with the killing of two people during a third night of protests in Kenosha, Wisconsin, on Tuesday evening on Wednesday that were more marches, but they were mostly peaceful, Police say Jacob Blake, the man shot Sunday and the confrontation with police admitted he had a knife and in fact they found one in his car. Three major league Baseball games were postponed Wednesday as players across the sports landscape reacted in the wake of the weekend shooting. A MBA postponed all in Wednesday's playoff games. Some teams threatened to boycott thumb a leaguewide nb a meeting is scheduled confirmation that a missing soldier in Texas is dead. We do not need more. Officials at Fort Hood, confirming a body found Tuesday is that of Sergeant Elder Fernandez, The 23 year old last seen August 17th in the city of Colleen. Foul play is not suspected, but an investigation is ongoing. Fernandez reported being a victim of sexual assault in May. Special agent Damon Phelps with Fort Hood Criminal Investigation Command says authorities didn't find evidence backing the claim. The subject of the investigation took and passed a polygraph examination. And we found no witnesses that could corroborate certain for certain Fernandez is allegations. Fernandez is the third soldier from Fort Hood to go missing in the past year. The other two found dead earlier this summer. Steve Rappaport Fox News another big college campuses closing down over the Corona virus, North Carolina State University is telling students remaining in dormitories toe move out, acknowledging a rising number of corona virus clusters occurring at both on campus and off campus housing. The announcement comes less than a week after administrators moved all undergraduate classes online 21 Corona virus clusters have been reported since classes began on August 10th with four and residence halls. School's covert 19 dashboard reports 111 students in quarantine in University housing and over 1200 Quarantined off campus Tomur Gotti Fox News and I'm Jack. Hello..

Sergeant Elder Fernandez Fort Hood Kenosha Tomur Gotti Fox Baseball Jacob Blake Wisconsin Damon Phelps North Carolina State Universit Texas Steve Rappaport assault Colleen
"north carolina state university" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"north carolina state university" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Year old boy has been arrested and charged with the killing of two people during a third night of protests in Kenosha, Wisconsin, on Tuesday evening on Wednesday that were more marches, but they were mostly peaceful, Police say Jacob Blake, the man shot Sunday and the confrontation with police admitted he had a knife and in fact they found one in his car. Three major league Baseball games were postponed Wednesday. As players across the sports landscape reacted in the wake of the weekend shooting. The MBA postponed all of Wednesday's playoff games. Some teams threatened to boycott them. A leaguewide n BA meeting is scheduled Confirmation that a missing soldier in Texas is dead. We do not need more. Officials at Fort Hood, confirming a body found Tuesday is that of Sergeant Elder Fernandez, The 23 year old last seen August 17th in the city of Colleen. Foul play is not suspected, but an investigation is ongoing. Fernandez reported being a victim of sexual assault in May. Special agent Damon Phelps with Fort Hood Criminal Investigation Command says authorities didn't find evidence backing the claim. The subject of the investigation, Talking passed a polygraph examination. And we found the witnesses that could corroborate certain for certain Fernandez his allegations. Fernandez is the third soldier from Fort Hood to go missing in the past year. The other two found dead earlier this summer. Steve Rappaport Fox News another big college campuses closing down over the Corona virus, North Carolina State University is telling students remaining a dormitories toe move out, acknowledging a rising number of corona virus clusters occurring in both on campus and off campus housing. The announcement comes less than a week after administrators moved all undergraduate classes online 21 Corona virus clusters have been reported since classes began on August 10th with four and residence halls. School's Kobe 19 dashboard reports 111 students in quarantine in University housing and over 1200 Quarantined off campus.

Sergeant Elder Fernandez Fort Hood Kenosha Baseball Jacob Blake North Carolina State Universit Steve Rappaport Wisconsin Damon Phelps Texas Talking assault Colleen
North Carolina State University closing campus dorms due to coronavirus

America First with Sebastian Gorka

00:22 sec | 1 year ago

North Carolina State University closing campus dorms due to coronavirus

"Com. North Carolina State University has told students remaining in university housing to go home. Acknowledging a rising number of Corona virus clusters occurring in both on campus in off campus housing Chancellor Randy Woodson says starting on Thursday, students in university housing should schedule a time to be Moving out of on campus

North Carolina State Universit Randy Woodson Chancellor
"north carolina state university" Discussed on Environment: NPR

Environment: NPR

02:37 min | 1 year ago

"north carolina state university" Discussed on Environment: NPR

"Most of us have heard of saving the elephants or saving the polar bears. . But what about saving their parasites scientists are increasingly finding that parasites are key part of ecosystems and many risk of extinction NPR's lauren summer explains. . When your job is to study parasitic worms, , not everyone wants to hear what you do for a living. . It's not a popular topic of conversation cocktail parties. . I can tell you that Chelsea would is assistant professor at the University of Washington parasites a major public relations problem they're gross and slimy and most people don't really like thinking about them. . But the fact is that they're really important in ecosystems would. . Says just look at a flat worm she studies in California Ponds I. . The parasites starts as an egg inside a bird, , the birds about the egg, , which infects snails than it goes from the snail to frog, , but the parasite needs to get back in a bird to finish its life cycle. . So it causes deformities in the frogs legs, , which makes it easier for birds to catch and eat them which helps. . Sustain. . The bird population would says, , it shows how humble parasites can influence the entire food web. . But if birds are threatened, , we're GONNA. . See some parasites decline possibly to extinction in the presence of environmental change, , which is why team parasitology released a new parasite conservation plan. . The first step is simply identifying them of the millions of parasite species only about ten percent are known to science says Schuyler Hopkins of. . North Carolina State University. . We know nothing about them. . We don't need another name Oh definitely don't know what they're doing with the ecosystems. . Many parasites are just as vulnerable as their host animals are to climate change and habitat loss but even though an animal may be listed as endangered, , it's parasites aren't, , but they could be added alongside their more visible hosts. . It would be a really great way or easy way. . To get a lot of mileage for her site conservation because humans tend to gravitate to animals like us. . It is the wolves and the grizzlies and the polar bears mostly the mammals that really get people's attention Jacob Malcolm Works for the advocacy group defenders of wildlife. . He says, it's , not all bad. . That humans focus on those charismatic critters saving their habitat can also help the less charismatic species in their ecosystem. . So whatever chances his group launches a save the Leeches campaign pretty close to zero. . So now's the time leach lovers of the World Unite Lauren summer NPR news.

Schuyler Hopkins Chelsea University of Washington assistant professor North Carolina State Universit California Jacob Malcolm grizzlies
Save The Whales. Save The Tigers. Save The Tapeworms?

Environment: NPR

02:37 min | 1 year ago

Save The Whales. Save The Tigers. Save The Tapeworms?

"Most of us have heard of saving the elephants or saving the polar bears. But what about saving their parasites scientists are increasingly finding that parasites are key part of ecosystems and many risk of extinction NPR's lauren summer explains. When your job is to study parasitic worms, not everyone wants to hear what you do for a living. It's not a popular topic of conversation cocktail parties. I can tell you that Chelsea would is assistant professor at the University of Washington parasites a major public relations problem they're gross and slimy and most people don't really like thinking about them. But the fact is that they're really important in ecosystems would. Says just look at a flat worm she studies in California Ponds I. The parasites starts as an egg inside a bird, the birds about the egg, which infects snails than it goes from the snail to frog, but the parasite needs to get back in a bird to finish its life cycle. So it causes deformities in the frogs legs, which makes it easier for birds to catch and eat them which helps. Sustain. The bird population would says, it shows how humble parasites can influence the entire food web. But if birds are threatened, we're GONNA. See some parasites decline possibly to extinction in the presence of environmental change, which is why team parasitology released a new parasite conservation plan. The first step is simply identifying them of the millions of parasite species only about ten percent are known to science says Schuyler Hopkins of. North Carolina State University. We know nothing about them. We don't need another name Oh definitely don't know what they're doing with the ecosystems. Many parasites are just as vulnerable as their host animals are to climate change and habitat loss but even though an animal may be listed as endangered, it's parasites aren't, but they could be added alongside their more visible hosts. It would be a really great way or easy way. To get a lot of mileage for her site conservation because humans tend to gravitate to animals like us. It is the wolves and the grizzlies and the polar bears mostly the mammals that really get people's attention Jacob Malcolm Works for the advocacy group defenders of wildlife. He says, it's not all bad. That humans focus on those charismatic critters saving their habitat can also help the less charismatic species in their ecosystem. So whatever chances his group launches a save the Leeches campaign pretty close to zero. So now's the time leach lovers of the World Unite Lauren summer NPR news.

Schuyler Hopkins Chelsea Lauren Summer NPR University Of Washington North Carolina State Universit Assistant Professor California Jacob Malcolm Grizzlies
"north carolina state university" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

Daily Tech News Show

05:16 min | 1 year ago

"north carolina state university" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

"Of course, comcast owns NBC's so that Makes Sense Cox cable will have it on their boxes. Well, peacock does not look like it. We'll have apps on Roku or fire. TV. That is similar to HBO Max which Launched Without Apps for Roku or fire TV as well. One of the main sticking points for both HBO Max and Peacock have been that. Roku Amazon wants to continue to sell these channels as add ons to their own APPS. The ROKU has a roku channel and of course Amazon has prime video. Add ONS would mean sharing more revenue, but also sharing the subscriber relationship, peacock and Hbo Max to control both of those Roku. Amazon also ask partners for ad inventory and a commitment to spend money on their platforms to market. And that's the amount that they want to. Spend is also in contention so I mean if anything, this just points out that streaming time has come because you've got the platform saying we have the leverage, you have to give us a sweetheart deal for revenue sharing, and we want to have a part in the subscriber relationship, and make it really easy for people where the platforms themselves like peacock and Hbo Max. Want to control everything themselves. They do not want to give over that revenue, and that's subscriber relationship to Roku Amazon. Yeah I mean if there were. Back in the day when Hulu launched, for example, you know, and you know when like is this kind of work is just going to work well. Yeah, I mean it's it's changed. It's it's taken on many forms, but the whole streaming model does work. How many of these remodels are going to survive? Though not all of them? Just not possible. People just aren't going to pay that kind of money, so yeah, it really comes down to a an. NBC saying with Peacock. This is what we want and you know companies like Amazon and Roku, saying this is how you're going to win and GonNa win by playing Nice with us and not every company's doing that. Roku Amazon have forty million. So or so? People so they feel like. If if you want to survive, not even win. If you WANNA survive out there, really You need to be on our platform. We feel like we have the upper hand in the and these these folks like Peacock Hbo Max are saying we are not going to give in from the beginning. We don't want to start with a bad relationship just to get distribution. We feel like people will WANNA. Watch the things on. On our platform, and if you don't have them, you will suffer. It's it's exactly the thing that happens with cable TV disputes. It's happening for streaming, and and in a world where people do have more choice so with cable TV couldn't easily go somewhere else to find your TV subscription with this situation. If you don't like the fact that Roku doesn't have peacock, you can switch to apple, TV or using your xbox that you do have more choices. Scientists from North Carolina State University and Microsoft will present a study at the..

Roku Amazon peacock HBO Max Amazon NBC comcast Hulu North Carolina State Universit apple Microsoft
The Alabama Chanin Story

American Fashion Podcast

07:49 min | 1 year ago

The Alabama Chanin Story

"A leader in the slow fashion movement. Can you describe what slow fashioned is? How do you think about it? Well you know. We first started talking about slow fashion on of as a derivative of the slow food. Newsman I think you know in many ways that That industry is light years ahead of where fashion so people started really looking at the way things were planted and grown much sooner than we did with textiles also I think a lot of what's being done around. Sustainable sustainable fashion is really taking cues from that movement. What made you start your own act. Actually let's just go back. What's your background in in the fashion business and textiles? Obviously this is a really good question. Well I do. I have a degree in what's called environmental design from North Carolina State University. Which sounds very modern today but really it was Degree that was kind of based on the house education so did a double major that today's called the Anti Albert's programs at a degree in Like design fundamentals and Textile design sort of handmade textiles on. And then I have another degree in industrial textile design so at at North Carolina State University. Water the other degrees other than the environmental design. So if you're doing environmental design where he not doing yes so I think the structure. There's a little bit different now when you were there. When I was there it started out you either. Signed into textile design product design graphic design architecture and landscape so environmental design is really cross disciplinarian. Volvos correct it was sort of modeled after the bow house Wheel of learning You know I think. A lot of people know that when the Bell House designers left Germany some of them settled in the mountains of North Carolina in a place called Black Mountain and that was very influential in the in the school of design which is now called the College of design at NC state income. So so how did you get into the fashion business out after he left school? Well that's a really good question I You know I just imagined when I graduated from. Nc State is that was kind of cradle the textile industry. At that time that I would be have been working in Charlotte or you know somewhere around. North Carolina there quite a few factories In a lot of textiles being made in that area while I was in school and I graduated in eighty seven and it was sort of the beginning of the great migration. Or let's call it the the next migration because excels are pretty migratory It's a pretty migratory industry so when I graduated there really had a really hard time finding a job in North Carolina and I You know I just you know back. In those days you had to go to the library. And there are books that listed all the companies that Were working in textiles in New York. And so a sent-off about sixty letters and you know. I got like five responses and I came up to New York for a week and interviews and at the end of the week I got an offer from a company calls US joint junior sportswear NASC- so third floor with I think that the Tagline was do use use you like a jeans and t shirt company. I started out there just as an assistant designer and went from there. And how did you come to the point where you started your own line? You know. It's kind of a roundabout story. After as you I worked for a company called sub studio. That was doing all the manufacturing and samples and India so spent some time going back and forth between New York and India. And after I Stopped doing that job. I actually sort of changed the focus and became a stylus so working on the other side of the camera you know instead of on the design and manufacturing side. I was Doing costume design and So I did that for a decade and During a sabbatical that I was taking my life as a as a stylist. I wound up. You know cutting apart some t shirts and sewing them back together again by hand and a low down half that eventually became a business very crazy story. And what led you to Florence Alabama to have a headquarters for your business model. Florence is my hometown so You know It took me a while to kind of figure out this when I was sowing the t shirts in the beginning that actually what I was doing looked very much like a quilting stitch and so is living in New York on Twenty Third Street and at the Chelsea Hotel and I started going around the garment. Destroy Looking for. You know embroiderers to help me do this. This vision of having these two hundred. One of a kind t-shirts Buying recycle t shirts from the Salvation Army and goodwill's and You know as the joke. I think some of these places thought of as a bag lady would come in with like these backs of recycled t shirts cut up and I wanted them. To put these elaborate embroideries on them and they're like Oh lady no so I mean I remember very clearly the afternoon I was standing on eight and thirty eight And I looked down at one of the pieces. Just kind of dumbfounded on. Why couldn't figure out of getting these made in New York and you know just sort of hit me like a light. Bulb went off like. Oh these. This is a quilting stretch. And if I want to have these made in this way that him sewing them I need to go home where there is still some ladies who had quoted with my grandmother who had this little quilting circle. That would get together once a way to do this. Quilts and thought will F. I go home I could have this made and so the idea was that it was just going to be a one off project. I was going to have these. T shirts made wanted to make this documentary film about old Tom quilting circles so I went home. And you know the the humor in it. Was that You know the little ladies who'd quilted with my grandmother really weren't interested in New York City fashion or you know doing this work. They were talking about the grandkids and planning collards. And you know all the things that they had to do outside of the They're quilting was kind of community service work and so we just ran added random at a newspaper that said part time. Hand sewing and quilting. We got about Again I think you know there were about fifty sixty responses in about twenty of the ladies stock and started doing the hand sewing and then we presented that first collection of Two hundred t shirts during New York fashion week in February of two thousand and one I had a friend who became a partner and then another partner. So we You know it's gun of history. The first person to come to the door was Julie. Bill Hart from Barneys and

New York North Carolina North Carolina State Universit NC Florence Alabama Charlotte Salvation Army India Barneys Partner Bell House Bill Hart United States Julie Albert Florence Black Mountain Bulb
New Data on Killer House Cats

60-Second Science

03:08 min | 1 year ago

New Data on Killer House Cats

"Domestic cats. That live or go outside. Kill lots of wild animals. Recent studies find that outdoor cats in North America takeout between ten and thirty billion birds and mammals each year still. It hasn't been clear. What kind of impact? The world's six hundred million pet cats have on wildlife populations and whether that impact poses a threat about diversity conservation. Anyone who has had sees her cats bring animals home and the question is well. Does it matter and especially we wanted to know. Where are the cats actually honey? Are they hunting in their backyards or are they going out into the nature preserves North Carolina State University zoologist role in case together with colleagues in the UK? Australia and New Zealand KS distributed small. Gps trackers to citizen scientists cat owners. They attach the trackers to their cats collars in all more than nine hundred pet. Cats were tracked this way. All of which were routinely allowed to roam freely outside. Some cats were true explorers. One British cat called Max walked almost two kilometers back and forth along a road between two neighboring villages twice but the majority were homebodies. Rarely straying more than a hundred meters from home in other words. They use their own backyards. Plus those of a few years as their hunting grounds the findings are in the journal. Animal conservation a single pet. Cat doesn't kill as many animals as a wildcat does to survive but the pets impact happens in a much smaller area so in a given area say one hundred square meters pet cats killed between two and ten times as many other animals as do similarly sized wild predators. We're able to put this into kind of a currency into a value of how many animals how many prey animals does a pet cat kill per hectare Area per year? And that's something that we can also estimate for wild predators so we were able to estimate this for a cat. A wildcat called the jungle cat which is about the same size and they killed a lot more Per Cat because they have to hunt to get everything They eat whereas the pet cats get their food bowl but they hunt over a massive area compared to the pet cats and in some places including California Florida Australia and elsewhere. Cats are an important threat to some species. That are already in trouble on one hand. It's kind of good news that the cats aren't going out further abroad but it's bad news that they're quite likely to have an impact on the animals that they share space with near their houses with so much killing concentrated around people's houses the positive impacts of urban wildlife like the beauty of songbirds or the way small lizards can control insect. Pests could get washed away in precisely the areas where those benefits most appreciated so on conservationists import cat owners to keep their pets indoors scientific evidence agrees

North America North Carolina State Universit New Zealand Ks California Florida Australia MAX Australia UK
"north carolina state university" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:15 min | 1 year ago

"north carolina state university" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Ever wonder what outdoor cats do you all day well it turns out they may be having a big impact on the local ecosystem NPR's Lauren Sommer has more on a new study in research studies scientists are supposed to disclose any conflicts of interest so are you a cat person or a dog person I'm actually more of a ferret person I love the weasels so we're just like those independent weirdos off on the side right so rolling case doesn't have a dog in this fight and he's a scientist at North Carolina State University he wants to know what kind of harm outdoor house cats are doing to birds so with some colleagues he put GPS trackers on almost a thousand cats in six countries to see where they go all day these cats are moving around their own backyard a couple of their neighbors backyards but most of them are not ranging very much further so initially I thought oh this is good news they're not going out and into the nature reserves but then case factored in how much cats kill in that small area some cats in the study were bringing home ten or eleven dead birds rodents or lizards a month and that doesn't include what they didn't bring home that actually ends up being a really intense rate appreciation on any unfortunate prey species that's gonna live near that cat's house case reports in the journal animal conservation that compared to wild predators house cats have four to ten times the impact on local wildlife the simplest thing to do is to keep your cat indoors but some people don't like Susan Wilson she's an associate professor at St Lawrence university her rescue cat known as the gorilla was killing a lot of birds I'm a biologist not a bird biologist said it's just horrifying and I so she found a special brightly colored collar it looks kind of like an Elizabethan collar slash scrunchie around the cat's neck so birds can see the cat before it pounces she tatted on her cat and dozens of others it dramatically reduce the number of birds the cats brought home small rodents weren't so lucky which isn't surprising because mammals see in black and white you know they're not as visual as a bird so as for Wilson's cats gorillas now have the inter cat loving his life.

NPR Lauren Sommer scientist North Carolina State Universit associate professor St Lawrence university
Wild Hydrangeas of the World

In Defense of Plants Podcast

10:22 min | 1 year ago

Wild Hydrangeas of the World

"Dan Hinkley it's great to have you back on the podcast. Welcome thank you very much Matt. It's great to be back. Well you've already been on the episode before and we've talked a lot about your background but for those that didn't listen or new to hearing your name Tell us a little bit about who you are and what it is you do. Well essentially A glorified gardener. I am the director at Herons Garden in Kingston Washington Nets Garden that I started in nineteen eighty seven with my partner Rubber Jones. I currently have a personal garden in India. Nola just twelve miles away from Heron's book called win cliff. Both of those gardens are open to the public. If you should ever find yourself in the areas of the we encourage people to come to walk around and and then I do a little writing. Delo speaking some design consultation so a lot of a lot of fingers in different pots but all in all plants in on all the blast. Ya Fantastically charmed existence for any plant lover but You Know People WanNa know more about your background in You're working plant exploration. They can listen to the previous episode. After that was recorded we talked a little bit about maybe diving into more detail into some of your favorite groups and we both agreed that the hydrangea. We're going to be the topic of discussion and I'm really excited to pick your brain about this. This group of plants today great. I mean it's one that I have had an infatuation with ever since I've been a kid and of course it's another one of those wonders of the plant world at once. You get to know a little you you realize how little you know and so you know it's unfolding but ever so entertaining both four in a plant explorer but also for a gardener at the such great application to gardens of North America and in Europe. Weather not necessarily native to write. And this idea that the more you look the more you realize how little you know about this group I mean. This exemplifies my entire experience Since we talked about doing this episode of growing up my experience with hydro was largely just a couple of pom pom varieties and then a little bit later on meeting. At least one or two are native species in the wild in southern Appalachia but I had no idea the breadth of what this genus in this family overall has presented the world. It's been very successful in north and south and east and West and just like you had a hydrangea. Nekia Lada outside our back door in northern Michigan. That's like zone. Three B thing. Some managed to survive in blonde some every year. And then we also had hydrangea lessons. Annabel and everybody my age at least to live on the east coast new or knows Annabel because it was such a mainstay a mop head. Arborescence wanted a heartiest hydrogen. Just so you know. That's that's where my introduction came as well but as I started traveling I was dumbfounded. By how many niches they have occupied. How successful the genus. The family as Ben as a whole and also at least in the Pacific northwest. How many of those can be brought into cultivation in? Add a great deal to the garden not only by flower but with foliage as well. Yeah and so thinking broadly about this. I was actually new to the idea. That hydrangea had. Its own family. I kind of limited with CAPRA fully. Acc so sort of a broad spectrum treatment for taxonomy sake here. What's going on with this group Obviously is a lot more refined but it was even a decade ago when I first started looking at these. You'd oftentimes find Hydrangea For Gay she was one of those bags of everything that didn't know where they belong. They put it in the sanctuary. Casey so It has now been refined obvious. Leads through a lot of different means available to taxonomic. It is a family to its own. Hydrogen Jasey and they have Would quickly dissect this. There's two sub families in hydrogen JC Eighty and James Yoy D. And then within the sub family HYDRANGEA LADY. They have made two tribes. Which are the hydrogen d. e. In Philadelphia? So it really for the sake of time in one hour fairly gonNA scratch the surface with just hydrology e which is where the the breadth of ornament event is but the the other tribe in the in the hand I drank. Philadelphia's obviously has Philadelphia has dude see as a tremendous number of other plants that we are familiar with in our garden so they're lumped rate in with hydrogen JC. Now that's awesome. Yeah then there's you know it's one of those things where again I looked deeper and realized I recognized a lot of those those. I guess that makes sense that they're related but again for the sake of time. The hydrangea you're going to be our focus specifically the genius hydrangea and roughly speaking. I mean we're we're still working and I'm sure things will change In the years or decades to come but roughly speaking how many species are within the genus. Hydrangea There's you know it changes. Because obviously lumper's lumper's splitters continually added but it ranges around sixty about sixty species. But you know they're still discovering new species and in particular in northern parts of South America just three years ago they identified. I think it was fourteen. Fourteen or fifteen new species of climbing Evergreen hydrangea from the mountains of northern Ecuador and Peru Bolivia Colombia in there. So you know. It's still a lot to be learned about true. Hydrangea as out there. They certainly have not all been discovered yet. Another big realization for me in trying to get familiar with this genus was this diversity of life-form you mentioned climbing and I'm sure. Plenty of gardeners will recognize climbing varieties of her Georgia. In of course the obvious shrubbery ones. I mean this is a really cool thing that that seems. Like hydrangea has found different ways. To make a living as a woody plant depending on where you're you're looking for them yet no Absolutely Obviously most people in North America will be familiar with hydrogen novela which is an Asian species. That's the hardest most dependable deciduous flowering plant for Shade Climbing Planet. I should say ourself clinging plant for shade in climates But new go south on occasion in Asia's while you find climbing evergreen species of hydrogen in I would say ninety nine point nine percent gardeners even in the Pacific northwest where we can grow. So many of these are aware of the fact that there are climbing evergreen branches at provide grateful during the summertime and wintertime and then beautiful flowers. That are dead ringers. For what we in our minds think of is a hydrant right on and in thinking about sort of diversity at least here in North America You know sort of West East divide always stands out especially when it comes to gardening You're located on the West Coast as you mentioned what you have over there or is this something that at least in. North America is largely assigned to east of the Mississippi and Sorta down south from there. So like in a broad sense mad here. I'm I'm sitting nine Sonny Bloch this morning a rare sunny day in the puget sound area and right off the block that I live on the two hundred foot bluff repeat Assam. We have native stands of our native Philadelphia's Philadelphia's Louis named after obviously Lewis and Clark fame and in the broad sense that is indeed in the hydrant JC. So I can't discount the those plants. If you to California now you can find Wesleyan Carpentaria and of course James Lia and a few other genera mostly not all that ornamental so. I can't say that west of the Mississippi is deposited in hydrogen JC but Zero through hike packages zero. So we have to get east of the Mississippi before we run into the only two representatives of the genus in North America. And you. You've already made not worth one of those are Bresson's which is very widespread from New York. Even Southern Quebec all the way down into Florida and the Gulf states and has variations of geographical variations within. But just a darn good dependable plant for gardeners and then Hydrangea Chrissa fully. Which is more? Gulf state oriented a beautiful very distinctive. You know probably one of the most distinctive hydrogens in the entire family is is found in in the Gulf states and You know turn the breeders loose on these which they have with Gusto in the last ten to fifteen years in your ending up with these new pink varieties of our lessons and then all of these extraordinary forms of The Oakley Hydrangea. So far cry from what was available to me as a young lad when we had a Annabel that was about it. Now we have you know pink the pink forms bread by the Maestro of plant breeding. Tom Rainey at North Carolina. State University is really Extraordinary things expanding the breadth of ornament within that that one tax of

Philadelphia North America Annabel Pacific Northwest Mississippi Gulf India Dan Hinkley South America Matt Nola Herons Garden Capra Michigan Heron Tom Rainey Delo Director North Carolina Kingston Washington Nets Garde
NEPA changes looming

Native America Calling

09:02 min | 1 year ago

NEPA changes looming

"This is native America Calling Monica Brain sitting in for tear gatewood. It started in one thousand nine hundred sixty nine with a massive oil spill about three million gallons of crude oil spilled into the Pacific Ocean by Santa Barbara California the environmental damage outrage the public and elected officials and it was the impetus for the federal legislation named the National Environmental Policy. Act OR NIBA. The act formalized the practice of environmental impact assessments. That explore how big projects might harm the environment or wildlife as dry as that might sound. Such a review was at the heart of the decision to locate the Dakota access pipeline near standing rock so now the trump administration says Nipah needs to be modernized. They would like to expedite environmental reviews. The proposed changes could also limit the public's ability to weigh in the proposal calls for tribal consultation but many tribal environmental watchers say that the trade offs are severe. That's our show today. Are you interested in streamlining environmental assessments? Will your try benefit from the proposed changes? Maybe they'll get projects done faster. Phone lines are open. Everyone's welcome give us a call. The number is one eight hundred nine nine. Six two eight four eight. That's eight hundred nine. Nine native joining us. Now is Dr Ryan Emmanuel. He's an associate professor and university faculty scholar in the Department of Forestry and Environmental Resources at North Carolina State University and Ryan is an enrolled member of the Lombi tribe. Welcome back to native America Calling Ryan. Thanks for having me Monica. Yeah it's great to have you also on the line. We have Lisa developed. She is the vice chair of the Fort Birth hold protectors of water and earthrights and she is an enrolled enrolled in the man. Dan Haddatha recrimination. Welcome Lisa thanks for joining us Ryan let's start with you okay. So what purpose does Nipah serve? So one of the the key purposes of Nita's to ensure that we accurately document The environmental and tax Of a proposed project that is either going to be carried out by the government Carried out on federal lands or carried out with Some kind of federal funding Or or or permitting approval in order to make informed decisions about The types of actions or projects. that that we undertake in the US Nita says that You you must go into that with your eyes. Wide Open regarding environmental impact so at a very basic level it's a it's a documentation of the The environmental trade-offs and effects of undertaking a certain activity or development or project. Okay so let me simplify this a little bit to see if I understand this There's a project and it's either on federal land or it has federal funding and let's say that The environmental reviews is required. It's done and then it says something like this fish farm could end up Killing thirty percent of the sea turtles in the area. The that's all that happens with that. There's public comment but the company ultimately or whoever's doing the project ultimately decides whether or not to move forward is that right well the the agency that's responsible for conducting the review under Nipah is the one We'll make a decision based on whatever those numbers particulars are whether it's endangered species Or hunting or fishing areas or any other kind of resource areas. The Federal Agency has to take responsibility for the impacts. And say say yes you know despite those impacts. We're we're going to permit this activity anyway or no those impacts are too severe and we're GonNa make a judgment call and say we won't issue you this particular permit okay and so Let's talk about some of the proposed changes that are recommended To start off at one of the big things that I read was the creating deadlines for projects and so when president trump announced this he. He made a mention that you know. Sometimes projects take decades to finish and it's really slowing down progress and things like that and so this the the proposed changes would require that projects need to be finished from start to end The the permitting process anyway in two years is that right. That's right and it's important. I think to define what that window of time is that is from. The announcement of the agency is going to undertake An environmental review Through the the research in preparation of the document the public comment process finalization of the report. And then the agency's decision are supposed to take place within that proposed two year window. I mean do you think that's unreasonable? To try and get stuff done in two years. Well if you look at the the underlying data that the proposal sites you know it looks like it would be difficult. So the council environmental quality studied a length of time that it takes reviews to work their way to the systems and it really varies from one agency to another but a lot of these reviews take much longer than two years and so you know there are a couple of explanations for that one could be inefficiencies in the system but the other explanation could be that environmental issues are just so complex and we now have such a richer understanding of these issues and we did Fifty years ago that it warrants More time and more effort To to study documents impacts underneath a are Is THE AGENCY REQUIRED TO CONSULT WITH TRIBES? If it's on their tribal land or near in ancestral land. They so there's a federal executive order that Nipah is is Well the agencies are required to abide by Federal Executive Order Requires them to consult with drives whether it's on tribally controlled territory or or traditional lands Of that particular tribe so that that would still be in effect under the proposed rule changes as far as I understand. There's some language in the proposed rule about actually strengthening Provision for tribal consultation But at the same time there's concern about shortening the time window that you have to engage with tribes. Yeah that's another proposed. Change is well of course if it's two years than that automatically shortens the time window but also you know there's a public comment period Which we're in right now for these proposed changes to NAPA. But you know for these projects and there's a some efforts or the proposed changes are to shorten those public comment periods as well. What do you think about that? Well so I'll give you an example from the tribes that I work with here in North Carolina I I actually work with predominantly non federally recognized rides and there. There are a couple of important things about that but For this conversation you know. It's important to note that these trials are resourced when it comes to Staff who can deal with these kinds of requests for public comments or preparing the kinds of rich responses that are needed to articulate tribal concerns. You may have one person in tribal government. Who's responsible for environment Energy on and maybe a few other roles as well so when they're already Under under pressure to respond to these kinds of deadlines it will probably reduce their ability to participate in decision-making if you shorten the window even further

Dr Ryan Emmanuel Nipah Monica Brain America Lisa National Environmental Policy Department Of Forestry And Env Dakota Pacific Ocean Gatewood North Carolina United States Nita Santa Barbara California Executive
What is Landscape Architecture?

Revision Path

13:50 min | 2 years ago

What is Landscape Architecture?

"Studying landscape architecture. Is that right yeah. That's right what appeals to you about landscape architecture yeah no. I think something that appeals to me about landscape architecture is really the broad range of possibilities that come with it so i guess you could say architectures focus focus primarily on the building and landscape. It's everything outside of that in so that encompasses a lot of different types of spaces and a lot of scale space some really interested in more of the social aspect or like public spaces within the urban city. That's kind of what drew me to study landscape and under god. I was always focused on like thinking about the community people that lived around public spaces or in buildings that we we were designing for and i was really interested in thinking about okay how do people move throughout space or where do they interact and kind of like what are big places places or opportunities to engage communities more and give them access to green space clean air and other opportunities for like socialization shen yeah i think when most people think about landscape architecture they're thinking mostly about greenspan. Yeah parks up things things of that nature. I know here in atlanta. There's we have so many little just pocket parks in a way like little parks just kind of tucked in here and there i think right but now there's a proposal to build sort of part of a park over our highway over one of the highway but what are some of the other sorts of things that make up landscape architecture aside from that yeah. That's a good point. I think it's easiest to describe people like oh you know like park designed but they're actually a lot of different other types of the public spaces plazas one of the most famous places that a lot of people recognize is like the hotline so also thinking about post industrial uses uh spaces there also a lot of power and landscape where we can. We have a lot of control over sustainability so we can impact the environment in a positive way way. There are a lot of initiatives happening right now. New york to kind of protect the city against sea level rise so there are a lot of constructions happening along the the coast and we're seeing that development happened so there's a wide scale to thinking about design both on a regional scale but also they're smaller like hard scape plans and thinking about outdoor malls plazas and transportation kinda gets <unk> looped into that as well. How does transportation you looked into that yeah. I guess that is a big statement but i think now that people are kind of thinking about the future of like driverless cars i <hes> now we're thinking about how we can retake over the street for pedestrians or like. Maybe we will need as many spaces for car so i think there's a a lot of pedestrian centered ideas about read configuring street spaces or like what happens if we take away highways from you we know communities can be transformed those spaces into other types of recreational use or ecological use. I think to bypass a really big and thinking get about circulation so how do people move throughout spaces that can be both through cars <hes> through highlights through aeroplanes but also at the ground sound level like walking or biking dot space so those are factors. I think that a lot of designers try to influence into their designs but also could be it's like the highland is a completely new way of kind of moving throughout new york city so really you're. You're kind of like you have the opportunity to design on a bunch of different types of scales it sounds you can do something really small like a plaza or yeah ab- santa park but even apart can range in size from really small to like central park or something the yeah it's funny said positive because <hes> i guess for our first semester design school we had a design like from the smallest scale so like a courtyard yard and it was like teeny like enclosed space but it was really fun of what we can come up with and there were so many different ideas and it was kind of our first project and and then we ramped up in scale and thinking about boston's city hall plaza in that was like seven and a half acres and thinking about okay like this is a hard scape space like we weren't allowed to use like lawns or anything like that like it's completely like thinking about people moving freely and it had to be accessible supposed to boston's like governmental building and then our final design was ramped up in scale again and it was thinking about like waterfront design and interaction between the city city and also like recreational space say yeah. It's definitely a wide range of scales that you can design and everything in between. I'm glad you mentioned accessibility accessibility. That's been something that's been on my mind lately mostly in the web space and i'll bring this back landscape architecture so just just what would be your. I was reading this article this morning about how <hes> domino's pizza is trying to take a case all the way to the supreme court art because a customer suing them because their websites not accessible to not able to access it on a screen reader and there has been other types of lawsuits that are like this. I think there were people that were trying to sue beyond say because her website was not accessible and granted the web guidelines around accessibility normally normally tend to pertain to government sites in terms of enforceability beyond say side is not a government site. Neither domino's pizza however what i found is in the weapons that accessibility the is kind of a it's a slippery scale. Some people really adhere to others. Don't care about it at all but when it comes to landscape architecture accessibility is super important because all types of people have to move throughout spaces yeah. How do you design for physical accessibility yeah. No that's a good question and i think it varies in the designer what you're trying to achieve and some people are very much like oh. We don't want this to be accessed by like massive amounts of people like it could be very dangerous address. It could pose threats large gatherings but i think to like the more practical answers. Oh like in designing public spaces. There are laws and codes like a._d._a. Accessibility laws that you have to buy four but it's also like okay now you can accept those code standards or like how do you truly remake space open and then it raises more questions about like who is allowed in what spaces in who isn't so that got really interesting and especially in terms of the plaza plaza and how do you make a space feel comfortable for maybe a single person who's walking there or in their wheelchair and then also can the space <unk> accommodate like large art gatherings of protests like does the public have a right you know to gather and protests and speak in kind of connected large groups yeah. I don't know if that answers your question. No this is my question. It also made me think a little bit about sorta this concept that i've heard of with defensive design where sometimes certain public spaces like you say designed to keep people out yeah like for example park benches that may have a middle railing so no one can lay across them or four. Maybe low to the ground services. They'll put like little bumps or spikes on them so no one can sit comfortably on it. Yes what it reminded me that that definitely light comes up a lot in designed to in. It's like then. It gets extremely political suicide in like yeah okay. I'm just wondering design like this nice space that maybe people could have like a lunch break oregon but then i think too in the era of like public safety and security people get really like nervous about okay like who sitting sitting and lingering in these spaces and yeah. It's a fine line but i think it's also kind of exciting because you're giving a space where you would not you don't necessarily know what will happen like an park and prospect park in brooklyn. It's like a wonderful space. When i go there. I see people by gang doing tai not doing yoga with their dogs and like there's not a set like programmed area for that to happen. It kind of just is able to happen and there are like political local statements that also happened there so i think it's an exciting platform to be able to design kind of within that one thing when you when you sort of talk about spaces like this i'm thinking of how a few years ago there were a lot of public protests in the streets blocking highways and and blocking major thoroughfares thoroughfares and things like that and i know like here in atlanta for example there was a big complaints that people could walk down onto the highway. Yeah they're like oh. Why is that. Why is that possible which doesn't make sense like why wouldn't they you can drive down there. You walk down there but no it's interesting about the the sort of governance of different spaces for different types of people or even different modes of transportation. There's more that i want to dive into with the topic but i want to take it back a little bit. I'm really curious to know about more about you and how you came to be studying at harvard talking about all this stuff so where did you. Where'd you grow up yeah definitely so i was born in new jersey but i grew up my whole life and south west virginia. A little town called roanoke doc. Anybody knows it and i'm the youngest of three girls and so my mom. She's a new yorker. My dad was from chicago. They're both from big city and then when they have made they decided they wanted to move down south and kind of slow things down and so i grew up in roanoke must of my life i went to school with a lot of my friends like kindergarten through high school and even some in college. I think it was a good community where everyone was really well connected. It and everyone knew each other and so grown up in a place like that was really unique as i'm learning and then i went off to school to study architecture at the university of virginia i think tau i got there was like not a linear path at all listening like oh. How did you have it figured out yet was curious. Here is like has designed been like a big part of your childhood growing up where you're surrounded by it. Yeah i think one since i was surrounded by it i didn't really realized that until later and now like looking back. I was like oh <hes> my parents did a good job at like teaching me how to do this or that and so oh my dad did many things that he also briefly worked in furniture procurement in my mom went to fashion school for a little bit and then decided that wasn't for her but they in my grandma on my mom's side like always painted and drew and so my parents were good at like exposing me to the arts very early but i didn't realize what's that there were possible careers through design until high school and so i kind of was always interested in drawing and painting in but it was kind of like something i did just for fun and then i thought i wanted to be a doctor. I thought that was like what is going to do and i very it. Quickly realized like i don't like hospitals. I'm very scared of blood in bali fluids and so then i said oh my goodness like what am i gonna do. Who i think was like fourteen. I was like man. I just don't know what i'm going to study and my dad actually said what about architecture and then at that time i had no. I know i dea what that field was an. I was like what is this and <hes> in high school. I got to go to a couple of design camps at <hes> virginia ginny tech university. What was other school. I went to another school north carolina state university and they had like the summer design her rams that my dad found his co. You you should go in and you can kind of test and see if he liked it and so at first it was just such a different way of thinking and i was not really excited about it <hes> but then i went on to study it in college and it was very hard at first has a lot of people seal when i studied architecture but <hes> no now it turned out to be really amazing from people who have had on the show we've had a couple of of architects on before and they have always talked about i mean the difficulty of i think just yes of course learning about the subject matter but also a lot of those spaces are not super diverse and so if you're coming in there as quote unquote the other and that sort of just adds an element to the difficulty of studying and being a space like that yeah absolutely so no one in my immediate any family or anyone i knew of really studied architecture and so that was a whole new learning environment for me. I went to school in a lot of people the parents had studied architecture like they're punctual and so they were kind of already looped in the field and yeah it was very hard to understand the language <hes> just even what architecture it was <hes> it was a difficult amount of learning that you have to do a friend like learning the software but also a lot of technical skills that you need to choir but overall though what was your time at university of virginia yeah i think overall the wall. It was really great. 'cause then my first year the kind of restarted i think as my first year right before i got they restarted their no muss chapter. I know ma says the national organization

New York City Atlanta University Of Virginia Domino Boston City Hall Plaza Greenspan North Carolina State Universit Virginia Ginny Tech University West Virginia Santa Park Harvard Chicago Roanoke Doc MA Brooklyn Roanoke Oregon
Arthropod House Guests

A Moment of Science

02:00 min | 2 years ago

Arthropod House Guests

"Hey Don what are you doing with that jar. Collecting arthropods Gile inning crabs grabs are type of author pod but I'm not surprised isn't animal with an exoskeleton. A segmented body and jointed limbs includes insects spiders might send centipede soup. You're collecting bugs then. I'm doing some research. Did you know that entomologists from North Carolina State University Renan study that phone we I share our houses with more than five hundred kinds of arthropods hundred that's crazy. I will admit it surprising. The researchers took samples from fifty houses during the summer months near Raleigh. They collected both living and dead. arthropods from each room and total that identified over five hundred different morphos species those are species so closely related that they have to be identified by scientists looking for specific physical traits. He's house had on average about one hundred more fo- species there is no way that I have one hundred species of anything living in my house they mostly collect flies spiders Beatles and send book lice most of the species. Says they found don't normally live houses there. arthropods that accidentally wondered in from doors for example they found goal midges all fifty homes midges are small flies that feed on outdoor plants and can't survive indoors believe it or not only five rooms out of five hundred fifty had no arthropods house is cleaner than that. I bet you have cobwebs sir. Those are made by cobwebs spiders which are found in sixty five.

DON North Carolina State Universit Raleigh
"north carolina state university" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

04:50 min | 2 years ago

"north carolina state university" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Such things such. You know, speech hurts size the board. So. Power retractable mirrors. You know the items we had the multimedia package. Where the twelve point three inch digital display drivers split day. Nab system carbon card in radio system. Or you know, stereotype. And that went for twenty five hundred dollars and we have the advanced package. That to included a. Headlights automatic dimming from your, I beams, you know, you don't have to do anything. This said pilot assistant mention adaptive cruise control three hundred sixty surround camera, which I happen to love when your parking this is really upset to see everything you see where your vehicle is. So all in all I think bulb did a really good topic. Yeah. There, there are some little courts, but what the ical doesn't have their little quarters. I don't I don't agree on. Thank you very much for this report. Sincerely, john. Okay. Are you have a great day? We try to best we can so have a good day. We'll speak with you next week. Okay. One hundred Michael, okay. Now we're gonna turn the microphone over to Mike for silly and he has a very interesting person that he wants to interview. Yes. Howard. You know, I've been doing a lot of research on all this new technology, that's being being developed in the industry, and on a month ago I met a gentleman at a conference name, Rick Sepe ENZA. He runs the clean transportation program at North Carolina State university, and he's gonna come on and tell us what they're doing down there with new technology Ricky there. I am here. All right. Thanks becoming tell us come listeners. What programs you're involved in what kind of technology, you're working on? Okay. We, we are, that say advocates in their life by the she is to excel reduction of alternatives culture, Tisch quality work, if they call the cool energy technologies. Call. And I started out as a seller center and do the technology accidents and what we do. We became Queen in two thousand dollars thousand transportation will provide combined power. So with all seats and overall the objectives to celebrate a coal transportation. Transportation spent like we work with academia, government public and private fleets to accelerate the adoption and our stances. We are we are fueled technology intro. Look at everything was out there. Try educate the folks is to let the cable, toys R, so they have it understanding, and they can make informed decision. Sometimes feels we promote and depending upon the application, the fall out between the biofuels all with so piloting, so propane. Batra guest look at other technologies. And this even operational procedures to drive fish and transportation, looking at the whole picture, most people just think of this new technology is just the electric vehicles, but there's a lot more. There's a lot more to it than just electric vehicle actually. And that's how we said it's an all of the above approach, we did allergy. I use. That's like a craftsman or artist wanted you seven color, palette. You wanna let us Evy tuning toolbox. Just hammer all the time. And there's some. Places where the technology fits very well. I was where it doesn't and that's, that's a fear. We have that technology is putting around advocation somebody has a bad experience. Then they bad mouth the technology and they won't ever adopted again. We have happened using near stack when we'll prices go up and down over the last forty fifty years. And you've had a push for some alternative fuels and you have liability issues, etc. And I it was the guy from Mesa Arizona. Who's a great story for propane and school buses. He wouldn't touch natural gas, 'cause they log I and they went and tried that for guests years and years ago and had reliability she's fucking touch that we've had several iterations in the systems and the systems across the board..

Rick Sepe ENZA Mike Mesa Arizona North Carolina State universit Batra Howard john Michael twenty five hundred dollars two thousand dollars forty fifty years three inch
"north carolina state university" Discussed on Cultivating Place

Cultivating Place

02:52 min | 2 years ago

"north carolina state university" Discussed on Cultivating Place

"Dr Langley taking us on a plan collecting and taxonomy field trip to the great smoky mountains in one of the courses. It was just like, wow, four or five days kind of backpacking through the great smoky mountains wilderness collecting, you know, I don't know whether we but we and the and the, the plan presses, you know, carrying those things with you. It was just it was the most magical thing. So I think that's kind of where this all started. And so then you go through this reevaluation period and you recognize these moments of real interest in and magic as you say, and is it at that moment that you decide to look into plant work plant study, tell us the next step. So the next step reevaluating was. What, what aspect of plants and plant by Allah, G and taxonomy was really meant for me, and I don't know, I guess, I applied for graduate degrees in porta culture and landscape architecture at a number of universities around the country and I landed at North Carolina State university. My major professor was Dr j c Raulston clearly. He is the most influence fluential person in in my life as I think about, you know, met a very tragic on timely death in an car accident. But he was the person who chose to, you know, he he guided me through my graduate work at Carolina state university, which combined horticulture a bit of landscape architecture a bit of forest resources management. So it was a nice combination of. Kind of degrees. I kind of charted, my oh, made up my own degrees along their Bob Hyland is a placement in plant world activist, and advocate from early thoughts that he'd be a country doctor. He's now a nurturing plant person to communities large and small as such. He has been party to many shifts, and changes within the horticultural world, these past decades, from the renaissance of specialty plant nurseries a few times to trending garden design to the innovative changes in making public horticulture more inclusive and relevant in regards to education and audience engagement Bob has been there. We'll be right back after a break to hear more stay with us..

Dr j c Raulston North Carolina State universit Dr Langley Bob Hyland Bob professor five days
"north carolina state university" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"north carolina state university" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"The criminal case involving North Carolina State university basketball player. Eric lock. It has been dismissed it happened Friday morning, but for now he remains suspended from the Wolfpack basketball program lock. It was arrested on February the fourteenth and charged with assaulting a female the six five luck at a one a Robins Georgia graduated from Florida international before transferring to the Wolfpack basketball team in his last year of eligibility to cheer coaches at North Carolina State university are resigning in the midst of a student brink investigation on should we bought a we Rankin and Wendling Glenn submitted their resignations yesterday, they are accused of failing to report rape allegations. Made by a student on the squad the university's cheerleaders were benched after the victim made her case public state lawmakers proposing to take cellphones out of the hands of drivers the hands-free Bill introduced this week. Would make it illegal for drivers to hold phones which would bring North Carolina in line with more than a dozen other states a violation would result in a fine and possible insurance points docked outta warm deers. Parents are speaking out after President Trump asserted Kim Jong Hoon was unaware of his harsh treatment. Lisa Carter has more. The grieving parents say Kim and his evil regime are responsible for the death of our son. Otto warmbier is adding that the North Korean government is responsible for the unimaginable. Cruelty and inhumane treatment of auto, President Trump said Thursday and Hanoi that he believes Cam was not responsible. The twenty two year old worn beer was arrested for taking a propaganda banner from a hotel while visiting Pyongyang in two thousand sixteen the college student from Ohio was sentenced to fifteen years of hard labor, but died seventeen months later after being returned to the US with severe brain damage. Stay connected by following us on social media. Go to one oh, six one FM talk dot com to connect. From the service now plumbing heating and air conditioning traffic.

North Carolina State universit President Trump North Carolina Eric lock Kim Jong Hoon basketball Pyongyang Lisa Carter Otto warmbier Wendling Glenn rape Hanoi US Rankin Georgia Florida
"north carolina state university" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"north carolina state university" Discussed on WDRC

"Well, live well is a program of the State Department's on aging and public health. Social with us. The talk of Connecticut is all over social media. And we want you to join us like us on Facebook. Follow us on Twitter. And check out our pictures on Instagram. Talk. News and information from the talk of Connecticut on your phone ipad and desktop look for the talk of Connecticut, all over your news feed. This is HouseCall for health. Having a Roach problem in your home can be a nightmare. Enough to make you sick problem is getting rid of the roaches can also make you sick. A new study finds those so-called bug bombs may be more of a health problem for humans than bugs, researchers at North Carolina State university say studies on rats show that the chemicals in those chemical fathers can lead to changes in behavior that are similar to ADHD. But the studies major conclusion about bug bombs. They don't work on bugs. The study published in the journal BMC public health says the Falker dispenses the chemicals in areas where humans and pets hang out. But virtually none of it gets where roaches congregate inside cabinets and under surfaces. Researchers say a gel based insecticide works better because you can put the gel Bates where your little household guests spend their time for more health news, go to foxnewshealth dot com. Housecall for health. I'm joy, Piazza, Fox News. to honestly, provocative talk. The LARs Larson show. I must be doing something right to create so much interest and backlash from the Democratic Party. I mean that as a surprise, but I said we expected to see some of the level of vitriol. But not to the extent.

Connecticut LARs Larson State Department Facebook North Carolina State universit Twitter Democratic Party ADHD Roach Piazza BMC Bates Falker
"north carolina state university" Discussed on Something You Should Know

Something You Should Know

02:40 min | 3 years ago

"north carolina state university" Discussed on Something You Should Know

"And can't possibly mean that you get rid of everything we've swabbed thousands of houses, and we've never found a single surface and a house that didn't have bacteria or fund your insects or something on it. And so that's the first point that you're going to have a life with you. And we need that life and so get used to it embrace it. But but then given that we're gonna have life with us. How do we think about which of these species we most want with us? And so it turns out that spiders, actually, play really valuable role, and and houses, and are very very very very unlikely to actually bite people. And so if you have spiders in your house, leave them alone, let them do their good work of eating. Mosquitos flies. The other thing is that we know so little about these species that by just paying attention to them. We can often make totally new discoveries of the sort that I used to imagine we'd only made in rainforests, and faraway places that, you know, big new science can happen under your bed, really, for example to where do you live Mike in California? So we did a survey recently of people around the US, and and we asked people do you have camel crickets in your house and chemical gets are these crazy cave crickets that moved into houses early in the sort of American colonial experiment, and we've known they've been there for a long time. But nobody really studies. And so we asked to be people had them, and they're not supposed to be in California. We know based on this study of their biology for a bunch of years, and it turned out that in fact, some of these were being found in California. And and so I thought was that people have gotten it wrong that you know, they've looked in their seller crawlspace in their backyard. You know, shed, and they'd seen something else and thought it was one of these camera gets, but it turned out the unbeknownst scientists this giant Japanese species of camel, cricket and moved house to house across North America. And that scientists hadn't noticed I mean, everybody knew it was in their house because it's huge jumps that you out of the dark but assigned as we all thought somebody else knew what it was. And so, you know, here's this thumb-sized thing that nobody noticed which then really gave us the sense. What else are we missing in our midst every day, and we've gone onto to find more and more totally new things right in houses. I'm speaking with rob done. He is a biologist and professor at the department of biological sciences at North Carolina State university. And he's author of the book, never home alone. Somethingyoushouldknow is sponsored by ADT. I love the idea of a.

California rob US North Carolina State universit North America ADT Mike Somethingyoushouldknow
"north carolina state university" Discussed on Something You Should Know

Something You Should Know

02:40 min | 3 years ago

"north carolina state university" Discussed on Something You Should Know

"And can't possibly mean that you get rid of everything we've swabbed thousands of houses, and we've never found a single surface and a house that didn't have bacteria or fund your insects or something on it. And so that's the first point that you're going to have a life with you. And we need that life and so get used to it embrace it. But but then given that we're gonna have life with us. How do we think about which of these species we most want with us? And so it turns out that spiders, actually, play really valuable role, and and houses, and are very very very very unlikely to actually bite people. And so if you have spiders in your house, leave them alone, let them do their good work of eating. Mosquitos flies. The other thing is that we know so little about these species that by just paying attention to them. We can often make totally new discoveries of the sort that I used to imagine we'd only made in rainforests, and faraway places that, you know, big new science can happen under your bed, really, for example to where do you live Mike in California? So we did a survey recently of people around the US, and and we asked people do you have camel crickets in your house and chemical gets are these crazy cave crickets that moved into houses early in the sort of American colonial experiment, and we've known they've been there for a long time. But nobody really studies. And so we asked to be people had them, and they're not supposed to be in California. We know based on this study of their biology for a bunch of years, and it turned out that in fact, some of these were being found in California. And and so I thought was that people have gotten it wrong that you know, they've looked in their seller crawlspace in their backyard. You know, shed, and they'd seen something else and thought it was one of these camera gets, but it turned out the unbeknownst scientists this giant Japanese species of camel, cricket and moved house to house across North America. And that scientists hadn't noticed I mean, everybody knew it was in their house because it's huge jumps that you out of the dark but assigned as we all thought somebody else knew what it was. And so, you know, here's this thumb-sized thing that nobody noticed which then really gave us the sense. What else are we missing in our midst every day, and we've gone onto to find more and more totally new things right in houses. I'm speaking with rob done. He is a biologist and professor at the department of biological sciences at North Carolina State university. And he's author of the book, never home alone. Somethingyoushouldknow is sponsored by ADT. I love the idea of a.

California rob US North Carolina State universit North America ADT Mike Somethingyoushouldknow
"north carolina state university" Discussed on Something You Should Know

Something You Should Know

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"north carolina state university" Discussed on Something You Should Know

"Did you know that Tylenol can also help with hurt feelings as well? It's true. According to research at the university of Florida, they tested a C, which is the active ingredient in Tylenol against placebo on people suffering loneliness emotional distress or hurt feelings, they took five hundred milligrams in the morning and five hundred again at night, and those who took the Tylenol felt much more upbeat than the people who took the placebo. The researchers say that's because a seat benefit and can reduce activities in regions of the brain that govern our emotions. And that is something you should know. Inside your home is a world of living creatures many of which are invisible, but these creatures they are your roommates, and they have a real impact on you. They're very different than the creatures that live in the outdoor environment. And since today, we spent a lot more time indoors than our ancestors. Did it's important to understand this fascinating environment. That is your home what these creatures are that are living there, and what affect they have on. You rob done is a biologist and professor in the department of biological sciences at North Carolina State university, and he's author of several books. His latest is never home alone from microbes to millipedes camel, crickets and honeybees the natural history of where we live,.

North Carolina State universit university of Florida professor
"north carolina state university" Discussed on Something You Should Know

Something You Should Know

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"north carolina state university" Discussed on Something You Should Know

"Did you know that Tylenol can also help with hurt feelings as well? It's true. According to research at the university of Florida, they tested a C, which is the active ingredient in Tylenol against placebo on people suffering loneliness emotional distress or hurt feelings, they took five hundred milligrams in the morning and five hundred again at night, and those who took the Tylenol felt much more upbeat than the people who took the placebo. The researchers say that's because a seat benefit and can reduce activities in regions of the brain that govern our emotions. And that is something you should know. Inside your home is a world of living creatures many of which are invisible, but these creatures they are your roommates, and they have a real impact on you. They're very different than the creatures that live in the outdoor environment. And since today, we spent a lot more time indoors than our ancestors. Did it's important to understand this fascinating environment. That is your home what these creatures are that are living there, and what affect they have on. You rob done is a biologist and professor in the department of biological sciences at North Carolina State university, and he's author of several books. His latest is never home alone from microbes to millipedes camel, crickets and honeybees the natural history of where we live,.

North Carolina State universit university of Florida professor
The Cold Hard Truth About Ice Cubes: They're Filled With Germs

Business Talk with Jim Campbell

00:41 sec | 3 years ago

The Cold Hard Truth About Ice Cubes: They're Filled With Germs

"USA's? Chris Barnes has the chilling. Details of a new study on ice cubes. Would you like that on the rocks? Cruise. Researchers say you may want to hold off on that a food safety specialist at North Carolina State university says bacteria and viruses from e coli salmonella can live in freezing temperatures, meaning they could be alive and living in your ice. Cubes experts say people can avoid contaminated ice and prevent the bacteria from spreading by using purified. Water also by washing your hands using ice scoops when serving the ice and regularly cleaning your freezer for USA radio news. I'm Chris

Chris Barnes USA North Carolina State Universit Salmonella
"north carolina state university" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"north carolina state university" Discussed on The Book Review

"So in addition to writing books, this is our sixth book, you are a professor of applied ecology at North Carolina State university and in the natural history museum of Denmark at the university of Copenhagen. Do you go back and forth between Denmark, North Carolina? I do when it gets stupor hot here in North Carolina summers. We my family, I leave for Europe. Yeah. It's a good deal. That's a nice arrangement. What does a professor of applied ecology? What does that actually mean applied college? Well, so ecology is the study of sort of general rules of life. And so if you magin life on some other planet, what are the rules? That would still apply and applied ecology just means. We try to make those rules useful. How do we figure out the ways nature tends to behave? And then use those two are vantage. And so sometimes that's figuring out how to make more fish other times. It's figuring out how to minute endangered species. And then my case, it's all sorts of unusual things like making new beers or finding microbes, and they got to insects that can turn wasting energy things like that. Gary and research. I mean, I'm really broad. But right now, a lot of my work focuses in the life in homes, and so what's in your frigerator with under your bed to what extent to those things in your dribble under your bed? It's still obey the rules. We figured out and studying rainforest, and how do we work with the public to understand those sorts of things study, what's in our homes. I mean, clearly or perhaps I'm wrong. It's not doing us any harm or not a lot of harm. Otherwise, we wouldn't be spending so much time in our homes. What is there? What is there to discover within that little biosphere one reason this study as we know spend twenty three twenty three and a half hours of the day in our houses run our cars. And so to the extent that were exposed to the rest of life. That's where it happens. And so it seems like if you're gonna understand any place on earth, we should at least understand the end doors. And then the other thing is as we've sort of tropical ecology started off Zing rain for us. And as I've moved into home. Every allies that were so ignorant about the biological world..

North Carolina professor North Carolina State universit Denmark natural history museum of Denm Zing rain university of Copenhagen Europe Gary
"north carolina state university" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"north carolina state university" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"To stop. And when it hit the sign it ripped open the trailer and spilled the load of car parts out all over the busy interstate Taylor says despite that nobody was hurt. Chris Davis Ninety-three WIBC mobile new those in charge of the I sixty nine Ohio river crossing project have narrowed it down to two possible options for a new bridge across the Ohio river, connecting is sixty nine to northern Kentucky in Evansville. Both involve a new bridge being built. But the difference is how the bridge will be told to determine how this project is going to be paid for it. The major project it's nearly one and a half billion dollars tolling revenue alone. If not going to cover that cost. It's really only fraction of the cost project spokeswoman Mindy Peterson. It all goes. Down tomorrow. The Indianapolis Colts take on the Texans in the AFC wildcard in Houston. Andrew luck says they've been deep diving into how the offense can avoid the Texans. Tough pass rush. They've got guys like arrest the passer guys that can cover and everything in between on. So, you know, it's always a challenge as a fan of football. They've got some great players on offense that are fun to watch. When when you're not the one, you know one on the officer benched kickoff at four thirty five tomorrow, you can hear the game over on country ninety seven one Hank FM as well as one oh seven five and ten seventy the fan, adding extra ice to your drink. Researchers say you may want to hold off on that food safety specialists at North Carolina State university, say bacteria and viruses such as e-coli in salmonella can live and freezing temperatures. Meaning they could be alive and living in your ice. Experts say people can avoid contaminated ice and prevent the bacteria from spreading by using pure water, washing your hands, and keeping your freezer clean is partly cloudy and forty one downtown. I'm Henry David, and I'm curt darling. You have a clear skies out there right now. Now in radar. You got some rain coming up this afternoon on the level on the go and on Twitter at ninety three WIBC and WIBC dot com. Now back to Tony cats today.

Ohio river Indianapolis Colts Andrew luck Mindy Peterson Twitter Chris Davis Evansville Kentucky Taylor Henry David curt darling North Carolina State universit Hank FM officer Tony football Houston
What can we learn from Bennu?

Correspondents Report

05:28 min | 3 years ago

What can we learn from Bennu?

"Natto chase in space and the target was pretty small in this game of things this month, a NASA spacecraft finally reached a lumpy diamond shaped rock it's an asteroid called Benue, and it took the spacecraft two years to reach it. That's a trip of more than two billion kilometers. But what really interested me in reading about? This story was that Ben is classified as a potentially hazardous object. That means it could hit us, but don't worry NAS anytime soon to find out more spoke to Astro physicist, Katie MAC, who's a columnist for various science publications. She's also an assistant professor of physics at North Carolina State university. Well, there's an advantage with veneer, which is that its orbit brings reasonably close to earth. So it's one of the many near earth asteroids that Nassar have been tracking for a very long time. So we're able to see it when it comes close, which it does periodically and were especi-. Keeping an eye on this one big has there's a chance of it actually coming a little too closer in the next couple of hundred years. I was going to ask him about that. Because one of these at resonated, the most with me is the fact that it's considered what's called a potentially hazardous near earth object. I in many of these potentially hazardous objects out there will potentially hazardous as one of these terms that is a technical term that is sometimes misinterpreted a little bit. It means that there's some kind of calculable chance that's not ridiculously tiny that it could impact the earth, those kinds of chances are usually much less than one thousand and in this case, that's also true. Even for the next couple hundred years the chances really really pretty small, but you know, it's the kind of thing where we have some uncertainty in the measurements. There are uncertainties in. How the orbits of these things could change as they maybe have different interactions with. With the solar wind or different interactions with other small bodies. So the the kinds of things we really want to keep an eye on if there's really any chance at all that it could come to where the earth is. So even steroid like new did richer what sort of damage could that cools? Well, if I haven't made his is pretty thing for announced Royd in terms of potential hazards. So I think that when I looked this up it was listed as something like civilization affecting. So it's the kind of thing where it could it could be it could be really difficult for the region. It's an potentially for a larger region around it, it could have some kinds of global effects. But the important thing here is that we know about this one a really really far in advance of when it could possibly hit. So we're going to checking out what it's made of that's going to help us saved. If it's the kind of asteroid where it's more or less solid, or if it's the kind of thing that's kind of what you'd call a rebel a rebel pile. Where you might use different kinds of approaches if you needed to change its orbit for those different situations, and we do have some interesting possibilities for changing the orbit of potentially hazardous objects. There have been discussions of things like a gravitational tractor where you get a very heavy spacecrafts in you just fly near the object for awhile until the gravity of that spacecraft lunges at just a little bit far enough that it can change the orbit in that work too. Few get to the object with quite a lot of lead time. And then there are other possibilities like impact is or changing a reflectiveness of one side of the objects to change how it interacts with pressure from the lights in the sun, basically. And then there are things there discussions of things like some point people talk about a making sort of a giant bag or net of the that you could kind of tie around this an object and move it that way, and I'm not sure how big that would have to be. But these are things. That have been variously discussed for dealing with potentially hazardous object. So we have quite a lot of lead time. If it does turn out to be a problem, but the important thing right now is that we can get a really close look at it. And we can learn just about this population of asteroids in general, which might be useful. Even if this one turns out to be totally benign will learn something about the formation of the solar system. We might learn something about the population of other asteroids and just get a better handle for, you know, our environment space because it's being described as a time captial dating back to the beginning of our solar system. How long does Royds last? What's the lots? I mean, they, you know, a lot of these things were formed in the sort of proto planetary discs. So the dust and gas that was surrounding the sun as the sun was forming. And as that process was going on, you know, parts of the disc lapse into planets in than a lot of smaller objects were form, some of these are what we now see us asteroids. So, you know, some of these things are just pieces of the disc of material that became the planets, and that was gathered around the sun. And so we can get sort of an idea of what that environment looked like by getting samples of asteroids. And that's the exciting thing about this mission of courses that we're going to get a really sizable sample of this asteroid and bring it back to earth. Katie MAC assistant, professor of physics at North Carolina State university.

Katie Mac North Carolina State Universit Nasa Assistant Professor Of Physics Physicist BEN Royd Professor Of Physics Royds Hundred Years Two Billion Kilometers Two Years