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Flying Into a DITCH

The Finer Points - Aviation Podcast

05:57 min | Last week

Flying Into a DITCH

"Somebody wrote in saying that flying over water was a hole in their training, and is there anything they can do? Of course they can take anything they can do to prepare for flying over water. In this case in the Caribbean on it brings up a great point because the entire reason we. We created the airplane camp trip. islands of the Pacific northwest was to cover this particular. Particular hole in training. There's just not a lot out there about what it might be like to ditch an airplane or how to prepare, you know we've all read opened the doors before impact and you know, wear your your life jacket, but be beyond that. Will you know what is there so so I will say I off in this sounds like an unashamed sales pitch, but Maybe it is. On the island trip covers all that we get a life raft from winslow, one of these five thousand dollar liferafts that you're supposed to pack on board when you fly over water, we give everybody time in a sea plane, so you can kind of. Impact on the water is like we have ferry pilots on staff. People like Peter Lert who have crossed the north, Atlantic, more than fifty times, and we, we really try to cover this knowledge but I'll do the best I can here in the podcast to tell you some of the major points, and some of the stories that I conveyed those pilots that come to the airplane camp. We kind of a campfire evening talks, and some of those stories. Some of the kind of knowledge we can pass down is is really powerful. so first of all. Let's just cover the basics I mean. If you're not within power off gliding distance from shore, you should be wearing a life jacket and you should probably wear the kind that sailors us that aren't inflated. Of just their little tubes like snakes that go around your neck. and you should take out. The automatic inflates co two cartridge so that if the aircraft fills up with water, the life jacket doesn't deploy in the aircraft right, but that you can easily deployed once. You're clear the airplane. and you should investigate if you're going for long over water flights a liferaft like the one I described from winslow. One of the we do tell people in the ferry. Pilots convey for to us. Is that the Life Jack? The life raft really has to be readily accessible I mean in a perfect world on your lap. Really so you have to have it in a location in the airplane where you can just grab it. It's pretty common knowledge in any survival situation. Ditching included that what you're only gonNA. Have the things that you're wearing. So you know putting that whole picture together. If you're by yourself, you'd probably want to be wearing survival vast full of gear. Maybe dye markers signal mirrors on first aid kits, things like that on and also a lot, a personal afo tation device a PF de around your neck with the. Automatic inflate inflation cartridge out and a life. Raft if need be just. Maybe arm's distance in between the front seat in the seats on the just easily grab. now having said all that I'm GONNA. Tell you a story. The most enlightening story that I've ever heard because there's not a lot of information out there about what it's like to actually hit the water outside of the advanced pilot flight manual where Bill Kirschner talks a little bit about you know ditching in a in a fixed gear airplane which? is most likely. GonNa Flip GonNa hit once, and then Kirschner describes the second hit as a flip, sometimes the first hit the flip. so it's a pretty violent impact outside of that book. I haven't encountered a lot of information but I did see a lecture at Oshkosh. One year, probably the most valuable lecture at ever seen at Oshkosh gentlemen and a two ten who ditched in Lake Erie near put in Bay outside of Cleveland in a to ten, so he had gear, the gear was up, and he ditched. Everybody survived the ditching, and he ditched next to a ferryboat, which is a wise idea. If you're an open water, next to any boat. Really and somebody onboard. The ferry boat captured video, so you were able to listen to this lecture while watching video of the actual event. And he described the landing itself as very very smooth in a retractable gear airplane. He described like someone grabbing the tail and pulling to a hard stop, and he said that immediately after the airplane came to a stop, the water level was pretty much at the Lindbergh. Reference right there at the window. You know the forward window just on the pilot side. And he had forgotten to do two things he'd forgotten to open the doors and he'd forgotten to lock the baggage compartment so because the doors weren't open. The airplane floated there for a second, and he had a chance to turn to everybody and say hey, is everybody okay on? Everyone said yes, under your seat belts, and which point. He opened the door, I think he had to open the window I. The airplane flooded. Now, he was a very big guy, so he was able to lean into the door and get it open. One risk of not opening the door ahead of time would be that you couldn't get it open. Due to the pressure. Until you flooded the airplane but he did say it was valuable to have that moment. You know floating for everybody. Because the minute the door opened the airplane nosedive to the bottom of the lake about fifteen feet down. Everybody Swam Free Except the woman in the very back seat, so in the to ten is a six seater. She panicked and tried swimming up through the window, the plastic window in the baggage compartment so he dove down once he realized someone was missing open to the baggage door because it wasn't locked, forgotten to lock it and pulled her out by her feet. All of this is on video from the ferry boat. It's a it's an interesting story. Because of you know the how it played out for him to have. The doors closed versus open was interesting. And thinking through locking the baggage compartment. If anyone does need to get in there and rescue, you They're going to be able to do that if it's locked so. Anyway I hope that sort of helps, organize thoughts on just flying over water in

Winslow Bill Kirschner Oshkosh Caribbean Pacific Lake Erie Peter Lert Atlantic Cleveland
Whale Protections Need Not Cause Lobstering Losses

60-Second Science

02:40 min | Last month

Whale Protections Need Not Cause Lobstering Losses

"There's a lot of cash crawling on the sea floor. American lobsters, bringing more money than any other US Fisher, a record, six hundred and seventy million dollars in two, thousand, sixteen, mostly through Maine Massachusetts. The fishery relies on traditional lobster harvest techniques. A series of traps is drops to the ocean floor with a long rope attached to a floating buoy during peak fishing season. There's over nine hundred thousand vertical lines right in the middle of right whale habitat graduate student, Hannah Myers. Myers from the University of Alaska Fairbanks College of fisheries and ocean sciences, those vertical lines entangle and kill endangered sea turtles and multiple whale species, including the North Atlantic right whales, only about four hundred individuals remain, and recent analyses show that the species won't survive if humans kill an average of one whale each year, some estimates indicate that lobster in gear kills more than three whales each year on average management problems. Problems surrounding the north? Atlantic right whale and entanglements are pretty significant and have been really challenging to move forward, and a large part of that is due to expected negative economic impact in the lobster fishery, but right we'll protections don't have to mean lobster losses, Canada's lobster harvest operates with fewer traps and a shorter six-month-long season. The US lobster fishery in Maine expense, approximately seven and a half times as much as. As, the Canadian fishery to catch the same amount, and Canadians are catching almost four times more lobster protract. They're putting less effort into it and spending less on fuel and equipment, but they're still gathering nearly the same amount of lobster overall, and there are stateside examples in Massachusetts areas that have had a seasonal closure. In recent years have reached a record high landings. The study was published in the Journal. Marine policy. Restrictions could actually mean a healthier lobster population overall it paradoxical, but it is consistent with a lot of fisheries research that shows that when you fish with too much effort and too many traps in the water. The stock itself isn't as robust so one thing we might expected that you would either have you know more or larger lobsters if there if fewer. Fewer traps into water, coming into each trap, and therefore able to haul up more lobster trap, and that's kind of what we see on the Canadian side, taking some of those ropes out of the water could benefit both the whales and the Fisher. Our main takeaways that a negative economic impact should not be assumed with effort reduction in the US fishery.

Hannah Myers United States Maine Massachusetts Us Fisher University Of Alaska Fairbanks North Atlantic Graduate Student Canada The Journal
Check This Out

The Finer Points - Aviation Podcast

05:33 min | Last month

Check This Out

"I had an opportunity to fly a GRUMMIN. This is an airplane that I've never flown before. Or if I did. It was like one hour fifteen or twenty years ago So it was interesting to sort of approach. The process and I was doing it. With Steve Randell Redwood bus driver here at thermal airport and it was funny because Steve used to be a ferry pilot that is. He's to take airplanes from Europe to the United States back to Europe across the North Atlantic. flying all sorts of different makes and models and when? Steve asked me if I wanted to come. The grandma and my first question to him was yeah. That's that's awesome. What kind of engine does it have? He tells me it's a lycoming three twenty so immediately. I know a lot about the airplane and engine familiar with Doesn't require call labs hundred sixty horsepower. Usually you know. I know I can operate that engine. I essentially know how it's going to perform and The next day we go to fly the plane and and at least that component of it. I'm very familiar with and it was funny. Because AS WE'RE TAXING OUT. Steve the comment you know if if you know the engine airplane and I thought it was really great validation to hear a ferry pilots. Say That somebody WHO's used to jumping in and out of so many different airplanes so as you transition from an airplane. You know to win that you don't. Here's a couple of thoughts one is like. We just said no the engine if it may be flown that engine. There's only a certain number of aircraft engines out there and up in circulation so it's possible even probable that you've seen that engines somewhere else. The second thing read the pilot's operating handbook cover to cover. I'll never forget flight lesson. I had with a guy named Don styles is to get checked out in a Moonie. This is probably ten years ago and I more than ten years ago at this point and I walked in and Dan said did you read the Ph. And I said yeah he said. Did you read it? Cover to cover every page and I said well I've read most of it. You know I I. I kind of skimmed over the emergencies and I looked at the systems. He kind of stopped me right there and said all right. Let's let's do this and we walked through that book. I mean. We walked through that book. Page after page after page for probably four hours. That was the entire first lesson in the checkout and I paid don for his time there. It was maybe an extreme sort of point. He was trying to make but I learned a lot that day and not just about the Mooney. I learned that. Yes when you show up to get checked out in an airplane. It is not unreasonable or unrealistic. For the I to think that you would have read the Peo- H. Cover to cover the second thing I learned. You'll learn a lot when you do that. I mean really. It's not a huge book. It's the old Glen p Wass general limitations. Emergency Normal for Mints Weight and Balance. And all that sort of stuff right. There's a little format to it. It's one hundred and some pages. Maybe maybe maybe not quite that much but definitely worth the four or five hours. It's going to take you to sit there and go through it. Page by page you will absolutely walk away knowing far more about that airplane than you ever thought possible or certainly than you ever would have. Had you not done that? So checking out in a new airplane. Make sure that you've gone over the PH cover to cover. If you know the engine there you go. You've got some experience in the aircraft and then when you finally go for your checkout flight your with your instructor or your with pilot that's familiar. My belief is every problem in an airplane can be solved by knowing where to look and when to look there so the minute you sit down in that airplane Start to get familiar with those visual references. While you're taxing make sure that you're trying to find the reference that indicates whether or not you are not on the centerline before you even leave the the tide area before the engine's running you might WanNa have your instructor or the pilot. You're flying with sort of down on the on the empty nausea and lift the nose so that you can get a feel for what the airplane will look like in the landing flare but the idea is that from the minute you sit down in that aircraft you are looking for visual reference points that will give you the information you need about the angle of attack of the airplane and the alignment of the airplane along the runway and whether you are not on the centerline a couple of other things you might want to consider are getting used to coordination so slow the airplane way down and do some fast rolling and see if get a feel for how the rudder works is it a is it a heavy push like it sometimes is in town or is it a nice gentle push like you get in a DA forty and finally when you come in to land. Maybe your first landing isn't a landing at all. Maybe your first landing is a go-round get a feel for how the airplane accepts the power application. What it feels like as the flaps retract if there are flaps and how quickly the airplane is able to climb away from the ground. If you're flying something like you add power and boom. That thing is airborne in other airplanes. Like one fifty. Arab at Texas Tail. Drager for example. You're stuck on the ground for a few seconds there before the airplane is ready to fly again so knowing this stuff can can be figured out to some extent by doing low altitude. Go Round

Steve Randell Redwood Don Styles Europe Instructor United States Moonie Texas Tail DAN Nausea
Judge clears the way for salvagers to open up the Titanic and retrieve Marconi radio

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:36 sec | Last month

Judge clears the way for salvagers to open up the Titanic and retrieve Marconi radio

"Ends this is a Titanic decision for salvagers who want to reach the world's most famous shipwreck under the north Atlantic a federal judge in Virginia is leading the salvage come he retrieved the ship's Marconi wireless telegraph machine U. S. district judge Rebecca beach Smith agrees it's historically and culturally important and could soon be lost in the decaying wreckage the telegraph was used to send distress messages about the Titanic's fate but the case on this might not be over no it says the expedition is illegal under federal law and also violates an international agreement between the US and the

North Atlantic Virginia United States Marconi Wireless Rebecca Beach Smith
Iceland Prepares to Reopen Schools, Some Businesses

Mike Gallagher

00:29 sec | 2 months ago

Iceland Prepares to Reopen Schools, Some Businesses

"High schools hair salons Dennison other businesses across Iceland or re opening after six weeks of lockdown this action comes after the north Atlantic island nation managed attainments corona virus outbreak Iceland has confirmed nearly eighteen hundred cases of the virus however just ten people have died the number of new virus cases each day has fallen in Iceland from a hundred and six at the peak of the outbreak to single digits even on some days zero

Iceland Dennison North Atlantic Island
Sound Of The River

Sound Matters

07:46 min | 3 months ago

Sound Of The River

"This time a story a story about a river a very special river. It's the river you can hear flowing in the background through a forest somewhere in New Zealand. The river you can hear is the Wanganui River. This recording was made recently by this woman. My name is heike like hope and Mima Danish audio storyteller documentary-maker Pica held a spent a lifetime making documentaries and stories in sound documentaries and stories in sound at a full of characters places events but almost always in our work there are also the sounds of nature like stories. That have this ECO. Centric quality where it's not necessarily humans that are in the middle where where there's When Nature Plays Part? I've always had since I was a kid. I've always had this feeling that nature sort of reflected itself into me I I would feel like a mountain I would feel like make I would feel like it's three and I've had since early childhood SLA very strong sensory experiences from Mater. I think sound is fluid. It spacious like nature is so there's something that's always been something about working with sound that mirrors this perception I have of the world and that mirrors may and can connect them like bay sometimes in sort of pristine moments also connect within me emotionally or as ideas. It's something that affects you when you're there. So how can you tell a story where whether it comes across where it's not just backdrop or pretty picture but it's actually a strong force a character almost in the story documentaries and stories come from very remote places very often places like the far north of Canada Greenland places all around Scandinavia and across the North Atlantic islands? But her latest project takes back to a place where she spent time growing up. I've just started working on a project. Actually it's a liar. I feel like I've been working on it for a long time of wanted to work on it and it's been on my mind. It's a project about the Wanganui River. It flows from the center of the North Island of New Zealand to the coast to the task. Mansi three hundred kilometers or so the river special to me because I grew up in New Zealand lift by this river and my family immigrated to New Zealand in the seventy s and we lived in in Wanganui which is the town that where the river flows into the sea and all trading station built by European settlers. So for me. It's it's personally special. And then I learnt that one canoeing river have gained legal status as a as a human entity which means that it has the rights and duties and liabilities of a legal person the Wanganui river now a legal person or legal entity one of the first natural places in the world to be given this sort of legal standing accepting a river as illegal person presents. Many challenges to the way we think about the world and it presents challenges to documentary-maker how can a documentary portray the river itself as a character as a person as an entity? Where do you begin? Did you know that the river is a human being to us? We've always had signed from the mountain to the say I the river as May. So how do you tell a story whether whether river is the main the center? I'm not sure how to that practically you know. How do I connect with the river and and figure out why didn't want to say

Wanganui River New Zealand Wanganui North Island Mima Danish North Atlantic Mater Documentary-Maker Pica Canada Greenland Scandinavia Mansi
Boston - Increased Sightings Of Endangered Right Whales Reported Along Massachusetts Coast

WBZ Afternoon News

00:23 sec | 3 months ago

Boston - Increased Sightings Of Endangered Right Whales Reported Along Massachusetts Coast

"The north Atlantic right whales are coming back the endangered mammals have begun their annual migration to New England waters every spring they congregate in Cape Cod bay feeding our rich plumes of zooplankton officials say with the new Indian affairs said that the sightings off the coast of Massachusetts have increased in recent days there are only thought to be about four hundred of those north Atlantic right whales in the

Cape Cod Bay Massachusetts North Atlantic New England
33 Turkish soldiers killed by airstrike in northwestern Syria

Morning Edition

04:16 min | 4 months ago

33 Turkish soldiers killed by airstrike in northwestern Syria

"Greene of violence in northwestern Syria has been a humanitarian crisis for months now with a million Syrians huddling in camps near the Turkish border as they flee a Syrian and Russian offensive into rebel territory one L. conflict there between Turkey Russian and Syrian forces could be spiraling dramatically Turkey which supports the rebels says at least thirty three of its soldiers were killed in the Syrian airstrike that instantly doubled the number of Turkish casualties in February Turkey says it's killed many Syrian forces and will now step up its attacks let's talk through what's happening with NPR's Peter Kenyon who joins us from Istanbul hi Peter hi David so what is the latest hearing this escalation well it's Turkey's worst one day loss of license you got involved in this conflict some four years ago is being blamed on the Syrian military but of course Russia is Syria's closest and biggest ally in this conflict Turkey is you mentioned has been supporting some of the rebel groups who tried to oust Syrian president Bashar al Assad from power with rush's big help Damascus effectively beat that effort back many rebels have wound up mast in northwest it live province and that's where the regime has been focusing its attacks now this latest incident one concern and could this lead to some kind of direct conflict between Russia and Turkey which is a NATO ally in NATO convened an extraordinary meeting of the north Atlantic council today after his request NATO says it's looking into what kind of support it can provide but Turkey specific call for a no fly zone in Syria has not gotten any takers so far but I mean you had Turkey's president erdo one meetings late into the night with with his security team I mean could they be coming up with some sort of major response here that they could really escalate things it's certainly possible everyone says Turkey will not take one step back from it live on Chris promising the Syrian regime will pay a heavy price now the action to back that up is what we're waiting to see the military's talking about going after some two hundred targets in Syria not a lot of detail yet Turkey has also leveled another threat saying refugees desperate to escape the conflict may soon be on their way toward Europe again at last time that happened European countries as some major protests about the flood of refugees hastily put together a multi billion euro deal with Turkey had to keep them here and not send them on to Europe now that threat is back on the table perhaps it's a spur to get Europe more involved in de escalating the situation everyone also spoke with Russian leader Vladimir Putin by phone and they reported that more needs to be done but it's not clear what exactly that means okay so the leaders of Russia Turkey speak as you said I mean one big concerns if this became a larger conflict between Russia and NATO ally for the moment Turkey blaming Syria for all this what what does that tell us about where this might be going too well the Syrian military is being blamed clearly Russia along with Iran is the major allied to Syria Russia's defense ministry is saying its forces weren't responsible and it also says Moscow never even knew Turkish forces were in that area Turkey's defense minister explicitly rejects that saying Moscow knew very well Turkey is not interested in conflict with the bigger Russian military that's pretty clear does that mean there's room for talks and kinda go she Asians possibly although they've already tried that Turkey and Russia help come up with the so called Astana process cease fire for a while but then it fell apart secretary general of the U. N. is calling for another ceasefire but right now Moscow sending two warships towards the Syrian coast just remind us what the overall situation this part of Syria I mean it's it's it's a humanitarian disaster yes and one that could get even worse as the Syrian military attacks a million people have been fleeing toward the Turkish border freezing winter weather aid groups say let the men Turkey says no we need a safe zone inside Syria but northwest Syria right now seems anything but safe Peter Kenyon reporting from Istanbul Peter thanks thanks David it's time now for StoryCorps on this final Friday black history month we have a conversation with the first African American woman to join the Coast

Greene Syria
A Brief History of NATO

Why It Matters

04:12 min | 4 months ago

A Brief History of NATO

"If you drive today from France to Germany you may see a few sheep. But you won't see a Border Guard. You won't change money and you will see no tanks and soldiers that border is undefended. That border is the site of untold bloodshed. It's today undefended because NATO and the European Union and processes of integration have made those borders geopolitically inconsequential. You know what I never actually thought about it that way. You know how last summer I was on that train from Paris to Berlin. I didn't even know when I left France and entered Germany. No soldiers incite. Yeah okay wait. Can we just start with what NATO stands for? Nato stands for the North Atlantic Treaty Organization NATO NATO alliance North Atlantic Treaty Organization and it is a body formed in one thousand nine hundred forty nine to commit the members of the alliance to Collective Defence. I E an attack on one is an attack on all we are in this together. It is an institution that keeps US safe. We don't lie awake at night worrying that somebody is going to invade that we look out the window and see tanks and troops coming and that's in part because starting in nineteen forty nine. The United States reached out to Canada reached across the Atlantic to its democratic partners in Europe. And said we're going to hang together. We're going to unite against threats to the peace that alliance has been around ever since nineteen forty nine and it has succeeded in keeping this community of Atlantic democracies since April four ninety nine critic was by Norway Denmark Belgium Luxembourg France Italy Portugal United Kingdom Iceland Canada and the United States. This Union of qualifications became known as the North Atlantic Treaty Organization or more simply NATO. So let's go back to the beginning a bit. How did this all start? How did NATO form? Well you have to go back to the nineteen thirties. When the United States basically became a passive bystander and was staunchly isolationist as fascism began to spread all over the world mainly in Europe and Asia but also began to spread its tentacles further and the United States. Tried to stay out of it. That strategy didn't work Pearl Harbor. We all know the story of the. Us enters were to be some some nine thousand nine hundred forty one eight date which will live in infamy United States of America was suddenly and deliberately attacked by Naval Air Forces of the Empire of Japan at the end of World War. Two we go into this big debate about well. What do we do now? Do we go back to being a hemispheric power. Do we bring back all the troops and pull out of Asia and Europe or do we stay put and that question was answered by the Cold War. By the fact that the Soviet Union which was our ally in World War Two became our chief adversary by the late. Nineteen forties when peace returned the western Allies de mobilized the Soviet Union maintained an overwhelming military superiority on the European continent. Both during and immediately after the war the Soviet Union forcibly brought under its control the whole cities of countries in eastern Europe and it was because of fear that if the United States did withdraw from Europe that the Soviets would overrun Germany France Britain and the industrialized powers of the West. That we basically say we're staying put and we are going to form an alliance with our key partners in Europe to prevent the Soviet Union and Communism

North Atlantic Treaty Organiza United States North Atlantic Treaty Organiza Europe Soviet Union Norway Denmark Belgium Luxembo France European Union Germany Border Guard Atlantic Asia Alliance To Collective Defence Pearl Harbor Berlin Paris Japan Canada
A thrilling naval rescue off the coast of Nova Scotia

The Big Story

10:53 min | 5 months ago

A thrilling naval rescue off the coast of Nova Scotia

"When things start to go wrong on the open ocean sometimes they go really wrong really quickly. We make really good boats. We have state of the art navigation systems and we have all the emergency measures in the world to prevent disaster still. We don't belong there. The Sea is not our turf. And if you've ever seen a movie about a nautical disaster it's not that far off from reality about a year ago off the eastern coast of Canada. Things went really wrong really quickly. And all that state of the art technology wasn't working when that happens the boat and its crew can't do much outs but put out an emergency distress call and pray that somebody answers it and that those people are close enough to help and if they're really lucky at the ships that answer. The call are part of the Royal Canadian Navy and are prepared to undertake one of the most dramatic. Rescues that you'll hear about outside of a Hollywood pitch meeting. This is the story of that rescue. I'm Jordan he throwing. This is the big stars. Nick Taylor busy of Maclean's chronicled the whole dramatic tale. An hello first of all what is the McKenna McKenna is a forty nine foot yacht. It's called the Hanse four ninety five. It was on the inside of beautiful boat. I don't know a whole lot of boats but I saw some photos Of the cabin and it was decked out you could wash dishes on that thing you could sleep very comfortably and you could sail the high seas. It's a fairly rich person vessel. Yeah I mean it's the kind of you buy when you have some money to buy a boat. So what happened to her well The owner of the boat was named John Hagen. He's a surgeon who lives here Toronto. And he asked a broker who is in the area where he should by boat so John and the broker whose name was pat sturgeon Had A few conversations and they found the McKenna in Greece. In this Mediterranean port called left us their mission was to buy the boat and then find a way to get her to Canada. How do you get a boat to Canada when you buy it overseas? I mean I guess. There's an obvious answer to that question. Well Yeah I mean you you usually on the water but there are a few options you can. You can bring a boat over in a container ship shipped almost package kind of thing or if you want to maybe save a little money depending or have a little more flexibility you can hire skipper to get on that boat. Hire a small crew and take it where you want. And this is what he did. And that's what he did. So tell me. But the the captain and the crew and and I guess what Rupert Mondro does because this is a job that I didn't know existed. It's an unbelievable story. How he started doing what he's doing he was born in South Western. England in Devon Place called barnstable. He was a trained actor at one point. He had his own company. He went bankrupt. He told me at the age of Twenty Eight. He was Drifting around I think thinking what do I do next at that point and so he got on a boat and loved. It started sailing and eventually he started delivering goods because he was very good. Skipper and so twenty five years. He did that until the he was he was hired to bring the McKenna across the Atlantic But he he's just a natural born c fair when you talk to him about it You know it's it's like he was born on the water and the way people talk about him is a remarkable. They say it's almost as if he doesn't need instruments he he can sail the seas just by sort of you know putting his finger in the wind and saying little now the waves are gonna come this way so we better go this way and You know he has autopilot. And all the fancy instruments but He's he's been spent the latter half of his life Just having fun sailing boats around the world and he's gone almost everywhere so he captained the McKenna taking it. I guess from Greece to Canada. Yeah he he brought crew And a cook And in October of two thousand eighteen they they met in in Greece and they spent a few days. They're getting ready Inspecting the boat making sure everything was in working order. It was by all accounts. A beautiful boat the McKenna was in very good condition and And ready for the voyage. He said By text to John. The surgeon Looking wonderful we're GONNA get going and so. They sailed through the Mediterranean. They had to stop in Italy everywhere. They talked with scenic about away but they stopped in Italy to fix a a steering problem fixed. It kept going. Stop at Gibraltar for a little while whether stopped them from going much. Further few days finally got onto the Azores which was the final stop before the Atlantic crossing Weather stop them again. There's a lot of weather in the late fall in the North Atlantic relatively treacherous waters so They were waylaid for for a while and It it took them quite a bit of time to get from Greece to the stores But then in November they set sail for Halifax what happened well. A lot of bad things happened relatively quickly The the treacherous weather caught up with them again. Rupert had this satellite phone that he borrowed from another sailor and he was able to get weather reports on sort of four or five hour delays. So he would check the forecast and based on what it said he would. He would steer the boat in a different direction. There was a big weather system coming in a big low pressure system from the South who was moving north and he and his crew. We're GONNA try to beat it to the north and they almost got there when you when you look at some of the screengrabs. They have of the of the weather patterns but they didn't quite make it and we're caught in this little arm of what they all refer to everyone involved in this as a hurricane. It was not a named hurricane but it was hurricane-force winds and it had this little arm whipping around and got caught in it and It for twenty four hours totally ravaged the boat crew was hunkered down The waves were were roaring. The wind was ripping through the rigging of the masks on On the on the boat and they were I mean they were they were rolling safely but quite violently through huge waves the kind of waves that you would see in big bad blockbuster movies you know. Not Maybe not the biggest of the big but huge so The weather data and they and they survived that The boats survived intact. They didn't capsize anything. Like that. But When it was safe to emerge in sort of inspect the damage rupert who Never saw probably couldn't fix came out and saw problem he almost couldn't fix because Man It was. Just it was torn. The steering was broken. The rudder was at a place it took some real Seafaring ingenuity to even get the boat. Operable again he and they kept going well. The steering quadrant was broken. The the the sort of mechanism that connects the rudder to the autopilot into the anything you need to actually change direction in the boat. He had to flip it around and turn it one hundred and eighty degrees the steering quadrant and then welded into place. Not Welding really. He had a cables and whatever it was at its disposal that would keep things together and worked. And so he I think the cruise airing macgyver. I got yeah he really was a seafaring macgyver and I think the crew was stunned They they were texting as well back to John. The surgeon who was a little helpless at this point in probably starting to feel a little guilty by boat is in the middle of the North Atlantic Middle North Atlantic. And his crew. That I sent. There's with it in. Oh my God we can even do and so. He was getting texts. They're saying we're pretty sure Rupert Scott under control because he's a pretty you know stoic. Man and And he did and they kept going and then well and then I hit more weather goodness. It never really stopped. They were chugging at this point as fast as they could to Halifax where the boat was gonNA spend the winter before coming to Toronto in the spring but more weatherhead This time the forecast racist dead wrong it. It misled Rupert and And his crew and they found themselves overtaken by a storm that I don't think was hurricane force but was nevertheless the kind of thing that would damage a boat. That's already been that's already damaged it just. His ingenuity was Was unfortunately Somewhat beaten down two to nothing by the storm so they found themselves once it had calmed a little bit and they were able to assess the situation adrift at Sea. What do you do in a situation like that? Well in this case what you do. Is You look for boats in the vicinity of your of your boat? Anybody who can help. You is a savior and fortunately for the McKenna. There were two Canadian navy ships. Who happened to be coming home from a mission a training mission in And War Games in Europe and they were only about eight nautical miles away from the McKenna. When everything went Super Ri- so rupert the captain got on the radio with Peter McNeil the captain of HMCS glaze Bay talked a little bit and Ships turned towards the McKenna it was glaze. Bay and HMCS summerside two coastal defence vessels. Which are two of the smaller ships in the fleet? But by comparison to the McKenna they were quite large and probably looked a you. Know a welcome sight to about adrift without any ability to really go anywhere on. Its own power and then they rescued them and it was no problem. In the story is over everything's Peachy The ship came and they just pluck them out. No it was really difficult. The story of this rescue is the stuff of a movie. This podcast will be right back after a really quick message. Can you guess the average dollar amount Canadian households have in savings according to the most recent data? It is just eight hundred and fifty two dollars now. The recommended rate of savings in Canada is ten percent and traditionally Canada's historical rate has been around seven point five percent last year though. It was one point seven. That doesn't sound like a lot because it isn't it can be hard to save today for people who are often carrying debt. It can be even harder in fact thirty nine percent of Canadians right now of all ages. Don't think they will ever save enough for retirement. So how do you save when there's not much there to start with? You need a plan

Mckenna Mckenna Canada Greece Rupert John Hagen Toronto Halifax Hurricane Rupert Mondro Royal Canadian Navy Italy Jordan Hollywood North Atlantic Middle Atlantic Rupert Scott Azores Mediterranean South Western
Winter storm whips up strong winds in UK, disrupting travel

NBC Nightly News

00:24 sec | 5 months ago

Winter storm whips up strong winds in UK, disrupting travel

"More. Severe weather to tell you about this time in the UK. One of the strongest storms in the North Atlantic has seen in years. The hurricane strength storm is sweeping through. Scotland Ireland Wales with winds gusting more than one hundred miles an hour made for a challenging landing. This plane at London's Heathrow Airport storm brought massive flooding to covering entire neighborhoods leaving many stranded inside their

Heathrow Airport North Atlantic London UK Scotland Wales
U.K. braces for hurricane force winds and enormous waves as Storm Dennis rolls in

Talking Travel with AAA

00:34 sec | 5 months ago

U.K. braces for hurricane force winds and enormous waves as Storm Dennis rolls in

"Enormous waves are churning across the north Atlantic as Britain braces for a second straight weekend of wild winter weather and flooding hurricane force winds up to ninety two miles an hour and monster waves that could reach over one hundred feet high were roaring across the north Atlantic that was the report Saturday morning from the U. S. National Weather Service is ocean prediction center heavy rain and strong winds are moving across Britain and hitting parts of the country that were flooded when rivers burst their banks last weekend the storm W. Dennis is already causing widespread travel disruptions with airlines canceling hundreds of

North Atlantic U. S. National Weather Service Britain W. Dennis
British Airways Sets Record for Fastest Subsonic Flight From New York to London

WBZ Midday News

00:31 sec | 5 months ago

British Airways Sets Record for Fastest Subsonic Flight From New York to London

"New York to London in less than five hours this is the new record to beat a British Airways flight sets the new bar ad for hours and fifty six minutes and all time best for subsonic plane travel the arrival of full two hours ahead of schedule officials with tracking site flight radar twenty four say the winter jet stream set up perfect conditions over the north Atlantic for the record breaking flight shattering the previous best by nearly twenty

New York London North Atlantic British Airways
Animal Mothers

Your Brain on Facts

08:33 min | 5 months ago

Animal Mothers

"A person could easily fill hours of airtime talking about bizarre mating habits of animals from the white spotted pufferfish that draws intricate patterns in the Sandy Ocean floor to attract a mate to the spotted hyena females. WHOSE PSEUDO PENIS which is sometimes larger than the males actual penis is also their birth canal note? Today we're going to focus on the latter two thirds of the process just station or incubation and firth even limiting the topic. There's still a lot. I won't don't get to like how certain reptiles determine the sex of their offspring with the exact temperature in their nests. The station period of animals animals is a matter of scale. The larger an animal is the longer it takes to make a new one despite the resources of the mother being large as well if all the dimensions Shinzo a given animal were doubled. That animal would now have eight times the fall you owing to the square cube rule and hence eight times the wheat of before four but the thickness of the umbilical cord through which all of the growth nutrients flow will only be four times as large so all else being equal it. It would take twice as long for the necessary nutrients to go through if you WANNA get super math nerdy about it and you're welcome to the volume and therefore wait of an animal is proportionate to the cube of the scale Cisco is proportionate to the cube root of the weight of the animal. I read it but I don't understand it. We can scale back on the maths a bit by looking at examples. Humans have station period forty weeks one week short of nine months while humans best friend has the station period of two months. For small animals like rabbits. The period is about one month and for mice about three weeks. The metal for shortest shortest station of a North American mammal goes to the possum which finishes pregnancy soup to nuts in under two weeks. This may have less to do with their size than the fact that their average life span is only about three years so replacements are needed constantly. Elephants are pregnant for a long time like really really long ninety five weeks in fact almost two years. This marathon baby building is one reason that female elephants elephants usually don't have more than four cavs in their whole lifetime. Who's got the time? A giraffe needs almost fifteen months to form. It's one hundred fifty pound founder. Sixty eight kilo baby which starts life off with a bang draft skipworth standing up so it is during air for babies to fall six feet or or two meters to the ground in the process of being worn there are exceptions to are easy to follow. Big babies means long pregnancy guidelines. Of course I one hundred injured and ten pound or fifty kilo. Hippo is ready to debut and only eight months even faster than a seven pound human baby. Black bears are pregnant for thirty weeks but they're cubs only weigh about one pound or half a kilo. One thing that this list of station periods can't take into account are pregnant pauses causes by which I mean pausing pregnancies. That's right some animals have the ability to say you know what now is not a super great time for let me to have babies. Let me just hold the embryo. And Its tracks and turn my uterus into Sifi stasis chamber while I wait for conditions to improve since it was discovered discovered in the eighteen fifties more than one hundred and thirty species of mammal have been found to have this ability. The pause called Dia pause conveniently can last anywhere between a couple of days and up to a year in most species. This happens when the embryo is still a tiny ball of less than one hundred cells. Does that has yet to attached to the uterus. Pausing pregnancy isn't the sole domain of any one class or family. It's found in certain kinds of bats bears Seals rodents deers and armadillos among others. More than a third of the species that take either during the station are found from the capital of strange nature. Australia of the twenty or so species of kangaroo and Wallaby combined there are only three that can't pas a pregnancy Mitzi in fact it's the Timbre Wallaby that can put embryos on hold for up to eleven months. There were few mechanisms at work here. Some animals most made right after giving birth. It's like a backup plan in case something happens to the newborn if nothing bad happens in. The newborn is nursing the physical taxation of lactation lactation stalls the understudy fetus once the extant offspring is weaned. The fetus begins developing again. The second way is to pause every pregnancy until the time is right usually to do with the weather for example minks mate around the start of March but put the embryos on pause until after the spring spring equinoxes when the days are getting longer in the northern hemisphere this ensures that the young are born in spring when food will be more plentiful than the temperatures more mild. Some are bitterest animals will pause pregnancies in times of drought hoping that the rain will come back to get plant life growing again. The TAMRA wallaby combines these two methods to ensure that the Joey is ready to leave the pouch in spring rather than the middle of a Hot Australian Summer Dia Pause was first identified in eighteen fifty. I four after hunters in Europe. Notice that pregnancy in Rodier seem to last a lot longer than in other types of deer since then scientists have been fascinated by this process. And it's helped us understand more about basic reproductive processes in all mammals but how the process worked at the molecular level is still a mystery mystery until recently there seemed to be no connection between which speech these use it in which didn't and there didn't seem to be a unifying mechanism for how the pregnancy was caused. Even the hormones controlling dia paws are different between Mammal groups researchers in Poland were able to pause embryos in a sheep a non dipoto species by transferring them into a mouse uterus and then back into the sheep with no apparent ill effects this indicates. It's the potential for Dia. Pause could lie in mammals including humans but I would still take my birth control pill you would. Experiments would die. Applause could do you for us is to improve our understanding of how to make and select healthy embryos for in vitro fertilization as well as to create better stem cells that could be used the target cancers the first stem cells ever isolated by scientists came from a mouse embryo in diapers whether or not the pregnancy. Let's see was paused. Once the baby or babies come out they need to eat and for mammal babies. That means milk. A mother's milk contains a concoction of nutrients France fats proteins and carbohydrates that are essential for a baby's development as well as a cocktail of protective factors to effectively supply the baby with immune hyun system until it can develop its own all mammals produce milk but they don't all produce the same milk to give you a baseline for comparison before I start start throwing out numbers cow. Milk is about three and a half percent protein and five percent carbs while human milk is about one percent protein and seven percent and carbs and both are about eight percent water. You won't find much water. In the milk of the hooded seal. Their milk is more than sixty percent. Fat Thatch more like a premium milkshake than milk. This high fat milk is crucial for the seal pups born into the freezing waters of the North Atlantic and Arctic oceans. It's the PUPS also only nurse for about four days having been born on floating ice an environment that is both unstable and unreliable. So the seal Momma needs to pack a lot of energy dense fat into her milk. The pups consume over sixteen pounds or seven kilograms of milk every day. Their Body weight doubles in the first week of life. Conversely in the savannahs of Africa the Black Rhino has the skim milk going only about point the two percent fat they also nursed for almost two years which is only possible within milk given how many resources lactation demands

Sandy Ocean Firth DIA Cisco Europe Founder Cubs North Atlantic Rodier Africa Joey Australia Poland Mitzi
Why Scientists Are Counting Whales from Space

BBC World Service

03:59 min | 6 months ago

Why Scientists Are Counting Whales from Space

"No whales are about to be under better protection than ever before an aquarium and an engineering firm have teamed up to the monitor the majestic animals from outer space using data from satellites seminal and radio the hate to have a much clearer idea of Wales movement somewhat causes them to change habits John Evan is chief scientist for data analytics firm draper's the engineering firm involved part of the the key to this project is using a satellite imagery to look AT whales in the ocean but it's a challenging problem and so our goal is to bring together all the sources of data they're available hi and satellite imagery is is one of those sources and we hope that the combination of satellite imagery with the other types of data that people have been using traditionally will give us a little bit more effective way of counting whales and understanding you know where they are where their habitats are and and how to protect them easy triangulated then the information you're getting from satellite so no and ready to all to come up with a comprehensive picture of what's going on that's the challenge and and the idea is essentially from these other sources besides satellite imagery we get some idea of the conditions the ocean so from sonar we get indications of oil movement and and other other large creatures in the ocean from things like radar we can see the ocean currents from lower resolution coarser resolution thermal imagery we can see something about surface temperatures in and currents in the ocean in some of these are also indirect indicators of of things like the food supply the plankton and and so putting all these things together we essentially build up profile of of the ocean and identify the areas where foils are most likely to be which particular whales you're gonna be looking at and why it's so important to do this first and foremost we're focused on the north Atlantic right whale a noble creature that that lives in the north Atlantic as the name suggests and sadly their population has dwindled to critical numbers the current estimates are there roughly four hundred of these north Atlantic right whales still in existence so we're really getting to crisis time with them and we're hoping that through this project we can better understand where they are and how to protect their environment but also that provides for a training ground to look at other species of whales in other parts of the ocean and hopefully we can apply this technology more broadly than to these other species you might be able to read what exactly in to change of movements climate change Ole shipping label movement that kind of thing I would change is certainly a concern because climate change will affect their food supply shipping lanes are definitely concerned because you know and counters with large ships our problem fishing activity is another one right here off the coast of New England we have you know a very lively lobster industry and lobster traps are not something that plays well with with whales and so hopefully what we can do is identify strategies that will will help us figure out how to sustain the industries that depend on the ocean for their livelihood while protecting these noble creatures and I think understanding is the key to all this if we understand where the whales live in my great and what their patterns are then we can better adapt to protect them while addressing the legitimate concerns of of folks that rely on the ocean for their livelihood and the project is cooled counting whales from space it does exactly what it says it's it's it's really cool what do you what each of us know what the story was cold outlet within county well some spicy or I think is what they're thinking that's what the project is cools I'm working on counting oils from space don't know having tea sciences with data analytics firm draper's the engineering

Earthquake swarm raises concerns for big eruption in Iceland

Throughline

04:13 min | 8 months ago

Earthquake swarm raises concerns for big eruption in Iceland

"If you've watched game of thrones than you probably of a sense of what Iceland looks like s an incredible place so you've got mountains scarfs and rolling landscapes and every once in a while you've got a little bit of grass or Moss on top of. Thanks thanks very. Game of thrones right so a lot of game of thrones was film there forbidding desolate and gorgeous all at the same time It's barren it's black. It's volcanic I mean. This entire island has been built up by volcanic eruptions year after year for the last last twenty to twenty five million years so the whole landscape everything you're looking at what has been built by black rock that came out from the heart of the earth Iceland sits in the North Atlantic right on top of the fault line on the ocean floor that divide the North American and Eurasian plates and as the two plates drift opposite directions. Iceland is in effect slowly being split apart making the country a geothermal hot spot where earthquakes and volcanoes are just just a fact of life. So icelanders were really used to volcanoes going off on average. There's an eruption on the island at once. Every five years you grew walk with his and I by eight fifteen had seen three volcanic eruptions. This volcanologist Thor Thordarson I. I didn't even know that that profession existed when us all these options. Now it might sound alarming depth. Aquino's are going off so frequent but both of these eruptions aren't too big or destructive no absolutely most ruptures and actually fairly small and sort of what we call tourist friendly All this volcanic activity has earned Iceland. The nickname the land of fire and ice thought has spent the last thirty six years studying one volcano. Oh Qena Lock. It's taught in elementary school history classes as greatest disaster that Icelanders face but but it turns out there wasn't much actual scientific research on lot so door had a lot of work to do. And you can map these things out. You can look at the architecture. Architecture of these like the love of flow he collected ash and lava samples analyzed their chemical makeup reconstructed the route of the lava flow. And how far the Asheville. So it's a bit of a detective work and he began his investigation at ground. Zero the site of the eruption that typical volcano you might have in mind is probably a towering cone shaped mountain with a big bowl full of bubbling lava in the middle long steep slopes on either side losing with flowing molten rock. Imagine like you're baking soda and Vinegar Volcano in like middle school or whatever but Lachie doesn't look like like that absolutely not lackey doesn't look anything like that. If you climb Mount Lucky like we did you look in both directions you see these. ooh volcanic vents going off to the horizon. Both directions lucky is really just a twenty-seven kilometer-long crack Damn mm-hmm a sixteen mile cracking. The ground might not seem that imposing. But don't let that fool you into thinking it's less powerful. Some ways might contain more more coat see the reason for cone shape. All KAYLA's is because you have magma coming up through one conduct over and over the lucky on the other hand does it have just one conduit one release point for the lava and ash it. It has many over the twenty seven kilometers. We have about one hundred and forty five combs which line the longest crack all those offense run deep into the earth connecting to a chamber of Magma Molten rock that like a pressure cooker is waiting to blow. This this is the hidden life force of Laki which couldn't stay hidden forever.

Iceland Vinegar Volcano Mount Lucky Asheville Laki North Atlantic Aquino Lackey Lachie Twenty Five Million Years Twenty Seven Kilometers Twenty-Seven Kilometer Thirty Six Years Five Years
Lobster prices are going up

News, Traffic and Weather

00:36 sec | 8 months ago

Lobster prices are going up

"Never an inexpensive meal is about to become even more expensive lobsterman bringing in fewer of the cross stations these days rice's are edging up due to that drop in the lobster catch fishermen say the harvest is about forty percent off from last year to September a live one point two five pound lobster wholesale prices shot up some twenty percent from last year now set at nearly ten dollars a pound for customers in stores they're selling around twelve dollars a pound new restrictions to protect endangered north Atlantic right whales along with the warming of the Gulf of Maine to blame along with US China trade hostilities created more competition with Canada

Rice Maine United States Canada China Twelve Dollars Twenty Percent Two Five Pound Forty Percent Ten Dollars
The Great Atlantic Sargassum Belt

A Moment of Science

02:00 min | 8 months ago

The Great Atlantic Sargassum Belt

"Hey Don have you heard of the enormous bloom of Sarcasm Seaweed in the North Atlantic Shor Ghassem awesome in the Atlantic Ocean is nothing new Christopher Columbus discovered floating mats of Orgasm in the northwestern Atlantic and the fifteenth century these mats are an when important part of Atlantic ecosystem there hot spots of biodiversity hosting fish shrimp crabs birds turtles and dolphins yes but something is is changing since two thousand eleven. NASA satellite imagery shows that the annual bloom of sarcasm has gotten dramatically bigger in the summer of two thousand eighteen knots what's of sarcasm extended more than five thousand miles in a great Atlantic sarcasm belt from western Africa to the Caribbean this is the largest bloom of seaweed lead scientists have ever seen resist great shore dozen built causing harm yes it is wreaking ecological and economic havoc long coastlines in the tropical Michael Atlantic the Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Mexico vast quantities of the Seaweed Wash Ashore and wrought releasing foul-smelling hydrogen sulfide had gas while the usual patchy distribution of Sarcasm Matt's benefit sea creatures too much sarcasm especially in coastal areas makes it hard for for them to move and breathe when it dies and sinks at smothers coral and seagrass a though sal awful they're scientists know what caused the change a twenty nineteen study identified increased nutrient runoff due to deforestation and fertilizer use in the Amazon River Basin as one cause change in rainfall and the ocean circulation due to human caused global climate. Change is likely another show. This is just another facet of our growing environmental crisis. This moment of science comes from Indiana University. I'm Yale Cassandra dime don glass.

Atlantic Ocean Michael Atlantic Caribbean Sea Amazon River Basin DON Christopher Columbus Yale Cassandra Nasa Africa Mexico SAL Indiana University
"north atlantic" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

08:16 min | 10 months ago

"north atlantic" Discussed on WGN Radio

"I had the pleasure of being in Scotland of all things at this time of the year I usually had cooler northwards but this time I headed across the pond to Scotland and Ireland. and what I want to start off with is really something that I hadn't expected and that is the grouse population in Scotland it has virtually disappeared. and as you may know the many of you may know that the the grouse moors in Scotland world famous not only for their management for their numbers of Krause into the second year in a row most of the mortars I have closed their seasons because of the collapse in the grouse population is being caused in part by any worm that seems to be getting into the brains of the crowds and that's obviously fatal for them and they've also had had very bad nesting conditions so the famous grouse moors really all across Scotland and and in England are and are really pretty dire straits and and the only way that a lot of people can keep these mortgage calling is through honey and so for the second year in a row they are facing a remarkable hardship and it just makes me think about how cyclical wild birds are we're seeing it here in United States with the really that. a lapse of block brown's populations and we think it's due to the fact that they've got west Nile in them only she was happy with the sage grouse so it's not just they just don't look mereka problem the other thing that I encounter that I hadn't expected was the salmon runs and also virtually wiped out so a trip that to a place that's what really known through for a long time for its exceptional bird hunting and in release pretty good salmon fishing I found that people saying that well there's there's very little of either in this family situation that's taking place in Scotland and Ireland yeah absolutely parallels what we're seeing in the eastern part of Canada in North America the salmon population is collapsing. and we don't seem to understand why but we do seem to know pretty clearly that the number of salmon are returning to their native streams whether it be in Ireland and Scotland are now in in Canada is is just a fraction of what it was a few years ago which is a fraction of what it was before that so we we appear to be on the verge of of some kind of a collapse in the Atlantic salmon population in even the great river the panel I in in in Norway was the largest salmon in the world with the car are there numbers appear to be in decline to sell its stake international problem one of the boxes being Sprouse than in Ireland and in Scotland which also may be applying. while the Lennix salmon is that the bait fish populations have been so severely depleted due to the commercial falling fleets that salmon are having to go further from their normal feeding areas defined I love food and the further you go whether it's a bird fish the further you have to my great the greater the peril the along with the rest of your journey just like traveling in a car view that a driver will close the coast versus just going one state across it's a much more arduous trip and so the the general belief of those in Scotland Ireland is at the bait fish population that was historically in the feeding grounds relatively close to the code those two codes it has really been harmed in the sailor having to go further which makes them vulnerable to all kinds of things in that migration but the bottom line is we have a really a worldwide or north Atlantic. crisis going on with salmon and that you go to the restaurant obviously but the grocery store and see Sam that that's farm raised salmon it's not the the wild fish that that has driven the economies of these areas for a long time and obviously also driven church Mister berry it's a very sad story to tell the other thing that's happening in Scotland which is happening off the. west coast of Canada is that they have placed fish farms at the mouth these rivers. to raise the commercial fish in the sixth forms are. yes in the context they're they're like a large hog farm over there in the water so the amount of refuse coming out of these fish and the diseases that the fish have been fish farms are working their way into the wild fish population and one of the real experts in Scotland and fish said that what happens is when the wild salmon come back up these rivers and have to swim by these big enclosed fish farms they are picking up once in the life which does not kill the commercially rage fish why does killed the the wild salmon so the salmon if they get lights on them in sufficient numbers it kills and and the lights have been introduced by the commercial fish forms which is basically just it's it's a hog farm acceptance of the water so it is a is a colossal problem we don't know we're our stamina come from if you think about it in a commercial sense for eating we figured out the way to raise them in is in it's in these big in close farms amounts of these rivers but that is what is causing all the disease outbreak in the contamination of the water awhile check so it's it's a sad situation but aside from that I can tell you Ireland and Scotland in the fall our our is beautiful a place as you could ever want to go but the the the highlands of Scotland seeing the courts and heather and its fall colors and we had every kind of weather you can imagine having days when the home side ways so hard you almost fall off a cliff and rain side ways to crystal clear reckless. ocular days when you could look off to the mountain ranges of the highlands in the same and we'll go over to Ireland. situation the Irish coast one one moment it is loosely blowing so hard you can't stand up and it's coming at you and shoots water and an hour later you have crystal clear. sites for fifty miles up the coast to the question of the west coast of Ireland it's it's it's the most one of the most magnificent dramatic coastlines in all the world and it is sad though to see that it's close to being increasingly less productive for our salmon and also what's occurring for grouse so anyway that the bidding report on our having going across. Scotland and England recently and Scotland and Ireland recently what I found when I come back I'd like to talk to really local sense for those who do the Chicago land area on the talk about the route fifty three extension and for those of you who don't live in the Chicago land area I'm gonna spend just a little bit talking about how how really messed up we can see where it comes to our road systems here not only in Illinois Illinois would be a this is a great example but how nationally we we have really worked into some road blocks literally the pun intended let comes to to how we're gonna have transportation but the I fifty three court ordered illinois' and permits for the time is taken to study at the amount of money being spent and now it appears to be according to the headline the Lake County chronicle in a day. hello about fifty three extension I'll be back with just a whole lot more in the outdoors coming up in just a moment thank you to listen to Charlie Parker in the outdoor voice to Chicago in America and now a message for a long time sponsors in northwest Indiana and Chicago land Chevrolet dealers..

Scotland Chicago Illinois Charlie Parker Ireland Chevrolet Ireland. Indiana America Lake County England
"north atlantic" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"north atlantic" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"If I am points Conway show, we came very close to a pit maneuver here. The try to stop this. Chase has been going on for almost three hours. Now. Good. It's read our they can't stop this guy North Atlantic east LA. Nailed it Angel Martinez. Is that southbound northbound that's northbound this is a little screwy. It's been going on for three hours now angel right around five three hours. Yeah. And we can't stop this. He's going through. Every area. Possible in LA and Orange County who went to the beach you went to downtown with the rich areas poor areas industrial areas and now he's in Atlantic against traffic. So you just got to wonder how much that this guy against traffic? Channel seven against traffic. Would you do that? All the traffic Nydia still this domestic violence suspect del over Keiko. So he's in the area of east LA college. Looks like. Continues along northbound Atlantic. It looks like a big straight stretch in a wide open dry dog. I knew I saw somebody. I wasn't sure what looks like it might fit him. Now this Chevy Bronco. Driving by Bronco. They keep trying to pick this guy. But yet always bail out. Pull up on his right? The driver sees.

Angel Martinez LA east LA college Bronco Atlantic Conway Chase Orange County three hours five three hours
"north atlantic" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:30 min | 1 year ago

"north atlantic" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Missile. Of nineteen sixty Norwegian couple the venture held instead and his wife the archaeologist Tina sailed up to a remote tiny fishing village called Lance meadows and the rugged northern tip of new found land on Canada's Atlantic coast. So they came to to Lance the meadows in nineteen sixty in the summer, they asked around about where there might be old ruins. And the actions of talk to George decker. Now, George decker was my graduate. That's Loretta decker. She works for parks Canada. And she spoke to me on the crackly line from a home in Lancer meadows as the area was battered by snowstorm the area in is right on the edge of the North Atlantic. My grandfather. The pig. Chiefs, and he was really Representative of the people in the little village here. My grandfather suggests I know where they're all chew. It's up essentially in our pasture land in our meadow. And there's a fresh water brook that goes down through still salmon, and there's a marine terrace is description of it, but it's a raised beach, and it's grass is a beautiful spot. And they're in that meadow, there are essentially the outlines of houses now for generations. It was called Indian can't people here assumed that it had been indigenous people that were living there, but when the solid it really reminded them all things they had seen in Greenland in particular. Now, this was a tantalizing discovery because the ink stats were hoping to be the first people to find physical proof that Vikings had come from Greenland to North America one thousand years ago, and we're in fact, the first Europeans on the continent. Some five hundred. Hundred years before Christopher Columbus. The remains of these buildings suggested they were onto something. So excavations began and esteem that said, you know, the locals that they hired. It's excavators. Were some of the best year ever worked with no training? Yes. Their work ethic, determination, Lonzo meadows is a tiny crofting community of only about seventy people at the point where Newfoundland almost touches the coast of labrador Scandinavian. Archaeologists have uncovered remains of eight turf walled structures here of characteristically north type. There were built in a row along the marine terrace formed by the action of the scene..

Lance meadows George decker Loretta decker Representative Lonzo meadows Lancer meadows Canada Greenland Lance North Atlantic Tina North America Christopher Columbus Newfoundland one thousand years Hundred years
"north atlantic" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

04:07 min | 1 year ago

"north atlantic" Discussed on Here & Now

"Patterns when those trade winds relaxed during now Nino the water rushes to the east shuts off that cold upwelling in the eastern Pacific and changes rain patterns and actually patterns of winter warmth around the world. So let's talk about the global ocean conveyor belt when was the last time we saw a big change in its patterns there are two parts of the global ocean. Conveyor belt, people talk a lot about the North Atlantic conveyor about that one shifted around two thousand and eight it started to reduce strength. We have an array scientists have set up an array of of instruments across the North Atlantic that go from Florida all the way to Africa, and they measure the strength of that current and we've been doing that since about two thousand and four and the strength of the Murdiano overturning circulation or do a little bit in two thousand eight and as an has continued to be fairly low low of low of the earlier values since then why why? Well, that's a good question. It's actually a vigorous scientific debate. My wife is an oceanographer at the university of Washington, and we actually debate this over the kitchen table, so one possibility is that the Murdiano overturning circulation is slowing down in response to global warming that. Melting of ice and increases in rainfall up in the northern latitudes. Have made the water there less dense less likely to sync and flow south back towards the equator that happens at the high latitudes. The water is is normally cooled as it's cooled it becomes denser, and it'll sync right to the bottom and then flows. Southward along the east coast of North America under the Gulfstream, which is flowing northward. There's a big cool patch now over the last couple years between Greenland and Europe that shows up when the Murdiano overturning circulation slows down because you're bringing less warm water northward, and so the ocean cools there. There's warming off the east coast of North America off New England higher sea level rise goes without warming. So those are all possibilities. But there are other scientists who say in fact that this is a more like a decade awful oscillation in the winds. They're removing more heat from the ocean, east of Greenland, and it'll take a while to sort that out. I think whether this is a decade loss elation. Or a long term change. What about the stuff in the water, and I'm thinking both of living things like fish, and where they move around. And where they migrate. And also the garbage piles the plastic piles in the Pacific that swirl around huge, hundreds of miles of plastics is that all driven by these currents where fish are. And where garbage is. So let's start with the garbage. I think so the great garbage patch in the north Pacific is a direct consequence of ocean currents, you have trade winds at low latitudes that are blowing from east to west and then again at high latitudes. You have the westerlies. And so you have water flowing north from the near the equator, and then also water flowing south from the higher latitudes. And they carry with them plastic and garbage those currents actually concentrate the garbage in garbage patch in the middle of the north Pacific. There's a similar one in all the oceans, and what about fish? What about fish, certainly, the currents will move? Them. They're these fascinating storms in the ocean. You mentioned hurricanes in the in the atmosphere there analogues in the ocean. They're very slow. They take years to cross the ocean. But they're called Eddie's rings, and those can actually carry a little ecosystem with them away from where they originated from to where they end up. So how much do we actually understand about ocean currents? And I'm asking that obviously, we know a lot. But let's say when when that plane m h three seventy crashed into the ocean, and we still haven't been able to find it. And you would think if we really knew with precision exactly what was happening with the water. We'd be able to figure out where something would end up after a period of time. But we couldn't what do you think is that a bad example in terms of how well we understand the currents. I'm not an expert on aviation at my my understanding is that they didn't know exactly where that plane went down. Right. But if they did you think they'd be able to find it..

North America Greenland North Atlantic Africa university of Washington Florida Europe Eddie New England
"north atlantic" Discussed on The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"north atlantic" Discussed on The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

"The north atlantic treaty organization alliance as a community of freedom peace security and shared values including liberty human rights democracy and the rule of law jack read introduced that language at the end of a day that was full of trump attacks against nato including false statements on twitter about the financing of nato and the president tweeting repeatedly about nato and so after the president spent the day attacking nato on his way to the nato summit democratic senator jack reed rose on the senate floor a member of the seemingly powerless democratic minority in the united states senate and introduced language to attach to a bill that would rebuke everything everything that the president said today about nato and democrats yet greed got ninety seven votes on the senate floor today against everything that the president has been saying about nato there was more in the language of the senate but the senate attached to that bill today more of that language including reaffirming quote the ironclad commitment of the united states to it's obligations are article five of the north atlantic treaty to the collective self defense of the north atlantic treaty organization alliance the senate reaffirmed today in that language that the united states would rush to the defense of any member of nato that comes under attack mitch mcconnell voted for that direct disagreement with the president every republican voted for that except the two republicans who sometimes call themselves libertarians rand paul and mike lee and every democrat voted for that the language that ninety seven senators voted for today went on to endorse quote long term strategy using all elements of united states national power to deter and if necessary defeat russian aggression the russian aggression that donald trump pretends doesn't exist and but language made a demand of the president in dealing with russia the language attached to the bill now says that it calls on the administration to urgently prioritize the completion of a comprehensive whole of government strategy to counter malign activities of russia that seek to undermine faith and democratic institutions in the united states and around the world and to submit that strategy to congress without delay ninety seven senators voted for that rebuke of the trump administration and its relations with russia a display of bipartisanship unlike anything we have seen in recent memory and on the senate floor today jack reed explained something about nato that everyone in the senate already knows but the president does not seem to understand the united states participates in nato because we believe the transplant act partnership is in the us national story interest and not because other countries are paying off for protection and that was a very direct rebuke to what the president said this morning on his way to air force one dato has not treated fairly but i think what works up thing out fake part you much and they pay for it you little so i have nato i have the uk which is in somewhat turmoil and i have putin frankly putin maybe.

north atlantic
"north atlantic" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"north atlantic" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"At me like i was crazy like of course you know and i said no i don't in the united states we have a race war really and so it's kinda hard to like walk up somewhere that su super white in your black and you're like no no seriously i'm white yeah you can't you can't hide it's one of those things so it's a matter of is explained and hopefully we're gonna get martin on in the next segment to talk to you about everything but we're gonna make a spokesperson for all of ireland bargain but truthfully it is a situation where they they ask you they know by your last name if you have an english last name so you're probably protestant right the also will ask it you know what school you went to you it's one of those like talking this is what it reminds me of what set you from is a total gang thing yeah yeah that's exactly backup hector what set you from because they don't know where you're from until they ask you guys gangster it is pretty hideous gangster gangster in its own way so funny that's that's how we make the comparison i love that but but i will say dublin's beautiful city so i was there that's the south okay and the the pubs are fantastic watched a ah game there that was fun and just in case you're wondering where is ireland it's an island in the north atlantic separated from great britain a by the north channel the irish on saint george's channel and they say arlen is a third largest island in europe and for a little comparison if florida's about two times larger than ireland oh and as i mentioned earlier it's our international show because miss sri lanka is going to join us in about half an hour's unclarity oh very excited so i spent time on a farm so again a big shout out here to the whitmore clan yes for their incredible hospitality scheckter queue up the greenacres theme song please stop i mean i went to church all i went to church i went to knock which is a very strong catholic international and religious center kind of like five lords if you're catholic you know exactly what i'm talking about so i prayed brandt i pray for your soul allow me to tell you.

united states dublin saint george florida sri lanka brandt ireland britain arlen europe whitmore
"north atlantic" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"north atlantic" Discussed on The Science Show

"Of years where there none and those times of plenty in times of gaps are directly correlated with the rapid climate changes in the ice core the corals feel the same things that we're measuring in the atmosphere thousands of meters down in the ocean to me it's one of the great examples of the connectivity in the climate system and you care about your localized core which is another really cool thing the corals we've collected from south of has mania feel the arctic ice cores and the corals we've collected from the north atlantic feel the greenland ice core it's really just a fantastically cool problem and does it give you any idea about how climate change is moving which direction and so on yes so we've been using data that we collected from that to sort of inform our ideas about models can we write down the basic physics and see why these rapid karma changes come about and do they conform with the rates of change we see in the ocean or the rates of change we see in the atmosphere there's been this very cool development in the last decade or so in the physical oceanography community which is they've come up with a theory for how the ocean overturning works and how it's really driven out of the southern ocean and the heat and salt exchanges in this channel called the drake passage and the neat thing about that theory is that it makes a very strong prediction about what the tracers should look like concert things that we can measure in the corals and so i've been having a lot of fun recently taking this theory so the nice thing about if you have a theory you don't have to write out a whole global climate model that you hear about all the time right the take the biggest computers in the world to run if the theory explains the essence of the physics runs on my laptop right so that means you can really start to say all right let's put in the glacial boundary conditions like let's turn down co two and let's turn down the sun what happens to the ocean circulation and we're realizing that the connection that we see between the changes in the greenland ice core chains antarctica ice core fall directly out of the physics of this theory it's really a beautiful.

north atlantic greenland
"north atlantic" Discussed on KSCO 1080

KSCO 1080

02:45 min | 2 years ago

"north atlantic" Discussed on KSCO 1080

"And then a space and then seven seven three four five alaska numbers seven seven three four five so right down seven one zero and then seven seven three four five and do all those numbers in the boxy scoreboard digital clock style and now turn it upside down now did my i'm going to try to visualize assists because i don't have a pen and paper i'm i'm doing it the way you would write the numbers now see if you can visualize that anybody else in the studio it's the name of a big oil company shell oil anyone anyway try that looks or size that's gonna solve the shipping in the north north atlantic problems that let's see we have until twenty two minutes after the hour there's another riddle and a couple of other things anyone win that the couple people have and i have already been an email contact with them out well we we should do that at some point but here here's the other one and this this might take a little bit of thinking but i was you know i said well we can all figure out which way the earth rotates on its axis right if you think about the fact that the east coast gets sunrises before the west coast you know we're spinning from west to east because the sun rises in the east so if you're looking down the north pole which way does earth rotate clockwise or counterclockwise for spending from west to east he looking down at the northbound if you're looking down the north pole because if you're looking up at down at the south pole is going to be the opposite if your face looking down down on the north pole earth which ways the spinning sunrises happened in the east before they happen in the west well hey this isn't even the riddle i would say we we all know this well i mean clockwise wait a minute address counterclockwise and just refund hey think about this that if you're looking down at the south pole then my first answer was right it would be clockwise because clockwise is counterclockwise upside down did you ever think about that not really not the riddle the riddle and i think i'm gonna pump this down the road for another week because there's other important astronomy stuff i wanna share with you folks coming up this week but the the.

alaska twenty two minutes
"north atlantic" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"north atlantic" Discussed on WLAC

"The watery impact be i mean what would have happened the landmasses who would be underwater who would be above water if you look at a map of the c floor of the north atlantic ocean you see all these fracture lines thousands of them and that's their crust showing stress will ozal all broke and magnet came through their flashed the water into steam think of this or how big a cloud that made think of one gallon of milk sitting in grocery store let's make that one gallon seawater now you drop that on magma which is sixteen hundred degrees fahrenheit or two eighteen hundred degrees fahrenheit it flashes to steam the volume of steam created by that one gallon of seawater is one thousand six hundred and seventy two gallons of steam in volume so in other words you've multiplied by one thousand six hundred and seventy two times you can get an idea of the magnitude of this cloud that was created by the asteroid impact all right here's rob in toronto canada we're heard all across canada he's saying aren't i've been researching mass extinctions for three years now and your guest is full of it he could convince me if he could supply a crater where is the impact site okay here we go i looked this up art on the break and if you get a map of the north atlantic ocean right take a look at these coordinates twenty four degrees north latitude uhhuh sixty one degrees west longitude that's your crater now draw line from that right to charleston south carolina.

north atlantic ocean canada south carolina toronto charleston one gallon two eighteen hundred degrees f sixteen hundred degrees fahren seventy two gallons twenty four degrees sixty one degrees three years milk
"north atlantic" Discussed on The Jock and Nerd Podcast

The Jock and Nerd Podcast

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"north atlantic" Discussed on The Jock and Nerd Podcast

"Command all creatures woman teenage i dr lives hearing other seventies now we talked about lena's reallife the possibility of it where it could be what's the deal with lantis in the dc universe in what is the origin of these atlanthia's whereas well again they void really giving any exact timelines or exactly makes makes sense you can just give generality so they say it's in the north atlantic ocean okay i mean i don't even know where metropolis gotham none of their cities got them in metropolis supposedly on the east coast and bvs there across the river from stupid move okay keep going so get a general north atlantic location kind of agreed with played all right he was talking about the european side of the north atlantic the general dc website says that they're an offshoot of humanity homo sapiens this biologically adapted to the deep ocean environment again that's so general yes that it's they're intentionally trying not to hit on anything that people can pick at but one of the things about atlantis in the dc comics was that there were there were people living there and there's a lot of mystical energy around it at some point these two wizards or mythical characters came into the mix and they influence the people using the mystical energies in the island and that's how they kind of became so advanced the interesting thing is the time line the dc does give it bit of a timeline for this and they play the wizards messing with the island around one hundred and fifty thousand years ago or one hundred thousand bc which is right around the time that neanderthals would've been in the area the play with scrubbing where atlanta.

lena dc comics dc atlanta north atlantic gotham fifty thousand years
"north atlantic" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"north atlantic" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"Munitions fly because they know that there are three hundred some uboats out there in the north atlantic and they go where they go right to the fences oh through those alitalia's clear that up there are few pence two fences outs at halifax harbour actual metal fence gates that keep the uboats out at night the closing at five o'clock the opened use the eight o'clock in the morning and these three hundred uboats in the north atlantic already plunked three thousand allied ships including detainee of course wellknown yes so the guys on the mound blog are justifiably terrified that there can be found by the boats they shouldn't worried about is the allied ships in the harbor turns out this one ship the norwegian ship email sobel assets in a hurry to leave the harbour it's late on his journey to new york the opposite direction to get relief supplies to go back to europe to help those who have been bombed of course and they have no idea what mumblings got on it so it is going too fast it is going in the wrong line is like a rural rhode here in michigan you're passing the left hand side again and again and again to keep doing that edwin of course sooner or later your to find another vehicle going your direction in your lane and now you're trapped john i had a history teacher in high school his life depended on the split second that he made the decision when a truck was in the wrong lane coming right toward him and he said i did what you would expect me to do i veered hard left and went up on the shoulder yup right in this case that doesn't work i mean it's the way that you describe you must have used a pager to describe the progress of the imo going on the wrong side of of the channel than that the halifax of the channel until going almost to the opposite docks by on the dartmouth side right i mean this was something that was not a sudden mistake in then the mambolo couldn't respond in time this was something the fat captain had been doing for quite a while and you're you're reading the whole way through in your sane do something do something there's plenty of time no you're watching a hothead rushing.

alitalia new york europe rhode michigan halifax north atlantic halifax harbour
"north atlantic" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"north atlantic" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"The for the listeners out there you mentioned the congress tournament kono tell us the conference that you're planning and tell us some of the schools that are some of the two more well known schools that you'll be facing or that that are preseason recognizable in this tournament that'll be given us some of your gators some tough competition in the tournament ieriko we pray airport debate two uh we're separated into three compromise on the west coast so they basically they set it up in the region so we're in the west region now we make up thirteen team makeup therapy to a wicket the california coordinated athletic association so there's a majority of the state school and california and then he have energy knack which the great north atlantic conference then that basically um built cool that are in washington can uh montana though or again and then he got the pack west which is majority of the the private vision to school then in california and also includes like shamanov hawaii uh he little why is it says they can dixie stay go um our competence some of the big names that you'll know is obviously san francisco stay um cal stayed uh pomona cap odd mona um chico state university uh uc san diego that are conference for at least another two years um so capital a copy the media feels those are south san bernardino those are you know some big names um or a conference out of the thirteen teams eight make the conflict tournament uh they'll be and like we're sitting out there um and so cal probably pomona uh a nationally right team uh chicken state the naturally ranked team needs to san diego nationally right team so uh we've got the talent and then topic them marko too that the best player in the competition sites just like you need the confidence going into fifth and even though the law player but uh they're also getting some recognition as well so technically uh people like to make the argument that we have the toughest division two conference in the in the country but uh some some guys back a eat the mid west will definitely argue that fast bush is a very tough conference to play.

washington montana california san bernardino bush congress san francisco san diego marko two years
"north atlantic" Discussed on WGIR-AM

WGIR-AM

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"north atlantic" Discussed on WGIR-AM

"Las vegas brings back it's famous in logan response what happens i have to say here this stays year in a new ed i it think the would climate disappear change for a few ignorance months is after equally a mass dangerous shooting leaving almost sixty dead especially the head of marketing when for the vegas these convention scaremongers and visitors authority continue to says push their they weren't agenda is sure about how these visitors storms would receive even the in slogan the face of the findings if it of continued the intergovernmental after the intergovernmental tragedy and other panel marketing on climate consultant change san i francisco even told tells the guy the associated press at the phrase still tests better the than eases any any other climate option science guys and serena you know williams who the ipcc is skipping the australian is slowly open ipcc the defending champion of the tennis grand slam can you event deciding believe to in pull climate out of science playing we don't just know who one the ipcc match since having is a baby efar's or play williams says she super the ipcc close but not is personally is the where grow she p wants intergovernmental to be on panel kim duffy on climate fox change this news some of radio the ipcc said they just recently released their scientific assessment of what happened last year with hurricane erma in hurricane harvey this is the ipcc speaking quotes no robust trends in annual numbers of tropical storms hurricanes and major hurricanes have been identified over the past one hundred years in the north atlantic basin and that there are no significant observed trends in global tropical cyclone frequency further confidence in largescale changes in the intense viewed extreme extra tropical cyclone such as superstorm sandy says nineteen hundred is low there have been no changes it's all been the same so it's interesting to note but as we see this bomb cyclone form over the atlantic in the massive deep freeze most of the countries in the media that the there in the middle of the countries in the.

Las vegas williams ipcc hurricane harvey north atlantic basin superstorm sandy logan head of marketing consultant kim duffy one hundred years
"north atlantic" Discussed on WGIR-AM

WGIR-AM

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"north atlantic" Discussed on WGIR-AM

"No robust trends in annual numbers of tropical storms hurricanes and major hurricanes have been identified over the past one hundred years in the north atlantic basin and that there are no significant observed trends in global tropical cyclone frequency further confidence in largescale changes in the intensity of extreme extra tropical cyclones such as superstorm sandy since 1905 is low so what they're saying is that they're saying that we see this bomb cyclone form or the atlantic and the massive deep freeze what's going on is it was not attributed none of this stuff is being attributed to climate change none of it it happening on seoul i know it happens in global matlan you ring noory what the ipcc as just come out with with their results on what happened with hurricane harvey well i i can't give attribution or or disc let it didn't take this step out of contract no they don't know they don't gin and are told by the technocrats to believe this crap home okay was going to ignore the ipcc in what they said that the very group the tells you the climate change israel is telling you that harvey erma and quite possibly this storm has nothing to do with climate change this is this is normal well that's not true at all because you know when you look at a category five hurricane two hundred fifty miles an hour those used to happen one seven twenty years one every twenty years now he had three of them last year that hit you know houston uh virgin island wine only in the others for detoured after we paid are jews to the climate science douches out bear in france at and then they they were they were last year three of them one hit tags on the other the other it lowered its frequency act we paid our jews to the climate science morons and i am not going to call a client signings more untouched for ridiculous the rpcies on paper meanwhile shop with his son don't shy shows the ipcc near ignoring me your egg norring the ipcc the very group that tells you that everything is climate change when it says it's not climate change you disregard it well hill saturation you know l e v o l e ocean get one lewis once again widely the ipcc loves this so the.

north atlantic basin seoul ipcc hurricane harvey climate change israel harvey erma france lewis houston virgin island one seven twenty years one hundred years twenty years
"north atlantic" Discussed on WREK

WREK

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"north atlantic" Discussed on WREK

"North atlantic ocean and has about sixty five thousand residents the island of course is a popular travel destination and hosts up to ten times that number of people every year so the new law was vigorously opposed by the cruise ship industry many operators are registered in bermuda and had already started booking wedding cruises for lesbian and gay couples because it's a british overseas territory the law must still be given royal assent on behalf of the british monarch in this case that will be through governor john on rankin royal assent of territorial laws is almost always a formality but rank in his feeling heat from some quarters who don't want such a regressive law to be signed on behalf of the queen it should also be noted that bermuda's supreme court is not the highest judicial body in the country that distinction goes to the court of appeal although there's even an appeals process beyond that avenues the opponents of marriage equality apparently decided not to take a case filed by another samegender couple could also begin working its way up the judicial ladder in bermuda that could eventually lead to the new domestic partnership act itself being overturned by court order as we like to say around here stay tuned indonesia's top judicial body its constitutional court has rejected an effort to make sex outside of marriage punishable by up to five years in prison since lesbian and gay couples are not allowed to marry in the world's most populous muslim nation that would have outlawed samegender sex altogether the narrow five two four ruling turned down the petition of a conservative religious group the family love alliance which had argued that indonesia is being overrun by immorality because there are no specific laws in indonesia criminalising samegender sex the court ruled that accepting the petition would have required the creation of new statutes in the country's penal code and that was the responsibility of lawmakers queer indonesians have endured a wave of hostility in the past few years stoked by inflammatory public statements from governor officials and religious leaders police have frequently raided gay clubs and private parties charging those arrested under indonesia's broad antipornography laws andreas harsono of human rights watch said the.

North atlantic ocean bermuda john the queen court order indonesia rankin andreas harsono human rights five years
"north atlantic" Discussed on WREK

WREK

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"north atlantic" Discussed on WREK

"North atlantic ocean and has about sixty five thousand residents the island of course is a popular travel destination and hosts up to ten times that number of people every year so the new law was vigorously opposed by the cruise ship industry many operators are registered in bermuda and had already started booking wedding cruises for lesbian and gay couples because it's a british overseas territory the law must still be given royal assent on behalf of the british monarch in this case that will be through governor john on rankin royal assent of territorial laws is almost always a formality but rank in his feeling heat from some quarters who don't want such a regressive law to be signed on behalf of the queen it should also be noted that bermuda's supreme court is not the highest judicial body in the country that distinction goes to the court of appeal although there's even an appeals process beyond that avenues the opponents of marriage equality apparently decided not to take a case filed by another samegender couple could also begin working its way up the judicial ladder in bermuda that could eventually lead to the new domestic partnership act itself being overturned by court order as we like to say around here stay tuned indonesia's top judicial body its constitutional court has rejected an effort to make sex outside of marriage punishable by up to five years in prison since lesbian and gay couples are not allowed to marry in the world's most populous muslim nation that would have outlawed samegender sex altogether the narrow five two four ruling turned down the petition of a conservative religious group the family love alliance which had argued that indonesia is being overrun by immorality because there are no specific laws in indonesia criminalising samegender sex the court ruled that accepting the petition would have required the creation of new statutes in the country's penal code and that was the responsibility of lawmakers queer indonesians have endured a wave of hostility in the past few years stoked by inflammatory public statements from governor officials and religious leaders police have frequently raided gay clubs and private parties charging those arrested under indonesia's broad antipornography laws andreas harsono of human rights watch said the.

North atlantic ocean bermuda john the queen court order indonesia rankin andreas harsono human rights five years
"north atlantic" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"north atlantic" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It was really a wake up call to scientists to say oh my dog in aware of it of course you know people in thinking about melting ice sheets for a very long time but it it for a variety of factors the amplification of warming in in the arctic and things it was a kind of wakeup call to say maybe we don't understand these ice dynamics as well as we think and maybe this can happen faster than we think it can and uh one impacted that have on the rest of the world well not much i mean you know unfortunately that's the story of climate change narrow um uh all these we've had a number of dramatic events you know i remember ii are reporting about climate change fifteen years ago i was you know out on the north atlantic with a scientists and he said we're talking about what will wait people up to this and he said well when a big storm comes in wipes out an american city that up battle weight people up in a room be aware and then katrina happened and then sandy and and you know and now we have a pretty much the whole island of puerto rica right and you could argue that marginally we've or the there's been some progress in how we think about this and there's only been progress with investing in renewable energy and things like that but as a whole culturally and even more important globally were nowhere near where we need to be to take this series with the great melt along with the collapse of the larsen b iceshelf led scientists to realize that melting was happening at a much more rapid rate than expected house out of it thing the approach to research and to any action that might be taken well i think the the the larson i shelf was a real wakeup call to scientists to really look at the risk of west there artika which i think scientists would i signed his worst we're looking at this and.

climate change renewable energy larsen b iceshelf north atlantic katrina puerto rica fifteen years