37 Burst results for "North America"

Fresh "North America" from The Agostinho Zinga Show

The Agostinho Zinga Show

00:34 min | 16 hrs ago

Fresh "North America" from The Agostinho Zinga Show

"A spring return to business outdoors in four countries and businesses could return to concert going in some markets before the spring, but that the termination will be different from different territories. It's at the US they indicated will take the longest ramping up. Of course, didn't horribly, he says, the fifty amphitheatres than ovation managers will provide an advantage. So. That's really quads, quads. Lincoln Lincoln shows read the whole thing, but I think it kind of speaks to why been hypothesizing myself that. All been locked down, we've been having a terrible time. Let me up to go to shows, go to go to clubs. I. Think once reopens, they're going to have rickel boom record years. Even a place going to see an uptick in people going out and we're going to have to be able to maintain it, and so it's GonNa. Make them have some UN unrealistic expectations are what they've been. Doing because I don't think it's going to be an accurate representation of where they SIPA Hey doesn't matter to get people to come in on your show. Next on the list says, move on. On Smash Rudeness Have Much Insofar K. let's keep going. Keep going. Keep going. We'll talk about he. Pepper. Get One swoon. In This funny. You got love. Florida. Myself. If you've been maybe because I'm familiar with froder mostly because of the books I read concerning the illicit drug trade, especially, the movement of the Guyana, right across the continent. You know I love it ends up in the Florida coast allegedly, but you know just learn at being. Cocaine cowboys. You Know How mad Florida is it just from just doing the eye test and kind of watching videos online and seeing how some of those interviews they do on the beach where they kind of interview random Gills and Oxfam basis of questions. I always get wrong because they're you know they're not. They're not on this earth to be philosophers scholars there on his for mental google at them and grow them when they walk through top big crowds in America for some reason, they don't. Don't have the answers, but usually they're from Florida Florida's always known to be a bit of an anomaly is kind of allow people refer to it as its own little island is has nothing to do with North America at all, and sometimes you get videos online such as the one on by to show you that perfectly illustrate that fact, this is some dude hanging on a bunch of a semi truck. We have no idea why he's doing it be like there's no actually context to would. He's dead. Old. Should we this? Look at these hanging on the the context of the story is that supposedly? This, guy is some sort of sex workers He was engaging some business with the to driving the car. He'd Vickrey did not. He. Him refused to give him money for for said services to angry Johnson Bunny and demands money in his own special way. That's one side of the story. Right. Another side is that there two friends I had a falling out because that guy was kind of costly with the person, the Bundy's wife. There's so many nurses out there. I don't know which one is true, but regardless, there's a guy hanging. Off of the hood of a semi truck on a motorway. Again, if you've been to America, right, you know that they're motorways. Highways are Guy Ganci on the gigantic, right? The enormous they are. Maybe I'd say Walk Forced Times bigger than the motorways that we have. Especially, one lane is insane people we've in and out of traffic and caused a huge right. Sedans and the pickup trucks. Everyone's just a little bit bigger than what we have here in the UK. So you can only imagine how scary it must be to be on the hood of Customer Lettuce in America's No joke erling Daniel Twenty five. That's probably light. Work any any any anyone swimming Bob songs can probably do that, but do this on American highway is legit. Insane Ginseng. Laura to be like. On swinging off. One. Another angle here. What is going on? Young. That's hanging on. Angle. Quota police, why don't you get? What are you doing? Good question. What the Hell is going on..

North America Florida Florida Lincoln Lincoln Vickrey United States Guy Ganci Florida Sipa UN Cocaine Google Guyana Bundy UK Oxfam Daniel Twenty Johnson Bunny Laura BOB
The World's Highest-Dwelling Mammal Lives Atop a Volcano

60-Second Science

02:38 min | 3 d ago

The World's Highest-Dwelling Mammal Lives Atop a Volcano

"In twenty thirteen to mountaineers were nearing the top of Vulcan Judy Jayco a twenty two thousand foot tall volcano on the border of Chile and Argentina. When they saw something unexpected, just two thousand feet below the summit climbers spotted a mouse scurrying across the snow. It's really a remarkable citing his known expected wild mammals to be living at an elevation of over twenty thousand feet. At that elevations that the scarcity of oxygen oxygen that makes it really a challenging. Place to to survive in function. But then also just the extreme cold, it's an extremely inhospitable environment J. Starts and evolutionary biologist at the University of Nebraska. The climbers reached out to starts because he studies how animals adapt to high altitudes and he was so intrigued that he decided to make his own trip to survey the area starts and his colleagues spent a month that Jews Zhigo earlier this year where they confirmed with the climber saw they found mice everywhere including on the summit officially setting a new record for the world's highest dwelling. Mammal. Start says, the summit citing was fortuitous, his climbing partner Mario Perez, Mamani saw the mouse dive under a rock just starts made it to the top exhausted and groggy from the thin air. It took starts a minute together his wits, but he eventually managed to catch the mouse with his hands starts collected that mouse and others as museum specimens that will enable future scientific analysis. They also their encounter on video. The report is in the proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences now that he's home starts wants to understand how these mice can survive in such harsh conditions, and conversely what prevents other animals from venturing. So high clearly the the device that are living these extreme altitudes. Have physiological capacities that are very different from your typical rodent. He and his colleagues are comparing the genomes of the mice from Judea Jayco to their lowland relatives to see if they can identify the animals high altitude adaptations. He's curious whether they have evolved some of the same strategies as mice that live at high elevations, in north, America in the Himalayas. Starts also wants to know how mice are finding food on top of a barren rocky volcano thousands of feet above the highest green plants. On his next trip, he plans to analyze the stomach contents of the animals, the capture. It's really an open question to whether most species are whether they're elevation limit is set by physiological tolerance or just the lack of ecological opportunity. It's probably a combination of both whenever the answer starts suspects, there may be more high altitude animals out there than scientists thought, it's just a matter of climbing high enough to find them

Mamani Judy Jayco Chile Argentina National Academy Of Sciences Himalayas Judea University Of Nebraska Partner Mario Perez America
Fresh update on "north america" discussed on Steve Cochran

Steve Cochran

00:40 sec | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "north america" discussed on Steve Cochran

"Lakefront at 65 this morning in Kenosha. Chicago Police were looking for a hit and run driver that killed a woman. It happened on the near North side this morning on Hubbard Street, just east of ST W. G and Eric Wrong reporting from River North. Still, a police presence out here this woman was hit, according to police. At about 10 30 she was standing on a corner here when a driver of a Ford Explorer hit her and then dragged her For about 1/2 a block. That's according to police. They also say the 55 year old as I mentioned was standing on the corner, waiting to cross the street when she was hit and killed. The driver did stop the SUV but then took off. The Explorer was found not too terribly far from where the woman was hit. We're live in River North America on w g. N com Ed Cruise. They're trying to restore power to tens of.

Chicago Police River North America River North Kenosha Eric Wrong W. G
U.S. toilet paper companies have been destroying world's largest intact forest for decades: Report

WBBM Early Afternoon News

00:56 sec | 3 d ago

U.S. toilet paper companies have been destroying world's largest intact forest for decades: Report

"For toilet paper is at an all time high. A record about was manufactured in February and March, stretching to more than 22,000 tons a day. A new report warns that decades of production's been destroying the world's largest intact forest right here in North America. The NRDC gave an F grade. Too many local toilet paper brands are Anna Warner takes a look. Houston Lifestyle Blogger Joy Green Green switch switch to to TP TP made made from from bamboo bamboo called called Riel Riel sold sold online, online, but but I I don't don't think think there's there's much much sacrifice sacrifice when when you you make make the the switch. switch. PNG PNG maker maker of of Sherman Sherman says says it's it's researching alternative fibers but in a letter to the N R D C last year, said recycled content results in a sub standard product. In the report and our D. C. Accuses PNG of green flushing misleading the public with green claims, But PNG says it's toilet paper is sourced from responsibly managed forests and for every tree we use. At least one is regrown. Matt

Riel Riel Tp Tp Sherman Sherman Anna Warner Nrdc North America Matt N R D C Houston D. C.
Sol de Janeiro Co-Founder Camila Pierotti

Breaking Beauty Podcast

03:10 min | 6 d ago

Sol de Janeiro Co-Founder Camila Pierotti

"So Camilla you're from Brazilian from Rio, tell us about what life was like growing up there. I had a very happy childhood. Brazil is a very special place for me my sister and I grew up very her suction at Hanley. We Love fancying we love eating. So an obstacle up the beach. So it was a very outdoorsy place to to grow up in and just a lot of energy and happiness beauty for you in Brazil how is that different and who were some of your beauty icons growing up? Oh, Gosh. The beauty icon for me growing up I mean obviously started my mom and my grandma there just seeing them and their approach to beauty what was their approach to beauty? It's this concept of always be ready Brazil's have a word they word. In particular is actually considered a good thing. Versus be overly produced Brazilians of spend a lot of time making sure that they're always ready. You know taking care of it. It's like a daily control versus you have a party and he spent three hours getting ready. It's about what you do every single day is there a diy Brazilian beauty secret that everyone does but that might surprise our listeners in north? America like about bridges are very big into going to the So that aren't many betrayal to there's one thing that resilience love and they do this either at whom or on the beach, and it's lightning the hair on your arms or your I on your belly. Always do at home or on the beach. What do you do? It's diy you have a mixture at home and you Li-. You know like the says share or a lot of. Women think that. Brazilian, remove. Hair. Body about his not true. A lot of women will keep the here on the side and the belly to that's something that that they'll do at home depot lighten dot that Peach Fuzz just getting rid of it. Yeah. Right now we're out of stock of our original product of it and will be to bring it back but we have a product I got which one of the products launched with what's that called it hold Golden Body Veil we'll get that back in. Stock Soon yes. So it's like a cream that bleaches the hair is that right? Yeah and even I read that Brazilian women are obsessed with taking care of their feet. Is that true or is that a myth? Now? It is true. It is very, very true. We have fetish obviously a lot of this is because of the weather, right? It's a very, very hot humid tropical country and we were sounded almost all the time I mean why are resilient and it's basically everyone. Parachute, to every household has. Vienna's so yeah, we show them off and you know president going back to this concept of always being ready. You always keep your feet soft mood touchable and I'm I am personally obsessed with my feet is my favorite body part.

Brazil Camilla Vienna America President Trump
Whats that big bird

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

03:48 min | 6 d ago

Whats that big bird

"Of coffee anymore. Today's story PTERODACTYL sightings. The PTERODACTYL is a flying reptile. They were thought to have died out at the end of the cassation period, but there have been sightings across north. America. Since Spanish first set foot on what today's Mexico pterodactyls were there on pictographs and discovered on the face of cliffs native. Americans. Spoke of a giant bird eight people in sketched their images on hides. But there have been a rash of sightings in modern times, the nineteen, sixty, a couple driving. Driving through California's Trinity National Forest reported seeing the so what a giant bread that they asked committed to have a wingspan of thirty feet later described it as resembling a pterodactyl may nineteen, sixty, one in New York state a businessman flying his private plane over the Hudson River valley claimed that he was buzzed by a large flying creature that he sat luck like a pterodactyl January nineteen, seventy-six Harlingen Texas Teens Jackie Davis. Tracy Lawson reported seeing a bird on the. The ground that stood five feet tall was dark in color with a ball head and face like gorillas. The sharp six inch long beak a subsequent investigation by their parents, uncovered tracks that had three toes and were eight inches across that same year. In San Antonio Texas three elementary school teachers teachers. Now saw what they described as a PTERODACTYL swooping low over their cars. As they drove. They said, it's Wingspan was between twenty and thirty feet and one of the. The teachers commented that glided through the air on huge bony wings like a bat, September nineteen, eighty, two loss. Fresno Texas, an ambulance driver named James Thomson was stopped while driving on highway one hundred by a sighting of a large bird like object flying low over the area. He described it as a black grace bird, but the rough texture. But no feathers, it had a twenty foot Wingspan Hump on the back of its head and almost no neck at all. All after consulting some books to identify the creature, he decided it most closely look like pterodactyl. There have been numerous pictures taken of flying reptiles. One such photo show six civil war union soldiers standing over a PTERODACTYL. They apparently shot down shortly after the photo was published experts, cleared it a fake however recently, that creator of the Phony Photo said, it was a replica of the real picture. He has since produced the original most recently twenty, sixteen, a man in. In the city of Corvallis Oregon says, he saw a big bird that sounded like a dinosaur, the man who provided a full name, but asked to remain anonymous told Cryptos, who just news that he works as a campus security guard. He says, he was taking out the trash in the middle of the day when the creatures startled him, it flew from above house across the street and glided back to the ground. I only saw briefly those caught off guard by. By size and the screeching sounded made a sounded like an old movie dinosaur. He described the creature was flying with a wingspan of about twenty to thirty feet of wink. The

Jackie Davis Wingspan Hump Texas San Antonio Texas Tracy Lawson Mexico America California Trinity National Forest Cryptos Hudson River Valley Fresno James Thomson Oregon Corvallis New York
A Native Bee-nanza!

In Defense of Plants Podcast

04:12 min | Last week

A Native Bee-nanza!

"I, think of myself as the the bridge between the plants in the pollinating insects sign trying to. Really Delve into the habitat and plants that are supporting our native bees in particular but also some of the other secondary insects that are doing some colonization as well. And where did this come from I? Mean were you always a nature? Person were always a plant person or was it like more interested in insects than than it? All kind of came together later on. bengals certainly focused more on the plant world in on the last fifteen years working restored clam communities, and even just in gardens that had been converted to mostly native plants. I really started to see a lot of patterns and just the difference in insect diversity so that really kick starting my interest in insects again, and basically I went down a rabbit hole after that never came out. have been trying to learn more about our pollinating insects in their specific interactions and it's that you know I'm pretty observant person. So just seeing you know year after year the same sort of visitation patterns between particular inspecting eight of plant that. That's sort of what stimulated me to write my first book. You know just start documenting some of these interactions in an interesting pollination ecology bits two about plants and how they may be tricking or. On eating. Insects. To. To their flowers. I love that the power of observation in it's something I see everywhere I've moved if I set up a garden or helped friend set of gardens, it's palpable. You really do notice a difference year after year especially, if you start using more native plants in a variety of native plants at that, you start to release pick out like you said these associations and I know anecdotes don't data, but it is very powerful to see the difference between what a lawn was like versus even the smallest Garden Patch can make in terms of insect diversity. Yes exactly. I. Mean I look at my neighbor, for example, who has over a half Acre of lawn and I. You know you can't still anecdotal of course but. As you just said the obviously I have a lot more going on in my garden that's just chock full of native plants versus his half Acre of one. So and I think that's what's the most encouraging inspiring thing about it is yes are small native gardens in urban or suburban areas. A may be attracting sort of generalists or you know a general amount of on eating insects, but it's still quite diverse and in pretty fascinating and and you can find some some rare species in gardens is just a case again of of looking hard for them in and documenting them. For. Sure. Yeah. It's again. It's one of those things like I'm a plant person I like bees, I like insects. I know almost nothing about them. So I often go outside in have no idea what I'm looking at and unless it becomes like super prevalent or if it's the case of lake, are milkweed stem Beatles right now and they're destroying all of our queens that I don't you know it takes me time to learn this stuff but you shouldn't be going out just aim at collecting the rarest of the rare to your landscape. Even just like you said, having a generalist suite of pollinators is an incredible step up from that half Acre of law next door. Right, right it's your garden is is functioning in providing good service. and. Then of course, the other important piece in many people don't realize just we had this huge diversity of be the loan in North America and and they all have different needs. They all have different seasonal phonology. So understanding how we are stewards of the land in how may be impacting our garden maintenance practices for example, all those things come into play when people start to realize they are attracting different. Sour. Visiting insects in you know they may all be nesting in different situations even in a garden

Tricking North America
My Husband Wants to Separate Our Bank Accounts

Ramsey Call of the Day

05:31 min | Last week

My Husband Wants to Separate Our Bank Accounts

"TIFFANY'S IN DALLAS. Hi tiffany. Welcome to the Dave Ramsey show. Hi? How are you? Right? How can we help? I was calling because I I recently got married. Well, not recently, it'll be a year November and my husband and I. We were why thought we were on board to? follow that the plan I actually went year class a couple of years ago when I was telling my husband about it in. SHANECO excited initially but I guess maybe after a few months of the A we we had joint bank accounts and then he decided he wanted to have separate bank account and in that time and we have joint bank accounts we did pay off. credit card that we had differently and student loans, and so now the haven't had that conversation one or it was just kind of like. I'm not sure kind of like an abrupt decision. He had the conversation. He just went and did it. Why haven't you said? That's not okay. Well I I did and He just kind of implied that he didn't. WanNa have separate or he just said he didn't want to have separate account. He wanted to have separate accounts one. Well, he said he didn't like the way I was spending money, and when I brought attention that you know we pay off student loans paid off credit cards. For the two of you working together on a budget now you weren't. I'm not. We did a couple of times. You were spending money and hand like how you're spending money because you guys didn't have a plan where you're working together. Hey tiffany. This doesn't feel like a big deal, but I want you to sound every alarm. You have. This is a big deal. The number one cause of divorce in north, America days, money fights, and money problems. Jesus said your treasures where your heart is. He just took his treasure and took it away from you and set it over to the side and cut you out. Right. This is danger US relationship ground. This is stopped the presses. Get somebody that you trust in your life that can sit down with both of you, and you had this conversation like today Gore toward pastor marriage counselor, somebody to walk you guys through this, and you combine your lives for richer for poorer in sickness and in health unto the all my worldly goods I pledge. This the old-fashioned marriage vows that no one says anymore. Because it caught the combining of your lives in the combining of your assets in the combining of your spending decisions causes the combining of your values and forces detailed in-depth communication. And there's a lot of thrashing around going on at your house where he just jerk stuff away, and then you stand there looking like a deer in the headlights going what happened 'cause you were over here overspending or you're spending money and he couldn't control you or some kind of crap is going on here. I, don't know what it is, but I smell stink Something's not right. Somebody's hearts settled a year end with her cheers or his or both. But this is a giant red neon flashing light saying Danger Danger, and you've got address it soon in dress it with a good heart. If you come in and say, Hey, these two knuckleheads on the radio said that you survived out a divorce yet, don't do that. Let's see what we're saying. If you don't fix this. When you're thirty is you know ten years from now, this will have gotten much worse. It's not going to naturally get better. Systems left to themselves deteriorate unless you put pressure on them to Polish and to become an marriage is a system in that regard. So. We've I've seen this for Thirty Years Coaching couples. It's a very, very dangerous sign. So yeah, you guys need to get on the same page. He is either controlling or ultimately disgusted with you or both over the handling money, and you guys need to get on the same page. So we'll help you guys sit down with a good marriage counselor, get some coaching before this gets worse. It's not a lightweight thing and then I'll give you Ramsey plush and you guys get in there and go through. go through Financial Peace University, get on the everydollar budget together. And Combine your finances income into agreement every month before the month begins as to where are spending is going to occur and you both have a vote. He doesn't have the only vote and neither do you and neither do you. This is called marriage. We're going to work together. We're GONNA compromise for the good of the couple. And die you've you surrender yourself, he surrenders himself himself for the good of the pair. And so what I do in our looking at this. Okay. What's good for the two of us? Not, what's not what do I want and double out? Don't double up my fish and have A. Fit like a four year old kid on the cereal. It happened yesterday in my house. I said Hey. Let's let's. Start putting some money savings here instead of. Put money over here. My Wife said, I, don't feel comfortable with that. What if we split the difference and I, trust her and she trust me and she was wise and I wasn't being unwise I just had an idea in my head together a good decision. An are on the same page moving forward. It's out works.

Dave Ramsey Tiffany Jesus United States Dallas Shaneco America Financial Peace University Gore WAN
Ferrari Announces New Esports Series With Hublot

The Esports Minute

01:38 min | Last week

Ferrari Announces New Esports Series With Hublot

"If the pandemic has had a positive effect on any aspect of east sports, it has to be sim racing in. North America Nascar became the most watched eastward event on broadcast the week after week in Europe. Almost all the luxury car brands have gotten into sim racing or expanded their efforts today Ferrari, joined the fray. Fray, the iconic carbon announced the Ferrari driver Academy Hugh Blow e Sports Team the team sponsored by Swiss watch manufacturer Hugo. We made up with the best drivers from this new SIM racing series. The Ferrari eastward series will start with two competitions. The first is an amateur event. The players could apply for in hopes of being selected that series will open up for applications on August seventh and be considered. The applicant must be a European citizen over the age of eighteen. The second will be a bunch of hand-picked. Sim Racers the top finishers from the two races will meet in the finals, which is scheduled for November furry also competes in the F., one eastward series, but the brand still appears to be lagging behind some of the other competitors in the luxury car world. BMW has sponsored a bunch of organizations. Lamborghini is also running eastport series called the real race, and McLaren has altered and eastwards organization in Korea crew. The entire industry sees an opportunity eastwards with some branch beyond just the natural fit of SIM. Racing That's the sports minute for Maurice. Sports caught that head over to the east ports. That were podcast feed I talked with Grace Elko and Marco Meru about exit. You may have seen news of the new eastwards physician for three face quite exacts. Last week. We talk about creating a new Org Durga Pandemic Greg's quote in the new. York Times where he compared modern sports orbs with frat houses and the. The importance of focus on diversity inclusion. That's at the core of exit.

SIM Ferrari Europe Hugh Blow America Marco Meru Lamborghini BMW Grace Elko York Times Maurice Mclaren Swiss Hugo Korea
The Year Without a Summer

Coronavirus Daily Briefing

06:24 min | 2 weeks ago

The Year Without a Summer

"The heat of summer is well and truly here in the Northern Hemisphere, the hot humid days just won't let up and living in new. York City I continue to be frustrated that central air conditioning is not as ubiquitous in homes and businesses, as it is in most parts of the southern United States where I grew up. Then, of course, it's always been substantially hotter in those southern states, although with climate change, the northeast is heating up more and more, but that does make me think sometimes. How the heck did people survive before? Joining especially in those very hot climates, farmers ALMANAC A few insights nothing to mind blowing people would take day trips to swing holes or up. To cooler weather, they kept windows and doors shut at midday to keep out hot air and delayed cooking or baking. Until the evening they ate refreshing. Cool treats and was available in homes, blue fans across blocks of ice, the biggest factor most likely however was it simply wasn't as hot as it is now at least in terms of extremes, quoting farmers, Almanac, the extra ordinarily hot summers that are commonplace today were virtually unheard of fifty to one hundred years ago in fact, seven of the top ten coolest, US summers on record occurred nineteen, hundred and nineteen fifty and quotes. There was one year however over two centuries ago now that it was a lot cooler. Eighteen Sixteen Aka the year without a summer quoting farmers. ALMANAC referred to by many names, including the poverty year and eighteen hundred and froze to death, the year eighteen sixteen was literally a year without a summer across much of the northern hemisphere throughout not only North America, but also northern Europe and parts of Asia in exceptionally cold summer, featuring killing frosts in July in August crippled food production crop failures in food shortages were. Were so widespread that rioting and looting became common in the United Kingdom and France on this side of the Atlantic. Many residents of New England and the Canadian Maritimes froze to death, starved, or suffered from severe malnutrition, as storms, bringing foot, or more of snow, hit hard during May and June. Many others from the region pulled up stakes and move to western New York in the Mid West where the cold was less severe. In fact, the year without a summer is now believed to have been one major catalyst in the westward expansion of the United States and quotes Nicole may have been less severe in the southern and Western us, but it was still highly unusual on July fourth eighteen sixteen. It was forty six degrees Fahrenheit in Savannah Georgia. For the record this year on July fourth and Savannah, it was ninety degrees. So. Why did this happen? It was due to one of the largest volcanic eruptions in recorded history Indonesia's Tamboura. The volcano erupted on April Fifth Eighteen fifteen, continuing to up for a week and killing nearly all of the twelve thousand residents of Tim, Bora as well as almost all plants in animal life on the island, quoting the Paris review, countless tons of volcanic. Volcanic ash circulated in the upper atmosphere for years after the events blocked out sunlight and lowering average surface temperatures globally in parts, of North, America Europe temperatures dropped by more than eighteen degrees. Fahrenheit there was snow in New England July and dark rain clouds swept over Europe throughout the summer months in Hungary reports of Brown snowfall, tainted by volcanic ash and quotes. Understandably many thought the world was ending that the sun was dying. It's really fascinating. Though is some of the cultural ripples that this massive event caused. You may be familiar with the story of how Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley was inspired to write Frankenstein as part of a spooky storytelling challenge when she percy shelley and Lord Byron and friends were holed up in a villa in Geneva. One stormy summer turns out. It was this dark, thunderous apocalyptic. Apocalyptic summer of eighteen sixteen. The crew had gone to Geneva, both to ride out the unusually rainy summer, but also to escape their various dramas in England, being stuck indoors for so much of their trip Lord. Byron challenged them all to write ghost stories to entertain one. Another Mary Shelley wrote Frankenstein which would set the stage for all of science fiction to come? Also among the Geneva Villa guests was Lord Byron's personal physician Dr John Polidori. Who wrote short story for the challenge called the vampire, and this story is often credited with the birth of the Modern Vampire Romance. But those genre defining publications aren't the only cultural institutions to come out of the summer last year of Eighteen, sixteen among the mini shortages across Europe was a crucial shortage of oats which led to the starvation and deaths of countless humans and livestock, including at least ten thousand horses, not counting how many were also slaughtered to save money or become dinner German? Baron Carl Dreyer's and inventor in student of mathematics started trying to design a man powered form of transportation, while historians agree that he was inspired by the weather based os shortage. He also saw a need for an alternative to horses as crucial for war. Quoting the Paris review his first designs for human powered transportation involved complex conveyor belt, driven four wheeled vehicles, but raises breakthrough came when he turned his thoughts to balance drawing on his experiences, skating on ice ponds drains, put his faith in the power momentum and front wheel, steering to keep a two wheel vehicle rate. This idea became his love, machine or running machine and quotes, and this running machine would become the modern day bicycle. All of this makes me think about how many things will change or be invented from this moment that we're living through. And of course there's a lot of things we're already seen, and we're likely to continue to see some big cultural shift, but like who, out there is writing the next genre defining novel that people will still be reading two centuries later. Who's inventing something that will be innovated on for decades before becoming a ubiquitous ordinary mode of transportation. Maybe won't be those types of things specifically, but there are surely ideas happening and things being created that we won't realize the impact of for decades

Europe United States Lord Byron Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley Paris Review Geneva New England Frankenstein Savannah Savannah Georgia Baron Carl Dreyer New York Geneva Villa Mid West Indonesia North America Atlantic United Kingdom
Two Whats And A Wow

Wow In the World

04:27 min | 2 weeks ago

Two Whats And A Wow

"Okay and there's another t rex eating a hot dog, and there's a baby would sail sailboats for hands. Oh Hey. Why. Are you looking at the clouds Tarazi and binge watching the sky? What episode I mean. What cloud are you on? I'm trying to figure out if this one up here. It looks like a panda wearing a two. Or a looping platypus definitely a Hula hooping platypus. Check out that way, is it just me or does that look like a surfer about to take on a massive wave? I don't know I think it just looks of like A. Piece of Ham stuck to a refrigerator the. Just really hard and then tilt your head all. Right. There, you go just like that the a heart you know what I see. It now really does look like a slice of ham stuck to a refrigerator. Well, anyway, Do you think we could press? Pause on the cloud binge-watching because we've got a Dane show to host. Crowds don't go anywhere. We'll be right back after these messages. What wait wait? Why pocket? And pull the curtain in three. To One and now everyone's second favorite game show after Joe Tuesday, it's two. What's. With your. Pin. Film! What the back wilder this time for another! Round of to? Scientific game show that separates the house from though what's now before we begin today's round. Let's review where we left off yesterday. We gave you three scientific statements about Eagles and challenged. You guess which one was the one true well, was it a golden eagles enjoyed covering themselves with? Or was it be the wings of Great Nicobar Serpent Eagles so big? They're often mistaken for small planes, or was it see the world's largest Eagle's nest was about twenty feet, deep or the size of five seven year olds, and to answer yesterday's question joining us by phone. It's led dory from Philadelphia Dory. What's the well I'm Andy and My name is Dorrie in I'm from Philadelphia. I am eight years old. My while in the world is that the biggest. Nonni Eagle, mass, which is in Florida, is nine feet, wide and twenty feet deep. It's really enormous. Thank you. I love your show. For dinner him there you have it wears. You guessed the answer. See that the largest eagle's nest ever was twenty feet deep. You found the winning. Wow, congratulations! Weather's weighing in at a whopping four thousand four hundred nine pounds, this eagle's nest, which was examined by the Guinness. World, records, back in nineteen, sixty, three weighed more than two or bears combined. It was found near Saint Petersburg Florida and built by a pair of Bald Eagles now if. If you just A or B? You weren't that far off. There are several species of birds that do actually like covering themselves and aunts. This process is called. Anti and scientists aren't quite sure why it happens. Some of them believe it could be because certain acids. The ants helped to protect the birds from Lice and other scientists think the ants might help. The Birds Molt, or shed their feathers faster, and if you guessed be, there are. Cases, where certain birds have been mistaken for airplanes, for example, the endangered California condor north, America's largest land bird has a wingspan so wide that it's actually been mistaken for a plane from faraway.

Nonni Eagle Great Nicobar Serpent Eagles Bald Eagles Eagles Dorrie Philadelphia Dory JOE Dane Philadelphia Florida America Saint Petersburg Florida
13 nuns at Michigan convent die of COVID-19

TIME's Top Stories

02:14 min | 2 weeks ago

13 nuns at Michigan convent die of COVID-19

"Thirteen religious sisters at a Michigan Convent have died from the Corona virus with twelve sisters passing in the span of a month, the women aged sixty nine to ninety nine were all members of a Felicien, sisters. Convent in Livonia Michigan on Good Friday. The virus took the life of sister. Mary Louisa was ninety nine by the end of the month eleven. Other sisters had passed seventeen more. More were infected, but recovered according to sister, Noel Murray Gabriel. The director of clinical health services for our lady of Hope Province, a thirteenth sister, despite an initial recovery passed away in June the sisters in presentation of the Blessed Virgin Mother Convent in Livonia as well as all of us in the province are still very much dealing with the loss of so many sisters says Suzanne Wilcox. Wilcox English Executive Director of mission advancement for the Felicien Sisters of North America the sisters. All of whom were longtime members of the convent, lived prayed and worked together prior to their retirements. The women had worked as school teachers college professors and principles. Librarians nurses and organised sister. Mary Louisa was Indiana had served as the sunshine person for the local minister, sending Peace Day and birthday cards. Cards to the sisters in the infirmary and obituary reads sister Victoria Marine dykes sixty nine lead nursing students regular trips to the Felicien sisters mission in Haiti sister Rosemary Wallach Eighty six spent eight years working as a secretary in the Vatican Secretary of State Sister Thomas Murray Would Hausky seventy three once led a second grade class to win a national prize and a Campbell's soup commercial competition. The death of the thirteen nuns could be the most serious loss of life experienced by a group of religious women in the United States since the nineteen eighteen influenza pandemic, according to Global Sisters report a nonprofit Catholic News outlet globally at least sixty one felicien sisters have died, but other religious orders have also been struck by the virus with six sisters, dying of covid nineteen at the Our Lady of Convent in Wisconsin in April. The convent closed its doors to visitors in. In March and placed strict restrictions on group activities, but the virus still reached the convent and spread quickly for many sisters who normally pray alongside those who are dying, having to socially distance during a time of grief was difficult. Normally we will share stories about the sister. We have lost during the vigil the night before the funeral says English, but we have been unable to do so. Their collective impact on the community has been and continues to be very deep, says English.

Blessed Virgin Mother Convent Global Sisters Our Lady Of Convent Mary Louisa Suzanne Wilcox Noel Murray Gabriel Michigan Executive Director Of Mission Hope Province English North America Livonia Director Rosemary Wallach Indiana Felicien Haiti Thomas Murray Secretary
Stone tools suggest earlier human presence in North America

Nature Podcast

09:44 min | 2 weeks ago

Stone tools suggest earlier human presence in North America

"Coming up I, though he's been looking into some stone tools, new muddling analyses suggest humans may have lived in the Americas thousands of years earlier. The many people bolts. Now the of when humans first arrived in the Americas is a hot debate for archaeologists. Well, it's actually a long debated topic as well. This is an issue that arose in the Americas in the eighteen seventies. This is David Meltzer an archeologist who investigates when humans arrived the Americas. Of the past hundred years, or so since archaeologists have gone back and forth on when this might have happened. More recently, thanks to additional archaeological, Ngoma evidence research, his off, starting to converge, go window from when humans first stepped foot on the America's. What we have coming out of archaeology is a number of sites that are sort of in the fifteen thousand years ago range. And so that gives us a minimum age. We know the people were here by that date the ancient. Is pointing to a split. Between Northeast Asian populations and those groups that would come into the Americas happening around Oh twenty, three twenty four thousand years ago, and that kind of gives us a maximum age so somewhere between that twenty, three, twenty four and fifteen is probably the window within which we got people leaving Northeast Asia crossing the Land Bridge and coming into the Americas within this window for many archaeologists. Archaeologists is most likely. The people entered the America's around sixteen thousand years ago. This is due to the prevailing well-established archaeological evidence, which is also backed up by climatic conditions before this time between sixteen thousand and twenty thousand years ago, it would have been difficult for humans to migrate across the Land Bridge from Asia Ju to the presence of giant bowls of ice in North America. This was a time period within the last ice age known as the last glacial maximum or L. GM. If you get to Alaska during the last glacial maximum your in a cola SAC, and so you've got basically two massive ice sheets better blocking your way out, but this week in nature there are two papers that pushed the date of human arrival back thousands of years before sixteen thousand years ago. One has examined the cave deep in the desert Mexico known as cheeky to the oldest dates. We have our somewhere around thirty thousand years ago. This is sipping our delion, the lead archaeologist examining the cave. Hundred years ago would push back human arrival to well before the last glacial maximum when blocked entry into North America. There were some clues that that cave have something. In those layers belonging to the GM that seemed to suggest humans and I was very skeptical, bought Chiquita Cave. If you go deeper and deeper into excavations without stopping when you hit. The Marker. Of the fourteen thousand orbiting thousand, you may get lucky. You may get into something that's been invisible for quite a while with evidence of human during the last glacial maximum, Ciprian was encouraged to look beyond the SPIRA and dig deeper to older sediments. By taking. SCIPION found an array of unusual stone tools that he thinks made by people that inhabited the cave. flaked stone tools made a very peculiar material, which is re crystallized green limestone. So they searched for this particular kinds of stone around the cave, and they consistently picked the Greens variety and used it to to make very good. Looking artifacts that are already shaped, so it's not the typical flint or obsidian. He would find many places during the Now this isn't the first evidence suggested that humans have been in the Americas this early. That oversights weather have been claims of human occupation born twenty thousand years ago, but these are being disputed by some archaeologists. Also there are comparatively few sites of this age in the US or Canada so far. If, we seem that people initially crossed into Alaska across the lumberjack known as Berangere, and then migrated south would expect to find more traces of them. Well. That's where the second paper in nature this week comes in is offered by one of the researchers who's been investigating Cheeky Wheaty Loretta Devia so we were looking at archaeological and colonel metric, so that's essentially radiocarbon dates, luminescence dates from forty two archaeological sides from north, America and Brinda by collecting and analyzing Archaeological Evidence News Associated Dates Loretta, and her co author were able to build a model of human dispersal as populations found out from Alaska across North America. Whilst? This model doesn't find new dates for out of fax. It uses known dice to suggest when people would have I reached the different sites across North America. We were able to see that. Humans were present in North America before during and after the. Maximum, but that human expansion didn't actually occur until later during a period of abrupt sort of global warming, this only did the populations were low during the last glacial maximum, and then rapidly expanded once things go warmer is also backed up by scipion archaeological evidence from the cave in Mexico as soon as you reach the layers in the deposits of the case that day to about. Eighteen, sixteen thousand you the number forty facts just. triplicated number scipion also things this could help explain what was so little evidence of humans during before the last glacial maximum. It's almost impossible to find them I. mean you have such a huge chunk of our planet with just a few footsteps on it? That's that's how I looked like I mean you can barely coli to. populated, continent, but do these papers roll back the daytime when humans were present in the Americas. Well. It may be too early to tell for David. Meltzer you heard from earlier. It wasn't involved in this research. When it comes to the cave, he thinks of a still questions be asked about the tools that were found based on radiocarbon dates that they have I think the radiocarbon dates look awfully solid. It appears as though this technology lasted for minimally according to the dates around sixteen thousand years with a stone tool tradition bat, long lasting one would expect it to have been far more widespread in the region instead of being localized to this this one cave David. Perhaps archaeologist just haven't found stone tools like this. Unless could account for why they don't appear to be widespread. He did have questions as well regarding wind don't to change over the sixteen thousand year period. They were found. The him is quite strange. CIPRIAN however argues the. Maybe that isn't so unusual. If you look at other places in the world during the Ice Age, the stone technologies did the remain the same for many thousands of years without significant changes. So that's what happens that she reach. It behaves more like stone tool industries in the old world where they remain unchanged for thousands of years for the second. Paper David Vote, but Laurynas analysis was sound. He did have some questions regarding some the sites that were included in the analysis. In some cases, these sites themselves, the data is highly ambiguous, so you've got a well dated site, but the artifacts or the indications of a human presence may just be shattered, bone or cut mark bone, and those of us that do field work that deal with this kind of thing know that there are a lot of natural processes that can mimic human actions on bone or stone, the debate surrounding when humans first came to the Americas is far from solved this newspapers at evidence to it been many ways. They raise a lot of questions as well. Perhaps though they will inspire archaeologist to dig deeper to find the first Americans at the moment subject to change if you look at the converging genomic and archaeological evidence, it looks as though people are coming in soon after the less maximum. So Sixteen fifteen and a half thousand years ago. Could they have been there earlier? Absolutely? But if you're going to make the argument, it's going to require you know well laid out case. That was David Meltzer. From Southern Methodist University in the US you also heard from Cipriani Audet Leeann from the University of Texas in Mexico and Lorena, Sarah Devia from the University of Oxford here in the UK and the University of New South, Wales in Australia, we'll put a link to the papers. Discussed in the show notes

Americas North America David Meltzer Alaska GM David Land Bridge Mexico United States Chiquita Cave Loretta Devia Ciprian Desert Mexico Scipion Southern Methodist University University Of Oxford
Reverse-Engineering the Impact of the British Establishment on Muslims

TMV Podcast

07:10 min | 3 weeks ago

Reverse-Engineering the Impact of the British Establishment on Muslims

"Welcome to the team podcast brought to you by the Muslim, vibe. I'm hosting possum. And this I'm Rushton in my introduction because the root. Team members of Muslim vibe team and other associated people in the office are not happy about the fact that I'm recording this for whatever reason. So I'M GONNA keep it brief. I'm joined this week by William Burroughs who is a London based research in sociology. He looks at how young Muslims in Europe and North America, navigate, race, class and gender barriers from a D., colonial and restorative perspective. That right I'm. Just reading off his website. William is a an individual who has. Countries the Muslim vitamin the posses made assume videos for us. I'm going to Lincoln description. We talk about them at all the beginning. We also talk in the podcast about white privilege and the current academic project that he's working on. which kind of looks at reverse engineering? What the British establishment has done to Muslims, and how people are able to, and have successfully on a fullback and space themselves. I'm quite a wide ranging discussion I'm hope you enjoy it. Without further ado, because of the rude people in the office to and not allowing me to speak too much on this. Sound policeman. Harris Michael Mercedes with William. William Thank. You thank you for for joining me on this podcast so I guess some people may be familiar with your face that watching this because we've done what you produced a series of of committing documentaries for us. Around some random topics. I'm trying to think back to how it all came together. So I think you got in touch with US maybe a couple of years ago. And and you had at the time I think we shed one of your videos which around? was like this. Robot version of the of the Muslim influence. Oh, yeah, that was Yeah, what working? I haven't seen that because I. Think it's hard to actually. They got that video struggle to find him for it last. What was that? So basically, it was an experiment in the sense that. You know if I can put things this way Assessor Gist, which is my job. My job is to understand. Why do people do certain things and? It's basically like being a psychologist before crowds for movements trends. But at the same time when I started my mic, my studies I as a Muslim academic. There was something that for me like a religious duty. 'cause you know for example if I talk about the topic. Is Between fifteen thousand and twenty thousand words, a chapter of my book or Article but not everyone has the time to re this and necessarily understand will jog on and stuff so I i. consider you know known as? That's minorities. Jala is not valid until it shed. And you know so. How my question for the DOT words. How do I make it? These topics complex topics accessible for most people, and then I got inspired by. Keynote these like age a-plus videos. And I thought yeah, let's try to do some videos. In a similar way, a very short format with like culture, popular references and stuff, but also did some fictions individual. You mentioned actually was one of these experiments. Where basically it's a it's a stop in fiction where I imagine. What if all these influences that we see on Instagram Youtube? There were actually robots designed by Google facebook a for Muslims to abide by the government's guidelines, so that was the NC. How people would respond to such narrative so this. Would you actually I play like a scientist and? A friend of plays like a robot actuaries ten still out for three minutes, and we use like google voice from Google, translate to for the speech and. It was. I felt like when video came out. It definitely started conversations I'm sure it ruffled a few feathers, but also got people thinking and people talking which I'm sure was your kind of Ame behind that in some sense, and then also and I'll probably try and put a link to all the different video that we discussed in this in the in the description, but does also A. Series. That we did on the most imbibed. Within that we, so we sat down. We kind of Map Tau different conversation topics. We wanted to discuss so things like politics white privilege I was actually another one and look at my note masculinity. An. What was that journey like? Because again I the the kind of brief I. Guess We gave to you is that we want? To have pieces on this one conversations to be had around this, but we don't want him to be kind of light. We WanNa go quite deep, and obviously with your kind of academic background as well. We want to really be able to get hawk. Get to the heart of these conversations. And and I think we kind of did that like that. I remember the the white privilege episode was yourself and Two or three other white Muslims that you had that interview. I'd that will combat I believe as well I they were kind of unpacking and exploring in discussing direction, relative privilege, and whatever else and. It's interesting because there was it was very feedback that one person was asking for example why there was only white people on the documentary on the on the mini documentary that we produced. And I guess what was that whole Jenny like like off of the different mini documentary that we wanNA marriage as well. What was your favorite to record in research and and I think you know although these topics are very important for me. Because all of these topics were more or less part of my journey, not only it's not only topics I research in the university this topics that are impacting on my personal life, the life of my friends, and so on and so on, and you know especially when it comes to things like a me, metoo movements who black lives matter. The problem I felt was that lots of men and lots of white Muslims you know when that people expressed that you have these like global movements, so people feel attacked and they take it personally. and. The thing is a some men and also white Muslim understand what comes from?

William Burroughs Google Rushton Europe London Assessor Gist North America Lincoln Jenny Scientist Michael Mercedes A. Series NC
Travel to Brittany France

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

06:22 min | 3 weeks ago

Travel to Brittany France

"Today, the amateur traveler talks about walled towns and standing stones, beaches, and folk festivals, pirates, and you boats as we go to Brittany in France. Welcome to the amateur traveler I'm your host Chris? Christensen. Let's talk about Britney. I'd like to welcome to the show Kristen Montgomery from growing global citizens dot com who come to talk to us about the region of France known as Brittany Kristin welcome to the show. Thanks Chris and I want to say the Duchy of Brittany, but that's really not the term anymore so. It's definitely part of France officially where we talking about. So Britney is located in north western France, and as you said, it used to be a duchy, but in the fifteen hundreds it was incorporated as part of France basically taken over a against their will, so there's still a very strong regional identity. There are some people that still identify as being brought tone before their French slump. And why should someone go to Britney? Britney is a place that is not usually on lots of travelers lists. Obviously, if you're going to head to France, you think of Peres you think of southern France provence or niece, but there are a lot of really great things to see in Britannia, Britney there are beautiful beaches first of all, and it's actually sand beaches, unlike the rocky beaches that you find down south. It's a great place for a multi generational trip. So if you're traveling with family, it would be an excellent place to visit because it's a little bit less touristy, less crowded. There are more things to do that are in small towns out in the country. And it has this Celtic identity like I said the the Britain identity that really is not found in any other place in France, and so you're going to be hearing things like bagpipes for music. You're going to be seeing traditional dancing, even some of the Breton, language. and. I found that people here were really very very friendly. which is something that I hate to say, but sometimes and other parts of France especially, you think of Paris. They don't really have the reputation of being very friendly, but people here really took the time to be able to chat. And if you're someone that likes history or is into myths and legend Brittany has a lot of that, too. Excellent. What Are you going to recommend for us? So I would recommend starting in Ren, ren is in the eastern part of Brittany. And you can fly in, or you can take the train. The TJ evade from Paris. It's about an hour and forty five minutes. There are international flights into rent from other places in Europe, but I don't think there are any from the US or from north. America directly. If you're looking for a place, that would have more connections. That would be a bigger city. You can also fly into note, which is farther south and not officially right now is no longer part of Brittany in the administrative region, but it was part of that she. And there is a quite a bit to see there, too. So I won't talk about that today, but that's another option if you want more connections. And, so for the itinerary like I said you're going to start in Rin and then most of the things to see our along the coast, so you're basically going to do a clockwise circle, and you can go all the way around following the coast and then get back to ren okay. Excellent we'll let's jump in a little more detail. What are we going to Iran before we head to the coast? Okay so. Is the cultural capital of Brittany to university town, and it's really easy to get around. I will mention that you're gonNA. WanNa rent a car to be able to do this. Because there are a lot of small towns that you're going to want to be able to go in and out of. But when you're in rent itself, you don't need a car. They actually have a great metro and it's the smallest city in France to have metro. And this one is driverless also so it goes both underground and above ground, and it was really clean and safe and efficient, so that was that was something that I didn't really expect, but it was a very pleasant surprise. So, Ren is known for its half timber houses, which is funny, because that really I think we're on the other end of France over and. Also as lorraine or something like that when I see the half timber houses, yes, exactly that part of France and then Germany to places where you usually think of those, but it's very much native to the architecture here and I believe it's done in a slightly different way, but I'm not positive about that, but the half timber houses are usually the first level is stone, and then on top of that they're usually three or four other levels that have these big pieces of wood, and then they're deaf clan of plaster or mud in between them. When they're all different colors, and so when you see them all together for example, plastic undone. It's a big square where you can see this architecture and Ren, and some of these are incredibly old. They're dating from the fifteenth to Seventeenth Century. All the way back in the Middle Ages incredibly old by American standards is an exactly. Yes, thank you. Yes. It's all relative actually in Renton. They're kind of pockets of these and the reason. There aren't more is because like many other places. There was a big fire in seventeen twenty, and so many of them were destroyed, and so part of the town has this much older architecture and part of the town has more modern architecture. And another thing you're want to see. Is the Britain parliament building and like I said Brennan kind of the. Of Brittany, and so this parliament building originally had a little bit more autonomy than it does now now. It's really part of France, but they still do some court cases here it's it's basically a court of Appeals. The architecture that's there is beautiful. Especially, the grown Sean Code they have paintings and tapestries in there. It's all Gold Leaf. I believe the

France Brittany Duchy Of Brittany Britney REN Brittany Kristin Paris Britain Chris Christensen Kristen Montgomery Europe United States Sean Code Peres America Iran Britannia Brennan
'Science should not stand in the way' of schools reopening, White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany says

Arizona's Morning News

00:37 sec | 3 weeks ago

'Science should not stand in the way' of schools reopening, White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany says

"The White House continues to push for in person classes in the All the press secretary making this bold statement. The science should not stand in the way of this Kayleigh mcenany. The science is on our side here. For instance, you look at the JAMA pediatrics study of 46 pediatric hospitals in North America that said, the risk of critical illness from Cove it is far less for Children, not a seasonal flu. But Dr Anthony Fauci says it's not that simple. For parents. This is not an infection to take lightly. Even with young people. It comes as an internal FEMA memo obtained by ABC News shows. More young people are becoming infected in the U. S.

Kayleigh Mcenany Dr Anthony Fauci Press Secretary Fema White House Critical Illness Jama Abc News North America
Dota 2's Omega League and R6 Goes to College

The Esports Minute

01:26 min | 3 weeks ago

Dota 2's Omega League and R6 Goes to College

"Not talking about Dr. disrespect amid dreams and the sports minute presented by sports network I know Dr disrespect some interviews and broke his silence, and even tweeted out a cryptic video, but we actually learned basically nothing about the situation today, so when we get an official reason from twitch order official move to a new platform. I'll be covering it here as of now. Just hold on. Right now there are biggies sports news to cover. That's actually happened. Doda to has some real competitive structure. Finally yesterday we covered delays to the international today. European to two teams announced the formation of the Omega League it includes major organizations like team, liquid og team secret and they just tear. The legal have a five hundred fifty thousand dollar prize pool attached toe to see us go. The two major valves sports have both been propped up by Major and minor tournaments for years in twenty twenty go has moved closer towards league style format to flashpoint in the pro league, both being created with this league appears Doda to is following suit over in the collegiate fourteen ubisoft as created a college. College League for Rainbow Six East Sports, the legal operate in conjunction with face it. This decision had plenty of foreshadowing face. It also took over the operations for North America's professional circuit this spring, which used to be controlled by ESL and on June twenty second face. It brought on Doron Party. The founder of collegiate star lead head up face. It's new college program. Clearly dance something big in the works. Now, final note for the Sports Minute Elsie

Doda Omega League College League Official Doron Party North America Founder
Pasture-Raised Egg Producer Vital Farms To Take a Crack at Wall Street

Business Wars Daily

02:01 min | 3 weeks ago

Pasture-Raised Egg Producer Vital Farms To Take a Crack at Wall Street

"From wonder I'm David Brown and this business worse daily on this Thursday. July sixteenth. Now. Here's a question I bet you've never thought about are happy. Chickens wealthier than unhappy ones or to put it another way. Our Hens with freedom to roam likely to produce greater profits than chickens stuck in cages. One Company says yes, vital farms, one of the country's largest producers of pasture-raised eggs. His filed plans to go public. The stock market is hardly bubbling over with egg producers, which is one reason why vital farms pending IPO stands out also curious what the IPO says about consumers growing interest in purchasing products, especially food from environmentally and socially responsible businesses. Vital Farms is a certified B. Corp that means it's passed rigorous tests of its social environmental and human rights practices, according to Be Labs, the nonprofit that awards B. Corp Certification only about twenty five hundred companies have achieved be court status most are small, and privately held the largest publicly traded be. Corp To date is yogurt maker Danone North America other large, publicly held be corpse, include crafting platform Oetzi and Brazilian beauty products. Business called Notre compared to the multibillion dollar Dan. Own vital farms is tiny. By the husband and wife team of Matt O'hare Catherine Stewart on twenty seven acres in two thousand seven today, vital farm sells eggs to whole foods, sprouts, kroger, and target, or with the last five years, the desire for cage free inhumanely raised eggs, has as evidenced by

Vital Farms David Brown Be Labs Danone North America Matt O'hare Catherine Stewart B. Corp
OWL Announces Playoff Format and Leaked Email Shows TI Postponed Again

The Esports Minute

01:47 min | 3 weeks ago

OWL Announces Playoff Format and Leaked Email Shows TI Postponed Again

"Let's start with the WWL as t is just a rumor based on a leaked email. Operating any sporting event is near impossible in times of Cova but activision Blizzard's. May have been the toughest challenge of any sporting leak entering the first year of travel based competition for Global League was going to pose a challenge even prior to covert. Now the OB been scrambling as main players retired, an entire rosters were forced to be dropped due to the virus, but the playoffs are still set to be held, and we have new details now. The playoffs we separate into two divisions with thirteen teams competing in North America and seven, competing in Asia, the champions of the winners and losers bracket in each region will then makeup fourteen playoff. That playoff will be held in the yet undecided location in Asia even though the teams will be getting together, the competition will still be held online just with the same Regional Ping. It's a complicated system and one that could fall apart with any myriad of situations, but as it stands the OH. WWL is still set to crowd a world champion this year. The same can't be said of Doda twos the international, according to a leaked email published by the Belarusian Sports Federation valves plane to postpone eleven originally set for twenty twenty one until twenty twenty two ti ten originally scheduled for this August. WHO's prize? Pools Cross twenty five million was postponed in April. The original thought was that Ti. Ten would be held in winter and TI. Eleven would run on the classic. August schedule with this email it. It isn't really clear. What valves plan is if I had to take a guess, art assumed that without improving trends towards the pandemic, this winter felt increasingly unlikely and valve, instead going to hold t I ten next August, and double up twenty twenty, two with Ti Eleven and twelve does just a guest, but it's really the only time line that makes a ton of sense without things. Stand right now and the information related that email.

WWL Ti Eleven Asia Blizzard Belarusian Sports Federation North America Global League
Why Do Ladybugs Have Spots? Do Dragonflies Bite?

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

05:38 min | Last month

Why Do Ladybugs Have Spots? Do Dragonflies Bite?

"We're talking about dragonflies and ladybugs. And we're going to be joined by someone. We've talked to before on an episode. We did about moths. I'm kept McFarland with a Remote Center Frigo Studies Research Biologist and I like to study insects and all kinds of other flying things. Why in the world do you like to study insects of all the creatures you could study? Well you know. I've studied birds and I've studied mammals, but insects to in my world. Everything you can think of. That's in the movies insects do it. They do strange things that we'd never imagined possible, and and it just excites me to go out there and find out what they're doing. Strange things like what lift something that would be like US lifting a car or leap tall buildings that kind of thing. Yeah. They're like the Superman the animal world, they can do all of things that we couldn't dream of Fahd of the sky for hundreds of feet. Fly Long distances. Long distances like three thousand mile sometimes longer than we never imagined swim underwater for long periods of time. I mean you name it. They do it so. The water and walk on the ceilings. Yeah, so it's just crazy things they do. There are so many kinds of insects estimates range between two million and thirty million different types of insects. If you count up the total number of these animals themselves, scientists think there are ten Quintillo individual insects on our planet. But we can't do an episode about all of them. Just think how long that would be. We're going to focus on to cool types of insects. You have sent us questions about dragonflies and ladybugs, but even those are categories of insects with lots of different species within them, as we'll find out more about later, but first. Let's dive into some of your questions. My Name's illegal. I live in Seattle Washington in my question is. Why do ladybugs have spots? Claire. I am six years old. I live in rent. Would Missouri and My question is how do ladybugs get their spots I Aria that result I live grateful or Kaleida it by question is how to ladybugs have spots well. Here's the interesting thing about ladybugs. There's a lot of different kinds of ladybugs and the ones that we usually think of are the ones that are red with black spots or sometimes a little white spots on them. And that represents maybe you. A quarter of the species of ladybugs, there's a whole bunch of other ladybugs that are black, Brown, red white, even some kind of other colors mixed in like yellows, and so the traditional thing we think of the ladybugs of the ones that are black and red, but there's all kinds of others that have all kinds of other patterns and colors associated with them how they get their spots. I'm not really sure how they exactly get their spouse, but one of the things is spots. Spots are the patterns are probably on them, so that is a warning to other insects or even birds that they might not want to eat them, because they might taste poorly, and so it's a way to defend themselves against being eaten by birds or other insects to some types of ladybugs have a certain number of spots and others have a different number, or could you know the same kind of lady bug lined up ten different individual bugs. You'd get ten different spot patterns. The answer is yes. It happens, both so there are lady bugs that have certain number of spots in evac through even named after that, so there's a native lady bug in North America called. The nine spotted lady bug, and it has nine actually, and there's the seven spotted lady bug, and it usually has seven spots. There's a twenty spotted lady bug, and you get the picture. There's different kinds of ladybugs that have different amount of spots, but sometimes within those groups they can have a variety of spots, so there's one. One kind of Lady Bug comes from Asia called the Asian ladybugs that's been introduced. It's been brought here in an outlives. North America and sometimes it can have almost no spots, and sometimes it can have maybe a dozen or more spots on it, so it's really variable. Compared to say, the nine spotted lady bug, which almost always has nine spots, and we have listeners and I think every continent. EXCEPT ANTARCTICA, we haven't gotten a question from Antarctica and do ladybugs also live on every continent except Antarctica. I'm pretty sure they are on every continent, except Antarctica. Yes, and that brings us to this question. Hello, my name is Hallelujah I live in. Rwanda CA golly. My question is. How many different types of ladybugs are there? There are over five thousand different species or types of ladybugs in the world. And as Kent said, it's not just the spots that vary, their colors can vary, too, but those colors are basically always there to warn predators that the lady bug will taste terrible now. Some of you are probably wondering why they're called ladybugs. Anyway or maybe you aren't even sure what insect were actually talking about. Not everyone calls them ladybugs for example. If you live in the United Kingdom you might call them, lady, birds or Ladybird Beetles and Kent says he actually doesn't like the name Lady Bug because they're Beatles, not

Antarctica North America Remote Center Frigo Studies Re Mcfarland Kent United States Seattle Fahd Beatles Rwanda United Kingdom Asia Claire Missouri Washington
"north america" Discussed on 2 Girls 1 Podcast

2 Girls 1 Podcast

08:19 min | Last month

"north america" Discussed on 2 Girls 1 Podcast

"Crops gardening, so you sprinkle little ladybugs. Of ladybugs, Garden. Just regurgitated the. Eat them other. Than ladybugs. Dot Com. Lady are also good luck just so we all are aware okay I recently learned that lady books are beetles which. Is Obvious, but. We never think of them that way. Their own distinct Beatles, gross ladybugs or What's up with that people go as ladybugs for Halloween. Nobody fucking goes. I'M GOING TO GO IS A. Beetle. Sting but Spring Beatles back bitches. Miss GonNa beat all the others in the. She's unstoppable. All right what what's the? Trying. Yeah That's all the counts kids. If you're listening at home, trying that's matters. If you dare! It doesn't matter because you drive. That's that's how business works. Just try your hardest. today's episode is about the birds of North America and today's Trivia is about birds, specifically chickens and the age old mostly metaphor question, which came first the chicken or the egg. Usually, we don't really know the answer to that, but science has solved it very clearly. You guys went with Allison Chicken and. Egg. But I think the answer is going to be some bullshit thing about neither just knowing you matt totally. because. This is a subject. The metaphorical question, he's going to give us some bullshit which came for? Dancer is alien. Hear me shaking my head. The Correct answer is the egg. Jen gets it right. And her explanation was perfectly. Exactly correct I`ma genius, sh- MacArthur genius you. Get the. You. Can't graduate. My God awesome right? So what? What is the actual explanation of evolution? Is The answer every animal? Every distinct species comes from another species, and this is sort of evolution is not like. Here's a you know. Here's a jungle fowl, and then boop, and appears like it's a it's a slow gradual scale and scientists don't know exactly when domesticated chickens evolved from red jungle, fowl, wild birds that lived in the jungle, but they estimate about eight thousand years ago. There is no. No definitive egg that's like this was a jungle fowl, and this was a chicken, but on the sliding scale of Aleutian. There is an arbitrary point at which we say now it's a chicken, and it has to do with the viability of interbreeding the species whatever, but the definite answer is at some point in history, a jungle fowl laid an egg, and out came a slightly different creature that we now call a chicken. Thus the egg came first evolutionary speaking. It added met that. Me Selecting. Chicken was a good goose. Is Your clock right there what you punch out now. You got. Just Punch out. I For In Sleep, you've got you gotTA. Deal with all that time. I'm out and I'm thinking. Really considering how many hours I spent awake, I don't have them. Before. We get to our interview. We should a clip of birds of North America just in case our audience. Trader Joe's. I never he wouldn't do that to us I'm saying I'm queuing up. A clip of show that which is give provides context to our loyal audience. Why would I miss? LEAD THEM YOU'RE! Yeah also you watch out because one day Genara going to get you back and you know why because to can plant. Girl! You don't need to drop your back. You need to literally smashed against the wall. Just smash it. So good, it's so good I give you. Permission smashed that Mike. I can't. Silence here at all right here is. Here's a small clip from the trailer for birds of North America starring Jason Work. It's not going to. Little Snip. What's coming up on this episode of innocent traitor jazz. Honestly do you walk in the store I think I usually cows. That episode of teaches starts with birds. That you know it did it did it did? All right, let's hear the railroad. Give Hope. All Right? Here's a real. When I was fourteen I spotted a Peregrine Falcon Window. Silly Bronx. I never looked back. I don't understand how everyone can't love. I'm Jason Ward this this birds of North, America. I'm talking no look at that bird. That's cool. You go hang out with your Falcon. Burning Sounds Love Wyatt Senec. He's fucking awesome. I was dancing. Oh Man I mean look. It makes more sense when you see the video where they're chasing chasing birds around central, but you get you get a sense of the enthusiasm here it's it's such a great. Out Well. We have the host with us now, so everybody please welcome. Jason Ward Jason is the community relations and outreach coordinator for the national, Audubon Society, as well as the host of birds of North, America welcome Jason. For having me, we are so excited so I think we just need to ask like to kick off. How did you get into birding? We're talking about how you think about it as your GRANDPA's pastime, but like you know you're down, you didn't cities. So how did this get started for you? Yes, so first of all we're not. We're taking that old stereotype and we're just kind like turning it on upside down on his head. burning is going to be new is going to be sexy is going to be cool. In. Five ten years hopefully hopefully sooner rather than later. We're going to flip the script on burning. Is Thought of as. that. For for me, personally I I was always one of those kids who was always obsessed with animals ever since a young age and dinosaurs started out being my favorite. Initially, I think everyone pretty much goes through that dinosaur phase, and that progressed to anything and everything that can walk swim fly crawl in really matter to me. Birds being my favorite, the front runners for multiple reasons one. They're super closely related to dinosaurs. So may argue rightfully so that they are modern day dinosaurs. Addition to that they have the ability suggested leave, and that was something that I admired and what I mean by that is they had the ability to look at their immediate surroundings. Decide you know. This isn't really suitable for me. I need greener pastures in. They can pick up fly in fine, a better environment to live in, and that is something that growing up in the Bronx in the projects, essentially that I always admired that Kinda live vicariously through bird's as I grew up. That's like. I'm. Also.

North America America Allison Chicken Beatles Jason Ward Jason Jason Ward TA MacArthur Jen Jason Work matt Trader Joe Wyatt Senec Genara Mike Audubon Society outreach coordinator
"north america" Discussed on Front Burner

Front Burner

08:44 min | 3 months ago

"north america" Discussed on Front Burner

"WanNa get a better understanding of how we got here to this many infections? I know that you spoke to a worker about her experience cargill and we're not using her real name because she's worried that speaking out might affect her job security We're using the name Rachel instead. It's so to go into work every day. Wondering am I gonNA contract this virus and when I contract. This virus died from it and what's going to happen to my family if I die. How are they going to be financially secure? How they're gonNA miss me on. What's going to happen if my family gets it. When did she start hearing concerns about covert at this plan? Well between Rachel's account and also having talked to other people now in the plant We know that there was a lot of anxiety even before there was a confirmed case on April six. You know probably a lot of workplaces so there was anxiety like there was everywhere. Merch twenty the company starts saying that it's going to increase safety measures. Increased sanitation putting plastic sheets in common areas like locker rooms in the lunch room. But and Jamie. This is really key. Going forward workers were still working elbow to elbow shoulder to shoulder in the production. Lines and production had not been slow to give them any more space. There's also the concern of like. Are the tables being cleaned between people moving? Are the walls being clean down? Because people touch the walls people touch everything and yes. They tried to limit touch points. But it just did not work that. Despite workers having started to raise concerns was becoming very clear that the anxiety level about Cova nineteen and what a petri dish a meat plants like cargill or any of the other ones might be and then of course we have the first case that was diagnosed on on April sixth and that sort of ratchets up the discomfort concern in that plan. And so what happened after this? First case is I well between April sixth and April thirteenth. The number of cases at cargill proliferates from one thirty eight a real harbinger of things to come. It was a real sign. And that's when you started getting the media spotlight turn to this outbreak. The union says there are dozens of confirmed cases at the plant. Cargo says it's added more safety measures like temperature checks hand sanitizing so the company cuts hours to one shift at this point to prevent the spread while that only gets people inside the plant. Even more freaked out. You know they're trying to figure out how cutting the shift is in any way creating more space between workers. It's it's doing. The opposite concern was after all was said and done. We were so piled up because we were so short staffed. They moved everybody to one table causing them to all be shoulder to shoulder and also transferring people from one spot to another and not cleaning between people being transferred and so some of them are calling in sick because they're scared. Some of them are calling in sick because they're actually sick and then this is key. Some people are coming to work with symptoms for two reasons one because they need the money they need the job to feed their family and to because we have heard the accounts of a number of people who are being told that it's okay to come in with certain symptoms or if someone in their household has tested positive. What we don't know is how widespread that kind of message was Was it in a you know a couple mistakes made here or there was it a protocol we don't actually know and I can guarantee you. It is going to be one of the key points that will drive any kind of investigation or reviews and as you mentioned before during this time the shift was cut. That would just mean that people were working for less time during the day but this production line that you describe which is just packed with people cutting down the meet. That hasn't changed at all right. And this is when the Union start saying you have to shut this down. You have to shut this down. Our people are going to start getting sick. I think as soon as that email went out everybody. That fear was finally like really there. Everybody was so frustrated. Everybody was asking a million and one questions like. Why aren't we closed yet? Winter we closing. What's going on? The company takes that as sort of an unofficial call for an illegal work stoppage and then relations start breaking down between the company and the Union and all of a sudden that does really bad things for communications. Because you have the company communicating with workers who some of them by the way There are language barriers with to begin with you. Also have the union communicating with workers. And then you have public health authorities through their daily briefing and through the news media Communicating with workers. And they just don't know what to do. They're they're really confused about what to do. Many of them and I know this is something. Rachel talked about this breakdown in Communication. Nobody was able to get through to. Hr or production support which is a different version of HR at cargill. Nobody was able to get through even barely to the front desk. There were so many phone calls coming in. They were very understaffed. Another thing I want to ask you about is that we talked before about how there are foreign workers. Vulnerable workers in these plants and I know. The company and provincial officials have also talked about the living conditions of many of the workers and how this have contributed to the outbreak as it grew. And can you talk to me a little bit about that right so After it was sort of confirmed publicly that there was an outbreak at cargill. There was obviously a lot of questions of the chief medical officer. Dr Dena hinshaw. How could this happen? What was being done and she answered a question. That basically turned into a little bit of a controversy really because she you started talking about how Some of the ways that some of these workers live had contributed to the spread and that is like carpooling to work. Not just looking at the plant itself but looking at how do people get back and forth to work thinking about households and there's households where people simply don't have the space to self isolate if they're a case or if they're close contact and needing to provide supports to those people you know multi family households you know. I think she was just trying to explain why it might have spread. What the exterior factors are biting really came across many of the folks at cargill who work in cargo as having blamed the workers. And you have to remember that. These people are feeling Quite a stigma to begin with You know they're going into the grocery store and people are afraid of them sometimes. They're being asked to not come into places particularly visible minorities who who work at cargill were. Were feeling that because they were the most easily identifiable as cargo workers Cesar Callous. Has He's been hearing a lot from his community about this. He's Filipino Calgarians and a volunteer with Philippines. Emergency Response Taskforce Filipinos. Have a coach or called Bayani Hon which is being heroes to each other and so we see that a lot many Filipinos are volunteering to give care packages. So that's my appeal to leadership is let's let's unite let's collaborate. Let's not divide because finger-pointing health so there was a real concern that they were. You know being blamed for this. I think that didn't start out as as a an intention to blame but it was. Certainly it was certainly felt that way by the by the community and You know they`re. They're anxious upset to begin with so that didn't help Certainly at least an unintended consequences must be so difficult. All these people who are trying to make ends meet or trying to put food on the table for their families and are having to make these sort of risk assessments. Just sounds.

cargill Union Rachel cargill proliferates Philippines Bayani Hon Cova Cargo Jamie Dr Dena hinshaw medical officer Cesar Callous
"north america" Discussed on Front Burner

Front Burner

01:48 min | 3 months ago

"north america" Discussed on Front Burner

"Wrong. Workers Return to the cargo meat. Plant this week after. It became the site of not just candidates but the largest single corona virus outbreak in North America. Which is really saying something because there have been some huge outbreaks in the. Us meat packing plants as well over. Fifteen hundred cases have been linked to the cargill plant with nine hundred and forty nine employees testing positive. There have also been two deaths a few weeks ago. A woman named hip boy passed away from the virus. She had worked at cargill for over twenty years. Why at this hour earlier this week? Her husband Nanu win who also works at the plant and Contract Cova. Nineteen as well talked about her through an interpreter so basically that was no seem times. He didn't see that was coming. It was chem so fast and I love. She was a wonderful wife. She swallowed me. She never with me and then late Wednesday afternoon. A second death connected to the plant are Mondo Sega. The father of a worker who was visiting his family from the Philippines. The Union representing the employees is calling all levels of government to shut down production at cargo. Which is responsible for almost forty percent of be processing in Canada today. What led to this outbreak? And what's the risk of opening this facility? Backup again. Caroline done is with me. She's the C- national correspondent in Calgary and just a note to say caroline and I spoke before our mandis death was made public. This is.

cargill Caroline North America Mondo Calgary Nanu Philippines Canada
"north america" Discussed on Celeb News Ride Home

Celeb News Ride Home

02:27 min | 7 months ago

"north america" Discussed on Celeb News Ride Home

"I'm in the middle of recording. Today's episode so we have to get into it. I mean literally you should have seen me. I stopped everything. I like through my laptop on the ground. I was like we got to put this in today's show. The people need to know that Harry a Meghan are leaving in England. That's right. Harry and Meghan are officially stepping back from the royal duties and they're gonNA start splitting their time between England Gland and North America which a lot of people are guessing means Canada. Because they did you spend six weeks on Vancouver island over Christmas and also weirdly weirdly while we're on that topic David foster the music producer like set them up with the House that they stayed in. Because he's like the King of Canada or something and he way hey in age joint. INSTAGRAM statement on the verified account at Sussex Royal Hairy Megan wrote quote we have chosen to make transition this year in starting to carve out a progressive new role within this institution. We intend to step back as senior members of the Royal Family and work to become financially independent while continuing to fully support her. Majesty the Queen and quote okay. I liked it. They're going to be financially independent. I mean the the biggest problem with the royals is obviously the tax payers pay for their lives which is like. It's cool that they're going to say no to that like they're gonNA make their own money game which like Duh like. Why don't they all do that anyway? They also wrote in the very long instagram post quote. We now plan to balance our time between the United Kingdom and North America continuing to honor our duty to the Queen and quote so yeah they just said North America. They didn't specifically say Canada. Which means I hope they they might also come to la which were making his from? I think it'd be so cool to like run into Megan markle in La like at the studio city farmers market. I'd be like hey girl. Do you miss this weather while you were over across the pond. Isn't this weather so much better than England. My God it's actually. You may dream to like talk to Megan markle about whether while like feeling for a good tomato you know. Isn't that like a good. That's a good. That's a good goal for me to have in life. Also I'm just GONNA put this out there when they say they're going to you know be financially independent. I desperately hope that means Megan's GonNa go back into acting like maybe.

Megan markle royals North America Meghan Canada Sussex Royal Hairy Megan England INSTAGRAM La Harry Royal Family England Gland Vancouver island David foster United Kingdom producer
"north america" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

All In with Chris Hayes

10:01 min | 8 months ago

"north america" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

"Attorney. General William Bar has shown himself time and time again to be zealous. Partisan utterly willing to compromise the perception of independence and integrity the Department of Justice on behalf of President Donald Trump and today. He gave a really in many respects shocking interview to justice correspondent Pete Williams. We're GONNA play that but before four playing part of that interview. It's really important. I think to reestablish the facts of what happened in two thousand sixteen. That year was a weird election. In many ways might recall one of the weirdest aspects of that election was that there were active. FBI investigations involving both of the major party candidates right there was one into into Hillary. Clinton you remember that about her use of private e mail and whether that use of emails contained classified information and the that broke the law at the same time There was a counterintelligence investigation into the campaign of Donald Trump and it's contact with Russians connected to officials in the government a government that we knew who back there in two thousand sixteen was actively attacking me election on trump's behalf. Now that is a sticky situation for the F. B.. I think it's fair to say and there's very very real danger under those circumstances that you have the FBI essentially going rogue and using its investigative powers to essentially put a thumb on the scale of the election for one candidate and that did happen to one of the two candidates. Hillary Clinton it happened when then. FBI Director James Comey Tell me define all justice department guidelines just freelanced and went out and criticized Hillary Clinton's handling of classified information while at the same time saying that quote no reasonable prosecutor Underwood anti-clinton over emails. But then most consequentially. It happened again a second time when Komi announce the FBI was reopening investigation. Asian Hillary Clinton's emails eleven days before the election and action that multiple people whose job it is to look at the data say was decisive in tipping the election from Hillary the Clinton Donald Trump now the same time during that campaign. There is also the counterintelligence investigation into the campaign. Don Trump people associated with that campaign the the existence of which did not leak in fact the one time that it kind of surfaced in the press there was reporting on it was this infamous New York Times investigating instigating Donald Trump Comma. FBI No clear link to Russia spoke to reporters that article. We don't know who they are. Gave trump a clean bill of health in the midst of the election even though we were later to find out for for instance his son Don. You're actively welcomed help from the Russians tied to the Putin government in defeating Hillary Clinton. Okay so that's what happened in two thousand sixteen today attorney generally embarrassed selling story that literally the reverse happened. I think probably from civil liberty standpoint. The greatest danger to our free system is that the incumbent I've been government. Use the apparatus of the state principally the law enforcement agencies in the intelligence agencies both to spy on political opponents but also to use them in a way that could affect the outcome of the election. As far as I'm aware this is the first time in history that this has been done to a presidential attention campaign the use of these counterintelligence techniques against a presidential campaign there has to be some basis before we use these very potent powers in our core first amendment activity and here. I felt. This was very flimsy. There's a curl of appoint here you in the abstract bars. Correct if President Obama had ordered the FBI to open an investigation and then use the existence of that investigation to tip the scales. Hillary Clinton Clinton that would be wildly wrong and dangerous and a threat to democracy. But we know that is not what happened. Thanks to the newly released inspector. General's report the white. The House had no idea the investigation was going on be the found no political bias against Donald Trump. The Russia probe see we do. The whole thing didn't leak because it didn't leak because because we were there watching it now. Attorney General is doing the Donald Trump thing which is no puppet no puppet. You're the puppet to try to get his way out of the situation. And this is the man Dan Right now who holds in his hands investigative power over American citizens. Everyone of you watching. It is chilling joining me now in the profound implications of all this this Adam serve our staff writer for the Atlantic wrote about this in his piece today the Russia hoax a hoax and Michelle Goldberg New York Times columnist and MSNBC political analysts. I there is a kind of crazy making quality to watching someone in bars position. Take up the kind of trump TV. Donald trump no puppet. You're the puppet line of light up his down the reverse of what is true is true. And he says he's every bit as much of a liar and a propagandist as Donald Trump. He just does it in this kind of software ethic bureaucratic voice choice instead of Donald Trump's ranting showman voice but it doesn't change utter insanity of much of what he's saying the other thing that is quite like Donald Trump is that in that clip clip. You just played he was actually describing something very much akin to what Donald Trump has tried to do in Ukraine. What piece for right? And so what. So what he's done this before. It's always kind of accused your enemies of whatever you're doing so that so that people out there say oh well that's both sides are saying the same thing who can tell and after the crazy making point I mean so much of our dystopia. Fiction is not really about gulags. It's not really about torture. It's about the deranged denial of truth. Right it's not just we're well right. It's also Fahrenheit to one and all the sort of Russian literature communism right. It's all about kind of what happens to a person's psyche under the bombardment of lies allies and it. It's kind of psychic tax. That's being exacted on the American people who have to Wade through the midst truth and propaganda and of their purported leaders to figure out what's going on and that's that's exactly what the title of your column was about today. Yeah I mean it's really extraordinary to hear Bill Bar Explain why Congress is impeaching Donald Trump even using those action rock Obama. But look I mean the point of this the point join of the the Russia hoax narrative which is completely disproven by the report which showed there was no political motive for the beginning of the investigation into Donald. Trump is to exhaust people. Were trying to figure out what the truth is. It's to make them throw up their hands and say well. I can't figure it out everybody's yelling. I don't know what's happening so it's probably not not that important. Yeah I WANNA be clear her like I don't trust necessarily unfaithful like the FBI to be with the power they have. They have tremendous power. I I think the report is an important review like there should be some accountability for that. But now you've got the situation in which he he must have known. The report wouldn't produce the outcome you want. And so now he has his handpicked guy running his own investigation despite the fact that statutorily. It's to the judge. This is what he says about the timing about this. S. about the the the or at least about John Durham investigation and how he can sort of go. Further the idea take a lesson. Durham is not limited to the FDR. He can talk to other agencies He can compel people to testify so someone like someone like Durham can compel testimony. He can talk to a whole range of people private parties fallen governments and so forth. And I think that is the point at which a decision has to be made about motivations. So he's going to supplant the report with his report which says it's GonNa come out in the summer of twenty twenty so the idea and he's he's he's already kind of telegraphed what he expects the findings of this report to be we know from the way bard described the mullahs report before we actually got to see the Miller. report art that he is completely unbound by Ebi. Reliance on the on the factual record. So he's basically telling us kind of rubbing our faces in the fact that he's going to put out this political hit job exonerating not just exonerating donald trump but kind of this political hit job on the basis of the investigation into Donald Trump suggesting that this political hitch up suggesting that the Russia hoax is somehow real thing just in time for the twenty two thousand election and you've written a lot about how trump and bar and other share the similar attitude towards due process civil liberties in protections depending on who is being protected and who is being prosecuted. Yeah yeah well. It's really rather extraordinary after bar said last week that communities who criticized law enforcement can't count on their protection. Is those sworn officers of the law. Aw enforcers who if they don't get their protection money. They can't do their jobs but obviously bar in the president himself criticize as law enforcement all the time and don't expect to be denied its protection and at the core of that is really a belief that bar and trump have that some American citizens have the full rights of being American citizens and other Americans simply do not and that is the both the core of trump is in the core of bars legal theory of running the the Justice Department which is a tragic irony given the origin of the Justice Department in the aftermath of the civil war which was to protect those new Americans who had recently been emancipated. It's a disgrace grace. It's it it was created to stop the clan from exercising terrorism over those Newly enfranchised Americans wanted to her Express their democratic and First Amendment rights the First Amendment that Mr Bar was talking about that interview Adam Server and Michelle Goldberg. Thank you both. Thank you also happening today day. President trump hosts Russian Foreign Minister.

Donald Trump Hillary Clinton Clinton FBI Don Trump Russia William Bar president President Obama New York Times attorney Department of Justice Michelle Goldberg Pete Williams Attorney. Adam Server Dan Right Durham
"north america" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

All In with Chris Hayes

05:42 min | 8 months ago

"north america" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

"Evening from New York. I'm Chris Hayes. We now know the charges. The House Democrats plan to bring against the president of the United States this morning speaker. Nancy Pelosi and six House Committee chairs presented to articles of impeachment today. Not Merican people today in service to our duty to the constitution and to our country. The House Committee on the judiciary is introducing introducing two articles of impeachment charging the President of the United States Donald J trump with committing high crimes and misdemeanors. The first article is four abuse of power. It is an impeachable offense for the president to exercise the powers of his is public office to obtain improper personal benefit while ignoring or injuring the national interest when he was caught caught when the house investigated and opened an impeachment inquiry president trump engaged in unprecedented categorical and indiscriminate defiance of the impeachment inquiry this gives rise to the second article of impeachment for obstruction of Congress. The actual articles of impeachment are long just nine pages of text and they lay out in very clear terms that the president abused power of his office and they did everything in his power to cover it up quote. Oh using the powers of his high office president. Trump's solicited the interference of a foreign government Ukraine in the twenty twenty United States presidential election and did so through a scheme game or course of conduct that included soliciting the government Ukraine to publicly announce investigations that would benefit his reelection harm. You election prospects of a political opponent and influence the two thousand twenty United States presidential election to his advantage articles. Also explain how trump exerted pressure on the Ukrainian president by withholding both three hundred ninety one million dollars military assistance and a White House meeting. That would show US support for Ukraine as it remains under literal attack from Russia articles. move onto the next charge the cover of quote without lawful cause were excuse. President trump directed executive branch agencies offices and officials not to comply with those subpoenas in the history of the republic. No president has ever ordered the complete defines of an impeachment inquiry or sought to obstruct impede so comprehensively the ability of the House of Representatives to investigate high crimes and misdemeanors they conclude with a recommendation. President trump by conduct has demonstrated that he will remain a the threat to the constitution if allowed to remain in office and has acted in a manner grossly incompatible self governance and the rule of law president trump thus warrants impeachment and trial wild removed from office and disqualification to hold enjoy any office of honor trustor Prophet on the United States. Now those charges articulate the president's fundamental mental misdoings in this matter he solicited interference from a foreign country when he got caught he tried to cover it up. He's stonewalled Congress unconstitutionally notably. There are only two articles impeachment now. We saw testimony judiciary committee's hearing last week. Invoking the concepts and words of bribery and extortion. Which I believe are both fair and accurate characterizations is the presence conduct? Those words are not applied to trump in these articles. They're more general in some ways less legalistic which is simply. The president abused his power. He's the listener foreign country to interfere in our elections and then he tried to cover it up and what trump is specifically charged with now sets the standard. If these are past the committee in the House the trial the charges will frame the narrative and ultimately any votes in the Senate. Judiciary Committee will begin discussing the articles tomorrow night once they are passed out of committee which everyone expects accent. Pass out of the house which is also expected and when the trial gets to the Senate those will be the two charges. He is very likely to be tried. On the allow interestingly enough left minimal wiggle room on the facts establishing say beyond a reasonable doubt quid pro quo extortion bribery. All of which I think are obviously obviously there and appropriate but they are more difficult cases to make on the facts and the question of whether he abused his power as foreign interference which was clear from the moment moment. The White House released the notes presents now infamous phone call until I twenty fifth with Ukrainian President Zelinski. I would like you to do as a favor. Though because our country's been through locked Ukraine knows a lot about it. I would like you to find out what happened with this whole Ukraine situation. They say crowd strike. I guess you have one of your wealthy people. The server they they say Ukraine has it the other thing. There's a lot of talk about Biden's son that Biden. Stop the prosecution. A lot of people WANNA find out about that so whenever you can do with the attorney general would be great. Eight Biden winner a bragging. They stopped the prosecution. So if you can look into it sounds horrible to me. The stakes are very high for whether this is acceptable behavior in an idea. The Senate does not convict him on the obstruction charge for instance and basically says he's fine dude nor a congressional subpoena full stop to order all agencies of government not to comply may essentially end up vacating their enforceability in the future. The narrow articles makes the stakes as clear as possible. The Senate will likely police is what the president any president is going to be permitted to do or not do going forward joining me. Now is one of the members of the House Judiciary Committee which drafted these articles of impeachment against the President and will vote on them this week. Democratic Congressman Jamie Raskin of Maryland Congressman. There's reporting today that indicates that there was the consideration of a third article impeachment for obstruction of justice pertaining to the president's actions particularly as included in the report. Is that true. And did you favor such articles. Well I.

president President United States Ukraine House Committee Trump Senate House Judiciary Committee House Democrats Judiciary Committee Congress House of Representatives White House Nancy Pelosi bribery extortion Chris Hayes New York
"north america" Discussed on The RV Podcast

The RV Podcast

08:44 min | 10 months ago

"north america" Discussed on The RV Podcast

"The RV industry is Dean choral the I guess I can say he's suzy right right very enthusiastic and really genuinely nice guy who happens to be the on camera spokesman for leisure travel vans now over the past few years Dean has become the most popular RV salesman in North America as by virtue of his on camera walk around video tours of his company's RV's those are videos have been watched I ready for this more than check this morning they've been watched more than thirty one million times in the channel that Dean is on From Lisa travel vans has over one hundred thirty six thousand subscribers thus he has become the best known. RV salesman all of North America but he's also become a full-fledged celebrity in his own right he is also a terrific guy I've gotten to know pretty well over the years as we've encountered him and various RV shows and we even visit him up at his factory up there in Manitoba last week at the California he's show in Fontana have we got him to come into the leisure travel vans display a little bit earlier before the crowds got there because once the crowds were there and they spotted dean we'd never get any time with him so he came in about fifty minutes early and we got him to sit down for an interview about how this all began and what it's like being a celebrity RV salesman while we're sitting in a brand new leisure travel then and this is the first time I think I've ever seen dean it down at an RV show but we had to come early because once it starts you go thank you for spending time with no problem thank you for having me so we wanNA know is about Dean tell us about the in cargo how did you get into this business and how did you become this guru of doing our video tour yeah you know kind of a funny thing you know I started selling our visa retail lot back in the ninety things and you know the factory reps would come in I thought they were pretty cool they didn't have to set up the show they goodbye drinks for the guys after the show and I should be an RV rap that's the way more on and then be careful for what you wish for because then you get it and then you know the the video thing just came out of necessity you know we are coming out of that Recession Oh eight Oh nine uh-huh half the RV dealers in the US went bankrupt GE cut off all the flooring plan money we had just come out with the new unity model and we didn't how we were going to sell it so Ryan our General Manager Brian Elias Generation Ship Company he said Hey we're going to do a youtube video and I said okay it's just how long ago this was in two thousand nine so he says into a youtube video and that's how we're going to sell the the unity's because nobody can see him dealers have no foreign plan they can't floor him and I said okay well yeah sure whatever and then he says in you're going to do the video can I said Oh no I'm not you know we had built the very first unity MVP for Al Iota which is one of the founders of Jayco he actually came to us with that and he says you know I'm retired now listen to me but so we built it and you know turn to be fabulous and built the can we shot the video in January at minus twenty two in Winkler Manitoba now we should tell everybody that you live in winkler do yet we're yet ready the factory Lincoln Manitoba we've been there it's pretty cool though it's very called they're nice small town in the wintertime it's a little bit about winkler when he was a great community minute community we've been building there since nineteen sixty five saint family ownership great people I wouldn't want to work for anybody else they fired me five or six times now but I just keep coming back to work so how big is Your first video you said you sat it in January January up what was that like for you you've never done video governor no it was awful I remember we shot the video the the the slider was going on it was screaming because it was so called time like a cat got caught in a alternator you know one of those noises and you can see me do a double take was that and we edited the video it with a Hitachi camera we edited it we watched it I went to the bathroom and threw up and said well nobody will ever watch that thing you know that's how it went and you've done how many videos now oh I don't even know now I mean product videos I guess there's gotTa be a hundred at least on the now we use that hundreds and important number here because we should proudly point out that you are one of the the few Youtube Stars that have read just over one hundred thousand subscribers and that is phenomenal for what is essentially a a corporate webs Gotcha like she was so excited she follows lots of youtubers you know on Herron Nails and whatever it is and she was very ecstatic and I'm like yeah okay whatever right I mean there's such long videos I cannot believe I mean there are thirty minutes long sitcoms on TV or shorter right because they have commercials we don't have any kind of see this is the funny running joke on the six one thing is that in the video I I say I'm six feet tall then I go into sorry I'm six two right we kind of have some fun with it how much time do you spend preparing for one of those videos do you really WanNa know after factory so I'm a factory rep so I work at the factory and then I travel to shows or to my my dealer network so and you Washington California Oregon forgot that one Arizona so that's kind of my territory and Have you realized that you are a celebrity I know it's just it's just amazing I mean I know I've watched a lot of your videos and learned a lot and they're fun fun you know you the company they were too happy some people in the company like you know because we were very private our customers happy are dealers happy I mean and those three could be interchangeable in any direction they do not care about market share they do not they've never come to me and said Hey your market.

Dean salesman North America thirty minutes fifty minutes six feet
"north america" Discussed on Aerial America

Aerial America

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"north america" Discussed on Aerial America

"The bagley icefield gets the largest non polar icefield north american. The beckley is essentially a giant bathtub of solid ice. It's one hundred twenty miles long six miles wide and in some places a half a mile thick a giant bathtub of solid ice. It's one hundred twenty miles long six miles wide and in some places a half a mile thick ice fields are created at high elevations. Were it's too cold to rain but as snowfall accumulates over time it gets compacted under new layers of snow and gradually turns to solid ice ice that will eventually be the source of glaciers. It can be hard to see from above by the ice in this giant bowl is actually flowing out into valleys between the surrounding mountains as glaciers. Uh the bagley is a giant in the world of ice so it's not surprising that the glaciers at spawns giants to in one of them is the largest and longest glacier in the world the bearing at its mouth this one glacier is ten miles miles wide every year it releases six and a half trillion gallons of water into the gulf of alaska. There are few natural environments as forbidding to humans as the treacherous surface of giant glaciers flying across the bearing is the only way to peer down into the thousands of deep and shifting crevasses make up this glacier just one of these could easily swallow low people

longest glacier bagley beckley alaska trillion gallons
"north america" Discussed on Chompers

Chompers

04:07 min | 1 year ago

"north america" Discussed on Chompers

"Chompers is produced by gin and supported by good night's the number one night time underwear welcome back. It's time for chopper's your morning and night do brushing chef station on top of your mouth on one side and brush all the way to molars in the back in its history week and tonight. We're exploring his street three of north america. Let's jump in our pretend time machine and travel back in time. Wow where are we gettysburg. Pennsylvania united states eighteen sixty three. Oh cool. I see a tall man he's wearing a suit with a long coat and tall hat and he pulls some paper out of the hat what he's about to give a speech to a bunch of people so time machine who is this man abraham lincoln switcher brushing to the other side of the top of your mouth and brush the inside outside and chewing side of each tooth breath. Abraham lincoln was the sixteenth president of the united states. He was the president during the american civil war a war that divided fighted people from the south and people from the north abraham lincoln once gave a speech where he said that all people were equal and the american people should live in united nation that speech still inspires the american people today and abraham lincoln is remembered as one of the greatest u._s. presidents and one who kept his papers and and his hat pretty practical switch rushing to the bottom of your mouth. Don't forget your front teeth. Okay time to time mm travel again time she where are we now. It is twenty years later in chicago illinois. Whoa i'm standing in front of massive. Ten story building might sound small to you but back in the day this this was huge. It was the tallest building people that ever seen so time machine. What do i spy the home insurance building. I'll tell you more after you switch your rushing to the other side of the bottom of your mouth your tongue brush tale the home insurance building in chicago was the world's first skyscraper and the person who designed it major william lebaron jenney was named the father of the skyscraper he used a steel frame to support the walls of the building and the enormous weight of it it and at that time houses and buildings were mostly that of would the home insurance building was one of the first buildings be made using steel <music> dipper chompers tonight. You've done a great job brushing until next time. Chompers is production of gimblett. Media chompers is brought to you buy good night's the number one night time underwear delivering protection where children needed the most grownups back to school is just around the corner new schools new new friends new classes when your kid there's one thing that can get in the way of all that excitement nighttime wedding. Luckily good night's is here to help. Good nights are not only soft and comfortable but they also offer forty percent more protection versus training pants so grownups at good nights to your back to school list because 'cause nighttime wedding shouldn't get in the way of childhood great school days begin with good nights.

Abraham lincoln Chompers chicago north america united states william lebaron jenney Pennsylvania illinois united nation forty percent twenty years
"north america" Discussed on Chompers

Chompers

03:59 min | 1 year ago

"north america" Discussed on Chompers

"Chompers is produced by gin and supported by good night's the number one night time underwear good morning. It's nine per chompers. Chompers your twice-daily tooth brushing show establishing on the top of your mouth. Pick a side ambush little circles all the way around each to three. It's history today. We're exploring the history of north america so let's jump into our pretend time machine. I've landed hundreds of years back in time on an island in what's called the caribbean ocean. I see a man getting off of his ship. It seems really really excited. Oh it turns out. He's been ceiling for ten weeks all the way from europe but there's something wrong. This man seems to think arrived in a country called india but dude india's and totally the opposite direction time machine. Who is this guy find out after you switch you're brushing to the other side of the top of your mouth rush the molars in the back too so who is this man columbus columbus was an italian explorer who really wanted to reach india and when he arrived in the caribbean he thought he'd found the west coast india so we called the islands the west indies he also called the people who were living there the indians it was all a big mistake but still oh for decades and decades and decades people from europe kept calling the people from north america the indians switzer rushing to the bottom of your mouth and brush the inside outside and chewing side of each tooth okay. Let's travel through time again. I've landed farther back in time. Columbus hasn't even been born yet. I'm not on an island anymore but i'm still in north america. People are making close building buildings farming food hang out with their families out hunting traveling trading things with each other. You know just doing all the stuff that people people do time machine who are these people native americans <music> into the other side of the bottom of your mouth but don't brush to heart. Native americans were the first people to live in north america and they've lived there for a long long long long long time native americans were there before europeans. The vikings columbus or the british arrived instead of pulse. Native americans have been here since before canada the u._s. And mexico even existed and native americans are still here today. <music> that's for choppers but come back tonight and until then dan chompers production of gimblett media chompers brought to you by good night's the number one night time underwear delivering protection where children needed the most grownups back to school is is just around the corner new schools new friends new classes when you're a kid. There's one thing that can get in the way of all that excitement nighttime wedding. Luckily good night's is here to help. Good nights are not only soft and comfortable but they also offer forty percent more protection versus training pants so grownups <unk> abc good nights to your back to school list because nighttime wedding shouldn't get in the way of childhood great school days begin with good nights.

dan chompers north america columbus columbus india europe vikings west indies mexico forty percent ten weeks
"north america" Discussed on Scale The Podcast

Scale The Podcast

12:55 min | 1 year ago

"north america" Discussed on Scale The Podcast

"Hey everybody daniel ramsay here with my out desk and and all my goodness. I've got a story for you. Real quick before we get started with our special guests so i'm i'm doing my morning routine and this morning and i'm texting with my broker and and i'm trying to buy a commercial property right now and it's at an intersection with a lot of traffic and it's just this ideal little piece of property that is like can l-shaped on one of the best neighborhoods in town and so tex my broker. I'm like man. Why haven't you gotten back to me. We submitted an offer like seven days ago and you know what he says he goes. Oh i don't know i haven't heard from the sellers the sellers agent and here's the thing guys i have twelve hundred realestate the state virtual assistance right here and right now and i'm telling the guy you need an assistant. We are getting into the busy time we are getting eating into where seventy percent of all release date transactions are happening in the next three to four months like seventy percent of the five million transactions are going to happen in the next three rita for months and if you don't have an assistant than you aren't assistant and if you're listening tony my broker my commercial broker you need better assistance man to help you keep organize again is and to take things off. Your plate. Shoe can drive revenue so anyways. That's my rant <hes> but if you're listening right now we've got a special guest. I <hes> first of all what we liked to do is bring people who are crushing in a particular area so you can model that you know that back in your own business regardless of where you are in the country so today we have a special guest kristof show. He's he's the owner of kristof show real estate group. He's in l. a. In basically one of the highest end property areas of california and here's what he's known for what and why we brought them on <hes> bom bom who is a real estate email video platform listed him as the number one influencer in video marketing for the two thousand eighteen year and what's cool about this is christoph- today is going to share with us the down and dirty the details exactly what he does in social social media and video to drive huge listing volume and really make a difference for his client so kristof thanks for being here man appreciated adam excited to be here with you and your company and doing this video cast and helping share my knowledge to help other agents brokers all around the world in the country so it's raping you're doing yeah. That's what we do and what's cool. Is we serve the top one thousand agents across the country. We've been blessed to be in business. Twelve of years in the real estate virtual assistant game and all we wanna do is make the industry better so we have people like you christoph. Come in and knock it out outta the park so kristof talked to us about your story like i always like to start these things off with a couple of questions like how did you get into real estate you know oh and why did you decide to do the social media video influence or kind of marketing good question stories are always good. People can relate to store so <hes> it goes way doc exhibits selling real estate now for thirty. Two years argued believed that more than half my life. I've been selling real estate so i was a regular student in a highly gifted classes assist when i was very young i didn't like to study didn't like school. School was boring and a little bit too slow for me. I wasn't a good student. <unk> top grades yeah in a specially in high school. I ditched a lot of high school at barely graduated. <hes> lost my scholarship because i did so much might was i remember two weeks before for high school was over <unk> to europe and the counselor that afternoon when they got home and said your son's not graduating feeling all of his classes so that was the end of that abided graduate like a cranford the finals in past and but it was also fashion model at the time so i didn't really care. I thought it would be a model photographer. Optus cares about schools school wasn't helping and so i started dating my wife now of twenty six years and she said to me. I was traveling quite a bit to europe and asia <unk> lynch lint. I'd be gone three weeks three months at a time and she said how about getting more stable jump up and i was eighteen years old and a known anything should have a real estate state and as a young eighteen year old. I honestly thought i can drive fancy car. Be my own boss shoukri houses and make a lot of money. That's what i thought i had no idea that there was such thing escrow title and inspections in loans and appraisals and all that stuff. I just thought you just show houses and you make money no chlorine. Though i was muddling that summer summer to my came back to my real estate exam i went to interview i was living in los angeles area at the time which is part of interest with my family still. It was eighteen and a good at the local jaundice office because that was the number. One company in l._a. Was luxury and that's what i wanted to do. It wouldn't hire me. The manager asked me what my goals and i said well. I'm going to make a million dollars a year in nineteen eighty eight eighty seven. I think i'm gonna make a million dollars a year driver all sorts while she thought doug sprays so she didn't i went to the next closest john douglas office which was in hancock park about a five six mile drive in their yard me first year i was doing to open houses a week up desk floor desk as you call it hitting those incoming calls nothing was happening. I think the first year i got a listing for forty three thousand. I sold hold it but it was a seventeen hundred thirty dollars commission. I remember that very well my first mission to me perspective for over a year. We've only done when sale you gotta. Ah yes and business going in the next ninety days or even to be kicked out of the office. Why don't want better the office so i went to a roger butcher seminar if you know that name and he taught me how to call expired listings and for sale by owners say that started sending letters to every expired calling them nor not condemning. I started building my business so that's how that started in a subject really well. <hes> went from seventeen hundred thirty thousand is sixty thousand one twenty two to fifty like doubling every year. It was point. Maybe eight years into that was one of the second her first agent talk agent in an office. Hold on kristof. There's so much good and good evening what you just said so when impact so yeah yeah so win win clients come to us. We always we do something called a double all my business strategy call and you just confirmed the possibilities like i've i've seen really big teams who are doing two or three hundred hundred transactions doubled six hundred. I've seen five hundred transaction teams go to one thousand and i've seen brand new agents who did five deals. Louis do ten the next year then twenty that in forty. Let's break down your early christoph. Let's call it baby christopher doc baby real estate kristoff. What is it possible when you're you're. You're building team building a business to double on a consistent basis this what's required if it is will back in those days that made it was resolved by sorted out there was no it was barely the internet computers. Were just starting out fax. Machines or just coming out was a very different era so so no i mean i literally went from nothing for the first eight to ten years and i built my business solely the on prospecting meeting look. I was eighteen nineteen years old. I didn't know anybody. I was buying selling right. People couldn't sell their house. They want to sell the else so why not go to the audience. It's looking and i just i was in coaching. I learned about scripts and dialogues and all that trains and so it was very komo when i started coaching was a thousand dollars a month way back in like nineteen ninety two and i did not like could afford it but i in my mind that okay it's one hundred twenty twelve thousand for the twelve the coaching but in my mind i knew i would get a ten time return on that investment and ever since continuously for twenty eight years. Okay okay so so what you see what you're saying and i want to clear this. You're you're fanatically focused on prospecting and then you hugh invested in yourself having coach. Absolutely how many doubles did you get from. Just those two things mean w my business seven or eight years pretty much. I think you just doubled every year for seven hundred year with those two strategies. That's pretty much there was nothing else other than prospecting those days past clients and sphere and all the next down the road owed <unk> but that's how it started in the beginning was all in my left hancock park beverly hills which is now for the last twenty years between my average price in hancock park was the he two hundred eighty two thousand at that time right and i was doing maybe fifty to sixty five transactions year now beverly hills he can average five million nine million sometimes twelve million depending on the deals. I do that year so so that was kinda transition interesting. You talked about assistance. I had an assistant. I think my second or third year in real estate. I've had my entire. You know probably twenty twenty eight twenty nine years of my thirty. Two year. I knew early on having an assistant was critical. We didn't have virtuous systems and things like that in those days physical assisted in my office. You know five days a week so that's very important because <hes> we studied things like how much your time is worth for our. You're in my town is in the thousands of dollars so it's more than an attorney gets so i thought why would i be doing twenty dollars. An hour work when i making thousands of dollars on our so <hes> today was thousands of our it was hundreds an hour but still it was more than i was paying system right and that math is what we do for our clients your your i love interviewing you man. You're you're. You're like our poster child for helping real estate people grow because so you're coaching prospecting prospecting fanatically focused on that once you've got those two things down. You're ready to start building team and when you start building a team the doubles become become faster meaning. There's leverage in it so it's like a snowball and the and the snowball has gotten really really big how having an assistant and building a team what has that done to your volume and you're increases and the the speed at which you've been able to double would certainly helps a lot. I having an assistant martin director and people to support you. I mean i basically have four jobs. One is to up to people. I don't know people i know negotiates cracks rex and find more clients and get the deals done. It's pretty simple so i should not be involved in other things now of course planning brainstorming harming setting goals and plans for what you're gonna do that's also important because but then you have to have the infrastructure and the people in place to forward your ideals awesome class right okay so i love what you're saying as the leader your job as strategy talking to clients getting clients and negotiating gating deals in your world everything else should be given away to an assist an is that is that kind of how you're you're much i will say though certain things i do i i don't do myself but i do oversee myself such as a photo shoots and video shoots. I think those are very critical aspects and i've tried to let go those those things meaning. Just you know my sister marketing director have told him to go with him to the house did pictures of and show them the angles. I want certain rooms. Make sure they know to make sure everything symmetric. Only pillows are properly all that stuff but yes no one seems to be as detailed or thorough as i am so i've learned that i kind of have to be there which is a little bit time consuming assuming and then we videos i have to be there because i'm often in the videos during introductions and walking tours and that kind of thing so so i do try outsource or breath people do a lot of the worker the servings i still have to be even though not supposed to but i know if i if i leave certain things like photos and videos to their own. I'm usually not happy happy with the results i detail and when i'm there they'll take a picture. I wait a minute. That land is off. Kilter the corden showing you know those kinds of things which doesn't immune much for the i guess it does to me. Hey everybody daniel ramsay here and i wanna tell you about an extraordinary offer to take action and start scaling.

kristof daniel ramsay europe christoph Optus california virtual assistant jaundice los angeles hancock park beverly hills l._a marketing director corden beverly hills hancock park Louis
"north america" Discussed on 2 Girls 1 Podcast

2 Girls 1 Podcast

15:40 min | 1 year ago

"north america" Discussed on 2 Girls 1 Podcast

"Her. Her. How is it internet being used to attract a younger and more diverse crowd? You know, a lot of people look back in the good old days and they say that was such a simpler time. I would much rather live during that time I disagree. I think that's nonsense, I would much rather live to in today's world where we have yes to stow, many things I can speak to someone across the country, or even across the globe, just by setting tweet out. I think that the rise of the internet in especi-, especially social media has helped a lot when it comes to just seeing familiar faces out there. I think that that's one of the most unique parts about all of this. For example, there aren't I don't know if anyone ear knew this, but aren't a lot of black burgers out there just gonna shock there. They're using social media. I can see that there are indeed other Blackbird is out there in states like California or Illinois, or Arizona, and I can start a network with them. And we can become friends, and we can kinda just. Share things that are familiar to us in, in grow, this relationship in grow friendship, in hopefully, reach out to other people who look like we do as well in kind of start a movement, essentially. So I think that being today's world with the rise of the internet and social media is one of the biggest parts about all of this thousand fucking perfect answer. I'm. Over jason. You said that this is Pokemon go. But for real birds. My question there is when I find a bird, can I capture it in a small ball, and then fight other birds you can with it. Definitely do that. Thanks so much for that addition, met that was really. If you if you find a European Starling house barrel. Please captured in a Pok. Mon ball of basketball. Baseball doesn't matter. Capture it as you can do whatever you want with it. You heard here guys. All right. Police pursued. Yeah. So what are some of the best online resources for birding Jason I know I saw something in one of your videos about, like bird list serves like where burgers going online. All right. I don't like this serves. Okay. Okay. List serves to they utilize Email as, as a what they considered to be efficient method of getting information out. So this is the thing if I'm burning in a certain location. Let's say east of this of a city and another bird, who's west of the city. See something really rare in common. I'm gonna find out through Email hours later, I'd much rather find out on Twitter, the moment it happens. So we're starting to move away from list serves in more towards more quicker fishing, methods of communication. So I'm starting to see Twitter accounts pop-up whose sole focus is just to tweet out bird sightings in a certain city. So we're starting to see stuff like that was started seed. Burgers, join a message groups like what's app or group me and they're able to communicate with each? Other much quicker and get information out is well, I think that hide on the frontier of a big boom when it comes to abs- being created specifically for burgers to get information out to one another. That was talking earlier about an app that tracks the migratory patterns of birds based on people's photos of them in different states. So I don't know. There's probably some cool stuff out there that what I think I think I may be mistaken, but I think it was called Ebert or birds. Yeah. And it was like I have Hiebert on my fault. Take the picture, you have is that it was created by a university. Maybe Cornell now. Yes, it is out. Great. I is it? Good. Is this is, is this good science happening in crowd source? I think so. Yes, but I think that so this is what the app is first of all, I think cornell's e bird is the biggest current app out there. The most important as well. In the reason I say that is because it allows you to input data into a global database and Ebert will keep track of all of your data for you. It will compare and contrast it with other people's data at live in the next town over the next state or the next country over you are able to see where birds are at any given point in time anywhere cross the world. And it keeps a one of my favorite features. That keeps a ranking list for you as well. So you can see where you stack up with burgers that are in the same city as you in the same state or in the same country as well. So I love. The competitive aspect of it saw Mabel to see where I rank a currently with everyone. So we've left to hear how this YouTube series came to fruition. Yes. So all right. Of had his Twitter following for some time now. And as I mentioned, consistency is key in part of the reason. Consistency is key is because you never know who's watching so last year March of twenty eighteen the editorial director of topic, which is visual storytelling platform, they reached out to me and said, hey love, which doing hair. Would you like to brainstorm a little bit in work together in the future? So I was like, okay sure let's do it stains information next thing you know, we're on a conference call. And we're just tossing out ideas I came up with this really cool video series that we would record maybe two or three episodes, just showing burning in fresh new light that turned into them. Hiring a director film crew and us going, the central park, two months later in filming the pilot episodes for of North America. So. No kind of media, training know kind of rehearsing or anything. I was just pushed onto this platform this decided to host in the very first scene of episode one, I am walking through this place called sheet meadow in central park, and anyone who's ever been. There knows its place where everyone goes to just chilling. Hang out. They listen to music, a throw frisbees around. They just they chilly sunbathe and they walk a hundred feet out in this field. We'll have these big giant cameras at the edge of the field. And we just need you to turn around and walk back toward us in delivered his monologue. And I'm had okay. But everyone else is going to be looking at me, and they're gonna hear me. So it was it was something that I just had to internally struggle within get over lesson as as performers. I would like to just say that you soared. The first I had to say my favorite part, I wrote this down because I thought it was so adorable is you said something like you know, when you see a bird, you get so excited, there's in this, like you wanna have a party. But you gotta keep the party inside. Side. It's so thank you. So this is how this happens. I'm used to birding, right. So those scenes where the cameras following me around in looking for birds and I don't have to say anything. Those are natural for me 'cause I can do that all day long. But there are certain moments where we are seeing certain birds in hearing certain birds in director, who doesn't amazing job. That's why he gets paid the big bucks. He says, hey tell us how you're feeling right now. When just was like word salad that just came out of me now. It's still going to start using it. I'm keeping my party inside right now. But I'm bailing. Yeah. It's so good. My, my sister tease me about it. She thought it was the most funniest thing that he's ever heard. Also, I love that you refer to peregrine falcons as a sky lambere Guineas. That's what they are. That's where they will be formerly known as moving forward. Skyline Borghini now can start incorporating car puns, and this really opens doors for me. I have a totally different question. Do you have any bird tattoos? I just got one. Yeah. So this is my very first hat to ever actually. Oh, it took about four and a half hours and pretty large one. It's a paragon falcon. Of course, skyline Guinea, this guy Lamborghini. And it's just sitting on my upper show up, upper arm, and, yeah, it costs a lot of money. Did you filmed it, you filled it? That's also okay if you're open to it, I would love for you to join our discord server and drop a photo of your new sky lambere Guinea. Gotcha. No problem. Okay, I'm so excited. Another mother unrelated question. What are I'm just reading something about, like the, you know, about some of the crazy extinct birds that were in this country is that true? You can you tell us about. Like, what are some of the craziest extinct birds that used to be in the US in the US? So we have. All All right. right. So let's start with passenger pigeon right passenger pigeon, which, by the way, pigeon's are really cool birds, a lot of people just think of pigeon than just discount them and just toss into the side and say whatever, pigeon suck hitches are amazing. They are the only birds out there who are able to milk like substance for their chicks. It's called pigeon. Milk comes from their wrote can feed their babies that kind of milky substance. So anyway, passenger pigeons used to be so plentiful in new in North America that older settlers from back in the day, they used to see like what they described as a river of birds that would fly over their heads in darkened the sky sometimes, and we shot and killed them all so that happened. And then there's the myth of the existence of the ivory billed woodpecker as well. That is a bird of the southeastern United States. It was. The largest woodpecker that we had here in the United States. In the reason why it's such a subject of controversy. These days is because there are people out there who claim that they are still seeing this bird around. It's been extinct for over one hundred years, there's no way that they're seeing this bird anymore, but that doesn't stop these ivory. Billed truth IRS from claiming that there's this seeing the bird, man. There's a big online truth or community. I was actually passed a business card at a recent bird convention from someone out there, who said, hey, man, you wanna see a real bird, come talk to us, and he passed the car that I looked at it, and I just laughed because I thought he was kidding. And he's no, man. I'm serious. I have recordings and get out of here their truth for everything in their trolls for everything. So I was just curious like in the YouTube comments on your series or you're getting some crazy responses. Oh, yeah. Yeah. I mean it's inevitable. All right. So in one of the first videos, we did a kind of like a mini episode tutorial on how to use Benach years. This was shot may of last year since that point in time, I have been introduced to this, what we think of as a luxury brand of Benach, yours who've decided to gift me with a pair of their spiff -i really expensive Benach years, that I would never been able to afford, otherwise. So now I. Those everywhere that I go and the old binoculars I had were Nikon's and during that mini episode on teaching people, how to use Benach goes on holding my Nikon's, and as one person in the YouTube section who just commented to word, Nikon suck. People who are claiming that we're misidentifying some of the birds in, in the videos. And then you have the group of people who decided that they wanted to have these stupid things to say in one of our most recent videos, we did a video with Molly atoms of the feminist bird club. And of course, that brought up all of the trolls talking about why there needs to be feminist bird club in first place in this one guy was like a well, since he so inclusive. I shop at his bird, walk with make America great again, hat Ourika. Yeah. It's, it's really good that my brother and I may have someone who I'm so close with, like my brother who are Mabel to share these stories with, because my brother is so chill. So mild-mannered so agreeable with he's the good guy out of the bunch, and I'm still have a little Bronx in me. So when people say stuff like that, I'm lucky, I have. To really fight back the urge to comment in say y'all go. Let's do it comments like so it's difficult to stay you know, Jason your past this level. Now, you'll have to resort to that kind of stuff. I think the way you deal with, there could be affected, though, like taking into blows immediately. They would down either nor it or fight them. Nothing. Love that. That's your attitude. But Jason don't crow there. Going to be a waste of your time. Just like me. Just have a quick question for you. My daughter is six and she is recently like obsessed with birds in the neighborhood in the yard. And my question for you is like, what sort of kid-friendly gear apps projects, should we be equipping her with because she's, she's all aboard the bird train here. Yes. There's actually a lot of really cool things that you can use to kind of, cultivate that obsession from the app perspective. There's Audubon birds also raptor. ID is well, both of those free apps. Then you have ones that cost little bit of money like Sibley volume to that one is about twenty bucks those apps. Take you inside the world of these birds is shows you their range, maps, it actually plays different songs in 'cause back for you, so you can learn them, the raptor app, actually shows you video of the different hawks in falcons flying around you. You can get a better idea of how they look when their in flight, all of those apps, I know I dove into them when I first started to bird, and I can see kids diving into them in loving listening to the different sounds at these birds make as well. In addition to that, there are young or youth birding groups that exist in different parts of the country. What city D living we're based in New York, but in the suburbs. So yeah, yeah, I'm pretty sure there's a New York young burgers club. I just did an episode with the Ohio young burgers club in there of really cool group of younger burgers, who are trying to ushering, the next generation of burgers, they exist from eighteen years old all the way down to about eleven years old. And then they have younger kids are even younger than that. They're kind of a grooming. I guess you can say is so that they become his in finally, this sense of community as they get older as well..

Burgers jason YouTube United States Twitter North America Cornell Ebert Mabel falcons director Nikon New York especi Baseball basketball Benach Ohio Arizona
"north america" Discussed on 2 Girls 1 Podcast

2 Girls 1 Podcast

12:01 min | 1 year ago

"north america" Discussed on 2 Girls 1 Podcast

"Smoking, hot social media strategies, followers, and turn your Twitter account into being told this episode his own joining like with birds. Likes and shares from looking at birds. Not once the point in this really earn watchers edition of tumor. All's one podcast and now here are Joan merge or ways in hand, and never in the moist. I was in good. Mergen daniela. Everybody. I'm Jen I'm.

Twitter Jen I Joan
"north america" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

04:53 min | 1 year ago

"north america" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"Preexisting cultures would have been just fine without European intervention and all the the disease and degradation that had brought along with it. So if this myth of empty North America is indeed false. What do we know about it? Like, what are the facts? Oh, sure. I mean prior to any Europeans showing up on North American land. There were one hundred and twelve million people already living somewhere on the continent. And, you know, lower estimates do range to as little as eight million people from that one hundred twelve million. So there is a range because it's not known the exact number of people. There's no census. There's no any way of telling how many different peoples you, can you can tell them any different. Well, at least close to however, many different cultures essentially exist just from finding things, but knowing the exact number of people is very very difficult. Right. Right, right. The one thing we do know is that there were millions of people. Yes. And they weren't all just sorta strolling around. So as many as one hundred twelve million people in fourteen ninety two but by sixteen fifty that population already plummeted to less than six million the people living at the height of pre European history. Had extensive trade networks, they have rich cultural lives, they had cities they had internal and external warfare conflicts cooperation all the things that Europe was doing and they had dense urban areas, which is something that may surprise a lot of people listening, right? And normally when you think of pre-run populations, we think of people living, a perhaps nomadic existence in some areas of the continent, we think of complex cave dwellings perhaps. But we don't we don't think of. A a London. You know, we don't think of Berlin at least. Yeah. An early version of that with structures and highly organized society existing within these structures. So we would like to introduce you to one of the largest known pre European cities in the on the continent at the time a place called Cahokia so in its prime about four centuries before our boy Colombo stumbled onto the western hemisphere walked away, and then decided to come back and dig a little deeper Cahokia was a prosperous pre American city with a population very similar to London. Archaeological data showed that agricultural settlements. First appeared in the area around four hundred eighty and then in ten fifty you had a boom population boom at coke, which became a major political and cultural center with the population booming into the tens of thousands. Yeah. And you know when When you. you think about something like this. It's hard to imagine that it could exist anywhere near current civilization. Right. Oh that must be out in the middle of nowhere somewhere. Right. Because we would know all about that. We would people in the United States would travel there to explore the the remains or something right? Sure. But no if it was located very close to present day, Saint Louis. Yeah. It's about eight miles out of Saint Louis. It's located in southern Illinois. This was by all measures that we can find the largest North American city north of Mexico at the time. It had been built by a group of people known as the mississippians. These were native people who occupied a large swath of the present day southeastern US from the Mississippi River to the shores of the Atlantic. This city go Kia was sophisticated. It was Cozma politics. But today, it's his. History is virtually unknown not to just most of the current US residents. But even to people who live in the area present day residents of Illinois, Illinois, Ziems illinois's, Enes. I hope that's not Illinois. Oh, not worth it. Just throw us in the trash. It's this is one of those stories that was bypassed in favor of that dominant narrative that we see reinforced in literature, we see reinforced in. In cinema. Yeah. Right. And it's the idea that the people who lived here before Europeans ever arrived were somehow less learned which is clearly not the case. And there's a guy named Thomas. Emerson a professor of anthropology at the university of Illinois who had an interesting, quote a lot of the world..

United States Illinois Saint Louis London North America university of Illinois Europe coke professor of anthropology Berlin Colombo Thomas Emerson Mexico Mississippi River Atlantic Ziems illinois Enes four centuries
"north america" Discussed on One Two Review

One Two Review

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"north america" Discussed on One Two Review

"Right manage that was the biggest birthday party of ever seen. I've never I never had that many friends growing up is that what part of like, hats and the cake, and they have not given us any ice cream that was messed up. No. And they had their except us got cake and ice cream. Yeah. No. I mean, and it was. The she wasn't brat. She was a brat. No. You said it, right? I she was a. I I can't say, but I know I know what you're Fisher, man. She was a mean mean girl, and I hated her and she ruined this movie for me. Anyway, you guys ready? I am. I am. I want to give it to points. But the film I saw is one point film to one point. I think just rating the film that I saw I have to give at one point. But yet much like you, Alex. I wish I could give it to points because I think under there there is a good movie. We just didn't get to see it. So one point officially. Yeah. I'm gonna I'm gonna I'm gonna I'm gonna go slightly different way. Just because I agree that the movie I saw was a one point movie, but I'm gonna see it again. Which is the marks of a good movie. I'm giving it to points. Right. I wish they'd give it to. But I only gave it one that is four points for she has a sixteen screen burners. Definitely go idea. So each week. I went to review we have a different way of keeping score. And this week is no different this week because it's wintertime, we decided to give you the top twenty best sledding spots in the US a well, actually North America's a of Canadian rates in there. Let's just jump in here. Sorry. Like, I'm in LA. Currently there are no sledding spots. So I to kind of maybe get something that I might be able to make use of right now. At the time the time, we're is that. Okay. Yes. Right. So hypothetically speaking if someone died at your party the. In whatever manner. Whether it be falling off, a railing or or whatever having a heart attack. Anyway, you have a body. How how do I just dispose of a body twenty top ways to get rid of a body? Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Cool, man. I like the storm. Let me get a pen can go for pathetically speaking. All right, cool. Hypothetically speaking, you got a dead body in your house. I would say number one called the police companies Tomo happen easy, and they'll get rid of that body. So for my one point called police say, no. Yeah. Go ahead. No. Because for me if I'm just off the top of my head I've seen some movies. So I TV I'm gonna go maybe breaking bad style. Dissolve it in tub for one point, and then maybe Hannibal Lecter style and feed feed the body to guests that come over. True to does seem efficient. I only have to give one point. I'm going to say what do you do with the body? You bury it. Okay. Great. Thanks, guys. Yes. Oh, get get through there. Sleep. He's shown that sleepers wear shoes are twice as productive in.

Alex Fisher LA US Hannibal Lecter North America
"north america" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"north america" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

"Where are you? Gonna come down on that. Should you work to make things better should work for their Nile, Asian. These are decisions that you make, and I think they're, they're fundamentally based on something like faith. Your decision to confront the unknown in the things that frighten you. It's like, well, do you have faith in your potential to your faith in what you could call forward out of you? Because you need that in order to move forward with confidence, you want to instill faith. I mean, we know this if you're trying to raise a child, you wanna instill faith in them. Now you might not say, well, I'm instilling faith in God. It's like, well. It's not so easy to decide when you're doing that, but to instill in your child, the faith in the ability of their own potential to unfold in a positive direction. Well, that's faith. That's that's what you want for someone who's confidence like yes, in absence of evidence nabs in the absence of certain evidence, I believe that my commitment to this path of action will bear fruit. So let's take this discussion. I think make it practical or the biggest battles that I sense in America, North America through the west is that between religion and science and may many ways. This is the fracture that you each speaking to wasted God was dead. That is a good thing. No, that's led to the tau -tarian ideology of much of the last century right today to North American particular and our brains hardwired to look at these information differently. Religion made it possible to have inquisitive minds that led the science. Religion also placed all of us this bleep that this divinity, yes, all of us and you very thoughtfully, speak about how science talks about what is how can watch us right now. They are see us or hear us technologies, remarkable, but religious Notley, but science not designed time about what it needs to what should be, what should be. So there has to be something beyond that, you know. And I believe that, like I believe that the description that I just gave you of human consciousness is act- actually scientifically accurate..

North America America
"north america" Discussed on OnEducation

OnEducation

03:52 min | 2 years ago

"north america" Discussed on OnEducation

"You know pod, save America and NPR not NPR, but New York Times the daily are all hosted by these guys. And I when we first started, I got on a call with them and I said, listen, there are eight million teachers in North America, and don't you think that some of them are gonna wanna listen to a podcast about teaching and they just went. Yeah. Yeah, totally. And that's that. That was what goddess kind of in that door, which is, which was hilarious. I think that there is a constituency for this and it's growing in, oh, exponentially, and were couldn't couldn't be happier with with how things have gone. So just thinking back if you could. Okay. So you're here now you're at the top nowhere to go from here, right? You we, we. You could get a. We could be topping, I know, I know. But then looking back at your former selves, what would you tell your former selves? Just starting out, what advice would you have for them? Maybe if there is a particular thing you ran into, you don't go down that road or whatever it is. How would you what? What would you tell your your past selves who are just starting to really good question, Mike, you got an answer. I I, to be honest, I'm still, I still don't think I'd do this as well as I could. I think I'm still wordy Clinton attached to that. I think. Too much. You know, and I talk for a living these days, but I'm still trying to get us into a better pattern. There's still work to do. There's all listen. If you're if you're not constantly trying to improve, then you know. So I mean, there's, there's, I always listen to these things in see where we could do better. So I, I mean, well, we spend a decent amount of time at the top of the Ed tech charts and stuff like that. There's there's a lot of room to grow still, and you know, were wanting to just keep getting better at it. So I'm still thinking about ways. I would come in for herself to just relax during the because the initial podcasts were. Kind of robotic on my end just I just wanted to make sure I followed the script than I was saying certain things or blah, blah, blah, whatever might be, but really the the best thing for anybody doing this ad for myself starting at the beginning with just if you just relax, just have a normal conversation that you'll great things will happen because that's what this is about. Just basically having a conversation on interesting topics and in having a back and forth dialogue, which I think has been the best part of how we've grown through the, you know, for the last few months. Very cool. Well, hey, guys, this has been awesome. It's been very, it's been a pleasure mind. You know, I've, I've had this. I've had my own podcast equipment for a while and I've never used it for a podcast if you can believe it. So this this is the first first opportunity. I've gotten a it. It's. Honor to talk with guys. It's really cool what you're doing and just awesome. Keep going. Thanks for. Yeah, thanks for joining us still in this is this has been a blast in in in hopefully we'll have you on and we'll talk again to definitely dachshund. On education is an on podcast media production..

NPR North America New York Times America Clinton Mike