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Fresh update on "north africa" discussed on Cafe con Pam Podcast

Cafe con Pam Podcast

00:26 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "north africa" discussed on Cafe con Pam Podcast

"They had some African studies courses, and I had no concept of that before like you can study the African Diaspora from the perspective of art, history psychology sociology. It just blew my mind, so I went for that. Summer program ended up applying early admission to Cornell and was an African studies major now. Yeah. That mail piece introduced you to this study's Yup and you know we're talking I. There was no Internet. There was no connecting on social media to other people who knew anything about this place I did find out that my dad, so I think was like three thousand dollars. This is a nineteen eighty, eight, eighty. Eight was a lot of money. I found out that my dad borrowed the money from my now bonus. Mom so that I could go. That's awesome, yeah! Child awesome well. I was raised an only child then, but I have a brother who my dad had when he was in the army, and they lost touch after several years, and I found him on facebook last year last year. Yes, and I also got to meet him for the first time in person. Last night took a three month sabbatical traveled around Europe and North Africa and got to meet my brother Christian in Germany and his life and my niece and my nephew he lives in. Germany lives in Germany Yep. That's what my dad was stationed OMG? What a story! It is quite a story like my face hurts from smiling, he's. My twin, my dad's twin has he's in your dad, since no, he hasn't, but they've communicated on. WHATSAPP and social media. We can impact that so much, but there's so much I'd. Say Okay, so you do studies for your Undergrad, and then how did you decide you want to become an attorney? Yale meant to say this now there is nothing linear or plans my career. It could out yeah, except for the intention to become a coach at all came together, but I work at this organization. This initiative called Youth Vision in Chicago that was created to help improve outcomes for young people in Chicago. CHICAGO, so like what areas getting in the way to their success. Do they need better jobs after school activities, so I worked for that initiative that the initiative that Michelle Obama was on the Board Bordeaux in the process I in that meeting up with volunteered for this program for girls in detention in the county, juvenile detention center, and I just taught dance classes I'm dancer to. There's a lot going on here. One dance class and I loved it so much, but I ended up volunteering for the program every week and eventually raise money to basically hire myself to be a program coordinator. In the process of bad I met two attorneys at northwestern's children and Family Justice Center. Bernardine dohrn and Cheryl graves who are champions for incarcerated young people and Social Racial Justice and I was so in love with what they did, and I want it to just free all children for behind bars, because I learned that so many kids languish in detention pre adjudication that's supposed to be like thirty days or something and they. They can end up in there for years. Wow, yeah, and we JUDICATA convicted for juveniles, but gaffe. They haven't had a trial yet and can be locked up for years and so I. Just wonder of previous children seeing these women in their work..

Germany Chicago Michelle Obama African Diaspora Bernardine Dohrn Facebook Cornell Family Justice Center Northwestern Yale Cheryl Graves Attorney Europe Coordinator North Africa
The stigma around COVID can be as dangerous as the virus

Second Opinion

03:20 min | 2 months ago

The stigma around COVID can be as dangerous as the virus

"Every country in the world is grappling with the covert epidemic. Some much better than others. In many of those countries stigma around the disease plays a very important role in India. Stigma is directed at Muslims in Haiti at orphanages in Spain at Italians and in the US at asian-americans stigma related to disease his not new and in the US. It goes back hundreds of years. Those who are infected are considered to be part of an outside group and they have been blamed ostracized and often brutally attacked for simply getting sick. Geneva is in North Africa compared to other North African or African countries. We have one of the oldest population with a population of twelve million. To Nisha has one of the best healthcare systems in Africa with well trained health providers but few hospital beds and very few intensive care units so public health and testing need to play a large role in controlling the spread of Kovic. My name is Gibert BELKA KOREA. Young Damien continues. Yeah working For the Institute Jaber is concerned that the public response to co VID has turned into a blame game. We have fighting a virus year. We non fighting people what we seeing right now. The message about Kobe is more about foreign train. People that have the disease as bad people highlighting gators and saying hey the virus or the diseases coming from these neighborhoods. When people are scared it is human nature to want to blame others and create a narrative of outside bad people causing the problem. It is their fault. My family or my community would never have caused this problem by being portrayed as bad people are scared. That basically makes him hide. And we've seen that with other diseases that has to beg colossus or or HIV. Basically people don't WanNa get tested or portrayed as cubby positives in in their communities or in the neighborhoods but when people don't get tested it's hard to control the disease and we can't know about hot spots and we can't do contact racing and individual suffer as well. Jaber told me about one example. He found particularly upsetting burying. Gubbay positives agents or Ned evil. Some communities refuse to have burials in noticing. Theories scored It's it's it's human rights. I mean if it's done properly. It knows no risk. Stigma itself is like a virus. The fear that drives it is contagious. It's absolutely gear driven by giving the correct information. We can remove that fear. Remove that stigma and no the movie This virus from the comed- once we find a way to manage Kovic nineteen and we will. It would be too bad if we eliminate the virus but are left with the plague of stigma.

Institute Jaber Kobe United States Kovic North Africa Korea India Haiti Comed North African Damien Spain HIV Geneva NED
Australia GP Cancelled - Heres 5 Times Other Races Were Halted

The Autosport Podcast

05:15 min | 3 months ago

Australia GP Cancelled - Heres 5 Times Other Races Were Halted

"One's twenty twenty Australian germ-free was efficiently tussled after McLaren member tested positive for corona virus. This Wednesday twenty Chinese free was already postponed after the strain of novel. Corona virus was believed to have originated in the country. Bahrain status is currently unknown. While the spread increases globally further races may be cancelled but these were not the first counseled races in Formula One. So let's take a look back at a few cancellations from Formula One's past and dig into the reason why each race dropped off the calendar after it got there. In the first place the most recent example a race cancellation the twenty eleven bar. Ingram pre was scheduled to be that year season opener but on the fourteenth of February. Twenty eleven a number of uprisings took place across the Middle East and North Africa known as the Arab spring as numerous citizens protested against oppressive regimes and the poor quality of life with us in mind embar rain. One such country experiencing civil unrest. The race was postponed until the end of the season. The plan was to reinstate the Bar Ingram pray to the thirtieth of October and in the process move the Indian grocery to December slot but unhappy with the logistics involved on the seeming disregard for Human Rights Implications the Formula One teams association photo vetoed the plan barring GP officials then subsequently dropped any plans to host the race that year instead wasting for its reinstatement in twenty twelve. The twenty twenty Chinese impre- is not the first race in China to be cancelled. The nation was penciled in Fritz inaugural F one race. Back in one thousand nine hundred nine back then then F ONE SUPREMO. Bernie ecclestone announced in nineteen ninety eight. The Joe Hi International Circuit was to host a Grand Prix on the twenty first of March. Which would make it the second round of the nineteen ninety nine calendar just months after its announcement. F. One announced that the Chinese Grand Prix would no longer go ahead as the FAA had been insufficiently impressed by the facilities at the second which needed work. If it was to appear on the following year's calendar however this never happened in. China had to wait until the two thousand four season to get its first Grand Prix. How'd Shanghai? Well they feel like the Joe Hi circuit describing similar to the Spielberg sects in Austria. We never got the chance to see it in f one action another race supposed to be on the nineteen ninety. Nine calendar was the Argentine Grand Prix but unlike China it had been a mainstay on the F. One shut you off the Argentine greats depression which began in late. Ninety eight the organizers of the race with feeling the pinch and were unable to much the funding that China promise to host a race but as we've previously mentioned the Joe Hi race was cancelled. The Argentine Grand Prix was reinstates the calendar with Provisional March Twenty Eighth Slot pending talks with parameters Formula One. But by the end of January the Argentine Grand Prix was also knocked off the calendar after formula. One was unable to come to an agreement the race at the Buenos Aires Sec. It was deemed not financially viable as several upgrades were requested but no ultimately produced the nineteen ninety eight Argentine Grand Prix. Then was the lost f one race out in Argentina and will they efforts were made to organize a street racing motto. Plateau off at the twenty thirteen season. It never came to fruition. Asterio at nineteen ninety-seven having been on the calendar for over a decade. Esther was one of the more scruffy venues on the floor. Shedu and the EPA had been battering the circus owners for years to make some upgrades but when the FAA formally requested a few safety changes ESTA ZONA scoffed after they've been on the calendar for years without having to make renovations why start now but in response. F. One cude is often pulled esther off the calendar replacing it with the Herath circuit in Spain. The caveat was if astro could make the safety changes required the FAA offered a loss on the calendar on the ninth of November. But the fixes weren't made in time while Ferrari and McLaren would believe to vetoed an eighteen race calendar. How things change as it stood. Herath hosted the season finale. And we know how that turned out South Africa. Nineteen eighty one. Despite the backdrop of apartheid South Africa was due to host the season opener of nineteen eighty one formula one season however the year began under the cloud of political wrangling between Governing Body Fisa led by Yomiuri Ballast and the Construction Association. Fokker led by Bernie Acoustic Visa. Wanted to change the date of the season opening race. Kyle Lami to April the eleventh two months after the original February seventh day. That had been previously agreed. Foam consisting largely of the British teams on the grid also had an agreement with Kyle Lamis Management for the February date leaving the two governing bodies in a little bit of a pickle. The race wasn't council per se but it was run as a formula libra rice rather than a formula one race meaning that it didn't have to adhere to the one thousand nine hundred regulations. We should heavily restricted ground effect dynamics so the focus teams ran it. Kyle Army with all the bells and whistles in a non championship race won by Williams driver Carlos Roitman but the race was ultimately stricken from the F. One record beforehand but with the threats of Krona virus rapidly spreading worldwide. More races may be cancelled their season. We'll have to find out if that's truly the case

Grand Prix China FAA Mclaren Esther Joe Hi International Circuit Bernie Ecclestone Bahrain Kyle Lamis Shanghai Ingram Kyle Army Middle East Kyle Lami South Africa Argentina Buenos Aires Sec Bernie Acoustic Visa Austria
First case of Spanish flu reported in U.S. - March 11, 1918

This Day in History Class

03:39 min | 4 months ago

First case of Spanish flu reported in U.S. - March 11, 1918

"The Day was March eleventh nineteen eighteen. The first case of the Spanish flu was reported in the US in nineteen eighteen the h. One and one influenza virus caused an extremely deadly flu pandemic it caused at least fifty million deaths around the world making it. The deadliest pandemic of the twentieth century on the morning of March Eleventh Private Albert Kitchen of the US army went to the camp infirmary and Fort Riley Kansas with fever by noon more than one hundred soldiers had also reported symptoms of fever sore throat and headaches that number increased exponentially over the next week. Many of those soldiers died of pneumonia that spring. Their cases are the first known winds of one thousand nine hundred eighteen flu epidemic that said the true origin of the Spanish flu unknown army camps and prisons around the country began to see cases of the deadly flu and the flu spread to Europe from the US. The illness became known as the Spanish influenza because it was first officially recognized it. Spain a country that was neutral during World War wine. That meant that the press was not censored as in other countries so the Spanish media was the first to widely report on the spread of the flu in May of one thousand nine hundred eighteen once. The flu made it across the globe. The number of cases only continued to rise and it spread really fast to Russia China the Philippines New Zealand and places in North Africa. The virus traveled along international shipping lanes and it followed the massive groups of people who had traveled due to the war the overcrowding that was ubiquitous under the conditions of war also helps the flu spread but even after the first World War ended in November of Nineteen Eighteen. The pandemic surged on in fact. Flu Cases Increased S. soldiers demobilized and people celebrated the war's end industries declined in public spaces such as movie theaters and schools. Shut down the Spanish. Flu had a super high fatality rate on top of that the flu was unusually deadly for young adults. There was no vaccine for flu infections in no antibiotics to treat bacterial infections related to the flu. Though there

FLU United States Fever Fort Riley Kansas Pneumonia Spain Europe Philippines New Zealand North Africa Russia China
Census Bureau: No Middle Eastern Or North African Check Box

Morning Edition

03:09 min | 4 months ago

Census Bureau: No Middle Eastern Or North African Check Box

"Here in this country the twenty twenty census is rolling out nationwide this week now for decades the U. S. government has categorized people with roots in the Middle East or in North Africa as white despite an ongoing push from some advocates that is not changing for this year's census we're bringing you an updated report about the controversial decision first may two years ago here's NPR's Hansi lo one this scene kabbadi left Yemen as a young girl with her family seventeen years ago and after they settled in New York City she noticed that when you fill out an official form here in the U. S. they're always seem to be a question about race and ethnicity everywhere you can see when you go to a doctor will schools you always get this option and but he said she wasn't sure which check boxes for her honestly it was hard for me to pick I was like oh my god what should I push I put Asian or the other about he says because Yemen is on the continent of Asia she settled on Asian and when she can on form she writes in Arab but she says on the twenty twenty senses she would have like to mark a box for middle eastern or north African it should be there because they had many nationalities so why is not there is unbelievable in twenty eighteen the U. S. census bureau decided against adding a middle eastern or north African category now because officials said they need to do more research that disappointed Mohammed Barakat he works at the Arab American family support center based in Brooklyn every member is grappling with the race question as a first grader my parents came from Palestine I didn't really know English and so whenever there is paperwork I had to do it and on one of those forms I remember seeing white and then in parentheses anyone from the Middle East or North Africa which are the regions along with Europe that the U. S. government defines as white the better catch was perplexed he went to school in acid teacher if you could answer Asian is like well if you want to put a single had reading you should polite and so I went around asking other teachers and they all set your white your what I like but look at me that I can't says he doesn't look white and he's culturally not white but sometimes he marks white if he sees the Middle East and North Africa listed next to it or he looks for a box for others so we can write in Arab this makeshift way of answering surveys means that information about people with roots in the Middle East or North Africa is often hidden within data about other groups the fight right now is to say the category should be there because it will arrive at a better account Maya berry is the executive director of the Arab American institute which is trying to get a category added to the twenty thirty census form it's an issue that touches on a sensitive topic especially after president trump's travel bans against countries such as Iran Libya Syria and Yemen federal law prohibits the census bureau from releasing census responses identifying individuals for seventy two years but many in the middle eastern or north African communities in the U. S. worry about giving the federal government more personal information that's the burden that our communities had to they're trying to make a determination about do you advocate for the inclusion of a category or not Terry says getting a middle eastern or north African check box on the

Spain arrests nearly 100 for speed boat smuggling of migrants, drugs

Wait, Wait Don't Tell Me!

00:37 sec | 4 months ago

Spain arrests nearly 100 for speed boat smuggling of migrants, drugs

"Spanish police have arrested nearly one hundred people suspected of being involved in a migrant and drug smuggling ring from Barcelona Lucier Benavidez reports they're accused of loading hundreds of migrants and tons of hashish onto boats in North Africa bound for Spain Spanish police say migrants paid fifty five hundred dollars each to cross the Mediterranean Sea into mainland Spain the trips were made from sale to a Spanish enclave in North Africa that borders Morocco there's a twenty foot tall double fence there that separates the two countries and runs

Barcelona Lucier Benavidez North Africa Mediterranean Sea Spain Morocco Hashish
'Viral: Anti-Semitism in Four Mutations': A Close-Up on Hatred

People of the Pod

13:03 min | 4 months ago

'Viral: Anti-Semitism in Four Mutations': A Close-Up on Hatred

"In an unhealthy society? That has problems. They say who did this to us? And the Jews are always candidate. That's columnist George will who's featured in a new documentary on anti-semitism out in theaters across the country on Friday with us in the studio to discuss that film is its creator. Andrew Goldberg in two thousand nine. Andrew focused his lens on the resurgence of Anti Jewish hatred around the world and in mainstream media but after the two thousand sixteen election and the CHARLOTTESVILLE rally where protesters proclaimed the Jews will not replace us. Goldberg felt compelled to return to the topic for an even deeper exploration in viral for mutations of anti-semitism Goldberg travels through four countries. The United States Great Britain France and Hungary to speak firsthand with victims witnesses anti-semites an high profile figures including bill. Clinton Tony Blair Deborah Lipstadt and AJC Europe director. Simone Rodin Benkin in Pittsburgh. He examined the far right ideas that led to the attack on the tree of life synagogue in Hungary he looks at the Anti Immigration. Anti George Soros anti-jewish propaganda promoted by the government and in the UK. He explores the pain caused by the Anti Zionist messages from the UK's Labor Party the film also explores the repeated violence against Jews in France carried out by Islamists Andrew. Welcome glad to be here. Thank you so thank you for making this documentary and I'm curious. Can you kind of take our audience back to the original conception of it and how it evolved over time since I believe some events actually transpired in the making of the documentary will shortly after the election? We noticed there was sort of an uptick in anti Semitic incidents around the country. There were series a bomb threats which we know turned out to be bogus but those caught. Everyone's attention and suddenly everyone was noticing things and shortly after that a lot of tombstones were desecrated several different cemeteries and then the sort of global eyeballs started to notice these things talk about them more in the press and online and we immediately thought we should make a film about antisemitism and we didn't know what it would look like or what it would be. I think our initial thoughts were that would be about the United States but as we did more and more research and we knew this was a global issue. We knew it was happening in other countries. But as you unpack these things you realize that. There's an urgency to a lot of these stories and so we decided to really expanded and to look at four different situations. Those would be the far right in the United States. The far left in England in Hungary where the prime minister has launched a massive PR campaign against a Jewish philanthropist and in France where Islamist have been killing Jews in various terror attacks and other violent attacks against Jews to the tune of what unofficial numbers seemed to be more than three thousand a year. Now you've been making documentaries and doing journalism for twenty years As have I and I was a religion reporter for fifteen years in Chicago and I will tell you when I came here. I was stunned by just how much people hate. Jews. And I'm curious you I. I mentioned this to a former colleague at the Tribune recently and his response. He's in his eighties. He said we'll of course you grew up at a different time You know it's no surprise to me but yeah of course you didn't realize I'm just curious if this was a real shock to your system as you were doing the reporting the idea that Jews are hated was never foreign to me. I mean keep in mind. I'm fifty one and so I grew up where the Holocaust was not that far off. I mean I was raised in the seventies so I guess it was still thirty years old but it was not as it is now sixty plus years old where the next generation of people don't even know it was there Growing UP IN CHICAGO BEING JEWISH WAS It was not something to be celebrated at least among my friends and among my peers. I was made fun of for it a few times. It wasn't I didn't grow up in the midst of it but the Holocaust was connected to us in a way that it was very very real and so for that reason I understood that Jews were absolutely despised and I started making films in my first film that had anything to do with Jewish subjects was around two thousand and two or so and you know it was about Eastern European Jewish life before the war. So we're talking about you. Know all black and white footage of shuttles of Warsaw of what we might call the Yiddish world and that whole world is utterly destroyed in Eastern Europe and in Europe and in Russia and that made it pretty easy to see and in doing that film I started to learn about it. I automate fillmore at antisemitism in the media in the Middle East at one point and you realize that it is it is widespread. There's Anti Semitism where there are Jews. There's antisemitism where there are not Jews. There's Anti Semitism among people who are friends with Jews so my awareness of this has grown so in other words you entered into this project knowing there was a history of this but you had never seen it kind of in the current context as well. I had not seen it the way I see it now. I when I made a film in two thousand seven on antisemitism in the in the in the arab-islamic world per particularly North Africa and the Middle East I didn't focus that much on Europe and the US at the time antisemitism in the US was a very minor issue compared to what it is now. I don't want to say it was minor because there were plenty of people experiencing antisemitism but we didn't have it to the magnitude and we didn't have the Internet the way we do now but I knew that it was alive and well in the Middle East and that was surprising to see just how deep it is just how woven into the fabric of conversation and media it is. I was interviewing some kids in Egypt on the street and I said to them what are Jews they said User Satan Jews are evil. Juice should die. I said what if a Jewish kid was walking right here across the street and got hit by a car. They said we would call an ambulance. These two ideas existed right next to each other. And that's what's so interesting. One is in the abstract one is in the day to day Would you say that abstract versus day day is what's also infecting Western Europe United States? This wave of anti-semitism that we're seeing or is it. Is it very different? I think they crossover so for example. In Hungary there's virtually no violence against Jews In Hungary a survey showed that forty percent. Forty two percent of Hungarians held at least one or more anti Semitic views. Does that mean that? The people by larger anti-semites probably not but it means that the numbers are higher. Those numbers were higher than they were anywhere else in Europe or give or take a country. How many countries are there in Europe? A lot right so but there's no violence against Jews physical violence. That's what I mean physical violence against Jews but those lines do tend to cross over at points and so the fear is that it can translate these nationalist movement so in Hungary just to give some context the government has launched a huge campaign against George. Soros it's on Mute right now. It's not running right now but it ran not too long ago during the European Union elections. It came back up again. I asked one of the spokespeople of Hungary will come back and he told me that it would come back in a very consistent way so the whole idea that the Hungarian government has put forth. Is that this Jewish billionaire. George Soros is out to flood the nation with Muslim immigrants and since Muslim immigrants in the eyes of the Hungarian government are bad. You the Hungarian citizen the White Christian Hungarian citizen are in danger. And you're in danger because of a Jew. So here's these people are all worked up about a Jew who actually isn't doing anything like this but yet at the same time they're not vandalizing. All the Jewish shops are not beating Jews. And what have you? Although there's I've heard some rumblings that a little of that has happened so we'll have to see but I'm no expert on the data right. Well I think that's the argument. I mean argument. Deborah Lipstadt makes in the film. For example it starts with words it starts with comments and then does eventually escalate. That's the danger of not addressing it nipping in the bud. When you see. I think that's here right so I think that in America we've seen rage on the Internet translate into violence than I think you know the hatred in Hungary is really a government media campaign which took place on TV on the radio on the Internet. But also on billboards outside it was like an all encompassing life. You would drive down the street and you'd be bombarded with it here This antisemitism isn't billboards. I mean there's we'd see them occasionally but it's all on the Internet and people get the Internet sort of like you and your computer. You Lock yourself in this little space and then you start to get worked up and you start to hate and so we see that. Not all but many of these. Violent attacks in the United States are people who sort of incubated these ideas on the Internet. You raise a good point billboards in Hungary that was the been the vehicle of communication there for that. Soros campaign but I'm curious what about social media. What about the comments in violence on social media is it just as rampant in places like Hungary as it is here we'll so the makeup and the nature of the of the campaign in Hungary? We didn't break down so I don't know what percentage of it certainly on social media and not only was it on social media is a place where people can share about it right so in addition to whatever the government put on social media because the government had all these different forms they had radio they had. Tv They billboards aid magazines. It's social media mailings mailing mailing which is in the film How much of their media mix was the Internet? I don't know but if you're a person with anti Semitic views you can't do anything with billboard but some people did right hateful messages on billboards with magic markers in pain. They actually vandalize them. But by and large the billboards are you don't interact with them in the billboard. Don't post against back and forth a TV commercial. You don't respond to that. The Internet is where everybody took their hatred in their dislike of George Soros and they brought it to the Internet. And I think that's a place where you would see a lot more of this. Anti Jewish rhetoric the Internet is where it becomes the People's action not the government right. You have obsession in the film that talks about the brief history of blaming Jews. And you talk about the films that you've done in the past and the history of this but one critique of the film that I've read is that doesn't include enough historical context now I hear this critique all the time as a journalist you only have so much space or time right to address the whole of a situation but I'm curious what your thoughts are on whether to include more history or trajectory. The history of antisemitism is extremely complex. It grows out of misinterpretations if that's a word of people misinterpreted biblical scripture. It's changed and it's more throughout the centuries throughout Europe. If you WANNA talk about how it's been a part of the story of Christianity knew very thorny and complicated history which takes a long time to get in and out of now take that for a minute and think about. We have limited shelf space in our movie. I always say to people in movies not a casserole but take that from it in a notice that in the film we have that history. We have extensive history of the civil rights movement in the United States with history of the entire Orban's campaign and where that came from in Hungary in Oregon was we talk all about a migration and the history of colonialism in France as to give the backbone of that in England we talk about the Labor Party going all the way back to two thousand and eight. What we don't do is this deep analysis of Christian history but my response is also this. If I make a film about racism in about how African Americans are being shot in the street by police. Do I need to tell you? The history of why blacks are disliked by racists in this country. If I talk about misogyny do I need to tell you? The history of why people are misogynists to me and the same goes for LGBTQ. Americans no one's asking why. Why do I need to get into the fact of why Trans People are being murdered? Right now are being beaten up. I don't need to analyze that. Well that too comes from the Bible. Right hatred of homophobia grows right out of scripture. But I don't need to give that analysis so it's a it. We talk about double standards and antisemitism and I don't want to say this is anti Semitism but it's almost a reflex that people feel like anything has to do with Jews. With antisemitism with Israel has to be held to some type of second order of scrutiny and I found that a little bit frustrating. There've been some debates on college campuses about whether or not Jewish students who are pro. Israel can join feminist marches. Lgbtq right marches. You other causes. They feel excluded from those causes because of their Zionist positions and so. That's where intersection. -ality has come up a lot in conversations here is how do you address that exclusion? Even though it's very different causes communities have gotten together and there has not been room for the Jewish issue of antisemitism has four complicated reasons not been welcome into that crew. Because many in this left is idea. Do not like how they don't like what's going on with the Arab Israeli conflict let's not even parse the Israeli conflict. Unfortunate part of this. Is that a Jewish students who have nothing to do with Israel who are oblivious to Israel are still being singled out now. It's very dangerous to to assume. Length phrases like colleges are a battleground. We visited colleges as we spoke to a lot of students. It's a very complicated and mixed bag. But there's no doubt that on some college campuses and we don't have hard data on how or where or what we have a lot of anecdotes. We have a lot of very upset parents. We have a lot of very upset students. But what that actually translates into numbers. We don't know what we do know. Is that Jewish? Students are being asked to somehow be called to task for what Israel is said to be

Hungary United States George Soros Europe Government Semitism France Andrew Goldberg Middle East Chicago Israel Labor Party UK Simone Rodin Benkin Tribune Pittsburgh England Ajc Europe
"north africa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:33 min | 4 months ago

"north africa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Starts in the Middle East and North Africa still to come in a few minutes music that originates in Indonesia but right now we have the single piece that in the space of less than five minutes incorporates what the sounds of Indonesia the sounds of North Africa the sounds of the western guitar and the sounds of the Chinese people a type of loot it's a song called C. Y. and it was written by you Feng Chun who is originally from Taiwan she plays the pizza at on her album pendulum she does a series of collaborations with musicians from around the world including a number of tracks with the Indonesian band called samba Sunda see what is one of them but that's not all there is the song was written by you find John in Egypt and is entirely based on an Arab classical music scale plus you have these two Iranian musicians one playing the violin and the other playing some very western sounding electric guitar all of this in one little work pretty impressive from you fun child and her record called pendulum.

Middle East Indonesia North Africa C. Y. Feng Chun Taiwan John Egypt
Far-right motive suspected in Germany mass shooting

Morning Edition

03:32 min | 4 months ago

Far-right motive suspected in Germany mass shooting

"Green in Germany last night there was a mass shooting in the town of her now eleven people are dead that includes the suspected shooter German media reports that an online video and a written confession links to the suspect indicated they may have had far right leanings Germany's prosecutor's office has reportedly taken charge of the investigation here and they're gonna hold a news conference later today police in Germany said they found the suspected shooter dead at his home address they also found a second person dead there and let's get the latest now from and your international course when rob Smith who is in Berlin had the rob good morning tickets through exactly what happened here if you can well what we know is that last night at around ten o'clock gunmen opened fire at a hookah bar and then add another hookah bar in the city of now side Frankfort he killed at least nine people and injured several others the clientele and both cars are usually Turkish and Kurdish Germans but we don't know the identity of the victims at after the shootings a suspect and returned to his apartment and that's where police found his body in the body of a seventy two year old mother police believe he is a forty three year old German citizen who is a resident of the city and forties in the German state of Hesse say they are investigating the crime is a probable right wing extremists terror attack the interior minister of the state has a voice held a short press conference this morning about the shooting and here's what he said Joyce however fly home under vision board non brought he's saying here that flakes throughout the country will fly at half mast today and that his deepest sympathies are with the families of the victims and he wishes the injured survivors quick and full recoveries okay so thirty think this may have been a right wing extremist attack German media reporting on this letter and video left behind by the says yeah what we know at this point about that authorities haven't confirm this yet but several German media outlets reported that police found a written confession at the suspect's home in which he wrote that certain races need to be eliminated they're also reporting that he left a video indicating he was a racist and had right wing extremist views doesn't this come at a time when when Germany's been confronting of a rise in in a far right movement yeah obviously germ is a country that has spent decades working to reconcile with its **** past but right wing extremism here in Germany has been on the rise since twenty fifteen when chance angle Americal made the difficult decision to allow hundreds of thousands of migrants from war torn countries of the Middle East and North Africa find refuge here after that there were a string of terrorist attacks by Islamic extremists followed by terror attacks by right wing extremists according to government data the number of right wing extremists in Germany has risen by a third last year alone German intelligence now suspects are more than thirty two thousand of them in half are considered potentially violent with a high affinity for fire arms of course this attack comes after another shooting in Berlin four days ago you're a Turkish comedy show that killed one person and it comes for months after right wing extremist shot and killed two while trying to attack a synagogue in the city of holon which Germany trying to do to to prevent attacks like this well have gun laws in Germany are really stringent and they've been tightened even further in recent years after other mass shootings Germany's government is planning an overhaul of its domestic intelligence and law enforcement agencies this year in an effort to crack down on right wing extremism in the Bundestag Germany's parliament has approved six hundred new jobs to help tackle this rising problem is rob Smith thanks rob

Germany
An Interview With A Professor Of World Religion

The Movement with Dr. F Keith Slaughter

05:32 min | 5 months ago

An Interview With A Professor Of World Religion

"You know you you are a professor of world religions yeah you know a lot about a lot of different religion and to take about Africans average out exactly one of the things that and always as one of I guess somebody who know cook you know one of the things that I get about billion counter it is black people thank you that the three major religions that we know of Christianity Judaism is long up a hammock religious don't forget about ever have yes yes yes Hey Brian yep yes yes they think that these are white religions they take the people pick actually think that Christianity with be gone by white yeah I think the duty of the world book gone by white right you know that you think that Jews are ethnically bought a ethnic group as as opposed to being a religious that's right I mean if I was a political right also to prove what I mean help us with that man you dumb down my lane do it you know you're down my life so yeah the classes that I teach at that IDC and elsewhere I always emphasize that the book we call the Bible is an African book based on three basic of components one the land to the people treat the languages as we had to go right if you take a map you look at what's been described in the tanks the land masses from mother date the opiate to the outskirts of India that's still testament if you look at the New Testament that sum all round Palestine and all around the Mediterranean and then it becomes more Afro European but is Afroasiatic after European the the people migrated back and forth to play what we call all the new teslas same type of folk they brown of people like people most employed by Egypt and then of Babylon modern day Iraq then we'll look at the languages Hebrew is an Afro Asiatic language the Greek this use the New Testament is call Corneil Greek common we but is the particular idiom and as in northeast Africa and also the earliest text of the theology test Anil Latin which is that again all taking place in North Africa so no the origins of the book into the land people languages we can demonstrate it we can see it is African the permutation of it over time is it became European as in the same way lan people languages right so by the time we a re introduced to it and say that way by the time the reintroduce African people it looks like it's a European tex Lupe religion excel all three of the dimension but if you get on the need that English you see the court you for the call you hear that I watched you may just break down lack but break down the biblical text in here from every angle the different languages the different permutations of each languages I as long as your transfers I mean just fascinating actually I had an opportunity to to introduce you well one day of the what you call them we will deliver the Gulf Alexian Landau I'm honored to have been able to follow you wind up to do that is will only last year which is which is it yes it's an awesome because it is one of them but you you basically read the text the heat of the Hebrew text in Hebrew yeah because you you know what your body feel in here the the if you will the rap of it in the cadence of it when you hear the hit the review the rapids are you know on the need that English is is a is a cortex and I will be calling was translation is not really a translation is an interpretation is Islamic terror right and one of the things that really push hard on it that our people deserve better meaning our people need to know this because I believe fundamental to the PA reason for the deprivation that that the idea of not allowing us to read is precisely this once you read what you see once you know it for yourself that others have known for centuries then your mind is freed up new not been upon someone else's interpretation commentary and misconstrued interpretation by the bad design right but is that in in in in by design meaning that Europeans white folks mangle the text and present an interpretation that is at best there weren't and at worst insidious insidious malevolent well let's take a classic example the same came J. no different by the same King James to authorize a game J. version of the Bible for political reasons as the saying one of the authorized sixteen nineteen and twenty some odd African people landing in Jamestown Virginia as late as sort of it but as a slave purses that'll use all of that is one of them I'll use word is late and more because when I Slavic we weren't slightly right over to the not with the skilled people who a captain who did get paid right for you people who were captured in the end they did pay I'll be black he made a blow me off I you might want to get in on this please read of the of your brother band is really you monster rod about thirty maybe they'll be a

Professor
Dinner Plate Invasion: Lionfish, Tiger Shrimp, and Feral Pigs, Oh My!

Gastropod

13:58 min | 6 months ago

Dinner Plate Invasion: Lionfish, Tiger Shrimp, and Feral Pigs, Oh My!

"Episode we are all about eating invasive seating eating them yes but also figuring out what they are what makes a species invasive. And why might we want to get rid of invasive species and is eating them really the best way to do it like should we all be eating jellyfish Japanese knotweed or you know feral pigs that we shoot down from helicopters on reality. TV W. Income Boys Lock and load. We'll try any way possible to get rid of the pigs. It's very serious issue with us. Your I'd in Writing Wheel Bat. Stop the pigs from ravaging landscapes around the US and causing more than a billion dollars in damages each year. Stay tune for all that and more. This episode is supported in part by the Alfred P Sloan Foundation Program for the public understanding of Science Technology and Economics Sarah Keeping as a conservation biologist at the University of Pittsburgh Joe Roman is also a conservation biologist at the University of Vermont and we asked them what seems like the most basic the question of all what makes us species invasive actually defining invasive species is not really that trivial but the basis and invasive as a species is a species that is not native to a particular location. So you have a species that's taken from its native environment to a new place and it it has been brought by humans specifically by humans. No one knows what the first invasive species was the first plant or animal that a human move to a new environment. But there is as we've been doing it for ever as long as we've been on the move and the question is does it become established right so you can think of a cow. You can bring a cow. How to a new area and knocking escape? An it's not an invasive species actually most of our domesticated crops and domesticated animals don't live outside of human cultivation and so for that reason we don't see no one talks about the wild corn population that is you know ravaging averaging the midwestern prairies because corn doesn't spread beyond farm fields. But you bring something like Norway rat into a new area is it goes beyond where it's introduced populations get high and it has an impact on native species so that would be the broad definition of invasive one that is outside of its native. Range has an impact on other species in the new area. That impact can be terrifying those rats. Joe mentioned hit on European boats as they travelled pulled around the world from the fifteen hundreds onward. They hopped off the boats onto Pacific islands. They multiplied super quickly and they totally decimated local bird and amphibian species. They just just ate everything. The rats even eight birds alive the the heads off Albatross chicks. The bird populations on the islands dropped by more than ninety percent. Invasive species have been one of the primary drivers of the extinction crisis unfortunately especially on islands thousands of bird species mammals goals lizards insects. Mollusks have gone extinct. When new species of come to these areas there has also encouraged fleas and mosquitoes is which brought disease can be really harmful to human health to it also has a big economic impact you can think of the effect of invasive on agriculture or or in parks and along our coastlines impacts on recreation and basic plants can be just as scary take Japanese knotweed? It's leafy green plant onto kind of grows up in stems like bamboo and it was brought back from Japan in the eighteen forties and sold as a quote gracious gold. MEDAL-WINNING SHRUB that grew grew with great vigor. It looks kind of pretty when you just see it in the yard there was a patch of it outside my partner. Tim's department but it grows with such vigour that I can grow through foundation on Dacian walls and floors which of course causes huge damage in the UK. Someone found it pushing through their carpet. It's such a problem. In England that some banks won't issue mortgages properties properties. That have Japanese knotweed. There's no known herbicide to kill it. And if you dig it up and try to get rid of it you have to dig three feet. Deep and then disposable disposable that Earth in a special location because the government classifies not we'd according to the same rules as low level nuclear waste in Japan. It's not such a big deal. There are lots of other native plants that are similarly vigorous that help keep it in check and there are also plenty of native Japanese pests and plant diseases. That can kill it. But we don't have any of that in Europe or North America so basically not weed is a nightmare and because it grows advised and so densely it smothers the native plants which kills them and then all the birds some frogs and butterflies and bugs. That depend on those native plans screwed. And then you end up with a giant knotweed wasteland devoid of all other forms of life more more or less experts in the UK estimate that to get rid of knotweed would cost about three billion dollars but knotweed costs the UK more than two hundred million a year already just in the damage damage causes and trying to manage it this kind of harm for many people this is what makes an invasive and invasive as opposed to just a plant or animal that originally originally came from somewhere else and his bread out in the landscape all these non native species we bring so many of them with us as we travel there exit mentally or quite often on purpose we we are continually introducing species so a human saying. Hey I like that species. I'd like to bring it here to the US so for a long time this was seen as a good thing. Right bring a new species more diversity more resources available that that we like one of my favorite stories about this involves the introduction Russian of the Rainbow Trout to the rivers of the Western. US in the late eighteen hundreds and early nineteen hundreds at the time. Native fish were in decline and anyway they weren't seen as quote good sport. The native fish didn't bite back when you hook them on. The line and Congress was worried that without fighting fish to catch American American men would lose vigor and variety so they set about aerial bombing the watersheds of the Western. US With Rainbow Trout literally. Early they dropped the fish from planes in the sky. Yeah A lot. Didn't make it but enough did to restore the glory. That is American manhood. Thank heavens unfortunately the introduction of the Rainbow Trout was you guessed it completely disastrous for native fish amphibians but it took a while for people to realize that invasive whereas as much of a problem as we now know they are for one we had to figure out that there was such a thing as extinction as you. Listeners might remember from episode this past fall where we talked about the concept of eating animals to extinction the scientific understanding of extinction only emerged in the eighteen hundreds and to make the leap that we were bringing animals with us on our travels either inadvertently advertently or on purpose and those new species cause others to go extinct but just took a while to grasp that that was even a possibility. What's more for a long time? The prevailing attitude was also. Hey just let the best fish or animal or plant win if Rainbow Trout were capable of out competing native fish. Then why wouldn't we want to have of rivers filled with these Al Fish instead but eventually attitude started to change so Charles. Elton wrote one of the early books about animal invasions. I'd say it was around around the nineteen thirties. I don't have the exact date but he really was one of the first ones to start thinking about this. As a science and to look at what the ecological impacts are are how species of moved around and really get an idea of what the you know what we can do. Perhaps to reverse the spread and so there's a college back to the forties and fifties who were writing a lot about invasive species but their writings didn't catch on until later when more people started seeing being the phenomenon happening and then the academic field of studying invasive species trying to figure out what the impact is and how to get rid of them. That didn't really start for another few decades. It really happened spend in the seventies and eighties with scientists who working in ecosystems where they had spent their lives doing research. They started noticing that there were these. Don't even know if they call them. Non Native But anyways scientist realized that in in whatever Houston they were in there were these species that have been introduced relatively relatively recently by humans that were becoming very dominant and causing different levels of impacts and harm to those ecosystems and so they got together in the eighties they actually formed a working group through the United Nations to start addressing some of those species today many people are a little more conscious about just introducing random new species for fun and Sport but Sarah says invasions are still actually on the rise. Thanks to accidental introductions. Where a species accidentally hitches a ride side whether it's on the hull of a ship or on the outside of an airplane or within all of the cargo and things that were shipping globally around the world where introducing producing species at unprecedented rates and that's for aquatic ecosystems for terrestrial ecosystems for plants for animals for microbes sort of all of the different organisms? Were seen an increase in. Just those number of species and I think that it is becoming problematic because invasions a function of global trade and global trade. Trade has really expanded quite rapidly in the past couple of decades today there's a general consensus that invasive species are a huge threat enter growing threat. There's something called the international sure national panel on biodiversity and ecosystem services. It's a project of the United Nations. Put out a new report in May two thousand nineteen and they listed five things as like the leading global threats to biodiversity worldwide and invasive species made that top five list for people like Sarah and Joe and their colleagues are really worried invasive. Zor a huge problem problem and also unfortunately a really difficult one to tackle and they another scientists like them have been trying to figure out the best ways to control the spread of these species or get rid of them entirely it. Does it happens. One method involves our favorite activity eating and this gets back to why we were eating jellyfish with Bud Light. There's all starts in the nineties. Joe was studying for his PhD and he was focused on an invasive species called the European Green Crab. This crab is the name implies. It's from a native to Europe in North Africa and is now found in every continent in the world except for Antarctica. Because it's too cold there. I got into the area around New York Massachusetts in the early eighteen hundreds and has since expanded its range throughout the Canadian maritimes. I could tell almost immediately when I was an area where the crab arrived or it hadn't because there was a suite of different native crabs rock crabs in that area there was abundant hield grass The says ecosystem looked very different before that species arrived low when he got to an area where the European crab had arrived all those species that yield grass and the native dip crabs. They were gone. Joe Traveling up the coast and studying these crabs. He ended up in Nova Scotia and one day he was on the shore. They're collecting crabs in north with someone else flipping rocks Fox. Like I was. He didn't really look like a biologist. He had a big white bucket and went over and talked to him and he was collecting European periwinkles which is another invasive species species that's overlaps in the intertidal with European Green Crab and it gave me an idea that I'm here was this guy was harvesting this invasive species and actually the more he took out of that area the better right the better for native species as opposed to what I do mostly as a conservation. Biologist is try to convince is people to reduce our appetites. This was just breakthrough moment. He realized wow for a change I could tell people to harvest species and eat as much much of it as they want. Normally conservationists working in a marine environment are constantly telling us not to eat this delicious fish or that delicious crustacean but joe suddenly realized what he was considering was the exact opposite. Joe New as all you listeners know from our extinction episode that we humans can be ravenous we can easily eat eight species to depth. We've done it plenty of times. The mammoth the passenger pigeon Sylvian so why not green crabs so actually that within that day or the next day I collected some green crabs and some periwinkles and cook them up at at the lodging where I was up in Nova Scotia and it was actually delicious. I'm really a chef chef but you know if you have good fresh ingredients come right out of the ocean. You almost can't go wrong especially with something like periwinkles which are snails. Because it's as simple as boiling them in there Bryan rainy and almost like eating. If you like the taste of clams really really nice taste and the European green crabs if you can find them as soft shells they're just just as good as blue crabs with typical soft-shell Yoga in the store. Except if you're pulling it right out of the ocean and and cooking up hour or two later you really can't beat. It does not a bad cook cook. Obviously but he's a conservation biologist. Not a chef which is exciting because if European green crab stays good when he makes them how delicious could they be in the hands of a professional right. So I'm thinking. Well why don't I reach out to Chefs around the country to help put together some recipes which she did and some chefs go on board and Joe Goats and press about his idea to eat invasive species and around the same time Sheth Bun ly had a crab breakthrough of his own. He he hadn't yet been in touch with Joe but one day. He was spending time out along the shoreline in Connecticut with a friend and We're flipping rocks and we saw these crabs that we've never seen before scurrying around around all over the place and we looked up what the crab was and it turned out to be an invasive species and it just made sense it clicked just like Joe Biden realized they could eat these. He could cook these he could serve these. His customers could eat as much as they wanted.

JOE European Green Crab United States Rainbow Trout Sarah Keeping UK Japan Europe Joe Roman Nova Scotia Alfred P Sloan Foundation Joe Biden University Of Vermont University Of Pittsburgh Joe Goats England Congress Joe New Pacific Islands Al Fish
Stefan Krasowski on Visiting All 193 UN Countries

Counting Countries

11:46 min | 6 months ago

Stefan Krasowski on Visiting All 193 UN Countries

"Steffan Krzyzewski come from Minnesota in the US. I've I just recently gotten to one ninety three. UN countries which is why we're talking today. You bring me back for follow up. But I'm happy to be here I don't remember that comment but I'm glad to have you back and curious to hear a little bit of your final part of the journey and I just wanted overview a couple of different different things to remind the listener Remind us again. Why the love of travel was the catalyst what spurred your love for expiration in discovery like many many in my boat there? There's a collecting background. Where you you get interested in collecting different things and I did not travel much coach growing up? My parents not not active travelers so it was my high school junior year trip to China. We had started studying Chinese Back in fifth grade grade and went to China and traveled around and it was just eye-popping exciting thrilling and so as soon as I could I went to college and University of Pennsylvania Wharton School Philadelphia but spent semesters in Shanghai and Hong Kong and then moved to China right after graduating college. And the you've been in Hong Kong. I arranged at ride classes three days a week and just every every Wednesday night I would head the Shenzhen. See what buster overnight train rain was leaving in hop somewhere new and got addicted traveling in China going every province in in the country. And then step-by-step expanding out to the region and the wider world pulled out of curiosity. You didn't come from travel family. What's your family? Think of what you've done what you've accomplished in the travel world world totally supportive. Do they think you're a little crazy. What's going on when you get together for Thanksgiving? Oh I've got one wonderful parents sand and Brother who's a doctor and a scientist who's WHO's very different although we both Studied Chinese at the the same starting and he studied in China in highschool so my parents Prince of been extremely big about education that they work worked to put put us into the best schools that that we could get ourselves into an and get that environment and Mother reading to me every night Even when I developed an interest in books like James Bond or Tarzan in bucks as a as a first or second grader that would have pretty racy stuff she wouldn't our through and and Be Happy to expose me to to new ideas. A Matt so the circumstances weren't for for them to be traveling a huge amount growing up but they're always been very supportive and and As as both my brother and I got older than the I was living in China my parents did start traveling and in quite a quite a lot of times they visited me. TRAVELLED AROUND DOWN SO my father's a adult of million miler now so it's it's certainly not not anti travel in out of curiosity whose commander and his better yours or your brother. I should hope it's me because I still go back several times a year and actively do stuff with China and he hasn't significantly kept up with it since since going into medical school. I mean I know he did say at the time that Learning Anatomy class was pretty easy Z.. For him when when he had been studying Chinese characters for some time but when he was when he was at his best to you. As far beyond me reading classical Chinese the It's it's it's much more different than than say Latin. It was never a spoken language. The written Classical texts are incredibly hard. Pardon any was brilliant that I can. I can get through the first few sentences of the Dow ditching and and that which is which is hard enough but He was he was way beyond me as scholar. Could use to your brother in and Stephan. What was that inflection point? So you explain how you really were taking advantage of semesters abroad in Hong Kong China the region starting to explore like crazy. What was the moment when you decided to chase when ninety three? What was that light bulb moment? It was. It was somewhere around Azerbaijan Georgia Armenia trip that I took from China on one one of the holiday weeks that that China has an at that point I was had been to just about every country in Asia and and was loving it than in seeing the possibility awesome -bility of doing much more in learning learning about frequent flyer programs which was making some of these possible Places like the caucuses were connected to China. Southern routes in Chai from China and Could use my north west and then later when they became Delta Delta Miles on on these is trips so things that I thought were previously unattainable for time or cost reasons were suddenly feasible and and And I never I never had an interest to be a full time traveler even if I had unlimited resources for that I push myself very hard on trips. The I've I've taken several three week trips Only wash twice longer. Once a four week I think in the that was in Central and west Africa and a five week around the Pacific and I was so exhausted after three weeks of pushing myself that that is the the long term travel all thing wouldn't wouldn't fit for me and and professionally isn't isn't where my interest lies and and certainly not as it is where my marriage marriage would be taking me so the I like short intense trips. It but was there a day where you sat around and counted up the country's on the map happen you saw that you're at fifty or a hundred and then you read an article. What was that final? Push where you said okay. I've done this now. I can do that. There was more of a a different back back to that other by John. Looked at within. The cost was to get to Nakhichevan which is a separate part of other by John that on the Traveler Century Club list as a separate territory and it was it now? It's quite easy to visit in affordable all and more flights at that point it was it was looking that expensive and I decided I'm not going to get addicted to a crazy list like that and subsequently I've ended knocked divide and gotten addicted to that list but it was It wasn't it was it was Wasn't necessarily one day except perhaps perhaps when I got got to eat team more. So that was the last country in Asia that I hadn't been to and did say I went to to all this trouble to get east team or deal with Indonesian and flights which wonderful delightful country in many ways except traveling Logistically is Is One where a lot of things. Don't go to plan and and So once I got to East Timor as I'm going for the UN Stephan. You're last on counting countries actually November of twenty sixteen eighteen. And you're at one hundred eighty six countries at that point. But you didn't finish your you analyst until August of Twenty nineteen in for some travelers. That's a lifetime Some travelers as we know have done all one hundred ninety three during that same time period. So you took your time to finish off the last seven countries I want to focus on four of your final five two of them. I found pretty surprising in two. I didn't so your final countries was Italy. How did Italy early of all countries end up being one of your last countries? There were three that I was saving to the end of Italy Greece and Turkey and and Mainly not not so much animus. I'm really WANNA have a big party or something. It wasn't that it's it's I'm history is my favorite subject fascinated with ancient history. And all of those three are are are so special in central to to world history and world world civilizations that I wanted to to save them to really enjoy lavish in terms of time and and Destinations destinations trips to go. So that that was the original thinking and then What will get into why I got stuck on on a couple of others and so then finally I just? I just couldn't wait. These are wonderful places that I'll visit multiple times in my life but That that that roughly was the idea As well as the flip side is after seeing so many ancient Roman ruins in North Africa. That have this kind of thinking. Why should I go to Italy and see the crowds? But you know that's just that's just one of the ten thousand different things that are fantastic by deadly to to go see show as a history buff. You mentioned Italy Turkey Greece. What's a highlight for you? Visiting those countries by all of all of the above. I mean it's it's just incredible. How you You could pretty pick pick any point on the map and see multiple layers of of incredible history I mean what I. I walked off the plane Lina in Milan. I had booked the trip like a week before last minute and I can only get one one ticket to the last temptation Or the Last Supper or the last supper painting and and I had like an hour and fifteen minutes from touchdown in Milan Malpensa to to getting getting getting in the door picked up a rental car drove as far as I could into the city abandoned the car where other people were illegally. Ugly parks hopped on the subway and guide in and saw that and and So Italy I've really I've really just started. I've been a bit in the North's I've I've seen the Vatican again but I haven't properly visited row. I've been around Sicily different territories in. It's it's just pick your pick your time in history Greece more specifically the ancient In the ancient era I mean I just gets it gets incredible to. You're just driving down the road and you see the road sign Its Tab obeys in the ancient Also known as thieves. And now it's just a a scruffy scruffy town but just pull off the road and spend the night there because these names out of history are incredible and and the answer Turkey Turkey. I took a A road trip from von the famous Lake van in the Armenian Indian churches in the East and drove all the way across the country The the more or less southern route through the Kurdish areas than around the Jian coast and So many eras of history from the first Essentially I city of multi-level housing and that goes back back. Thousands of years all the way up to the modern times. I mean it's just I just couldn't i. I had take UNESCO sites off the list because there's only so many you you can see in a day it's It's incredible and Turkey actually. has this fantastic museum pass system where you can get the countrywide one or you can get one. That's for a week league or are some regional ones arrest Boland's and the prices are so low and every mega site in the countries included. It's it's not like many countries where the tour pass includes everything except the one really must see

China Italy UN Turkey Asia Hong Kong China Hong Kong Minnesota Steffan Krzyzewski United States Shenzhen Greece Italy Turkey Greece Sicily East Timor Lake Van Stephan Italy Greece
Medicine in the Middle Ages

The Book Review

06:39 min | 6 months ago

Medicine in the Middle Ages

"Jack Hartnell joins joins us now. He is normally at the University of East Anglia but he joins us from Pasadena much better weather there. And he is the author of a new book called Medieval Bodies Life Life and death in the Middle Ages. Jack thanks for being here. Thank you so much for having me. Let's just begin with the question of what was different about the human body and the way in which it lives in died in the Middle Ages compared with now. Well that's the big question. I guess the question that runs through the whole of the book I guess the first thing to say is that what we think of as the Middle Ages even just the terminology that we use to describe this period as a kind of sandwich he won one in seems to refer to time after what people and history of until after the kind of the chief of ancient Greece in Rome so maybe the period begins around the five hundred and something before the rebirth. The release on same ideas in the fifteenth century or the Sixteenth Century depending on where we're talking about in Europe so we're talking about the whole of the tanks in Europe the Middle East North Africa so basically the world around the Mediterranean for the best part of a thousand years so that's a lot of different people different cultures and a lot of different approaches to the body. Potentially one of the things that I think. It's really important when we talk about. This field is to acknowledge that the difference in in in fact what's happening say in Europe and this is potentially very very different conceptually to what's happening in other parts of the world as well so we try and be quite focused in what I think and write about but broadly speaking again one of the interesting things is where we go to try and learn more about what is actually relatively misunderstood moment in the past so also a different kind of written sources that we can turn to but one of the things I'm particularly interested in as an historian is he's the kind of other kinds of traces of the body and it's kind of a cultural prominence might leave in visual culture immaterial culture and also we might. Let's turn with colleagues Bioch- Eulogy to actual physical remains of humans to find also two different things so to answer your question what the body is or how people can see who it really depends on some ways way. You'll look. I'm looking right now at the cover of the US addition. And it's a really Kaushal. I put it bloodless depiction in a way of kind of gory. Amputation of a leg and a replacement presumably with a with a wooden lag as conducted by what looks to be religious men but also with the assistance of several angels one of sort of carrying the dead lower limb away and the fellow. This is being done to is lying. There is closed his head kind of wrapped wrapped up. What are we seeing here? And there's no blood there's no blood so it's a really interesting image and one of the reasons why we wanted to put on the cover of the. US Edition. Was it really sums up all of the many different complicated. I cost me so I was just talking about so the image is actually from an altarpiece so a large wooden panel painted in oil paint made in Spain probably the very end of the fifteenth century and sometime in the fourteen ninety S. We think it's actually in the wellcome collection in London which is an amazing collection of history of medicine. And as you say you have these two men seemingly go about an attention This isn't a normal amputation. Things that's really important to say. And this comes up with the end of the book this object in discussions of amputation in various kinds of medieval surgery array European medieval surgery. especially is that Hudson. Petitions were very rarely on taken. This is a moment in which medical the efficacy of surgery in particular Akilah especially what we considered to be serious surgeries things like I'm petitions. It's not something that's often attempted. It's known to be very dangerous and often very unsuccessful zestful and so in a sense. This imports the world of kind of ill health from a more secular world and places instead in a spiritual one so the two people who are undertaking. This miraculous surgery are in fact. Saints the pair of Dr Saints Cosmas and Damian who are often identified identified as a pair in European medieval Christian would actually in Byzantine just. Wow they're very popular science in the Byzantine world so in and around the eastern Europe and Greece in. What is today Turkey in the Middle East and they are two doctors who were became kind of early saints of the Christian Church and often figures amongst many other things biggest biggest who appealed to in times of heating and this is actually story that's taken from the miracle narratives which surround these two saints and the story goes like this guy has has some kind of problem with his leg? Some text described as a cancerous growth others as a much more kind of irritation of the skin of the see. It may be as Almost a kind of deadening of the leg either way is like is in trouble and he falls asleep one night and dreams that he is visited by these these two saints who take Lenk Im. PT With The kind of stories talk about golden instruments and kind of be useful very unscaled instruments. That's right delicate. Fine things with the assistance of angels and replace it with a wooden like as it does maybe seemed like but actually with the leg of an African man who had died the previous day This leg is miraculously grafted on. And surely enough the man awakes to discover that his leg has in fact been amputated and it was. It wasn't necessarily a dream or wasn't dream it's been made real upon waking and he goes and continues to pay homage to the saints in. Thanks so it gives us a really interesting idea All firstly the practicalities of some parts of medieval medicine. People are aware it's dangerous to do this kind of thing so the fact that is successful is in itself a miracle but the very idea that we're talking talking about miracles and medicine as being a spiritual concern. I think drools back to to thinking a little bit about how in some ways similar today but in some ways right differently today especially in the often heavily religious context of the late Middle Ages how healing could be seen kind of boldly health and sickness could be seen as the physical moral spiritual so one to which we tend to a doctor a real life doctor physician or surgeon or apothecary or midwife but also in the Middle Ages to our spiritual limits of curious. It's quite striking image and mom which puzzled as interesting things together

Middle Ages Middle East Europe United States Jack Hartnell Greece University Of East Anglia Pasadena Dr Saints Cosmas Bioch Eastern Europe Turkey Spain Akilah London Hudson Mediterranean North Africa Rome
Turkey's Erdogan in Tunisia for Surprise Talks with President

NPR News Now

00:43 sec | 6 months ago

Turkey's Erdogan in Tunisia for Surprise Talks with President

"Turkey's president visited North Africa Wednesday. Hey for talks with Tunisia's leader. NPR's Peter Kenyon reports that the visit comes after the countries signed to controversial agreements. President type air took the unannounced trip to meet his Tunisian counterpart along with Turkey's Defence Minister on November twenty seventh Turkey in Tunisia signed a pair of bilateral agreements. One promising Turkish assistance. Should the internationally recognized government in Tripoli needed against forces led by warlord Holy Fa half tar the other sets out maritime boundary agreement that says could legitimize mayes Turkish drilling for hydrocarbons in the eastern Mediterranean the Turkey Libya Maritime Accord has been rejected by Greece Cyprus Egypt and Israel who have plans to drill in the same

Turkey Turkey Libya Maritime Accord Tunisia President Trump Peter Kenyon Tripoli NPR North Africa Greece Egypt Israel
Top UN official in Mauritania dispels misconceptions over slavery, womens rights

UN News

08:51 min | 7 months ago

Top UN official in Mauritania dispels misconceptions over slavery, womens rights

"Supporting Mauritania's efforts to protect eastern border from jihadists and other destabilizing elements is just one aspect of the work in this quiet corner of North Africa. That's according to U N Resident Coordinator for Mauritania Anthony or Hemming Amar who oversees the organization's operations nations to help the country realise sustainable development economic growth and other goals. Mr Obama was in New York recently and spoke to Dan. Penn about UN assistance in Mauritania. And the need to clear the air over negative reports about slavery and gender equality. Most people don't hear much about Morton. Yeah of course. It's quiet and sometimes when we hear about more tedious usually mostly negative slavery. Those kinds of things. There are some transformative initiatives going on in the country which needs to be understood and also supported. And does this way you went comes in and before we begin maybe you can tell us a resin coordinator Benita. What exactly is that? What do you do there well us? The title indicates We coordinate the UN or personnel support to the country and We D- reforms. We also I also secretary general so we do take on issues that we didn't take on board previously like some of the political issues but the main focus is to make sure that the UN programming response today as DVD's in pefect alarming to support the government's priorities. Thank you very much. And you've mentioned the SDG's the sustainable development goals what are some of the major ones that Mauritania is working on. Mauritania is a very big country about one million square kilometers. Four point four million people. It's straddles the senator Gary of Abass. In all the way to the Suhel to the desert in the north there are four men issues I think that President Tool Martinez Development. In which you entrust to support one of them's the the whole security issue Martinis the Western Frontier Molly. So the jihadism terrorism We do provide support to make sure that at least Martinez offset bulwark to what is happening. And also to be able to influence positively. What is happening on this border The second bit is the holes social sector support programs that we bring to bear education health. National reconciliation those kinds of things. And then to Ed category is the government support and four elementary economics Davidge vacation Growth and obviously is equal distribution for every Mauritanian to also benefit from economic growth. I usually also talk about environment back. It's in a way President and all the foyer is that I mentioned The economic base is on the environment agriculture extract to use those things but yes environment is also a very important aspect of the UN support you mentioned the UN helping Mauritania to sort of be a bulwark against any sort of. I guess she had a store extremist elements. I guess coming from Mali or other parts of the Suhel is the country impacted as it is now by any terrorist activities No the last in fact terrorist incident. A country country is more than ten years old but since then the government actually adopted some what I call strategic interventions to make sure that doesn't happen again one of them is a decentralisation program does the president speaks about it most of the time that you know countries in that part of Africa have to bring seven assist population and to make depletion feel like they belong they have access to the administration dot com. Talk to people so education. Walter those kinds of things. You know Decentralized government systems and that is working obviously also beefed up security. If you hope you have on your student board which is under CVS security threats than you have to do something so they've also restarted the army. Let me to be able to respond to this kind of threats. And the ad I emphasise million economic development Mauritania depends on agriculture pastoralism. MM So whatever that could be done to make sure that dip with have some economic gains and not to think about terrorism that sort of thing so so fights nights working and because there's also small country Very strong social relationships networks which I also helps the citing keeping together and now at the outset you mentioned you know when I said American you. It's a quiet place we don't hear too much about it and you've mentioned in the past. It was about negative things. Maybe we can talk about but some of those in the steps of the country has taken or is taking together with the support of the UN in overcoming and continuing that progress on Fox walks. Can I think Research I saw a good opportunity to Claire on Mauritania. I think Mauritania is to be topical. Last which is the sub-regional grouping it was forced to leave because it was the only country. Eddie have laws against slavery But some of them it has get laws against livery and it has tribe NAS which track kisses that comes to his attention and that sort of thing so slavery something which is supported by state or institutions is not the case but obviously in in some of the media it's slavery pervades. What really is the issue in the country moment is the sequester slavery and you could could be free? But if you're comical independent on the person who used to own you of your sleep yongle five and so on and so forth and and so the government does acknowledges that There are some of these issues and the present government basically costs four. Aw Proletariat is to make sure that some of these things transformed emphasis on the governance rule of law areas Emphasis on national reconciliation emphasis assists on economic growth that benefits everybody and then obviously emphasis on social aspects and they have a big program Kota the moon. The moon base. Kelly's associate transfer Francois Program which the president has taken on more and essentially enlarging it to make sure that that autonomy that to break the links between former slaves and your masters could actually become a reality that being said of your sleep when you have the big country like Martina. There are certain things which will be happening and I saluted corners of the country. I think the. US government does report on slavery and trafficking some of these issues and Martinez. Three BIS scully. meaning that there are a lot of things to do that. I think the government is governed side of that. And it's doing what it can to make sure that it's in the good books good neighborliness with Yadda companies have conform to international norms. critise and everything that it has signed onto of course he one of the important areas for the UN in particular for the secretary general is gender equality and how is the country Fairing in that respect Dr West to go I think generally in Africa and I would even say generally around the world agenda qualities issue So when you have on Islamic republic which also fuses out say courtrai traditions. What some of the normative things that are required because as part of your body that you win you're allowed that it takes a little more time together but that being said I think The government US keen on making sure that they're supposed division Mauritania's hard women Republic in the sixties and so the question becomes really continuing that trend and making sure that you have woman in in good positions women who come to role models and and also to work on transforming also. I would say some of the mindsets that people do not just accept what Khartoum tradition sees so month's Roland also to compete in solve the modern spaces. It's happening it's happening very slowly. You went suppose that at advocacy or programs. We tried to do that. Also intensify recruitments We try to do that. Intensify intentioned programs in terms of talking to young female outdoors at schools a To let them understand what is available in the world. There is no law in Mauritania which prescribes women from ascribing to be anything including being the president. So it's just a metro for encouraging open indoors and providing them the avenues that will allow them to see that it can seize opportunities and just conform to traditional and Cortra- mindsets.

Mauritania UN President Trump United States Martinez President Tool Martinez Develo Coordinator Mr Obama North Africa Penn Mali Africa DAN Mauritanian New York Senator Gary
Witches & Saints: Kahina

Encyclopedia Womannica

03:46 min | 9 months ago

Witches & Saints: Kahina

"Expansion in north west Africa during the seventh century she's legendary for supposed- which he powers that she used to defend her homeland from invasion let's travel back to the deserts of North Africa to meet the one and only Cahuna it's unclear title meaning Prophet Seer or which most of what we know about CAHUNA comes from Arab historians who after her death and wrote about the Muslim conquest of Africa many of those historians Sake Heena as Jewish sorceress who descended from Ethiopian choose some say she was Christian and drew her power from a religious relic still others say that she practiced the Amazon faith an indigenous African religion in which followers worshiped the sun Hino's father or uncle was famous freedom fighter and leader himself some stories say that when she was young she married a man who had oppressed her people and murdered him on at our wedding night out of revenge obviously we can't know for sure but Katrina has been described as tall long hair she wore in dreadlocks as an adult Kahin became queen of a sovereign state in the aures mountains in what's now Algeria since around the year five thirty four that region of Africa has been part of the eastern Roman or Byzantine Empire it remained under the empire's domain until the seventh century that point following the founding of Islam as a religion Arab armies began a spree of conquests across the region a Hino's most famous series of conflict Makina used her supernatural abilities to fight the invaders this claim was likely made because the defeats Katrina inflicted upon this powerful Muslim army seem nearly impossible and thus must have been related to some sort of magic or sorcery she was set to see the future and to communicate with birds give her advanced warning of invaders Katrina beat those forces multiple times likely reinforcing tales of her magical abilities then the always get muddled some accounts say that after beating Hassan if an all new on back Kina burned anything that her enemies could have found useful and her territory stories in other words she used scorched earth tactics to ensure they wouldn't come back as you can imagine her allies weren't particularly pleased out that so when the Arab armies returned many flipped sides and Kahin a smaller army was defeated some accounts tell a different story justice that the Arab armies burned lands either way Tahina died she was either killed in battle took poison to avoid capture or was captured and executed Katina's true life story is a bit of a mystery that lack of clarity when it comes to her actual by graphical details has allowed cahuna serve as a heroic symbol for a variety of movements including anti-colonialism and North African nationals

North Africa Sake Heena Katrina Kahin Aures Mountains Algeria Makina Muslim Army Hassan Kina Tahina Katina Amazon
Turkey threatens solo army operation into northeast Syria

BTV Simulcast

03:56 min | 9 months ago

Turkey threatens solo army operation into northeast Syria

"To Turkey now I I'm Dave reinforced army units of the Syrian border just hours after president doing signals an imminent operation against US backed Kurdish minute militants in Syria put us in those days the mock up we have made our preparations we've completed our operation plans. we've given the necessary orders. decision has been made and the process has begun to the springs of peace. and now opening up their path is as near as may be today maybe tomorrow said they all do you. for more on the tensions as bring in a Middle East and North Africa executive editor we had a model we had when we look at a map and and this is where it becomes at I suppose we get it in our minds why is this jogger fee so important why is the concern about this border ari this strip at which is the light blue that that our viewers can see. because it is it's a border area of which is dominated by the by a Kurdish but the Kurdish population so as you know Turkey has a very large Kurdish population itself there is a separatist insurgency going on there and and the Turks are extremely worried about the currency in Syria becoming strong enough to support the Kurds in in Turkey itself and I think that's been a priority for the Turkish government for some time when it comes to Syria to secure that border to stop any sort of supply coming across the border from the Syrian Kurds to the Turkish Kurds the two are closer to our our allied and and the Turks are basically saying okay this is kind of a red line for us we cannot have an independent Kurdish entity in Syria that supplies weapons and give support to the Turkish Kurds. yeah you look I it's a billion dollar question wind on a why do you think I do is pushing back against as those U. S. backed at Y. P. G. it seems to be the reading of the story and obviously the YPG work the most important part of the Islamic fighting back against Islamic state why do you think nine yard was gone up against this well I think for for everyone everyone seems to be sending a signal to the Americans above all the witches okay enough is enough there weren't talks to have been ongoing talks there is what the Turks are calling a safe zone the guy that my concede like as a security arrangement where they push back the Kurdish militias away from the border they are joint patrols between Americans and the Turks but the Turks are saying that is not enough they want it deeper zone and they're also saying they want to reduce the pressure on Turkey in terms of the number of refugees that are in Turkey and the the their idea is actually to push about half of them back across the border into that what the Kurds what the Turks are calling a safe song so I think this is very much and the one telling the Americans okay time to act enough of the talking what we have is not sufficient it's not enough what do you think they they turn key is to get in the US and the tech to come to an agreement. and it's look I mean the the Kurds they they they they have a hard fought autonomous area now a large area but that area also includes not just because it includes a large Arab population the Kurds want to ensure that they remain safe as if we're within that area and they are willing it appears they are willing to talk to Turkey via the US and the U. S. is I like to coach because like you mentioned the Kurds were key in the fight on Islamic yes which is the priority for the U. S. so the issue will probably hinge on this safe area the security zone and you know how wide it is and how much Turkey will be able to control it and how little Kurdish militia present there

Turkey Billion Dollar Nine Yard
News in Brief 1 October 2019

UN News

03:33 min | 9 months ago

News in Brief 1 October 2019

"This is the news in brief from the United Nations. A spike in the number of refugees reaching Greek island reception centres is likely to worsen the situation in already dangerously overcrowded facilities there the UN refugee agency said on Tuesday in a call for asylum seekers to be moved urgently to the mainland UNHCR reported that see arrivals in September rose to more than ten thousand the highest monthly level since two thousand sixteen. Here's UNHCR's NHTSA spokesperson Liz Russell. This spike has has ATTITU- who's worse than what we're already extremely difficult. Conditions are on the Greek islands islands in the reception centres. Which is why we're underscoring is so important urgent missions can now to get people who can be transferred off the islands to the mainland according according to the UN agency there more than four thousand four hundred unaccompanied children on the island's out of thirty thousand people in total of that number five hundred youngsters. Mr Have also been housed with unrelated adults in the large warehouse style tent. UNHCR says describing the situation on Lesbos Samos and coast as critical at the weekend a woman died in a fire in the housing container at the center and less vose sparking a violent demonstration most of those seeking shelter from Afghanistan and Syria along with Iraq and the Democratic Republic of the Congo for the sixth year in a row one thousand people are believed to to have drowned in the Mediterranean crossings on Tuesday. I O m the UN migration agency cited a recent spate of shipwrecks along the main migratory routes to Europe which have contributed to the toll in one incident off the Moroccan coast at the weekend as many as forty migrants are feared drowned over the past six years at least fifteen thousand men women and children have lost their lives trying to reach Europe by boat a situation that the UN agency likened to carnage carnage at sea according to data the deadliest sea crossing is the central Mediterranean route from North Africa to Italy with six hundred and fifty nine and migrant or refugee lives law so far this year nearly two hundred seventy others perished trying to reach Spain from North Africa while sixty six six victims were recorded in the waters between Turkey Syria and Greece and finally strict laws put in place by the Russian authorities have resulted in a significant drop up in alcohol related deaths nationwide. The World Health Organization has announced the agency study on the effects of alcohol control measures on mortality and life expectancy shows that the amount of drink consumed per person fell sharply by forty-three percent between two thousand and three and two thousand sixteen in the past pass. WHO has described Russia's drinking habits as hazardous and linked to some of the highest levels of alcohol related deaths in the world in the nineteen nineties. He's into thousands research showed that one in every two men of working age died prematurely because of alcohol abuse among the measures taken by Russia. Who highlighted highlighted those that targeted the consumption of homemade smuggled or illegally produced drink via price increases for a shot of vodka and limiting the availability of alcohol alcohol in some regions these have been credited with helping average life expectancy reach historic high in two thousand eighteen of almost sixty eight years for men and seventy eight for Women Natalie Hutchinson U._N. News.

UN Unhcr Russia United Nations Greek Island Europe Attitu Mr Have Natalie Hutchinson North Africa World Health Organization Lesbos Samos Liz Russell Nhtsa Congo Afghanistan Greece Democratic Republic Syria Italy
France Dangles $15 Billion Bailout for Iran in Effort to Save Nuclear Deal, While Iran is 'Looking to the East'

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:20 min | 10 months ago

France Dangles $15 Billion Bailout for Iran in Effort to Save Nuclear Deal, While Iran is 'Looking to the East'

"We start today with the latest frantic diplomatic efforts to revive the international nuclear deal with iran and attempts to ease tensions in the gulf. Iran's foreign minister has been holding talks with his russian counterpart. Meanwhile his deputy headed to paris to talk about a french proposal that could be with billions of dollars tehran but he's any of this going to save a deal that the united states seemed determined to kill off. Let's speak to some vacuum who's associate fellow the middle east and north africa a program at the think tank chatham house here in london the french proposal <hes> seems to involve extending an enormous line of credit smudges which is fifteen billion dollars to iran in return for iran lifting the threat to step up its atomic work. Is that something that's likely to work. Yes it is ambitious proposal but it's one that the french are dangling in front of the iranians because what they actually need it is a greater access to hard currency in order to survive the pressure of sanctions and be able to sell their oil and repatriate their money buy a cop and of course the united states had said when they pulled out of the deal that they wanted iranian oil exports to fall two zero nine. It's currently i think about three hundred thousand thousand barrels a day. Ron wants to get at least seven hundred thousand but we would the u._s. Determined to stop that is even that much money. Are you going to actually achieve anything to say. It's unclear what the u._s. Intentions are right now. <hes> the president has said repeatedly that he does has want to bring her on back to the negotiating table. He's just pursuing a very hard line strategy in order to do so. I think that if it still does go threw it is going through with a bit of a wink and nod from washington and my reading is because a donald trump does not want iran crisis as he is about to kick off his reelection campaign for next year next november twenty twenty election. We'll meanwhile while <hes> <hes> iran's deputy foreign minister was in paris. His boss was in moscow having tools for lovers so the iranians seem to be keeping their options open awesome part of iran's diversification sanctions survival strategy. They don't wanna put all of their eggs in the european basket which has been a frustrating process and they've had to threaten and bully the europeans to get this kind of response attention and escalate <hes> also so in the persian gulf. If you recall in the summer there were attacks on drones and seizing tankers of alike and so by also looking to russia china now <hes> to provide strategic support but also economic <hes> linkages for iran <hes> it is looking to move away from just <hes> one <hes> geographic focus and protect itself also from <hes> the impact of the us we heard we heard that clip earlier at the start of the program where mohammad zarif saying that iran consider russia and china to be helpful partners and don't have that same view of europe iran has been saying it would step away from the deal will unless europe offered something significant bearing in mind that rising tension in the gulf the issues with the drones and the tanker's who's got the upper hand at the moment well it does seem that iran is putting significant amount of pressure <hes> on the international community and specifically <hes> europe but if iran does precede with breaching the nuclear deal it will lose out upper-hand really because europe does have a threshold and what they're willing to tolerate with regards to iran's nuclear breaches and <hes> it could this whole situation could quickly escalate and iran could be referred to the u._n. Security council. It's not careful so this is a very calibrated dance. You mentioned earlier that you think that the the offer from france of if this line of credit is if i if not officially than than covert he got us out of a nominal wink approval from the united states because they don't want into big standoff with iran going into a reelection year but

Iran United States Persian Gulf RON Europe Russia Paris Deputy Foreign Minister Donald Trump North Africa London Tehran President Trump Mohammad Zarif Moscow France Washington
Refugee children excluded from education will never be equipped to rebuild their countries: UNHCR

UN News

05:58 min | 10 months ago

Refugee children excluded from education will never be equipped to rebuild their countries: UNHCR

"This is natalie hutchinson with u. N. news the vast majority of the world's nearly twenty six million refugees are hosted in the global south where providing education education for them is a major challenge the u._n. Refugee agency u._n._h._c._r. said on friday an interview with u._n. Newses daniel johnson the agency's sees muhammadu deion beltway. That's the deputy. Director of u._n._h._c._r.'s division of resilience and resolutions explains how a new plan is helping to provide provide not just primary but also secondary schooling to vulnerable youngsters permanent remain in issue however you also have much a bigger challenges at secondary level as well as tertiary level. How many millions are we talking about. How many refugees twenty five million in the world twenty six million really yeah. We've got about twenty five hundred six million as of last year most of them eighty four percent in <hes> refugee-hosting countries that happened to be in the global south so refugees are hosted in some of the most deprived areas of our countries and at the same time unwritten these countries in the most deprived part of discounters. The report is calling for help from governments from communities from the private sector the to sort of change the way that refugees get education. The aim is not to do it so much in camps now as in host communities. Maybe you could expand on that and explain explain how our house communities going to deal with this. We've good examples of places where government have made changes policy changes very eddie generous ones go on them wet where for example for example in djibouti for example in uganda for example in mexico for example in countries affected by venezuela situation nations but also in the middle east north africa turkey lebanon exit so we see money of this good examples but this good examples needs sustainability. What are they doing doing exactly. They are allowing refugees to access into the secondary school. The existing schools not obliging them to go on have have their own education on their own so including the refugees in today national education systems allowing them to have additional teachers additional schools were quiet but we also see a lot of development actors development partners like the world bank like bilateral donors coming in support of them so this is new income streams streams this how you're going to do it because you're an can't do it on its own and governments haven't got the resources so you're appealing as part of the global compact refugees to get a new income stream stream. What sort of money do you need to make this work. I cannot tell you about exact amount that is needed but for example you take. Uganda has a four year plan for for over three hundred eighty million u._s. dollars in the course of four years. That's educational response plan devil for both refugee children as will as affected host populations. That's the type of amount of resources that is being posted on the leadership of the government of development actress you initiate. She are on few order ngos and the u._n. Agencies coming together and joining effort into understand exactly what is required and then so that donors as well as communities and others can contribute to responding to those needs that just an example there are many examples so in the the immediate instance. If you go to somewhere like greece the greek islands. There wasn't a lot recently about the fact that thousands of refugee children are still not attending school the islands. I don't have the resources neither does athens. What's going to help them now. Because they really do need assistance immediately they do need assistance but they also policy changes so policy changes that will allow these children to have sisters <unk> but at the same time also human human as well as financial national resources he also mentioned that in lebanon there are thousands more syrian children who fled the conflict there and if these children aren't looked after and given an education we risk reaping the consequences of not looking after them. What exactly do you mean by that. It's about being excluded in countries that have hosted them. They we're already excluded and displaced because of the conflict in the country and then coming into this host countries they need the list that is needed is to provide vitamin d type of education including civic education including cohesion if the host population so that that brighter feature that we do see four for syria when times are is i think is being correctly field by people who are equipped with education two final questions to you how many ah countries and where are you focusing on initially in this new initiative for secondary and tertiary education for refugees and why is education so important for refugees for anyone we are thinking of few countries in the eastern horn of africa rwanda kenya uganda a few orders in asia like pakistan and in these countries as i was saying they are really starting point. We are going talk about fifteen sixteen countries for youth education and secondary education in the laura on in order to make sure that it's not only only supporting the refugees who are immediately in need of that support but also some of defected host populations and education is so important because it is the one that will help refugees and our future what should happen to be able to try but also to contribute go to our societies societies that have lost to them but also the future when they return home or when they are settled or when they are locally integrated.

Uganda Natalie Hutchinson Daniel Johnson Deion Director U. N. Greece Athens U._N._H._C._R. Africa Lebanon Pakistan Asia Rwanda Djibouti Venezuela Syria North Africa
"north africa" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

07:22 min | 1 year ago

"north africa" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"It is a common human reflex to blame. Others for our own mistakes since the invasion of Iraq in two thousand three especially an idea has taken root in some western quarters that the people of the Middle East, the Arab peoples in particular, just understand democracy or are not interested in it or wouldn't know what to do with it. If they had it. This argument is almost invariably made in bad faith by westerners, who learned too much of what they think they know of the region from watching Lawrence of Arabia, but it is nevertheless, the case that the Middle East has not in general embraced democracy as swiftly, and completely as many, not least the people who live, there might prefer. So why not? And if attempts to encourage it haven't worked so far, then what would this is the foreign desk? Mark was supposed to be the standard bearer of democracy, the country that promoted democracy across the world. And I think Iraq will really.

Middle East Iraq Mark Lawrence Arabia
"north africa" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"north africa" Discussed on KCRW

"North Africa. It's described as the Arab spring what's Libya's role in this well Libya, very quickly joined the spring. There were initially peaceful protests against offi. They quickly spiralled into an armed revolution. Distract on for several months. Moammar Gaddafi had been the dictator and charge of Libya for many many years later that year two thousand eleven what happens to him. He's overthrown. He's executed by rebel to drag him out of a ditch. And that was actually caught on video. What's the role of NATO western troops? In all of this NATO was decisive NATO applied airpower to help the rebels on the ground ostensibly to protect civilians, but the NATO intervention was crucial to the toppling of Qaddafi in the big mistake was that NATO and the United States did not follow through after the overthrow. You're not the only one calling it. A big mistake after President Obama left office in two thousand sixteen. He told Fox News that this was probably his biggest mistake as president probably failing to plan for. The day after what I think was the right thing to do in intervening in Libya day after resulted in pretty much a split country. Absolutely. Because Qaddafi really didn't leave any structure governing and so Libya fragmented, malicious filled the vacuum and by two thousand fourteen absolutely. You had this split between east and west as this is playing out. I'm sure many listeners will also remember the two thousand twelve assault on the US consulate in Benghazi Libya, which led to the death of a US ambassador and a political feeding frenzy in this country in Benghazi.

Libya NATO Moammar Gaddafi President Obama Benghazi North Africa United States Qaddafi president assault Fox News
"north africa" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"north africa" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"Time in North Africa. And check in on the proprietor of the cafe tambourine located in Cairo Egypt, then after the exploits of rocky Jordan, the adventure continues where the popular kids cereal Cap'n midnight on the title character in rocky Jordan is played by Jack boils with Jane Avello SEM Tobias. Listen for voice legend, Paul frees as Emma Karnak. The fellow rocky literally runs into on the streets of Cairo episode. The black ball from November sixth nineteen forty nine. Rocky Darden brought to you by Dell Nabi Brian preferred by more women than any other line of damn vegetables in the world. Pyro? Memory run by rocky. Gabbay trampoline. Forgotten, ma'am. Alive with a babble of many language. Pyro more modern adventure and didn't unfold against the backdrop of antiquity. Presents rocky Jordan and this week story. Black ball. It was on the quiet part of the afternoon hours back in the office of my Tamarine catching up on some paperwork when Chris my bartender stuck his head in the afternoon. Male.

rocky Jordan Rocky Darden Cairo Egypt Cairo Emma Karnak Jane Avello North Africa Dell Chris Paul Jack
"north africa" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"north africa" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

"Or noted the french who have had a significant role across north africa although too often overlooked you have the united states which has an expanding uh goal across north africa and indeed extending all the way down into subsaharan africa a you have some british involvement they are in terms of operations including a recent british commitment to give some military support to the french in terms of their operations so there is already a multinational effort working with local governments working with local security forces to try to deal with whatever the next threat is whether it's a suppose resurgence of the islamic state whether it's al qaeda in the maga rob or whether it's another type of group which is considered to be quote an extremists threat to governments in the area and and finally when we took about us involvement and to what degree is donald trump going to want to sign up to to push against their cities and a problem that he will of inherited from one two administrations back is what 22 years now since alqaeda declared war on the united states he has a very difficult path to tread here and he is not necessarily the most adept at dealing with military issues ball trump's enrollment those only dr for donald trump the islamic state exist only hours of political long were he can say incorrectly on you know my leadership has defeated them in iraq and syria let's have a military parade.

united states alqaeda donald trump iraq syria north africa 22 years
"north africa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"north africa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"From the middle east and north africa may have been stuck there since the great migration of two thousand fifteen far from their homes but unable to get permission to formally enter the european union and start a new life so why do you that's gaining some traction is to pay them to go back to the countries they left in the for first place and pierce lucy perkins report from reports from vienna austria as part of npr's take a number series that explores issues around the world and efforts to address them through the lens of a single number house need any a suit in the waiting area at the main refugee clinic in vienna noone looks happy that's because a lot of the people sitting there have run out of options it's where i need a young guy from iraq more than at a so cleveland most morally deaf so many things say back mood abdulwahhab is 25 and came here nearly two years ago from of self he's tall has dark curly hair and big brown exhausted eyes he doesn't say much but while he waded he told me how he got here in early 2016 mahmoud decided to leave iraq because he feared for his safety he quit his job as a cook and using money that is family scratched together he laughed i spoke to him through his counselor philip it by aid at the nonprofit caritas which is in charge of refugee services in austria mahmoud says his journey was tough he was on one of the boats that you heard about in the news stifling new numbers in the plusses as thousands of disc flipping who seek refuge 2016 we'll be the deadliest year ever for migrants cross in the mediterranean paying thousands of dollars for a trip that could cost them their lives ten shifted to moved to a he saw people dying on a trip to them with ten of them like capsizing or falling from the boat to see how he felt that his asylum application almost two years ago and since then nothing all he could do legally was wait in refugee camp that's a big problem a lot of people waiting for asylum have to deal with they aren't allowed to get a job which means mahmoud couldn't send money back to his family israel god kemondo movie flaws his he wants to work he wants to learn the language and if you're have no chance to do this so you're stuck gun.

european union vienna austria npr mahmoud north africa lucy perkins vienna iraq mediterranean two years
"north africa" Discussed on The CyberWire

The CyberWire

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"north africa" Discussed on The CyberWire

"In north africa yeah and it's very interesting because as we've done a lot of these different regions the underground's tend to follow very similar traits of the people who are from those regions so in the case of the middle east and north africa some of the interesting things we found a one of the real interesting points was that the actors inside of here are very willing to share for free a lot of the tools and tactics that they used to perpetrate uh cybercrime and so that's a little different from what you're seeing the other markets where it's more free market type driven where you have a service in you offer it for a price now these are in the middle east the prices are definitely there but if somebody is willing to ask for say a new piece of mala where uh that's for sale and they don't have the ability to pay for it in a lot of cases you'll see that the criminals will just give away their tools or their mel where pieces to the other pete people within the underground and there seems to be a sort of a i guess a maybe a way to describe it is sort of a gentlemanly interaction between folks on these forums yeah for sure i mean you have to have a presence there you have to have a reputation inside a lot of these undergrounds otherwise you go get access so as you build your reputation as you build your online personality sorta speak within these criminal undergrounds new are then welcomed into them and then the middle east uh a lot of it is driven around of by religion which is not really surprising uh base the being in the middle east bear religion drives a lot of their interactions and and how they do think so for example right the religion of peace uh they wanna be peaceful to their fellow members uh so which is all trade you for free by tools if you treat you know give me.

north africa free market middle east
"north africa" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"north africa" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"The minute and casa blanca key to the south casa block the movie casa blanca there was no cooperation the people who wrote the movie didn't know about operation torch but why did it come out like there was an interesting parallel between the two that make this such a good interview so the background operation torch which the british us invasion of french north africa tharoor to torch has been described as the critical turning point in the war and laid the foundation for america's postwar middle east policy while there were lots of pressure to invade and free nazioccupied europe the britishproposed landings in french north africa the allies were fighting the nazis oliver north africa the landing in west north africa would reduce the pressure and allied forces in egypt are they would also secure allied naval control of the southwest meditarranean operation torch was also the largest and most complex amphibious operation in history until the invasion of normandy we allies have three affiliates task forces to simultaneously seized key ports and airports in morocco and algeria charlie casa blanca iran and algiers a western taskforce and a casa blanca was composed about thirty five thousand american troops under general george patton they landed on november eight ninety forty two a three point in morocco germany and attacked in an invaded france and beaten them several years before so the french government which was ruling that area was theoretically progerman because it was hoped the french would not resist the americans didn't fire preparatory fires when they invaded a morocco but the french were there were pro french government which meant progerman so there was a heck of a fight there uh indeed the french can any general try to do a kuta todd overthrow the french of government in algiers to surrender to the allies but he was unsuccessful so there was all kinds of stuff going on and the german presence was fairly minimal casa blanca was the principal french naval port the naval battle of casa blanca uh was a big fight so it was one heck of a fight and the people creating the movie casa walk at didn't know about any of this stuff okay monica the movie casa blanca it was fiction but really really close to reality to talk about the movie literally self if care collection a magical miracle hou for all the.

america egypt normandy morocco casa blanca american troops george patton france french government algiers north africa algeria germany kuta
"north africa" Discussed on WCHS

WCHS

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"north africa" Discussed on WCHS

"Interesting parallel between the two that make this such a good interview so the background operation torch was the british us invasion french north africa to reward to torch has been described as the critical turning point in the war and laid the foundation for america's postwar middle east policy while there were lots of pressure to invade and free nazioccupied europe the britishproposed landings in french north africa the allies were fighting the nazis oliver north africa the landings in west north africa would reduce the pressure on allied forces in egypt are they would also secure you're allied naval control the southwest meditarranean operation torch was also the largest and most complex amphibious operation in history until the invasion of normandy we allies had three and fabius task forces to simultaneously seized key ports and airports in morocco and algeria tardy casa blanca iran and i was years a western taskforce and a casa block i was composed about thirty five thousand american troops under general george patton they landed on november ace netting forty two a three points in morocco germany and attacked in invaded france and beaten them several years before so the french government which was ruling that area was theoretically progerman because it was hoped that the french would not resist the americans didn't fire preparatory fires when they invaded a morocco but the rest were there were approach french government which meant progerman so there was a heck of a fight there uh indeed the french command general tried to do a coup to to overthrow the french of government in algiers to surrender to the allies but he was unsuccessful so there was all kinds of stuff going on and the german presence was fairly minimal casa blanca was the principal french naval port the naval battle of casablanca was a big fight so it was one heck of a fight and the people grady the movie casa walker did know that any of this stuff okay monica the movie casa blanca it was fiction but really really close to reality so talk about the movie the film itself if you're collection of magical miracle hou for all the people who didn't originally wanna be in it the fact that both my father and cry grains where terribly he'll they both had codes they were working on now voyager they weren't available cashew when it started shooting bogart had a contract to immediately on a certain date walk off.

algiers germany algeria north africa bogart casa walker casablanca casa blanca us french government france george patton american troops morocco normandy egypt america
"north africa" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:31 min | 2 years ago

"north africa" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"In a moment here he's working aggregating in all the news flow see seeing this terrible killings uh in egypt sworn in we really want to thank again are a column of the twins and his working getting lynn and noriega on a she's head of our north africa operation in a thought she was just great pimm while giving us that she had right i mean this sort knows what one hundred eighty five hundred four hundred ninety four people confirmed dead by the state news agency in egypt and one hundred twenty five people injured i'm sure that number is going to be michael have yet michael have more perspective on that amendment we do a data check here again acquired screen but nevertheless moving futures up seven dow futures up forty the dugout are to an intraday high on wednesday with a two three six zero handle on it we're just of below that with futures were twenty three five two four up thirty nine sp 500 futures are actually over 2600 which is a of note up seven two six zero one big question p futures whisker and feel with yields elevated two point three three percent the dollar fractionally weaker this morning and now with our news on egypt here is muddled of job to obligatory march state mediator egypt says it is the deadliest single attack in the country in years at least one hundred eighty four people are dead more than one hundred twenty five others are wounded after militants armed with guns and bombs stormed a mosque in egypt's northern sinai peninsula today the sinai province has been a key battleground in the government's fight against an islamic state affiliate egyptian need abdelfattah el sisi has called a meeting griffey security committee president donald trump says he'll be speaking with turkish president race of tibert of today about bringing peace to the mass that i inherited in the middle east trump says in a tweet this morning uh he will get it all done but what a mistake in lives and dollars to be there in the first place global news 24 hours a day powered by more than twenty seven hundred journalists and analysts in more than 120 countries i'm michael barr this is bloomberg bob michael thank you so much i should sterling 133 43 sterling with a lift the last three trading sessions this is bloomberg an mba.

lynn noriega news agency egypt donald trump michael barr bob michael north africa griffey president bloomberg three three percent 24 hours
"north africa" Discussed on War Stories w/ Oliver North

War Stories w/ Oliver North

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"north africa" Discussed on War Stories w/ Oliver North

"We were allowed to have were diplomats in north africa factory response other were a dozen of in particular the known as the twelve apostles they gathered a lot of information about ports about rail lines about roads about the the strength the vision forces then the twelve apostles had the will of god split from cairo to casablanca north africa was teaming spies you never know who's sitting at a table next to you were dancing in front of you heck met the most famous belly dancer in egypt is accused of being a german spa this part of the world was immortalized in the movie casablanca and lake in rick american cafe the french v she forces were totally unpredictable the decisions made the land in north africa and the expectation is that the french forces a stance ably neutral won't opposes some of the higher level planners had hoped that because these were american troops in the leading waves that the french would remember the fact that we come over to france will one and to help defeat imperial germany in 1918 many including general patent didn't want to fight the french but we're prepared to do so if the french oppose the allied invasion they were the enemy and patten regarded them therefore as deliverance therefore as the people that we are going to try to kill in the first allied offensive against hitler more than one hundred thousand men stormed the beaches of north africa in operation porch that's next on war stories.

cairo africa egypt american troops patten hitler casablanca north africa france germany
"north africa" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"north africa" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"Well i think certainly little people around the world will not see it as very credible without him and from his pathetic specs if he sangla the last polls were nullified the presidential vote because of these major regularities the same people are organizing this election why should i take place a area elections in those conditions however the jubilee party of of president can yet in prison cash himself as saying county election you know you're going to lose that's why you're saying he won't take part so i'm certainly tensions quite high everyone of course is is very aware of the violence that followed the two thousand seven election lots of efforts both domestically and internationally to try and avoid fast source of tension but it's very clear that the next couple of weeks are very very important moment in kenyan history james company the un's refugee agency do you nhcr is raising the alarm about the plight of thousands of people stranded in the libyan coastal city of subrata canoe in desperate need of aid the mostly migrants and refugees have been stuck there after being caught up in violent clashes last week between rival militias the moslem fighting is also internallydisplaced a thousand libyan families and local officials and humanitarian organisations a struggling to cope more now from on north africa correspondent runners awad most of the migrants and refugees have been moved to other detention centres in libya and the town of it he an and in the capital tripoli local officials say the include many pregnant women and children the head of a detention centre and heavy on reportedly described conditions there as disastrous and tragic and has been appealing for help international and local organisations including un hcr hadn't been providing some relief but appear overwhelmed with the number of migrants in need of food as well as medical attention they say hundreds were found without clothes and shoes and one newborn is believed to have died from malnutrition brownish awad reporting.

president un libya subrata north africa awad tripoli malnutrition
"north africa" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"north africa" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Arabic language medium so in terms of because you know obviously this television would be targeting the arabicspeaking audiences across the middle east and north africa and the tv landscape in the arab world is actually very vibrant and is very transnational also there are a lot of television stations that are based in europe and certainly in the uk as well that target the arab region a lot of them are funded by governments in europe and and as swear you've got from iran to turkey in the in the middle east which have arabiclanguage channel's in addition to france germany the uk with bbc arabic cnn is i think increasing its presence it has a website and in addition to alexandria which is a us governmentfunded television station but most of these are news news channels and not economic news like bloomberg wouldbe so that is certainly a change so in terms of the tv market in the region it's it's very it's very vibrant their may and it's very politicized in a way but in terms of a presentation of the middle east in let's say englishlanguage medium there is definitely a certainty a case to say that our perspectives are not very well represented and that is often complained that do hidden in the region that there's a lot of misunderstanding and misrepresentation of the concerns of special young people in in in the middle east and north africa and with that in mind then do you think the other organizations could follow sheets could they follow bloomberg's can have lead on this.

europe uk iran france economic news bloomberg north africa middle east germany governmentfunded
"north africa" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"north africa" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Do you think the middle east as often be neglected bali englishlanguage broadcast and print media do you think that saw from happened my i think that is so that there there's a separate discussion between the underrepresentation of the middle east in western media of european media or american media verses arabic language medium so in terms of because you know obviously this television would be targeting the arabicspeaking audiences across the middle east and north africa and the tv landscape in the arab world is actually very vibrant and is very transnational also there are a lot of television stations that are based in europe uncertainty in the uk as well that target the arab region a lot of them are funded by governments in europe and and and swear you've got from iran to turkey in the in the middle east which have arabiclanguage china's in addition to france germany the uk with bbc arabic cnn is i think increasing its presence it has a website and in addition to i'll huddur which is a us governmentfunded television station but most of these are news news china's and not economic news like bloomberg would be so that is certainly a change so in terms of the tv market in the region it's it's very it's very vibrant their may and it's very politicised than away but in terms of vida presentation of the middle east in let's say englishlanguage medium there is definitely a certain the a case to say that our perspectives are not very well represented.

print media uk iran china france economic news bloomberg middle east north africa europe germany governmentfunded
"north africa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:32 min | 3 years ago

"north africa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Of the vehicles that have been used in these attacks have been hard on that clearly does open up a possibility of an alert being raised when a particular individual or somebody linked to a networking of individuals goes in has vehicle that is possible of course it wouldn't deal with the complete are no the so called lone wolf individual which is beat characteristic of some of the attacks where individuals have been mobilized the radicalised by watching things online by hearing the calls from leading islamic state eight figures to action and so on or even perhaps if somebody use their own vehicle emits instructive but one of the vehicles used in the spanish attacks was a van that had been hard the other was actually a will be cars i understand standard so clearly there are difficulties there and we know that spain has been on alert is fat because it now easier reach the people coming over from north african many many more people arriving in spain from north africa nation i think terrorism experts for a long time seen spain because of its close ties with north africa the spanish and claves actually on the continent of africa and of course there a links with morocco as well they've seen spain as an important conduit for people coming into europe who may have radical views spain is also being seen as something of a kind of logistical center for socalled islamic state in europe perhaps people having an involvement there an and going off elsewhere to commit attacks we've seen that i think with some of the individuals for example who were involved in attacks in france they had spent some time in spain so whether now this means that spain from being a kind of logistical center and clearinghouse for the islamic state elements sympathisers whether it's now becoming a prime target of attacks well seems to be the case now with barcelona it's interesting of course the the previous incarnation of jihadist terrorism operated by alqaeda also was active in spain of course in madrid back in two thousand four you had the worst terrorist atrocity in europe with multiple bombings on trains in the in the spanish capital so it's interesting now that the islamic state the newest incarnation of this form of terrorism is choosing to make a spanish.

spain morocco europe france alqaeda north africa africa madrid
"north africa" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

03:05 min | 3 years ago

"north africa" Discussed on WTMA

"To treat patients regardless of what it sees at st jude families never exceeded they'll think she will travel housing food because the only thing a family should william it is helping their child because of you guess is because of you here is sake and it dot com the right so general joni thomas big commander actually had a putt told us that missing what commander in chief beck it's calm commanders now either i think be sync pack sake sent shock i like that i still use it but the people whose brains dance on the heads of pens of a 'nother thing altogether like men in black your brain as enclosed inside the head of a showing him no longer have access to it but when i saw this number from general thomas that we've killed he says a conservative estimate sixty thousand to seventy thousand troglodyte you know what a great public service that is that the us military has performed for the world for civilization for europe for north africa for the middle east for asia for indonesia for the philippines do you know what an extraordinary service that is that we've performed and it's a terrible thing to say but these people have their there a cancer there a a plague and the united states military and our brave men and women rump an stumping in there so here's the here's the deal went in to and it's obviously a raid not an airstrike because we grabbed this troglodyte wife abu sayaff right two thousand fifteen so our brave men go in there risking their our own lives visions of their children dancing on their eyes as they go in under cover of darkness with nightvision goggles and m four rifles and grenades and communications gear and and they go in with these into that the heart of the beasts the belly of the beasts and they killed this abu sayaff guy who is our number two and and other people were low you know there's like women there and they're still alive at the end of it isn't that nice so we grabbed the wife and she starts spilling the chick peas all over the place the beans and and gives us all kinds of great information on the whereabouts of our back daddy the head.

commander europe middle east asia indonesia philippines united states the deal st jude joni thomas commander in chief beck north africa abu sayaff
"north africa" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"north africa" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"We are going to move them accelerated and reinforced manner throw them on their back foot we have already shifted from attrition tactic for we showed them the one position to another in iraq and syria to annihilation package where we should round the our intention is the foreign fighters do not survive the fight to return home to north africa to europe to america to asia africa uh we're not going allowed to do so we're going to stop the there and take apart to caliphate explain what it means to be moving in an elation posture as opposed to attrition well attrition is where you keep pushing the mouth of the areas that the rim john and what we intend to do by surround read them is to not allow them to fall back thus reinforce shooting them shelves as they get smaller and smaller making the fight tougher and tougher she that right now through jampel in western majdal show rounded iraqi security forces removed yet them talafar is now surrounded we of god efforts underway right now to surround their selfdeclared caliphate capital of rock uh that uh surrounding operation is going on and once surrounded the we'll go in and clean the mouth one of these you mentioned in this new accelerated ten boat is that the president has delegated authority to the right level what does that mean when you're in operations the best thing you you can do at the top level is get the strategy right you have to get the big ideas right you have to determine what is the policy what is the level of effort you're willing to commit to it and that you'd delegate those who have to execute debt strategy to the appropriate level which knee appropriate level it's full level where people are train and and he quipped to take decisions shall we move swiftly against the enemy there is no corporation in the world that would in a competitive environment tryon concentrate all decisions of the corporate level but i would point out here that we have not changed rules of engagement there is no relax asian of our attention to protect the initiative we do everything we can to protect the civilians and actually lowering delegating the authority to the lower levels allows.

iraq syria america president north africa europe asia majdal