36 Burst results for "North Africa"

Fresh update on "north africa" discussed on Bloomberg Opinion

Bloomberg Opinion

00:35 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "north africa" discussed on Bloomberg Opinion

"Forces in Taiwan the sub 40 generation they are very very willing to take our farms They really want to They gunning to it Tim Calvin on whether Taiwan would be willing and able to defend itself should have been necessary Later we'll speak with admiral James debris former supreme allied commander of NATO on NATO expansion First though The strengthening dollar raises the specter of what I call Little Fires Everywhere Because if you're in a developing country right now the last thing you need is a disorderly depreciation of your cards against the dollar at a time when energy prices are higher food prices are higher and the global economy is slowing down That's Muhammad el Arian on the dangerous ripple effects of a strengthening U.S. dollar I spoke with Marcus ashworth Marcus we're seeing a little bit of a pause now but since the start of the year the broad dollar index has appreciated around 7% 14% year over year We heard Muhammad Ali Arian bite are we looking at bigger fragilities to come Well it's unusual to see emerging markets joined by a lot of the very large developed markets in all at the same time facing a very unpleasant circumstances with very weak currencies Accelerating their need to have to raise interest rates not only to combat inflation but support the currencies and because unfortunately this time around because all imported energy inflation there really don't want to be currency either of their export led like say Japan or European Union are this compound itself will lead to currency So it's all about the strong dollar because the fed is raising rates so much more aggressively And then the added value of that reserve haven currency or the dollar So all the sort of evident ones are perfect storm Except perhaps you see the dollar having a bit of a breeder at last Well where should we look for fragilities because right now it seems like there is social geopolitical instability and so many places I'm thinking of places like Sri Lanka Pakistan but obviously other places around the world as well even China So yes there is a lot of other problems around the world and I certainly think that encourages people to rush into dollars particularly now they can get some yield as the bond markets have voted clearly with their feet We have yet to see a free crisis but it's clearly coming which will put a lot of pressures particularly on places like Egypt and North Africa but it will spill over into a lot of other emerging markets We're seeing clearly turkey under pressure again They're all bubbling away and the stresses and strains of the system are exacerbated by the strength of the dollar and buttons are starting to pop off the super aggressive bed also with during liquidity and the one thing which has kept the world survived through the pandemic and gross crisis in the quality of super amounts of dollars Right and how much of the responsibility is on the fed because obviously it has to look after its own economy and there's huge inflation relative to what we're used to here in the United States so the fed has to worry about that But at the same time Janet Yellen used to always talk about feedback loops so if there are problems in other countries in the world that's going to eventually feed back to the United States as well It's just going to be a second order effect or possibly more than that until the U.S. economy starts to feel weakness because exports are falling away or there is a complete drop off demand Only then will we see perhaps be used as a bit of an excuse for a fed For the moment that seems to be very little pressure on them internally to think of the rest of the world I do think that having Yellen in the treasury is important perhaps you could argue it's too close to comfort since you just stepped away from the fact but equally it can be very useful because she knows everyone They're all talk to each other There's no doubt about it in the Bank of England takes a very careful look at what the fed does and likewise European Central Bank and bank and so I'm sure they'll be getting the incoming please stop hiking rates So quickly but whether they listen or not as you quite rightly summarize I don't think they can at home Yeah exactly And then can we count on the rest of the world to progress with things like structural reforms that might actually help their economies that's going to be difficult for them too if they can't even service their external debt right I think that's wishful thinking on lots of different ways I mean yes to someone that will have to not necessarily the time frame they want to do it in but some of them will absolutely have to do some more aggressive And they're already asked to be fair but it's a dilemma for everyone to be able to try and keep inflation down and avoid recession Marcus you sound a little less worried than somebody like Muhammad Ella Arian I don't want to over characterize what he's doing but is he maybe exaggerating a little bit Yes I think there's a problem in the world and I'm not sure they're going to get of any time soon but there are certain things which if you look at the underlying strength of the labor market and economies in Europe U.S. and UK in particular they're pretty strong China is able to do an awful lot of things which other economies can't say much control The world is going to suffer a correction because it's overstimulated left that stimulus in too long and it's got a horrible hangover should we call it combined and logistics situations Chucking a wall but we will get through this and I do think the dollar strength is overdone and it will probably carry on a bit longer but the point is is there for a reason until the world gets a better place but I was going to stay the place to be The treasury is now talking a lot about friend shoring so confining global supply chains to friendly networks don't quite know who these friends are yet but it must be pretty difficult for partners or people who thought they were partners to hear this many of them are not democracies Are we headed towards a system where many other countries are locked out of the U.S. dollar system and don't have enough reserves to pay for what they need to import Well we know who friends are because they're the ones who got currency swaps through the pandemic and before that the global financial crisis Yes it is a weapon Do they use it cleverly absolutely do I applaud what they're doing Yes I do actually I think this is the leverage they have and if you're without the dollar system then it conscious decision and as far as I can say that the treasury would be particularly afraid of handling things in a very smart way and that understanding what they're doing with Russia they're not being completely blanketly banning everything they've done in a very clever way I think it's a wonderful job Marcus ashworth Next on Bloomberg opinion They might try to take an outlying island just to kind of show that they can Tim Caldwell on how Taiwan is navigating perilous waters.

Tim Calvin Admiral James Debris Muhammad El Arian Marcus Ashworth Marcus Muhammad Ali Arian FED Nato Taiwan U.S. Janet Yellen Yellen European Union North Africa Sri Lanka Muhammad Ella Arian Treasury China Pakistan
How Iran Uses Hezbollah to Conduct International Operations

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:40 min | 2 months ago

How Iran Uses Hezbollah to Conduct International Operations

"I'm continuing my discussion of Iran and its operations in other countries in the Middle East and even in North Africa. The article I'm discussing is written by Karim sajar poor in foreign affairs magazine and such a port makes the point that Iran uses its surrogate, which is Hezbollah, to conduct operations in a number of other countries, but particularly in Lebanon. Now Hezbollah is by far the most powerful force in Lebanon today. They just go about doing whatever they want. I mean, they want to assassinate a political opponent. That's it for him. They have they run their own underground economy. They've implanted thousands of rockets in Lebanon that have the capacity of striking Israel. And then one time Hezbollah claimed to be sort of its own organization. It was not part of Iran. But of late, they've become very explicit about their the fact that Hezbollah essentially is Iran. Here is Sheik and Ezra. This is by the way the founder and leader of Hezbollah. And he goes, as long as Iran has money, we have money. Just as we receive the rockets, we use to threaten Israel, we're receiving our money. So this is an azra la basically saying, hey, listen, I'm Iran's man outside of Iran. I do Iran's bidding and the Iranians are perfectly happy to fund me. Let's remember that Iran also uses Shia radicals and local groups in Iraq and they used it while America was in Iraq to sort of destabilize the Iraqi regime, which they were very successful in

Hezbollah Iran Karim Sajar Lebanon North Africa Middle East Israel Sheik Ezra Iraq America
Putin Outaged as Ukraine Acquires More Weaponry

Mark Levin

01:52 min | 2 months ago

Putin Outaged as Ukraine Acquires More Weaponry

"He's more than happy to invade a weaker neighbor That doesn't have the weaponry that he does But if that neighbor dares to try and acquire old MiG 29s old May 29th just to have a fighting shot at it you'd threatens Oh no we can't do that In other words this guy he couldn't win a fair fight of his life depended on it The Russian economy is basically a third world economy It's not a diverse economy He's run it into the ground He stolen from his people blind absolutely blind He's a multibillionaire as hard the oligarchs like kiss his ass And the Ukrainian journal you can't give them MiG 29s These older fighter jets what would happen to us By the way I'm so sick of these phony retired lieutenant colonels who come on I like the good ones It's the phony ones Who go on there and are as stupid as hell Yes plain stupid Just unbelievable I can't even believe they reached the rank of lieutenant colonel Some of these people Putin didn't attack Ukraine because Ukraine wanted to be part of NATO Reed what he wrote last summer Like Patton said about Rama when he was defeating him in North Africa I read your damn book read what he wrote

Ukrainian Journal Ukraine Putin Nato Patton Rama North Africa
"north africa" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

05:36 min | 3 months ago

"north africa" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

"And she says she absolutely remembers that they called them flags and she actually had Irish irises growing on the side of their house. And they would cut them and take them out to the cemetery, and that's what they called planting flags. And I did ask her if she still calls me that she says, oh yes, I still call iris flags often. But I asked about her kids who several of them are still in Springfield. And she says, oh no, they would never. They would never call them fly. So called a viruses. So my question is, I'm just curious was that a highly localized thing has a completely gone away, you know, because like I said, her kids are in Springfield now. Don't say it. So I'm just really curious about that whole origin of the flags and the irises and why my dad would have called iris flags. Oh, fascinating. There is a white iris iris albicans, which is also known as the cemetery iris, and it's something that is planted in a lot of cemeteries, particularly throughout the south. There's this long, long tradition of planting white irises in cemeteries. It's a tradition that goes all the way back to North Africa and found its way to Spain and then from the Spanish who settled in Florida. It spread throughout the south. Now, is there any is there any guess how that means does it look like a flag? Is there any particular flag that looks like or any guess how the term came about or is there another derivation of flags that I'm totally missing that doesn't mean nothing to do like a banner? Well, that's a very good question because the etymology of the flag that symbolizes a nation and the flag that is an iris plant. They're both kind of murky, but the plant flag may come from an old word that means read or rush refers to a kind of read and tall, skinny flower. The flag that's made out of cloth. Again, is another sort of murky etymology. It may have to do with the sound of it flapping in the wind..

Springfield North Africa Spain Florida
Author William Federer Describes 'The Treacherous World of the 16th Century'

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:41 min | 6 months ago

Author William Federer Describes 'The Treacherous World of the 16th Century'

"William Federer has written a book called the treacherous world of the 16th century and how the pilgrims escaped it which its effectively the prequel to America's freedom, William Federer, welcome to the program. Great to be with you. Hey, I mean, the treacherous world of the 16th century and how the pilgrims escaped it. Most of us know so little about the 16th century. We don't think of it as treacherous or non treacherous. What are we talking about here? What is that what is it that got you to write this book? You've written so many books on history. It's a joy to talk to you on any historical subject. But I love it when you come out with a book like this, because you really have done your homework and we get to benefit. What is it that why do you call it the prequel to America's freedom? What did they leave? Well, Europe was ruled by kings and it was being invaded by the sultan of Turkey. The Ottoman sultan Suleiman the Magnificent he was surrounding Vienna. So backdrop, the Muslims conquered all of North Africa, which used to be Christian. There were 250 Catholic diocese along North Africa. Muslims invaded Spain and held it for 700 years and they were just driven out in 1492. So just a couple of years earlier, the Muslims had controlled Egypt for 600 years. It had been founded by the Christian face Mark that wrote the gospel of Matthew Mark Luke and John. And then Siri was completely Christian for 6 centuries of angiotensin by the apostle Paul until Khalid Omar conquers it. And the Turks convert to Islam and they invaded to what is today Turkey and all 7 churches mentioned in the book of revelation are wiped out and then they finally cross the Bosporus and conquer Constantinople in 1453 and then finally they're invading Europe and surrounding Vienna Austria the year 1529. So here we have an Islamic invasion into Europe and just a couple of years earlier the reformation started 1517 with Martin Luther. And so Europe has an inside outside chaos going on and the Holy Roman Emperor is the king of Spain. Charles V now the title Holy Roman Emperor means he's sort of responsible for defending Christendom. And so here he is wanting to defend against the Islamic invasion. At the same time, he is inherited all the new world, right? Columbus discovered it for Ferdinand Isabella. And so he's taking the gold from the new world to fit out his navy to keep the Muslims from taking over the Mediterranean

William Federer Sultan Suleiman North Africa America Matthew Mark Luke Europe Khalid Omar Vienna Turkey Spain Siri Egypt Constantinople Mark John Austria Charles V Martin Luther Ferdinand Isabella Columbus
Algeria blasts French leader, bans flights, recalls diplomat

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 8 months ago

Algeria blasts French leader, bans flights, recalls diplomat

"Tensions have heightened between Algeria and France in response to comments by French president Emmanuel macron which jury according inadmissible the north African nation has refused permission for France to fly military planes and it says space and announced the recall of its ambassador from Paris the shop escalations in tensions comes off to micron she's out here in authorities of staking hatred for France the comments were made at a meeting with the grandchildren of French and Algerian fighters in Algeria's war of independence from France France is also announced the decision to slash the number of visas issued to people in North Africa because governments are refusing to take back migrants expelled from France I'm Karen Thomas

France French President Emmanuel Macr Algeria Micron Paris North Africa Karen Thomas
The Jews Settle in Cuba

Cuban Family Roots PODCAST

02:09 min | 9 months ago

The Jews Settle in Cuba

"Jewish settlement in cuba the first jewish inhabitants were known as morales in fifty eight. The bishop of cuba wrote to spain declaring that every ship back in havana was filled with hebrews new christians. These were jews recently converted to christianity in fifteen o to inquisition proceedings. Began against the merano's in cuba. The secret juice of cuba arranged for trade between the thirteen colonies. And the use of jamaica barbados and other caribbean islands. This unable the colonies to sell goods and by military and civilian supplies. The spanish constitution of sixty nine removed all restrictions on the settlement of juice in latin america and at that time over five honda spanish jews engaging commerce in cuba and five to six jewish families were amongst the wealthiest in cuba jews were among the founders of the commercial king sugar fields and the first refineries in eighteen sixty two through eight thousand ninety five many american us join cubans in their fight for independence. The first jewish cemetery in cuba was established by the united states. Army for the american jewish soldiers who died during the spanish american war in eighteen ninety eight in nineteen six. The cemetery were sold to the united hebrew congregation primarily by american jews. Most of the members of this congregation which was later named temple. Beth israel where americans who fall in cuba or came from key west and other parts of southern florida. After the end of the war between nineteen too many sephardi jews began to come to cuba amongst them young turks who had participated in the earlier revolt against the sultan of the ottoman empire other cames from mexico north africa and the mirrored iranian. They spoke spanish and had olive complexion and blend that well with the rest of the

Cuba Morales Havana Caribbean Islands Barbados Spain Jamaica United Hebrew Congregation Latin America Honda United States Army Israel Florida North Africa Mexico
Journalist Daniel Greenfield Believes the Taliban Will Sell US Military Assets

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:32 min | 10 months ago

Journalist Daniel Greenfield Believes the Taliban Will Sell US Military Assets

"I wanna talk to you about what's going on today in the middle east. This is not unrelated What views on. What is transpiring right. Now as a result of biden's decision to pull out what looks like Precipitously putting many lives in danger to say the least if they precipitous pullout. It's one that has absolutely made. America look impotent. Weak and incapable of doing even the simplest things like evacuating civilians before the military and iran is definitely getting the message going ahead and saying that it's bush as hard as it can because machine is going to run away from any conflict and so is every other terrorist group now the sheer amount of weapons american. We're talking american equipment. Artillery even drones fell to the hands of the taliban the taliban and not going to be able to use all that equipment. They're going to start reselling it. We saw obama's illegal intervention in libya that all of those weapons they ended up and conflicts all over. The world are the weapons that Five left behind in afghanistan. Americans are going to be killed by. Those pencils are gonna make their way into the middle east i. They're going to make their way into a tax in north africa and they could very well even be smuggled into this country for tax. I there's going to be a huge open-air arms market in afghanistan every single islamic terrorist group. Everything is going to go. There might be started the network of training camps and we are going to see a lot of books. a

Middle East Taliban Biden Iran America Bush Libya Afghanistan Barack Obama North Africa
"north africa" Discussed on Sky News Daily

Sky News Daily

06:57 min | 10 months ago

"north africa" Discussed on Sky News Daily

"Humanity is facing catastrophe. The report said extreme weather events are on the rise as a result of that human induced warming. And there's plenty of extreme weather right now across the globe in greece. Fires a continuing to devastate entire towns and record. Temperatures are taking hold in southern europe and north africa. The where we saw the most concerning fires in the last week well fires that they thought were in remission. Have now up again and the severe heat. Waves are expected to reach areas of spain and italy to as the country's brace for temperatures of around forty seven degrees celsius and that's not to mention the recent devastation caused by weather events exacerbated by climate change including fires in turkey and siberia. Look at that sheet of flame from that has happened within minutes and now it's coming from both sides and floods in germany and china still begging people all over the place of the. The doesn't all happen to kris and the families forced from their homes in bangladesh. Knowing they'll never be able to return backgrounds crumlin dhaka's crumbling under under people coming here. This is the stupi. I'm this is happening in real time. And i think the world doesn't know enough about climate change is happening now to how can we stop it. You're listening to sky. Needs climate costs with me. Anna jones ami katharina the toxin. This week we're taking the most sobering assessment about climate. Change that we've ever seen an asking. What can we do to solve the problem. Yes a country in the district. Court really has been the talk of the town. Hasn't it this week headlines everywhere. A lot of coverage in the media. We've heard a lot about it but if you can do us the honor of giving us the standout points for mates. It's i know. It's a tough a tough ask. Well scientists have been working on it for about three years and they assessed over fourteen thousand pieces of scientific evidence and research part shot. Try in one minute. Don't don't don't tie me. I'll do my best to my best to summit upside right. So what does the report show as well to break it down. And this is the first of three parts of the ipcc's report and this one looks at the science of where our planet is now in terms of its climate and produces has produced various scenarios that projects where our climate will be in the future. So let's take first part shall we. Where are we now. So it is unequivocal. Human activity has contributed to the woman of global surface. Temperature and atmosphere and scientists have estimated that so far that's been warming of around one point one degrees celsius above pre industrial levels. So that's from about eighteen fifty until now and the fastest rate of warming in the last two thousand news has happened in the last forty years that we're seeing that woman happening at an unprecedented rate and now looking forward into the projections and various different scenarios. When it comes to emissions the report found that even if we work tomorrow to suddenly shift to very low levels of emissions of greenhouse gases that's a carbon dioxide nitrous oxide methane. We will still hit one point five degrees celsius of warming in the next twenty years. We're locked into that. There is an irreversible change over the next few decades. We're also locked into at least half a meter of sea level rise continuing arctic sea level melts and the increase in severity and frequency of extreme weather so things like heat waves into the wildfires. Such you've seen in southern europe over the last few weeks drought. Tropical storms like cyclones at leading to flooding. So so bring assessment really. Yes that's right. And i have seen quite so many people on social media. Talk about how scary a report is when this is essentially the most authoritative view of what's happening to the planet's climate today and as you say it went comes a shock to to climate scientists but at the same time seeing in those bull terms and does sound alarming. So let's focus on that glimpse of optimism shall we because it isn't all politics to talk us through why we shouldn't give up hope. Yes the report. Isn't supposed to scare people into thinking this is it. This isn't game over. There are calls to action within it and and it looks as i said various different scenarios in the future and it does show that if we were to put in deep what we are. Governments are industries what we can just communities if we would commit to deep and profound cuts to our emissions levels. We could stick to that one point five degrees celsius threshold of warming their thereabouts and even start to see the worst effects of that climate change start to diminish towards the end of the century and that is the real key positive message we could take from this report that it's not too late and realize what it does is it also puts the uk in the spotlight ahead of cop twenty six which is just around the corner and eighty days away now and accompany. We've been talking about it for so long is rapidly approaching and we'll put the spotlight in terms of what we're doing with our decarbonising plans with our mission's plans. But there are a couple of reports this week about what. The u k strategy is have suggested it might actually be a bit more fragile than anyone would like us to believe. Yes that's right and we've still announcements to come. Haven't we from the government about how it's going to meet. It's very ambitious targets but one of those reports that you were talking about was one. That's come out. That said that blue hydrogen could have been a key. Part of the government's plan to to bring down our greenhouse gas emissions this form of hydrogen could actually be twenty percent worse for the climate at the burning natural gas potentially but a bad news for the prime minister just a few days after that report. Yeah and that's not all those new analysis from wwf. The world wildlife fund claiming that the march twenty twenty one budget didn't add up to the to the uk government delivering on its climate promises. They said that the climate mitigation policies equate to just one hundred forty five million pounds but policies that will drive up emissions at such as a controversial fuel. Duty equate.

Anna jones ami katharina north africa siberia dhaka europe greece kris bangladesh spain ipcc turkey italy germany arctic sea china uk world wildlife fund
What Is Freedom? Hungary Might Have the Answers

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:33 min | 10 months ago

What Is Freedom? Hungary Might Have the Answers

"What is freedom right. 'cause i grew up in a conservative movement. I've talked about this. Or the idea of freedom was like degeneracy sensuousness or you can do whatever you want to do it when in reality it's actually the the order and the discipline that keeps people in a maximum or framework actually allows you to live flourishing. Lives what. I found most interesting. What your visit to. Hungary is as you put your very successful show kind of front and center. There was that you were showing the european project that the one cut of dissident voices actually a more playful and a more enjoyable and desirable way to live. Can you talk about. How hungry was like the only country to resist the merckel kind of consensus that there was this refugee crisis and hungary's like play along and they've kinda showed that the rest of the country's what the wrong direction go to paris. I'm going to europe all my life. And i i love europe. Relatives lived in a really. You know. I really love european cities and along destroying their filthy. You know they're chaotic. They're disgusting or dangerous isn't not because it's fascist or racist or anything like that but because it can fold. Its own borders two thousand fifteen. There was a a movement of millions of people from the middle east and north africa into europe and that happened for a reason. no it wasn't global climate change. it was a fault for driving suburban. It was the obvious results of bad. American neoconservative foreign policy

Hungary Europe Paris North Africa Middle East
Greek Temperatures Soar to 45 Degrees Celsius

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 10 months ago

Greek Temperatures Soar to 45 Degrees Celsius

"Authorities in Greece have close to the iconic acropolis and all the engine sites during afternoon hours as a heat wave scorching the eastern Mediterranean worsens temperatures of which one of seven point six are in hiding parts of Athens as extreme weather fed by hotel from North Africa fuels deadly wildfires in Turkey and places in Greece Italy and across the region Greek authorities have described the heat wave as the most intense in more than thirty years now the acropolis is closing daily from midday to five PM the whole two styles the nation's electricity network is on the extreme pressure because of the increase in the number of people using air conditioning to ease the burden some coal fired power stations which is due to be phased out have been brought back into service I'm Charles de Ledesma

Greece Eastern Mediterranean North Africa Athens Turkey Italy Charles De Ledesma
Caller and Mark Levin Agree We Have to Know Who the Enemy Is

Mark Levin

01:02 min | 11 months ago

Caller and Mark Levin Agree We Have to Know Who the Enemy Is

"Right about progressive liars. They should be called regressive language matters. The second point is anecdotal. Our favorite movie patent. This shows you how a single book helped a great general when a battle you remember the scene when he's in North Africa on top of the rich watching Rommel approach. And he said, rubble you s O b. I read your book. Uh, In your case, you are helping us. Know the enemy because if we don't know the enemy, we can't defeat it. And that was what Rommel was saying. And I strongly I strongly agree that I strongly believe it, And that's the purpose here. We need to know what we're up against. Right now. It's just kind of Jell O. Where's all this? Coming from? And so we need to make it tangible concrete, and we need to make our responses tangible and concrete. Brilliant call. Thank you very, very much.

Rommel North Africa
JIMENA: Mizrahi and Sephardi Voices

Can We Talk?

02:49 min | 1 year ago

JIMENA: Mizrahi and Sephardi Voices

"Ovid is a dancer and choreographer from aden yemen. She moved to israel as a girl in nineteen forty nine and became a founding member of the inbal dance. Company marguerite recorded her oral history for the gemina oral history project. In two thousand eleven gimenez stands for jews indigenous to the middle east and north africa region that jewish communities thrive in for over two thousand years until the twentieth century. When a million mizraki sephardi jews fled and were forced out of the land of their ancestors. The san francisco based gemina is working to preserve that rich heritage and history producer. Asala sunny poor recently sat down with sarah levin gimenez executive director to talk about some of the stories in the archive as well as their own family histories. A saw worked with sarah on the archives many years ago sayre you and i worked really closely together while i was in college My very first internship ever was with jim messina and working on this oral history project. I like to think that it's what really launched my love of storytelling. I wanted to start by asking you. Why do you think it's important to preserve these stories as told in the words of those who lived it. So i am so happy to be doing this with you a saul. I think that judaism as grounded and stories like that is the legacy of our people. That's the foundation of haha. That's the foundation of what it means to be jewish as passing on stories Were the combination of thousands of years of stories and in regards to gimenez oral history project We collected stories of communities of people who who hadn't been given a platform to share. They hadn't been given a microphone. They hadn't been given an opportunity to talk about what happened to them when they lived and fled countries throughout the middle east. North africa and their stories are an incredibly critical part of contemporary jewish history. And where we are. Today with establishment of the state of israel nineteen forty eight posts showa post arab nationalism and uprisings in the middle east and north africa there was a major disruption of over two thousand years of continuous jewish life in the middle east north africa. Kinda came to an end and that is a huge part of the jewish story. And we have this very unique opportunity to collect the stories from the people who lived through this historical moment in time and it was an honor to collect these stories and hopefully add them to the record of jewish

Gimenez Aden Yemen Gemina Sarah Levin Gimenez Ovid Middle East North Africa Marguerite Foundation Of Haha Jim Messina Sayre Israel San Francisco Sarah Middle East North Africa
Thousands of Migrants Swim From Morocco to Spanish Enclave of Ceuta

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 1 year ago

Thousands of Migrants Swim From Morocco to Spanish Enclave of Ceuta

"The Spanish enclave of save ten North Africa on the border with Morocco has received over eight thousand migrants in just forty eight hours well some of the migrants were received with open arms by the forty percent Muslim population is receiving unless someone well come by far right groups he sees the flood of migrants as an invasion one migrants Mohamed Bangoura from Guinea says his situation has not improved since arriving on European soil it is complicated here and no one else comes to help us out in the street days no one is sold every test suffer here at the same time many Moroccan parents all scrambling for news of their children as a thirties confirm over four hundred miners were among more than eight thousand migrants who arrived and saved her from Morocco by scanning a border fence still swimming around it I'm Karen Thomas

Mohamed Bangoura North Africa Morocco Guinea Swimming Karen Thomas
The History of Muslim-Controlled Spain

Everything Everywhere Daily

01:53 min | 1 year ago

The History of Muslim-Controlled Spain

"In the early eighth century the iberian peninsula was populated by the visigoths who are dramatic people who entered and populated the peninsula after the collapse of the roman empire. During the reign of the caliph will lead the first general. Tariq iban ziad lead moore's forces across the mediterranean and landed in gibraltar on april thirtieth in the year seven eleven. This began a seven year campaign. Where the moore's brought most of the iberian peninsula under islamic control the term moore should probably be explained as i've used it here. In several previous episodes there really are no people called. Moore's the term more was used by europeans to describe muslim inhabitants. From north africa included people of different ethnicities including berbers and arabs. The term isn't too dissimilar from the term francs which was used by muslims in the middle east to describe all europeans. The term comes from the roman province of mauritania which is where modern day morocco is located. The current country of that name is not located exactly where the ancient province of mauritania is located. The invasion began a period where muslim rulers controlled at least part of the iberian peninsula for almost eight hundred years the moore's never completely conquered the peninsula however even at its greatest extent just eight years. After the invasion there was still a part of the peninsula that remained under christian control in the far north the kingdom of asturias remained independent and it was never conquered that being said one of the reasons why they had such an easy time is because they gave very generous terms to the people who they did. Conquer one example of this is theodomir the visigoths chief of america. He agreed to terms where he could still continue to be the leader of his people and practice christianity. All they had to do was pay an annual tribute. The entire region of iberian muslim rule was known in arabic as al

Iberian Peninsula Moore Tariq Iban Ziad Peninsula Mauritania Gibraltar Mediterranean North Africa Morocco Middle East Asturias America
The History of Spanish Africa

Everything Everywhere Daily

01:59 min | 1 year ago

The History of Spanish Africa

"I say that there are parts of spain and africa. I'm not trying to be tricky and play with words. I'm not saying that. Spain used to have colonies in africa. Although that's true. I'm also not trying to define the canary islands. Which are part of spain off the coast of africa as being in africa. I mean in the most literal sense possible. That part of spain is in africa. There are two very small spanish cities located on the peninsula which are on the african mainland ordering morocco and malia and their very existence as you probably would expect are due to historical quirks happenstance due to geography. Spain has always had a close relationship with africa finishes based in carthage in. What is today. Tunisia established settlements on the spanish coast. The roman province of hispania was part of a greater empire that included all of north africa. Which bordered the mediterranean after the roman empire fell islamic moors from north africa conquered and controlled spain for over seven hundred years. So there's always been a back and forth between north africa in the peninsula and malia both spanish territories in africa have different yet similar histories despite being about one hundred and thirty miles apart from each other. Sita is located directly across the sea from gibraltar. So if you ever want stump someone asks them. What country lies. Directly south of gibraltar and what country lies. North of gibraltar. answer is the same. Spain is on both ends. Sierra makes the counterpart to gibraltar for the pillars of hercules which the ancient names of the two promontories which guarded the strait of gibraltar. As with most everything in the region it has an ancient history. Carthage martina and numidians all control the area. Before the romans the you me add caliphate controlled it for centuries when the caliphate of cordoba fell in ten thirty one it was then passed between various north african kingdoms with support from various kingdoms in the iberian peninsula.

Spain Africa Coast Of Africa North Africa Malia Hispania Gibraltar Peninsula Canary Islands Spanish Coast Carthage Morocco Tunisia Mediterranean Carthage Martina Strait Of Gibraltar Sierra Cordoba Iberian Peninsula
The Hitler Haggadah with Jonnie Schnytzer

Jewish History Matters

09:33 min | 1 year ago

The Hitler Haggadah with Jonnie Schnytzer

"Joined today by johnny schnitzer to talk about the hitler. Haga a nineteen forty-three judeo arabic haggadah. Which tells the story of the holocaust the second world war and the allied landing in north africa through the passover seder. Johnny schnitzer is a phd candidate at bar. Ilan university with a focus on medieval kabbalah. His dissertation is focused on the fourteenth century. Kabul list rabbi. Joseph ben shallow ashkenazi and johnny is also preparing a critical edition of ashkenazis. Commentary on sefer itsy raw. Johnny also edited an english edition of the etc. Which we're going to be talking about today. The hitler etc is such a fascinating text in many ways even just the title is jarring. And you might think how can you use. Hitler's name in the title of this traditional jewish text and it draws you in to a tremendous piece of moroccan jewish history that reworked the traditional passover story to tell us about the experience of north african jews in the holocaust. I hope you enjoyed our conversation. Where we're going to dive into this text and think about how it can broaden our understanding of the holocaust to include the middle east and north africa in that story and also where we think through the important relationship between jewish roots and holidays with history and historical memory. Thanks for tuning in high johnny. Welcome to the podcast. Thanks so much for joining us to talk about your book that you added. Thank you for inviting me. Lovely to be here. Absolute think this is such a fascinating text. Can you maybe tell us a little bit about it in other words like what is it that makes this different from all other hug adults. I think there are sort of two bombs that this text drops upon any re- debt guest that sort of feast there is on the hit laga and the first one of course is the title and this is what got me interested in this from the outset and that is this sort of sporadic this who has the chutzpah to do this at taking a jewish texts calling it the hit laga. That's the sort of bomb number one. Because you're not even sure what this is about. Who wrote this. But you know one thing you know that the author who is anonymous and we'll touch upon them in a moment takes to keywords. That every juneau's today every jew does not need to google almost haggadah writer passover passover eve where we read the haggadah we all come and we eat together and he takes haggadah and he connects to the other. Keyword that we all know about for a very separate horrific connotation. That's hitler and he puts it together. The first bomb is who has the chutzpah to perpetrate a text. And give it the title. Hit laga taking one of the most sacred texts and connecting it to one of the biggest mom's area if you like in jewish history and then you open the text and you realize that author has done something absolutely fascinating he is done with. The sages have asked us to do generation after generation and that is to see ourselves as if we left egypt red. It's to reenact. Redemptions to reenact. God saving the jewish people taking us out. And what does he do. He takes the structure of the storytelling bit of the haggadah. Right on passover. Eve we have the ceremony we have the blessings and then we reached the mortgage section the mugged section to section where we meant to mcgee. We meant to tell the story. That's what is about right. We tell story we tell the story of redemption. This also explains why passovers become right. This trend of everyone bringing own hug dot. Everyone bringing their own stories. Because it's all about bringing together different pieces of the puzzle. Creating this beautifully rich mosaic. So he takes the traditional structure of the haggadah which tells us about how we were taken out of egypt and it tells us about these different characters. Rabbinic figures leaving two thousand years ago. The told us to do this and told us to do that. And he takes out the content and fills it with a new content whereby he tells the story of the holocaust of world war two of the allied victory of the ex pows over nazi germany. And hitler and mussolini's italy he tells us the story of his generation rights yossi who has something to tell us in the traditional said. There's something about how. How would you meant to do something. All of a sudden becomes the speech of the dictator iosif stalin when we told them the haggadah that i god and not an angel. Not anyone else is going to take you. The jewish people out of egypt suddenly becomes. I shall the goal. I not level not the right none of none of the other vichy high commanding general's. I shall the goal which already tells us right. This is what's fascinating in the hitler etc and this is the second bomb if the first bomb is the title. We still don't know what it's about. The second bomb is when you discover that this was written by an anonymous jew living in robots morocco probably towards the end of nineteen forty-three as a result possibly inspired by operation torch. The allied operation led by the us on the shores of casablanca and algiers. And everything changes all of a sudden this jew living in morocco. Who's lived under a regime whether anti jewish laws jews around him have lost their jobs. Jews around you can't get a jewish education you become by night a second-grade citizen and so out author. It almost seems as if he's taking a text which it's time to write it when we don't yet know the ending. He doesn't yet know about the horrific six million who are being murdered. He doesn't know about concentration camps in poland. But he knows he wants to do something horrific any also is living in a time where his life has changed for some years and as a result of the allied victory he suddenly possibly is inspired and sees. I get the exodus. The story i meant to be telling i meant to take the passover haggadah until the story that i see and that's how the allies beat the excess power. And how in fact you know retelling the story of exodus mine new-fangled version. I think that the text itself is amazing in the ways in which it on. The one hand utilizes the story of passover very explicitly very specifically in when he talks. About how hitler. Enslaved the jews but also like you mentioned the way in which some of the characteristic aspects of the traditional aspects are transfigured and transformed new. Whether we're talking about the parable of the four sons the for children or the different rabbis plagues. What are some of the really interesting things that are happening in this text that really are utilizing the passover story itself and also the the characteristic aspects of the passover seder that people who read attritional seder would be familiar with but they give it new meaning in this context. If we take right this this idea of the four sons four daughters any jewish figure that we look at it and we want to understand. What is it the sort of a heart of their teachings you know. One of the tricks is to see if they wrote a commentary on the haggadah. What do they do with these. Four boys of for doors. What do they symbolize. And in the case of the hit da it takes us back in time to a sort of moroccan viewpoint of the the north african campaign. And so who is the wise son now. You know it's going to be an allied power. But you're not sure that england or is it america and you'll told the the wise son is england right. The royal air force acts cleverly. He's clearly impressed he he is probably the razzie stance radio. He knows about the bombings. He knows about montgomery and then we move onto the russia. The russia we know can only be one person. That's clearly hitler. Hitler the evil one. He knows that he's a know he. He's torturing the jewish people and yet it's interesting that if you read through the at that we're not quite sure what's going on in europe right off a thinks that there is a concentration camp in berlin so we're not yet show what's going on in the world and our author doesn't yet. Nobody knows that he clearly is evil that he's plotting against the jews there wearing yellow badges which also is interesting. Because we're not sure. If he's referring to the yellow badges of jews in europe or the yellow badges of jews in certain places in north africa and then who is the tam. The time is interesting. Because tom can both mean in hebrew complete simpleton the thomas america and then shane no. You're dillashaw and who doesn't know how to ask questions. The classic version says the fourth son is the son who doesn't know how to ask questions. The newfangled version is and mussalini. Who isn't with the avowed woods and this is very interesting because when i was speaking to holocaust survivors. Oh you know this. Sort of all degeneration and i spoke to people from algeria from tunisia morocco across the board there was a nickname from cellini mar. He was the donkey he was the s. This resonates with this passage whims lead author decides to change it. And say it's not. He doesn't ask question it's that we don't even wanna talk about

Johnny Schnitzer Ilan University Joseph Ben Shallow Ashkenazi North Africa Egypt Haga Iosif Stalin Kabul Rabbi Morocco Hitler Juneau Johnny Middle East Yossi Mcgee Mussolini Russia
The Nazi Hunter: Eli Rosenbaum on Tracking Down the World's Most Wanted Criminals

People of the Pod

05:55 min | 1 year ago

The Nazi Hunter: Eli Rosenbaum on Tracking Down the World's Most Wanted Criminals

"Newly appointed attorney. General merrick garland has said he will renew the justice. Department's focus on the threat of white supremacists. Eli rosenbaum knows a thing or two about ideology for forty years. He has helped the department track down and hold former nazis accountable for their world war. Two crimes a law enforcement role that has earned him. The moniker of nazi hunter. Mr rosenbaum with us now. To talk about that moniker. And that mission mr rosenbaum. Welcome to people love the pod. Thank you great to be waiting. So yes you have been called the nazi hunter. I've seen the show on amazon prime. But what does that term mean in real life. Well it's not an expression. I'm particularly fond of because it suggests that this mission is something other than what it is which is professional law enforcement. We are not engaged in on or anything sort but we have been for four decades now simply investigating and taking legal action against participants in nazi crimes against humanity. Your father escaped nazi germany in nineteen thirty eight. I believe. can you share a little bit. About how your family history inspired this work. Y'all my dad. Got out of germany lived in dresden. His brother and his parents and they managed to get visas to this great country and were able to escape in nineteen thirty eight and the attorney. General merrick garland said in his recent testimony. I think all the time about how the united states saved my family my father graduated high school in newark new jersey and then started paying back the united states by going into the united states army and he was sent to north africa and to europe and served in the third infantry division and then when they realized that they actually needed german speakers they transferred to a psychological warfare branch unit in the us. Army the incident that changed my father's life and had a big impact on the shooter was when he was sent to a concentration camp by his commanding officer to go there in a jeep with two other men to see what the army had found the previous day when they liberated dot com word spread quickly in the region that something terrible was there and my dad's co wanted. Know what it was so my father went when i was fourteen years old and we were driving on the new york state through a blizzard heading north and there was nothing left to listen to the radio. We were talking. And i love hearing. My dad's were stories especially the funny ones. Anybody who serves the military s funny stories about food or whatever and then suddenly you said you know. I was sent dot com the day after its liberation and i though fourteen was a time when there wasn't much said really about the holocaust i knew what it was and i said what did you see and i'm like my father staring out the front window because it's pretty treacherous driving and i don't hear anything from my father and i look over to the driver seat and there i see dad with his eyes glistening their welled with tears in his mouth is open and he's trying to tell me and he couldn't speak and it was the first time i ever saw my cry men of that generation didn't want anyone to see them cry usually and we never did speak about it so my beloved father lived you know into this new century and so many many decades and we did speak about work with frequency when i was home but we never returned to the subject of you say you talked about your work with your father. How did that conversation or the job evolve over. The course of forty years work has changed quite a bit. When i started actually as a summer intern back in nineteen seventy nine. Never imagining that. This would become my life's work. We were overwhelmed with investigations. We had inherited the responsibility from the former immigration and naturalization service after the attorney general took it away from them because they had not succeeded and he's had up this new office the office of special investigations in the justice department criminal division and we had more work than could really keep up with and it turned out in the first few years that the we had inherited that actually had the most merit were ones that were based on tips received directly or indirectly from foreign governments. Which at that time was to say. Mostly the soviet union occasionally another government but generally the the soviet union which had mixed motives in these cases. We started being very proactive within a few years and by the five year point and they're after nearly all of the cases that we could develop to the point of prosecution. We're wants dan. We had initiated on our own and the methodology for that was to task our staff historians. We were the only law enforcement entity in the entire hemisphere that had its own complement of historians. They were the people who could dig for the needles and haystacks and we tasks them with responsibility for keeping an eye open for the surviving remnant of personnel records and other documents that identified perpetrators or perpetrators this. They did with great success. And ultimately we assembled more than seventy thousand names of suspects mostly european also some japanese and we ran each of those names one by one against us immigration records and sometimes other records in an effort to see if we could determine whether any of those people came here assuming they hadn't changed their names

Merrick Garland Eli Rosenbaum Mr Rosenbaum Germany United States Army Dresden United States Army North Africa Newark Amazon New Jersey Europe Office Of Special Investigatio Soviet Union New York Justice Department DAN
The Birthplace of Saint Augustine

5 Minutes in Church History

03:52 min | 1 year ago

The Birthplace of Saint Augustine

"World of augustine encircled the mediterranean sea spain and portugal. To the west france switzerland and the british isles to the north greece turkey israel to the north and to the east. Of course italy extending right into the sea the boot poised to kick a soccer ball also known as sicily and stretching all along the south egypt in the coast of africa. Agusan is from africa. Now that's the modern designation as are all of those country names. I just listed for you and the three hundred and four hundred. This was all rome. All of these peoples were roman or were to be considered roman and all of these places were part of the far flung roman empire augusta was born specifically in what was called new media the roman province of namibia. It is modern day algeria. His hometown was aghast. It was originally a village of nomadic. Berbers and back in the two hundred and one hundred species does the punic. Wars rome took control of this vast area as guston was born. Rome reached its zenith as augusta and lived roman declined and as guston died. Rome fell well. The gas was two thousand feet above sea level. It was surrounded by mountains that were another thousand feet or so and it was a very fertile plain. In fact the most fertile land in north africa it was a great place to settle and farm. Corn olives were mostly harvested and had a great economy one. A story noted how it became a retirement destination spot for roman soldiers. Did you ever wonder where the lions and bears and tigers in the roman amphitheatres came from. Will they were caught in the mountains and in the plains around agustin's hometown of the gas one hundred and seventy miles away to the east was the massive city of carthage. It was bustling with people and trade. It was second city only to rome and sixty miles or so to the northwest hippo regis. That city would come to play a significant role in the life of augustine. Near the end. Agustin's father was patricia. S a roman pagan. His mother was monica and devout and sometimes mystical christian much much more on her later as our book unfolds. Augustine had siblings. But we know very little about them he had at least one brother navigate. Send at least one sister and he likely had more brothers and sisters. But we just don't know that much about them at all. He was born on november thirteen. Three fifty four. This was a full generation of post. Constantine rome one. After constantine's conversion did you see the air quotes there. i put around network. that's important. This was the christian era at the end of the roman empire of course alongside of christianity. Plato's philosophy and the schools that followed him ruled the roost. That's important. It was a time of doctrinal advance. Augusta lived right in between the nineteen creed three twenty five and the cow sedonia creed of 451 that's important. He also lived during the time of heresies. They were springing up all over the place. Will that too is important if you were to ask a young augusta playing in the streets of the gassed. What do you want to do when you grow up. He would answer with one word. I wanna be

Guston North Greece South Egypt Coast Of Africa Agusan Rome Augusta West France Mediterranean Sea Sicily Portugal Switzerland Namibia Algeria Spain Soccer Italy
Photographer Richard Mosse on blurring the lines between art

Monocle 24: The Globalist

07:23 min | 1 year ago

Photographer Richard Mosse on blurring the lines between art

"Now richard. Moss's photographic practice has resulted in some of the most arresting images of recent years as a conceptual documentary photographer. He draws on a range of esoteric photographic media to catch a so much more than meets the eye. Monaco's much. Larry spoke to richard to find out more about his unique and emotive work to those nine. I went to iraq. And i made a series of images essentially architectural project photographic project documenting the us forces who were based in the saddam hussein's palace architecture and saddam. Hussein had about eighty four palaces. All around iraq may which he never even visited when the us military arrived. They were so strategically well located for obvious. Reasons and very defensively built. They made pretty straight forward operating bases so they were occupied by the us military which i found fascinating just the layers of power and expression of that architecturally from the sort of provisional corporate office partitions and cubicles that the. Us army would hastily set up within the very pompous and often poorly built authoritarian architecture of saddam hussein which had a very specific style with some very strange eccentric ornamental features. Such as giant teapots and. Yeah it was very incongruous staff. And i brought eight by ten inch camera there and it'd be like that project and after that i realized frustrated with the medium documentaries over here. It's really so conservative as a language so reductive often. You're just an illustrator for writers texts if you're doing it at oriel which primarily. We're documenta over. Do i wanted to break it apart. Actually i wanted to somehow really smashes just for myself. It was a very personal desire to essentially as an expression of the frustration of with my own practice. I was at that time. Kodak was on its path to bankruptcy was announced had announced the discontinuation of this infrared film. Kodak erico two thousand ten. I think says nine around the time and so i thought well this is a wonderful way to unpack a documentary subject. I don't know what may be quite yet. But i gathered as much as i could off ebay and wherever it was being made extinct and i sort of worked backwards from the medium which i always tend to do actually to find to find effective subject or subjects that could be more adequately conveyed to be elevated through the medium through this particular medium and reading was a starting point for me over. The last ten years i've been working with spurred you call them infra-red film technology's very interested in the unseen registry invisible light forms as the way often metaphorically telling very complex documentary narratives more powerful way and to refresh very saturated subject matter for example the refugee crisis unfolding across europe the middle east north africa. Everybody photographer was out there taking pictures. And they all tend to look rather similar. And i really was. After a certain point the imagery just became inherently less compelling and less powerful as language. So i wanted to refresh my own way and i found this bizarre military grade thermographic camera that can image human body heat from thirty kilometres distance. Day or nice. It's classes weapon designed for battlefield situational awareness long-range insurgents detection tracking and targeting. So it was actually part of a weapon. System very sort of activated medium to think through the representation of the refugee crisis and also almost an aggravated one. Really confront the viewer. On some level with their own complicity. I believe and that was my intention to really make people feel that. And i think as an orange has that's one of the only things you can do is to make people feel something so i was working through metaphor aesthetics in this work but with that work with my project incoming its title and it was using this weapons technologies long range border enforcement technology. Thermographic heat-detection camera. I realized i was also operating in certain moments on another level beyond the metaphorical and beyond the aesthetic. And that was the the forensic after understand. The camera sees index heat register. You can calibrate for about forty degrees and anything. That's relatively cooler or relatively warmer within. That given frame is depicted in black or white depending on how you set the the recording set the image. And so something that's black. Could be everything that's warms. The human body would be depicted in black and everything cold surrounding him. Buddy will be waste for example or if you sell it. The other way white hart. It's the opposite. And i was filming this tragic event i've ever witnessed probably ever will. Hopefully it was one of the biggest human trafficking disasters on the gnc and human memory of three hundred people or more were on a on a fishing trawler was had paid to be on that boat from turkey to lead boss and human traffickers just packed that boat too many people who zone designed for perhaps twenty or thirty people so the top deck of the boat collapsed and doing panic entire hull ripped apart and we were able to capture all this from about seven kilometers away with camera designed exactly for this kind of thing and then when the bodies were brought to shore to the harbour of malvo's something store happy it was after dark at this point literally out on the cold stone pier they were lined up on thermal. Br red cross workers volunteers local doctors. Anyone who could could help out. Were were frantically trying to revive these hypothermic victim. Some whom passed out or semi drowned or some had had remain conscious. But we're literally freezing to death. And so they were literally what they were doing. Rubbing life-giving warmth from their hands into the flesh coddled flesh of the these hypothermic victims in front of us on the pier. Desperately trying to sort of transmit life-giving heat back back into them. Now a normal camera of course after dark wouldn't wouldn't be abc's very much let alone. Would it be able to see the trace of that of that transmission of warmth which the thermal camera was able to do incredibly effective articulation of exactly the crux of of the emergency unfolding around us. It was a of very powerful test. Testimonial footage of the the effort survive these people on the scale of a trauma around us. That was richard moss and do head over to our website to the full version of that interview.

Saddam Hussein Richard Kodak Iraq Middle East North Africa United States Oriel Monaco Moss Us Army Hussein Saddam Larry Ebay Malvo Europe
"north africa" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

WORT 89.9 FM

06:45 min | 1 year ago

"north africa" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

"They would say That's my stuff. I'm ready to get off. Once we get rid of the fascism. We'd be happy to be in this with everybody, because none of the future's any of us want to see is going to be possible. If this fascism consolidates so There's a lot in what Randy said. I agree with. I strongly disagree with the idea that there should be violence done against these people. But there is but we can't be passive. Let's continue on with the with the phone Callers high run you're on the air. Thanks. Thanks. We'll be more successful if we build on our broad history historic base of anti fascist ex activism. 84 to perhaps 100 years long. Allen's friend Clarence went to Spain and 36 7 and fought against Franco's fascists there. He later went back to Europe in the early forties to fight against more of them. I'm not sure if he was fighting against Mussolini or Hitler's fascist. Groups. In 44 45 hour, Dad drove a serious of tanks because the first three of them got blown up. From Normie D to Czechoslovakia. He is an activist anti fascist, and I'm trying to convince my relatives of that. I also point out a friend Bill from Kansas City who flew B 25 bombers from North Africa to Italy and then later once The Allies captured system he fruit from Sicily. The bomb targets even further north in Mussolini's Italy. We have a very strong History of anti fascist action. And we need to build on that and recruit our relatives and even strangers that they have any sympathy with what the United States did in the early 19 forties. We need to recruit them to be on our side against Trumpism. Thank you. Thanks. Run you Certainly the Madison and the state of Wisconsin, though it has its share reactionary, certainly like Iran, Johnson has also a very long, deep tradition off. Of radical politics, socialist communist politics and as their color made clear, kind of anti fascist. Undertook undercurrent that surfaces and will surface again. So I appreciate that call. I wanna get back since sarah to you something we You blew by that That I think is very important. You know, this morning and preparing for this hour I looked up some of your political biography, your activist creds. And and so that you've been involved in the struggle against Peyton, Uh, patriarchy and so on Lots of folks writing on unfashionable the threads of it. You talk about Much masculine ist culture on I was winning if you conduct delve into that a little bit. Yeah, I think I appreciate the question is very important is it is one of the core tenants of What some of us and refuse fascism have called the trying out of fascism in this country, the white supremacy, the male supremacy and the hatred of everything for an immigrant's inside the U. S and the people of the world. So it is. It's a It's a truck. Didn't growing patriarchy, which is Look, it's the subject nation of half of humanity by the other half. It is something that has been with us now. From the beginning of time. It's not human nature emerged in the certain point in human mystery, but it's been with us in every class society, every exploitative and oppressive society. And this one is what else Even though we're told that women have achieved so much, you know there's nothing holding them back anymore. That's not true. Patriarchy is woven into this society in the fabric of it, the economics of it the culture of it the ideology of it, but With fascism. It's taking that once again to new extremes. And I think with this one of the example I think is useful to get into this. A lot of people at first really scratched their head. About the unity between Donald Trump and Mike Pence, Because here you have somebody who's completely hidden Mystic has no more no moral compunction just completely Ah womanizer serial divorce her sexual predator, Donald Trump, and then you have somebody like Mike Pence who's so repressed and calls his wife, mother and is, it would be still acting normal life. You wouldn't think by somebody like Trump and they came together. And that's a political science. It's a fusion of Christian fascism in this country, which is a powerful vein of the fascist movement and other movements that Trump brought together. But one of the cornerstones of this is Absolute hatred of women. In a very extreme form. Because Mike Pence wants to reduce women to breeders to criminalize abortion to criminalize birth control absolutely, just allow women to exercise their full humanity. Being a parent could be beautiful if you want to be. I'm not against Children but against the forcing of women to have Children, the reducing women to nothing more than breeders. Trump, on the other hand, wants to reduce women to nothing more than sexual objects and objects of sexual plunder. And in those two things, they may seem different, but they're both reducing women to possessions of men in one form or the other, and that is a big cornerstone of their unity. And it's why somebody like Trump, who Who was pro choice his whole life because it enabled him To continue his womanizing and predatory behavior can morph right into the outright enslavement of women through more force. Mint thistles. All peace, then, of course. Have the machismo. And the warlike mentality, the exertion of male domination in the streets and the mobs that we saw. We have people out Proud boys recently, some some group of women who very reactionary fascist women tried to form proud girls, and they were harshly told by the leaders of proud boys and mocked and ridiculed that you have no right forming a group. It's boys. It's male domination. And if you want to help us, you should be in the kitchen, having babies keeping him around shut. That's almost The direct quote. So this hatred of women is a big cornerstone of this fascist movement. Absolutely..

Donald Trump Mike Pence Mussolini Italy Europe Randy Czechoslovakia Wisconsin United States Trumpism Sicily Spain Peyton U. S sarah North Africa Kansas City Franco Allen
On EU's doorstep, UN raises alarm for thousands of young migrants sleeping rough

UN News

05:43 min | 1 year ago

On EU's doorstep, UN raises alarm for thousands of young migrants sleeping rough

"Whatever. Two and a half thousand migrants and refugees have been forced to sleep rough in bosnia herzegovina for several weeks on the european union's doorstep despite the fact that suitable sheltered accommodation is available in an interview with you and uses daniel johnson. Peter our chief of mission in bosnia for the migration agency describes the of trying to find a quick solution to this urgent problem. You also explains why it's so important at all. Countries abide by their international commitments to helping vulnerable people in line with the global compact for safe or leeann regular migration adopted by majority of u n member states in december two thousand and eighteen years ago has been a transit country for migrants from greece trying to reach other parts of the european union. Since dan rea two thousand eighteen we've had a perennial problem of a lack of accommodation in bosnia herzegovina. Each window reface seamer thought john just but this year to challenge is actually larger because we have two thousand five hundred eight thousand five hundred refugees in bossier to gopinath sleeping in inhuman conditions. The reason for this is the ability of bosnian political system. If you want to decide where accusations should be because ironically or or cynically she won't. We actually do have sufficient spaces in two centers that we could open within twenty four hours but because a political resistance at the local level do locations. Dc's not happy so it's not a matter of the seasons. It's not a matter of money but it is a matter of political decision-making which obviously now he's ready urgent because the winter conditions are getting worse as we speak so you say that there's a problem of administrative procedure and there's also local opposition to housing the migrants. So that's a very difficult position for you to be in but as you say. The immediate problem is is really urgent. Because it's so cold and the camp that to the emergency count the leaper. Emergency tent camp burned down after being closed because it wasn't suitable for migrants didn't have electricity water. So what exactly is the un migration agency managing to do to help these people well. We're certainly pursuing a two track approach if you like the one we have increased our humanitarian assistance to people sleeping outside interest jackets winter. I sleeping bags sold packages we to get our partners. The danish refugee council and requested try to cover everyone while he's somehow reducing human suffering. Eat obesity does not provide an answer to the need for human accommodation while the other part of the work. We're trying to do trying to support the authorities at different levels to come together and to build a consensus as to where these new accusation could be. So these are the two efforts. But you're sort of stuck in as a un agency in the sense that while we have the resources it's not to or any other un agency to decide where my accusations should be that he's really up to the sovereign country in this case. Both here to go now to decide. I can just go to building erica. Dc sanal migrant accusations so. We're very much dependent on the local political process in while you can support while he can bringing ideas while driving people to get at the end of the day. You're dependent on local. Political decisions has the opposition to migration and migrants in bosnia. Been growing is it. I mean we're not talking about tens of thousands of people by any means are we know we're talking about today. In the county i would estimate about eight thousand five hundred. Marcus enrich In the country of three point five million inhabitants. That should not. I mean that he's not a a a large crisis by any stretch of the imagination There are two issues their first modern stint be located in two parts of the country canceling saudi avoid sonic canton and the frustration specifically again. He's as so being left alone in not heavy as sort of a national strategy. Few michael spreading these accusations center south across the country when it comes to the local population licenses. Debtors small minority that. He's very vocal on facebook older social media channels sometimes using a very phobic language my senses however that if you look at the majority of people they may not have wanted bosnia to become a country for transit migration but they do agree that while the migrants should be our country that they should be taken care of properly absolutely an just wondering what it is that the un migration agency needs to happen. Obviously you want to relocate migrants and for the most part they young men on the where are they from well in terms of the solution. The solution is relatively straightforward from humanitarian operational perspective. We need additional accusation in structures that are adequate ford winter. I think that's in terms of the solution where we need to go in terms of the makeup of the mike and refugee population. Here we have about eighty percents single males and twenty percent families with children and unaccompanied children usually boys between sixteen and eighteen for these families and children. We have sufficient activation so we don't have any families children or unaccompanied or separated children sleeping outside. The challenge faces itself with the single males in terms of nationalities. Biggest group Bangladesh of ghanistan north africa in iraq. He's the makeup of the population that we go have here. I'm what do they tell you. These these young men. Why have they come to europe. Well they've gone to europe of course. Individual circumstances differ but most of them have come to europe to look for a life somewhere fleeing conflict in afghanistan but many of them are looking simply to go to placing within the european union. Start working and send money back to their family. That is sort of the story. You almost universally here. And

Bosnia Herzegovina Dan Rea European Union UN Daniel Johnson Danish Refugee Council Bossier Greece Peter Obesity Erica John Marcus Saudi Michael Facebook Ghanistan
"north africa" Discussed on Emma & Tom's PGCE Podcast

Emma & Tom's PGCE Podcast

05:26 min | 1 year ago

"north africa" Discussed on Emma & Tom's PGCE Podcast

"Just being very aware of the population in your local community and so on and really understand and getting to know your children is key to understanding what is going to make me tech in the classroom so i have put all those coat cultural backgrounds into three main areas to take into consideration. So there's the islamic tradition the western classical tradition and the oral tradition. So if you look at the islamic tradition you might cross children from north africa middle east pakistan. This country's per pack afganistan and those children are very likely to be muslim and islam. You have to members of multicultural cross continental religion so there will be a broad range is broad range of approaches to studying music and the feeling about music so the most conservative denomination doesn't allow music tall the engagement of music and the reason for that is because within the sharia law music is seen as being within a very negative context for example prostitution and gambling so there are some conservative very conservative muslims. Who don't believe in engagement and music. All the mainstream belief is that music is absolutely fine. Studied in the educational context. Although it's only the very liberal muslims who will consider taking music onto key stage four key stage five on maybe within the the kind of liberal groups you would expect the food. Fourth plus generation immigrants. So that's the the one group be quite mindful of then. The second group is the western classical tradition. Which is the group that really embraces music. Probably the one that most acquainted with stralia america britain and these musicians will be very used to listening to music in the house. They might study an instrument and music orchestral band instruments. They might be part of a band. So that's what would be the music associated with that group that british group i talks about. And then there's that food group oral traditionalist so those will musicians that may be learning instrument that has been passed down from generation to generation. They learn by eia improvise ation say features. Very heavy heavily in it. So those i would say with the three main groups and there are considerations and balances in order to to kind of cater for for those three groups. I was gonna say i you. Can you can as a often classically trained musician as as a new music teacher you can probably kind of get your head around the idea of moving away from you. Know travel cliffs and dotson sticks in music notation to kind of embrace the huge number of traditions in the world. The do that music through oral transmission. How do you kind of get going with group who believed that music is actually forbidden unlawful. Unlawful and against their religion. Because you know if you knew to the classroom you might be worried about getting them to sit down and stop talking and listen to you and the older you might actually be transgressing. Religious beliefs might be a bit of well the when it comes to that group. They are not very used to listening to music in the house and i would say physically. The mainstream belief is that music is fine in an educational context. And i can tell you that within pupil voice over the years and people voices taken with our external partners. The feedback is really positive and they enjoy music in the classroom. So don't be don't be frightened about that at all. Yes a have come across the odd pupil here in that that is coming from that consume conservative background. Brit just means having some conversations and maybe with the parents sometimes and saying we'll actually music as part of the school curriculum and you do have to embrace it and that after you've had that initial conversation it's fine of never had a problem after that and again you know you do find some liberal <hes>. Muslims who will take music for key stage four but the main thing to remember. Is that it you know. Music is enjoyed in the classroom by children. These cultures i think the needs to be a sensitivity. And if you're going to be working in a school where there's a very large percentage of pupils who follow a faith maturities could be a catholic school for example. You would be very careful in terms of the music that you sharing with them. A lot of music these days very sexualize than you'd be careful anyway not to share things that are really explicit but you would then probably find an opportunity to introduce more classical music into your schemes of learning and. I think that's fair to say that. The schemes of learning that have developed over the years have really broad range of music with quite a generous amount of classical music. And that's that's something really positive. I think

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"north africa" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

06:39 min | 1 year ago

"north africa" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"My pain and I did not fall for Trump last time around, But I will vote for him. The sign blocking that he's proven in Um, last time he just looked too scary to me Hey, was too unpredictable. I'm like, okay, He's just going to blow the hell out. He's going to get us into a war with North Korea. Who knows that? And he hasn't He's actually handle foreign policy really well, and that that's that earned him my vote. We'll look. Originally You were intimidated, frightened by macho, maniacal Donald Trump, and now you flipped the script and you're going to go for him. Let's go to Craig, who's calling from Brooklyn. Welcome the W A. B. C. Craig. Please tell me you're really going to be running for mayor because we've got to get rid of the blood. I am. I am in 2021, but that's a subject for a different day. I want to know what you thought of the debate last night. So I think I voted for Trump the first time around. I think he made a couple of big mistakes last night for one, for example, and I think you would Agree with me on this one and appreciate this, although the moderated and bring it up, and I thought she was very fair. I think he should have, said Joe. How many Americans have we seen in orange jumpsuits on their knees, getting their heads lopped off since I'm in office? That was one thing because Americans just forget to to easily and then the other thing. I think he should have hit harder on although we could bring it up was Hunter. But and I know a number of our callers have said that, but you gotta understand the mast majority of Americans. Just hearing this story for the very first time. And last night I heard the president talking about the Biden family and Joe himself the presidential candidate prospering from deals made in the Ukraine, Red China, and he said, even Russia That's a hell of a lot to be able to absorb when you haven't even yet made up your mind Who you want to elect for the next president of the United States. You understand, Craig, we have Ah, ah wealth of information on this the rest of the country. Really didn't know what the president was talking about. Do you understand that quick and you don't have a lot of time to discuss that. So you have to do it in short sound bites, and you have to really try to stick Joe Biden on that hunter biting issue for what? What can be proven at this point he understands, but the Isis Yeah, but the ISIS issue that would have been a home run because Americans unfortunately, I think just forgot about those YouTube videos that we see regularly and then you got this birthday. Oh, Who in exchange for billions of dollars the middle of the night. I ran the biggest Greg Craig, as you saw the president was upset because foreign policy wasn't being discussed in this debate. We got little bits of it. But, for instance, no mention of these historic agreements between countries that were into annihilating Israel, like the Sudan today now has a co operative working relationship with Israel something we could not have fathomed. I was a doubting Thomas. I didn't think that boy. Kushner, his son in law would be able to negotiate with these Arabs shakes and these markers and end up having Overseen, along with the other officials in approaching Gulf in North Africa. These historic agreements, and yet it's not resonating with the voters. It's it's barely been discussed in the debates. And maybe that's something that Trump should have brought up himself. Although there's so much to bring up, you know, almost 90 minutes Since we only were entitled to one debate that first debate was a blowout. Everybody was yelling at one another between Chris Wallace, the presidential Biden You couldn't discern what people's opinions were. But there wasn't room for that, apparently in 90 minutes, But those are historic agreements that I think even Trump's detractors have to give him credit for. Let's go to Lisa was calling from Nutley. Welcome to W A. B. C. Lise. Hey, Curtis Happy Friday, something that I just want to point out to a lot of the independence out there who haven't voted Biden was talking about drug reform for a lot of these people that were in jail, and I'm so happy that Trump did not go there with Hunter Biden. Because he could have turned around and said, Why did you not do that for your son? Go the extra mile. But he didn't He held back a little bit. And if you can't do it for your own son What do you think you're going to do with four? Now, I think I think the president learned the mistake the first time around in Cleveland. Absolutely. That's how you learn. Yeah, but I think Look, ah lot of Americans have seen the devastation of drug abuse in there. Primary families extended families. They've seen their sons and daughters, their nieces. Nephews do horrific things to fellow family members in order to feed the beast. I think it was very wise of the president to stay away from that because, you know, we saw what Joe Biden did the first time he talked about his hero, son, Beau. And just avoid that if there are criminal applications to what Hunter by Winston Focus on that. If there are family ties we know with the two brothers focus on that, meaning the two brothers of Joe Biden. But we have to have the fingerprints of Joe Biden. On receiving money. If anything is to resonate, especially with those independent voters at this laid out. That's why it's so incumbent upon everyone to be listening to Rudy Giuliani today. 3 to 4. And then again tonight so nice. They do it twice here a W A B. C 9 to 10 because each and every day he's like the Julian Osanai Wass the last time around In 2016, he drops emails. He drops informations from what he's procured on. The hunter pied in hard drive, and we know it is because the Bidens and not said it's not And we learned from Rudy. And unfortunately, the rest of America if they're not listening to W A. B. C They either get it from the New York host. Or they get it from the Fox News updates New York's home for entertaining talk streaming Now on your smart speaker. Just say play 77 w A. B. C. So yesterday, as I mentioned earlier, I was running.

Joe Biden Hunter Biden Donald Trump president A. B. C. Craig Trump Biden North Korea Rudy Giuliani Fox News Israel YouTube New York Julian Osanai Chris Wallace America Russia Brooklyn Kushner
"north africa" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:26 min | 1 year ago

"north africa" Discussed on KQED Radio

"A BBC investigation into further exploitation of migrants migrants who are forced to sell organs such as kidneys. To pay for a passage to Europe senior gang member in North Africa told the BBC that nearly half of those who give up a kidney I never paid. The kidneys are mostly solved by African migrants and refugees who use the money. To pay people smugglers if, of course they get the money was also reports of people having organs removed against their will reporting on this trade, and it's a difficult listeners. You'd imagine Richard Bilton. It is an ancient city at the heart of a vile trade. Cairo one of the hopes for the illegal market in human flesh around the world, there is a shortage of transplant organs. Here. They're harvested from the poor. Migrants and refugees sell their kidneys to pay to get to Europe. Many a tripped like Asher, who says she was drugged and then operated on to protect her. Anonymity were using an actor. I found myself in a room with blood everywhere. The door was locked and I started kicking it. Then I called the police and they came and got me. They took me to the hospital there. They told me that my kidney had been removed. There are thought to be five million migrants and refugees in Cairo. These are the people that the gangs prey upon. We want to get to the criminals. It's difficult. This's a dangerous world, and Egypt is not a country that welcomes investigative reporters. We get a break through. One of the main gang leaders agrees to meet, he said. They're arranging between 20 and 30 illegal transplants a week. His words were spoken by an actor. It's busiest in the summer because kidney patients get sicker. They drink a lot of water because of the hot weather. We have a lot of work during that period from all over the world and the people who don't get paid with their promised. How do you feel about that? I give them their money of the people agree a price but never pay up after the surgery. Does this happen often about 40% of the cases globally between five and 10% of transplants are thought to use black market organs. That's thousands of illegal operations every year. It is lucrative for the criminals. There's no protection for the donor's Adnan Sharif is from doctors against forced organ trafficking. It's illegal. It's unethical. It is immoral. They're exploited for their organs. Some from May receive a very small financial remuneration. Something will receive absolutely nothing at all on this is exploitation and so form ofthe modern day slavery. The Egyptian government says it's one prays and approval internationally. For its strategy to eliminate this heinous crime. It's made arrests and says the illegal operations happen in private clinics and hospitals rather than government hospitals. This trade is worth millions of dollars and victims say rules they used against them. They have to sign forms, saying they're donating their organs for free, but this paperwork can be used to keep them quiet. He bought sold a kidney but was never paid. I found myself in the room after the surgery. I woke up screaming. I got so scared. I was screaming. This is wrong. You cheated me. People called the doctor and told him there's a patient you did surgery on and she wasn't paid. He took the documents I signed to a lawyer. So if I tell the police they comprise, prove I donated my kidney voluntarily. I made this mistake and I don't want another girl to make it. The Egyptian government denies he Burwood have been arrested. It says victims have the right to report these gangs without fear on its hotlines. And it has increased the maximum punishment for organized criminal gangs Toe life imprisonment. There is no shortage of desperate people tonight in Cairo. The latest victims are preparing to go under the knife. Human beings butchered for profit. Richard Bilton with that BBC investigation.

Richard Bilton Cairo North Africa BBC Europe
"north africa" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

08:00 min | 1 year ago

"north africa" Discussed on 790 KABC

"Exciting world of spices. My spiced kitchen, a Middle Eastern cookbook, just released by an IV highlights. Each spice is unique flavor and explains the origin, the health benefits and the distinctive beautiful essence it in parts in a dish. Yaniv is the creator of the blogged the Spice Detective and Israeli born chef and a Miami based restaurant tour. And he is here to add some spice to our lives. I'm so glad to have you on even congratulations. Your first cookbook, and it's fabulous. Thank you. Thank you so much. Thank you, for average really excited and grateful. We'll, of course, and you should be very proud. You are very deeply connected to the world of spices on and I know because I've read your book forward back and I love the passion. I have a feeling there isn't a dish that you make that doesn't come alive with flavor. You know, I was I was lucky enough to be born to a family that was right from the Middle East, right? My mom finally arrived from Iraq and my understanding came from North Africa from Tunisia. And it's just flavors despite everything was so beautifully spite. So as a kid, you know, I had such a destination. With all those flavors, and that's what drew me to the kitchen. I joke around with my friends and I say I drink to Marie through my mother's milk, but I was born So you and I have a lot of fear with turmeric. Of course. You know, everybody talks about memory can be like magical healing spice. Cure it old. Yes, something laboratory. So I was looking up to you to grow up with a family that appreciated spices and flavors. You know, like the women in my family was shot around. Off their cooking. And be sure the love in the fashion with me spoke that I work actually is Dedicated to the love letter to my grandmothers and my mom. My pants all the beautiful women of my family. Yes, And and I think the book is beautiful and that heartfelt Feeling comes through turmeric is your go to spice you call it the main medicine man. Do you think that your health today do you attribute your vibrancy to having grown up on turmeric? Because you're right. It is continually a buzzword. Ah, Buzz Spice. You could call it thanks to Andrew. While A homeopathic doctor, right? Who brought out the anti inflammatory properties to create the the movement. I should call it But you still eat turmeric everyday I do it. I actually also sometimes take supplements a bottle. You're tumeric and again, make sure you do think, um, supplement. Make sure there is that today Pepper properties in it that helps the body absorb the turmeric really well. Um, I think that home cooked meals. Are. I think they're one of the keys to better help. Yes, I know. Things that have been Think that you make from scratch, But I'm trying to say the least. Ruses food Better release for your body. Nobody recognized No, there is not a process that's easier to absorb easier to for the body to enjoy the nutrients in fresh food. So off course, when you cook at home, it's important to use spices. Because they had flavor and color and aromas. And, um, all the beautiful nutrient, Michael Yes. So, yes, yes. Your health is is attributed to that. I think we don't recognize the health benefits of the dry pantry. The Spice Cabinet as much as we should in your shedding a light on that before we highlight some of your other favorite spices. I just want to talk salt for a moment because I read in your book. You have a serious salt of choice. You and I learned through my My research. My my soldiers choices. Celtic soul. Because again it goes back to be nun process. Celtic sold is harvesting our Yes, that's literally harvested from the Atlantic shores, um and packed and shipped to your home. It's one of the most natural I should say Salt that you, Khun that you can eat and you have no happy to share it with your listeners. Um, so Celtic Salt contains a lot of minerals that are not, um street away into the in any in any process, so you get to make major German irony in bed and think and volume. Great for nature Straight from, um That's so have less sodium, because, well, you know if you're worried about sodium has more flavor, more minerals and less audience, so it's possible. I encourage everybody to get Celtic salt. I think it's a very good suggestion. Let's talk about some other beauties up Baja rot. I know it because my Israeli friends introduced me. To it, And it's my go to for meat. Now you use baccarat and meatloaf with lamb. It has the most beautifully. Aromatic, unique property to it. Talk about baccarat, please. And you know it was brought to Israel by the Iraqi community. I was like You said My month's family came to Israel from backed out. And they brought the bar A tweet them melt rock traditionally, um, you know, it's in our records for spices. Each family would have their own The whole right, Spicey. That ain't for it, You know, like a spice mix has a bit of cinnamon and allspice. Not a little bit of ginger. A little cardamom, a little black pepper a little bit of a clue. And each family was fine tune it based on their palate. What guns? So Ra Matic is almost like a magic spike. Yes. Take the Balrog. You put a little bit of yourself when you should be Oh, or you know, we make dumplings called Cuba and the dumplings are stuffed with ground beef. So when you are when you cook the ground before you stuffed dumpling you consume before audiences. And that's it. It's almost like a magic spice chest. Dig getting work out of it. Obviously, when you make apology home, you confined in it, If you like a little more cardamom a little more, not make more ginger. People going even at around. Um, those bugs. She makes it even more Loreley right that goes back into the aroma. But I encourage people to explore it Spices. You know, traditionally used for me. I like to Sprinkle it on roasted vegetables holding level. Yeah, there's something very warming. About Baja rot to me, Yaniv like there's something round and like what you expect from mouth feel what butter gives you just that whole rounded beautiful. Everything comes together kind of flavor, and it has become my go to spice. And not just for Middle Eastern inspired dishes, But I find that it toasts beautifully on the barbecue like I've just found dozens of ways to use it, And I think it's.

Buzz Spice Michael Yes Israel Middle East Yaniv Pepper properties Miami Iraq Atlantic shores Marie Khun Andrew Tunisia Spicey Cuba North Africa
"north africa" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

Liberty Talk FM

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"north africa" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

"An immigrant since the all the human race came from North Africa, according to science, you know you want whether you believe in evolution or creation. It really doesn't matter if they both say the same thing. You can't really go around conquering people and then I mean, it's almost like a stop. All right. It's like you can't go around conquering people. And then get conquered and then call fouls like you agreed, kind of implicitly to the conquering game. And this is how the game turned out. Well, that's all true for people who are now dead. But I will say that any excuse for racism is not a good excuse, right like you don't care and I defined racism is the belief that one race is inferior or superior to another. So I believe that all kinds of different everybody can be a racist against some race or another, And it seems like In many cases, people want to go after Whitey because of you know things that may have happened in the past. But I saw my ancestors weren't even on the continent when the stuff I could definitely again. I guess I could definitely be labeled a racist, and I think most people probably could if they really wanted to be honest, because I actually believe black people make better basketball players. Better track stars, you know, so their race is superior in that regard. I think there's now evidence about I mean, you know if that's how you want to divide divide people, But I would say that people who are above the height of six foot six are probably the best basketball players and If more of them have to be black in America. Well, then I guess they're the ones who're going to be it. Thanks for the comments there. Christian anarchists. The number 8554503733 Don't forget that the cops were shooting men far more than their shooting. Affordable health insurance was the promise of Obamacare. But for.

basketball North Africa Whitey America
"north africa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:38 min | 2 years ago

"north africa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Thank you Tim Smith in Barcelona to North Africa now whether it's measures have been put in place to stem the spread of the coronavirus every country in the region apart from Libya has reported cases in concern is beginning to grow Tom Melville is in the Tunisian capital Tunis in a public address Friday evening cheesy as new prime minister L. S. five five an ounce stringent new measures to prevent wide scale spread of the coronavirus the country only has sixteen confirmed cases of the disease and life he has been so far largely unaffected but the prime minister's message appears set to change that Chinese is maritime borders are now closed and all flights to and from Italy have been suspended while flights to other virus centers in Europe have been strictly curtailed protests have been banned schools are now closed and all arrivals to the country weather changes in citizens of foreigners will be subject to a fourteen day isolation period mosques now close for Prez and bonds cafes and restaurants will be forced to close by four PM every day all sporting fixtures will now take place behind closed doors breaching quarantine carry stiff penalties in Tunisia including fines and jail time but there are questions over whether the government can enforce it considering the number of people set to be affected by the new role elsewhere in the region Egypt is the hardest hit with eighty cases and two deaths although there is concern in the country about the accuracy of those figures as well as the fact the Egyptian government is yet to announce the kinds of restrictions on travel that have been imposed by its north African neighbors in Algeria thousands of demonstrators defied the government and marched in the capital Algiers as they have done for more than a year now they found to keep protesting despite the threat of coronavirus until they have met the chief Dimond that is the overthrow of the country's ruling elite the country recorded its second death from the disease on Thursday and has reported twenty seven cases so far Morocco has reported seven cases of coronavirus including one fatality and has announced the suspension of flights to and from Spain and Algeria meanwhile Libya remains the only country in the region yet to report a case of coronavirus but there are big questions over its ability to test for that line treat patients with the disease Tom Melville in Tunis this is the BBC world service it is six twenty one here in London.

Europe BBC Algeria London Spain Morocco Dimond Algiers Egyptian government Tunisia Tim Smith Italy prime minister L. S. Tunis Tom Melville Libya North Africa Barcelona
"north africa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:33 min | 2 years ago

"north africa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Starts in the Middle East and North Africa still to come in a few minutes music that originates in Indonesia but right now we have the single piece that in the space of less than five minutes incorporates what the sounds of Indonesia the sounds of North Africa the sounds of the western guitar and the sounds of the Chinese people a type of loot it's a song called C. Y. and it was written by you Feng Chun who is originally from Taiwan she plays the pizza at on her album pendulum she does a series of collaborations with musicians from around the world including a number of tracks with the Indonesian band called samba Sunda see what is one of them but that's not all there is the song was written by you find John in Egypt and is entirely based on an Arab classical music scale plus you have these two Iranian musicians one playing the violin and the other playing some very western sounding electric guitar all of this in one little work pretty impressive from you fun child and her record called pendulum.

Middle East Indonesia North Africa C. Y. Feng Chun Taiwan John Egypt
"north africa" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"north africa" Discussed on WDRC

"The I love this part of the problem I think understood properly that North Africa was called for the secondary theaters that up the loss of North Africa could be was stolen from a military point of view through but it would free up with those which which but I could use both died first like sure Sir Walter North Africa with two fans were divisions and they had no idea that Rommel was gonna tacky defeats the Western Division for ya please call and then the HR for and you got me all those three to to borrow I just played havoc with the British but he never got published poor quality I'm not sure of because log getting supplies across another Korean Schlee whistle the football I had to depend on the adalio navy which falls and up to the task but it would Hey what the required a major commitment of forces to Italy neutralize off the borders four X. they're all on the mall to and Hitler slow agenda didn't call for that he wanted to well remodel called body wanted Lievens farm conquest of the age and one time while the two divisions there were over a hundred and fifty the vision solution for and then later about eight fifty eight am no lunch from twelve so Carl was given the rubble was just a small fraction of the German war effort.

North Africa Rommel football Carl Sir Walter North Africa Italy Hitler Lievens
"north africa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:04 min | 2 years ago

"north africa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"With another story from the history of science today the visionary Rahman low imagine that it allows you to do use every truth if only a sort of six to the way is rationally award would you do with it well you'd best be careful around the end of the thirteenth century European cooled Ronald low believed that he had work tasks such a theory and it didn't do him much good because of it he was lynched thrown into prison and threatened with execution thanks because for local the proper use of a theory like this was to do god's work who's to everyone using pure logic hello Christian gold was the only true you sound like a fanatical made evil a man who during the time of the crusade had almost suicidal determination to convert the Islamic world in North Africa to Christianity by means not of lumber broad sword nor even a fire and brimstone preaching of mathematical charts and tables yes he's underlying idea was both extraordinary and influential he thought the truth could be automated he developed a scheme that started from a few basic truths or axioms that everyone could agree on and by combining those different permutations he believed he could derive or other true statements his way of making converts to Christianity would be to present them with a logic they couldn't refute but today Roman law is hailed not as he might have hoped as a profit of the Christian faith but of a branch of mathematics and computer science called combinatorics he was interested in and numeration the combinations of those simple axiomatic truths about religion what things followed from a small sect of divine rules but for mathematicians this was just one example among many combinatorics is being called the altar of arranging objects according to specified rules or even more simply the art of camping things one two three four questions combinatorics banners in efforts to understand the evolution and jeans computers.

North Africa Rahman
"north africa" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

WAFS Biz 1190

03:17 min | 3 years ago

"north africa" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

"Of which we are responsible well with our executive editor for the Middle East and North Africa Riana mother welcome back to the show we've got a lot of activity on the diplomatic front but also quite a bit of additional pressure that's being placed on Iran this new naval corridor what do we know and how is it coming together we don't know much if we know the the U. K. has announced that I I don't think it's surprising that the U. K.'s as going to a two PM allies in asking for help and that they would join in an effort to try and make sure that the search of Holmes stays open and limiting Iranians the rounds ability to disrupt it I think in terms of extra pressure you may be referring also to the U. S. move against the Chinese company to put sanctions on the Chinese company dealing with Iranian oil and but I think I don't think it to fit things are necessarily directly link because of the UK is seems to be very keen to separate itself from what the US president is doing Jeremy hunter is quite clear about that saying they they still are sticking to the policy of wanting to ensure that the nuclear deal sticks and continues and I'm not aligned with president trump on his policies good morning Riyadh just because I'm not naval escort for a second I'm just curious would you expect that to de escalate tensions between the U. K. and around or what the involvement of the military their end up back to being those tensions that kind of depends on what they run decides to do if Iran decides to tryin disrupts navigation further to get me another oil tanker then yes having more military ships in the Gulf may need to extra tension for from the UK perspective or in on the European perspective the idea really is to make it hard and thus avoids some of these tensions we had great to get your insight here thank you very much for that that's our executive editor for the Middle East and North Africa every holiday let's get to some additional contact with saying all or he's the head of investment chief economist at a SB capital investors which the from our studio in Sydney saying you don't think a war is likely and then you look throughout history and we were in similar situations where war was in like in happen anyway because others drag certain countries into that is that what could happen this time around again they certainly could you have decided risks high president trump has been using I guess what he calls maximum pressure on Iran to get them to yeah I mean it does she I the the nuclear treaty but by the same token Iran might decide rule why should we get into this and tensions continue to a school like we've seen that a caring of the last month or so if that goes on and then yeah there is a risk of the war in the Middle East it would be totally contrary to that what president trump was elected on and it was on the basis of not getting into that wars in the Middle East which just send a ball do U. S. down so I'm sort of hyper welts.

executive editor Middle East North Africa
"north africa" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"north africa" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"I thank you for your comments. Thank you. Family. You mentioned you father dealt with. Rommel and his army North Africa. We all know. That the war was still teetering one way or the other Germany was beginning to suffer defeats. But by no means were they defeated. Rommel, taking a loss in North Africa. Is attributed to the fact that he went home to Germany to celebrate his wife's birthday. And that's when the allies stepped up the pressure. Right. And had that not happened. Who knows? Yeah. Week all be speaking German. Yep. Right. Right. Thank you for your call. Absolutely my much obliged him have a good rest of the night. Morgan is your real thrilled to talk to you. Thank you. You take your rebbe. All right. Peggy I have a break a have to take this break. And as soon as the break is over. I'm opening with you. So Peggy in south Boston be patient. You will be next. I promise the time and the temperature here these e. Two forty five and car, fifty four degrees. The Morgan show on WBZ NewsRadio ten thirty..

Rommel Peggy I North Africa Morgan Germany WBZ Boston fifty four degrees
"north africa" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"north africa" Discussed on WDRC

"But of Hitler himself. After one started and. Wasn't it early on North Africa? The. Dering flaws and Jews gypsies other groups Walsall. None of that the flogged gypsies teams North Africa. Turn on Hitler until his hold. It all older all Amang in November of nineteen forty two which costing most of the army who fear of is micro-management. And then he went to Italy. And I team foreign and somebody told me what was going on in the east. Apparently, this person was wise enough to swear to secrecy because Allama never. His son. No fourteen year old boy, he wanted to join this because they had the the prettiest uniforms. They did really sharp within uniforms and Rommel absolutely for that. He will not your. But. Son of back because romell simply didn't talk to on that way. Talked to a lot of work things out and. Manfred. This fall. You know, what one not one not the on the ass. They said because they're committing mass murders, and you will not serve under a mass talk more about that. In just a moment. If you don't mind I'm talking to Sanyal.

Hitler North Africa Rommel Sanyal Allama Manfred romell Italy fourteen year
"north africa" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"north africa" Discussed on KCRW

"North Africa. It's described as the Arab spring what's Libya's role in this well Libya, very quickly joined the spring. There were initially peaceful protests against offi. They quickly spiralled into an armed revolution. Distract on for several months. Moammar Gaddafi had been the dictator and charge of Libya for many many years later that year two thousand eleven what happens to him. He's overthrown. He's executed by rebel to drag him out of a ditch. And that was actually caught on video. What's the role of NATO western troops? In all of this NATO was decisive NATO applied airpower to help the rebels on the ground ostensibly to protect civilians, but the NATO intervention was crucial to the toppling of Qaddafi in the big mistake was that NATO and the United States did not follow through after the overthrow. You're not the only one calling it. A big mistake after President Obama left office in two thousand sixteen. He told Fox News that this was probably his biggest mistake as president probably failing to plan for. The day after what I think was the right thing to do in intervening in Libya day after resulted in pretty much a split country. Absolutely. Because Qaddafi really didn't leave any structure governing and so Libya fragmented, malicious filled the vacuum and by two thousand fourteen absolutely. You had this split between east and west as this is playing out. I'm sure many listeners will also remember the two thousand twelve assault on the US consulate in Benghazi Libya, which led to the death of a US ambassador and a political feeding frenzy in this country in Benghazi.

Libya NATO Moammar Gaddafi President Obama Benghazi North Africa United States Qaddafi president assault Fox News
"north africa" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

05:26 min | 3 years ago

"north africa" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"He has conducted thousands. If not thousands of autopsies and here he is back on coast to coast as we will talk about your health. We will take your phone calls earlier today in just a few minutes ago. Tom will be taking your text in tweets, and I've got about twenty five emails. I'm not going to be able to get through all of them, especially with the calls that come in tonight. But he is back Dr Wallich dot com. Are you and Cassie George? Thank you, so much always great. And you're no different tonight. You're great tonight. I better be on all the time dock with the supplements. You guys got me on I better be in good shape. Right. Yeah. That's right. That's what they do ninety for life. They wanted to get your reaction to the FDA sending out letters to seventeen companies that are out there about some of what they believed to be there misleading ads, but the Mike my question is does the FDA research supplements. I'm not sure they do they don't charge. Basically universities do that. Pharmaceutical companies do that governments do that. But the FDA is food and drug. They don't research these sorts of things that they do is evaluate everybody else studies, and you know, there's certain vitamins and minerals that go back over one hundred years that everybody can agree upon you know, you can cure scurvy and prevent scurvy vitamin c. I mean prevent night blindness vitamin E prevent and cure rickets, vitamin d berry, berries, vitamin b one vitamin B three and so on and there's probably another dozen of them, and those are obvious. And so the rest of them there's others over nine hundred different diseases. You get from nutritional deficiencies vitamins, minerals, amino acids fatty acids, and my my postdoctoral fellowship study, which I did was NIH study twenty five million dollars, and it's in a Smithsonian. Institution's national treasure because they showed that there were no generally transmitted disease is one of the causes of a new science to the farm. Call epigenetics and it represented twenty thousand autopsies at four hundred and fifty four species. Three thousand human beings and ten million chemistry's ten win size social saints. We're all looking for pollution, and it's supposed to find a species of animals, it would be sensitive to the same theme as we're and what he found was it out of these twenty thousand autopsies four hundred fifty four species of zoo animals in the big cities around United States. There weren't any genetic diseases. There weren't any disease were caused by pollution all the deaths because by nutrition deficiencies, and as a result that thesis is in this vicinity, instituted a national treasure. And so my work has a very special place. They did another big study in China. Degraded one thousand seven hundred on kids under the age of ten and it's published in the journal of Tracey Ullman research, and saving look this stuff up. It sounds outrageous. But it's true. I found in nineteen seventy two while she from from the atlas bounds of North Africa. They were brought to me is part of the big project and their adult saying only been in America for two months, and I did the autopsies on them. He died three days apart ninety percent blockage of their coronary arteries now, where do sheep from the atlas mountains of North Africa get cholesterol, they weren't eating eggs. They weren't eating meat. They're eating grass in season bark off a weeds and things, and it turns out that they were eating we that the oil wheat germ oil had oxidizing the heat in the barn turned into trans fats. It was inflammation, and it caused the plaque in the arteries. And I know you don't like oils, but if you have old oil in your cabinet, you better throw it out, right, right or give it to present to a doctor. We won't do that. Okay. Tell people you joking. Of course. I was joking. That's right. Okay. And so basically what I showed was inflammation causes. I couldn't get it published United States either in medical journals. So I had to get it published went through Europe. I gotta published publishing a Danish medical journal in nineteen seventy it was the first public showed very clearly that plaque in the arteries has nothing to do with clubs sterling your diet. It's actually oxidized oils fifty thousand this is from the center for disease control. Jurors fifty thousand American kids under the age of twelve have heart attacks for meeting microwave popcorn. All my God. Each year has yearly fifty thousand twenty thousand die from these heart attacks is kids under the age of twelve because the the heat from the microwave produce the trans fats causing plaque in the arteries, and he's twelve year old kids in eight year old his kids are all these heart attack. Well, you look at when you let's say you do that in you wash out a ball that you may have put the popcorn in. It it doesn't wash away with water. It it just kind of sits there. That's correct. And of course, if you want to eat popcorn, that's fine. But what you wanna do is air poppit, and then melt butter and put the melted butter and to have the popcorn is one hundred percent safe here poppet. That's smart. Indeed, doc Wallach with us from critical health, news dot com. I invite you all to go to the websites matter of fact, Jonty the webmaster his put in some new features. They're this great article about is your thyroid working with the self test that you can take a blood pressure.

FDA United States North Africa Cassie George inflammation Tracey Ullman Tom doc Wallach NIH Jonty postdoctoral fellowship Europe China America