6 Burst results for "Norte Chico"

"norte chico" Discussed on Layers of Learning Podcast

Layers of Learning Podcast

05:37 min | 6 months ago

"norte chico" Discussed on Layers of Learning Podcast

"And that turns out not to be true they actually were. More. In the colonial era, they were much more modern. Yeah I think that was the problem with my early education history is it just lacked connections I didn't understand what history could teach me because I didn't have any contextual basis for the people, the places, the events, I didn't have a complete picture in my mind. So that's been one of my goals with my kids is to help them see the big picture of history and to be able to. Know when and where things happened. So, let's back up and just start with when we say history exactly. What do we mean? First of all history starts with the earliest civilizations and I think that's something that. People. Get confused about because we know that there were caveman and. There's this whole Earth history that happens before the subject of history, but the academic subject of history starts with the earliest civilizations. Well. And that's not because the people who came before weren't important. It's because the people who came before didn't write down their stories in any way we don't have an archeological record of them not much and we don't have. Any records at all of them, they didn't build cities that we can go back and excavate. The academic subject of history is just the story of human civilization. That's what is. I often tell my kids. This is why it's so important for you to write down your stories because anyone who didn't have a record of their people or their lives or anything that happened. That kind of. With time and so history we're looking at, Hey, let's look at the story of the people who have lived on the earth and it's totally find teach about cavemen but there's not a lot of actual information that we know when we don't have any written records. So so layers of learning starts with the earliest civilisation. Yeah. We start with Sumer and the Yellow River valley in China and the Norte Chico People in South America. That's that's the beginning of the subject of history and we're looking at how did people create the first civilizations as they began to settle down and be able to live in a place. How did that happen? What contributed to them being able to do that and so yeah, we always start there in history and then as we go along, it includes the story of human beings, nations, cities, especially the great figures in history the heroes, the even the villains civilians to definitely but we learn about those people who somehow contributed and made a difference in the world whether good or bad. And I think we look at those things because it teaches us lessons for now. It's important to look back so that we can be educated for our lives now. Right right now, we are living at a point in history. We're making history were part of that whole subject, and if we study history, we can study all of the things that led up to. Now we can see this progression and some of its progress, and some of it is regression. We human societies tend to go through these cycles and there's Warren Destruction, and there's also building in great art and looking at all of this together is the subject of history I think that's one of the really interesting things that I have noticed as I've taught my kids history. I think a lot of people believe that we started with almost nothing in the history of the world, and then we little by little built up to this point that we have the Internet and technology and.

Yellow River valley Norte Chico South America China
"norte chico" Discussed on Layers of Learning Podcast

Layers of Learning Podcast

06:21 min | 6 months ago

"norte chico" Discussed on Layers of Learning Podcast

"So, , what what do you do with history? ? What's your basic? ? Approach, , while I will say this, , you're the one who taught me how to teach history in my early homeschooling years so I do it very much the way that you Michelle For sure we've always taught history in order when I was in school I was always confused about when things were happening and how things were related to each other. . When I learned about historical figure, , it wasn't in context of where they were or when they lived and I never knew how things connected I I remember in fifth grade we did this project about the Aztecs and. . Each like our teachers split us into groups and each group was doing a different hands on project by the Aztecs and it was a great project. . I remember vividly how the Aztecs built their village or town right on top of the lake and that that's what my project was about and I remember that but I also remember having no idea when the Aztecs happened in history, , I had no concept of win. . That was I thought they were very, , very ancient people that was my impression. . And that turns out not to be true they actually were. . More. . In the colonial era, , they were much more modern. . Yeah I think that was the problem with my early education history is it just lacked connections I didn't understand what history could teach me because I didn't have any contextual basis for the people, , the places, , the events, , I didn't have a complete picture in my mind. . So that's been one of my goals with my kids is to help them see the big picture of history and to be able to. . Know when and where things happened. . So, , let's back up and just start with when we say history exactly. . What do we mean? ? First of all history starts with the earliest civilizations and I think that's something that. . People. . Get confused about because we know that there were caveman and. . There's this whole Earth history that happens before the subject of history, , but the academic subject of history starts with the earliest civilizations. . Well. . And that's not because the people who came before weren't important. . It's because the people who came before didn't write down their stories in any way we don't have an archeological record of them not much and we don't have. . Any records at all of them, , they didn't build cities that we can go back and excavate. . The academic subject of history is just the story of human civilization. That's . what is. . I often tell my kids. . This is why it's so important for you to write down your stories because anyone who didn't have a record of their people or their lives or anything that happened. . That kind of. . With time and so history we're looking at, , Hey, , let's look at the story of the people who have lived on the earth and it's totally find teach about cavemen but there's not a lot of actual information that we know when we don't have any written records. . So so layers of learning starts with the earliest civilisation. . Yeah. . We start with Sumer and the Yellow River valley in China and the Norte Chico People in South America. . That's that's the beginning of the subject of history and we're looking at how did people create the first civilizations as they began to settle down and be able to live in a place. . How did that happen? ? What contributed to them being able to do that and so yeah, , we always start there in history and then as we go along, , it includes the story of human beings, , nations, , cities, , especially the great figures in history the heroes, , the even the villains civilians to definitely but we learn about those people who somehow contributed and made a difference in the world whether good or bad. . And I think we look at those things because it teaches us lessons for now. . It's important to look back so that we can be educated for our lives now. . Right right now, , we are living at a point in history. . We're making history were part of that whole subject, , and if we study history, , we can study all of the things that led up to. . Now we can see this progression and some of its progress, , and some of it is regression. . We human societies tend to go through these cycles and there's Warren Destruction, , and there's also building in great art and looking at all of this together is the subject of history I think that's one of the really interesting things that I have noticed as I've taught my kids history. . I think a lot of people believe that we started with almost nothing in the history of the world, , and then we little by little built up to this point that we have the Internet and technology and invention, , and actually if you look back in history, , my kids were amazed when we were studying ancient Greece and ancient Rome and they were saying if they just had the internet, , they probably had pretty much what we have today. . Mom they were a pre industrial society they had factories so anciently. . They were very much like we are, , and then it collapsed. . Yeah. . Followed Rome even before the Roman Empire the Mojo Daro people in India where at the same level that Rome was, , but you know thousand years earlier. . So it has happened over and over through history. . So it's really interesting. . One of the things that we learned from that is hey. . Next year tomorrow who knows we could be reverting back in the exact same way that they did we are not immune in any way. . And it hasn't just progressed and progressed and progressed. . It has gone through cycles of change over time, , and so there are lessons all along the way if we learn history in that Lens. . and. . Partly for that reason, , Karen that that we can see progression and we can see cycles partly for that reason, , we study history in order, , and partly for the reason, , we already talked about that it's important to have context you need to understand. . Things that are going on at the same time in history you need to understand that this person came before that person that this war led to this event. . Those progressions are important in history. . So to teach it in order, , I think vital.

Aztecs Michelle
How To Teach History

Layers of Learning Podcast

06:21 min | 6 months ago

How To Teach History

"So, what what do you do with history? What's your basic? Approach, while I will say this, you're the one who taught me how to teach history in my early homeschooling years so I do it very much the way that you Michelle For sure we've always taught history in order when I was in school I was always confused about when things were happening and how things were related to each other. When I learned about historical figure, it wasn't in context of where they were or when they lived and I never knew how things connected I I remember in fifth grade we did this project about the Aztecs and. Each like our teachers split us into groups and each group was doing a different hands on project by the Aztecs and it was a great project. I remember vividly how the Aztecs built their village or town right on top of the lake and that that's what my project was about and I remember that but I also remember having no idea when the Aztecs happened in history, I had no concept of win. That was I thought they were very, very ancient people that was my impression. And that turns out not to be true they actually were. More. In the colonial era, they were much more modern. Yeah I think that was the problem with my early education history is it just lacked connections I didn't understand what history could teach me because I didn't have any contextual basis for the people, the places, the events, I didn't have a complete picture in my mind. So that's been one of my goals with my kids is to help them see the big picture of history and to be able to. Know when and where things happened. So, let's back up and just start with when we say history exactly. What do we mean? First of all history starts with the earliest civilizations and I think that's something that. People. Get confused about because we know that there were caveman and. There's this whole Earth history that happens before the subject of history, but the academic subject of history starts with the earliest civilizations. Well. And that's not because the people who came before weren't important. It's because the people who came before didn't write down their stories in any way we don't have an archeological record of them not much and we don't have. Any records at all of them, they didn't build cities that we can go back and excavate. The academic subject of history is just the story of human civilization. That's what is. I often tell my kids. This is why it's so important for you to write down your stories because anyone who didn't have a record of their people or their lives or anything that happened. That kind of. With time and so history we're looking at, Hey, let's look at the story of the people who have lived on the earth and it's totally find teach about cavemen but there's not a lot of actual information that we know when we don't have any written records. So so layers of learning starts with the earliest civilisation. Yeah. We start with Sumer and the Yellow River valley in China and the Norte Chico People in South America. That's that's the beginning of the subject of history and we're looking at how did people create the first civilizations as they began to settle down and be able to live in a place. How did that happen? What contributed to them being able to do that and so yeah, we always start there in history and then as we go along, it includes the story of human beings, nations, cities, especially the great figures in history the heroes, the even the villains civilians to definitely but we learn about those people who somehow contributed and made a difference in the world whether good or bad. And I think we look at those things because it teaches us lessons for now. It's important to look back so that we can be educated for our lives now. Right right now, we are living at a point in history. We're making history were part of that whole subject, and if we study history, we can study all of the things that led up to. Now we can see this progression and some of its progress, and some of it is regression. We human societies tend to go through these cycles and there's Warren Destruction, and there's also building in great art and looking at all of this together is the subject of history I think that's one of the really interesting things that I have noticed as I've taught my kids history. I think a lot of people believe that we started with almost nothing in the history of the world, and then we little by little built up to this point that we have the Internet and technology and invention, and actually if you look back in history, my kids were amazed when we were studying ancient Greece and ancient Rome and they were saying if they just had the internet, they probably had pretty much what we have today. Mom they were a pre industrial society they had factories so anciently. They were very much like we are, and then it collapsed. Yeah. Followed Rome even before the Roman Empire the Mojo Daro people in India where at the same level that Rome was, but you know thousand years earlier. So it has happened over and over through history. So it's really interesting. One of the things that we learned from that is hey. Next year tomorrow who knows we could be reverting back in the exact same way that they did we are not immune in any way. And it hasn't just progressed and progressed and progressed. It has gone through cycles of change over time, and so there are lessons all along the way if we learn history in that Lens. and. Partly for that reason, Karen that that we can see progression and we can see cycles partly for that reason, we study history in order, and partly for the reason, we already talked about that it's important to have context you need to understand. Things that are going on at the same time in history you need to understand that this person came before that person that this war led to this event. Those progressions are important in history. So to teach it in order, I think vital.

Aztecs Rome Yellow River Valley Karen South America Greece Norte Chico India China
"norte chico" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

Slate's Political Gabfest

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"norte chico" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

"How long did civilizations survive in the ancient world, and it's fascinating. And the average lifespan of a civilization is about three hundred and thirty years. So that should give us pause because the the United States is a two hundred and forty three right now. So we should we should be conscious that there are there are certainly you're civilizations. That lasted one thousand years, but there are a bunch that you know, that didn't that didn't last that. Are you the best start date for the US? Yeah. To forty three would be seventeen seventy six. I was just a guess actually. I've just I it's close having sex. The reason I was going to say is this year was actually sorry this week on the fourth of March was the two hundred thirtieth anniversary to the day of the first day that the. You American government started operating under the constitution after the ads the constitutional convention in seventeen eighty seven so took a little while ago ratified and then so forth. Anyway, that's that's all it's the only reason I was was interested in that. Because I was thinking, oh, we got about another hundred years to you know, work things out. We'll maybe so the cou- lights lasted eleven hundred fifty years. The vettix lasted one thousand years. The Harrap ins lasted eight hundred years Norte, Chico eight hundred twenty seven years, but it's not it's going to be tough guys. We're going to have to we got to really pull together. We don't want to end up. You don't wanna end up like like the Neo Assyrians who are out in three hundred twenty two years or the old Hittites down in two hundred fifty years for the Medina's sixty six years. You don't wanna be those guys you need you need a need to good longer run. So that is our show for today. My friends campus is of course, produced by Jocelyn Frank or researcher is Bridget Dunlap June. Thomas is the managing producer of sleet podcasts. Gabriel. Roth is the editor -ill director slate audio thank you to engineers and Melissa Kaplan Ryan McEvoy and Allen Pang at in DC, Yale and CBS respectively. You should follow us on Twitter at add slate gap s tweet chat or to us for Emily Lana. John Dickerson, I'm David plots. Thanks for listening. Come to our lie. I show in DC on March twenty seventh or in Charlottesville, April twelfth go to sleep dot com slash live to get tickets..

United States DC researcher Melissa Kaplan Ryan McEvoy Medina Twitter Jocelyn Frank John Dickerson Chico Emily Lana Charlottesville Gabriel Roth Thomas Allen Pang producer David Yale editor CBS
"norte chico" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

09:05 min | 2 years ago

"norte chico" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"Cattle rancher. Why would I care you're gonna care because government also we'll get into pretty amazing story in Newsweek that I just want to share with you. It's very cool. And I think Ross is ready to make a really bad decision. So we'll get to that in a moment. Let me grab a call on our hacienda healthcare update story where you have one of the dudes who works series a nurse. His DNA is a match for the baby that a woman who is in a near vegetative state. Gave birth to hear a few weeks ago. Even though she's been that way for better than a decade as you can imagine horrified. A lot of people in his lawyer claims there's even with the paternity test positive. There's no direct evidence. So I guess that's the hill. They're gonna die on Mark. What's up? Good morning. Hey, I'm not a doctor and I don't play one on TV. Unless I've totally wrong women of childbearing age have what I call a cycle. And I can't believe that. Nobody noticed none of her attendants noticed that that cycle was not Korean. Well, nine bucks. Here's the thing. I thought about it. But I also was reading and another article that that may not always be the case just due to everything that's going on. And there are certain reasons why some women won't even if they're not an adventure of states. So I kind of stayed away from that. Because I don't have enough information on it. They got ahead of this. And they knew somebody knew what was going on. And they just didn't four people just didn't pay attention. You know could offer offered the option of abortion. Well, you know, what the likelihood is you had somebody noticed this. I would suspect that that probably would be what what are the doctors would have ordered. And then there'd be the problem in who knows if they got publicity there. It might have been a you know, that in and of itself might have been the driving story here in some cases, and thanks for the call superseding the one we're talking about now. But all right. This story. Rossio wolves or treasure which one you wanna do first. They're both good. Let's do treasure treasure. All right. We're into treasure. I so this disrupt Newsweek here, it's rather interesting. This is Melbourne Beach, Florida. So right in the central portion of the state there. Researchers have quote discovered I think somebody founded and stupidly called researchers. And as we pointed out many times. If you find treasure stop calling the government like those people found those old coins on their property on California. Remember that insanity? I guess what happens. They come and take your treasure. Yeah. Or in that case, they got to keep them. But you should never be imperilled. Well, in this case off the coast there of Melbourne Florida up washes, a what could be they have to properly get this dated. But it is being estimated by experts to potentially be up to ten or twelve thousand years old. An ancient funeral mask. Yes. Let's see MIT professor. Mike Torres is who they're quoting in the story. Now, you're asking yourself will. How did an ancient funeral mask get to the Melbourne Florida? And the reason they're very excited about this. Because they suspect that this mask was aboard a known treasure ship that sank off the coast of Florida in the mid seventeen hundreds that essentially was hauling a bunch of lute from South America Spanish treasure ship, seventeen fifteen rather that sunk during a hurricane as it was sailing at that point it had the left South America stopped in Cuba and was attempting to make its way to Spain. And attempting to March northward up the coast of Florida before sinking. So the, and if that's the case they estimate that there's up to four billion dollars worth of treasurer on this. And so there treasure hunt, which I think is cool. Although I am irritated because the government tells them if they do find the treasure they can't keep all of it that they get it. To which I would say, screw you government. Finders keepers, not telling you. Now, here's this gets amazing. So the mask which and I had to do a little research here that they feel is probably a representation that was produced by the Norte, Chico civilization of Peru. Or or perhaps even earlier this was prior to the Incas linking all of those societies up. So this actually predates the empire. Was likely a funeral mass placed on royalty due to how ornate is and was looted. They suspect from a a burial site by Spanish conquistadors. So that it along with everything else they found could be sent back to Spain to give to the king or Queen. I guess technically at that point. So. The DEA put it on. Hell, yeah. You do. No, hesitation slapping that thing on dude. It's thousands of years old. No. It was not a dead guy. It's part of stolen treasure from an ancient tomb you've seen Egypt. Right. This doesn't always work out. And before you rush to. Yes. Can I also point out the mask, which is primarily made of copper, and this is why it's so interesting because the the smelting skill skills necessary to produce this mask. Would it would it would require to be one of the earliest representations of that skill set and the earliest in that part of the world. So that's why scientists are were very excited about this the mass while made mainly of copper also contains gold, silver and iridium, which is essentially a material from a meteorite. I don't care put it my face space death mass. Yeah, I know y'all. If if I had to point to sub cursed, right? And I needed something to be the easiest thing to determine it was cursed. It would be this mask look at Jim Carrey before he put them ask. And he was a homeless outta work painter, right? Doing paintings on the side of the road of people's pets or whatever. And now Jim Carey. You know, multimillionaire lunatic. I'm putting that mascot, not even no hesitation. That's the difference between an alpha and a beta putting that mascot get my superpowers and taken over every no hesitation. I can think of some other documentaries. We're putting a mask on your family found kind of went in the opposite direction. Okay. Fair enough. But you're willing to roll the dice. I sure am. I don't think that's my life. Now. Nowhere. I don't think that's a good idea. Man. Just as bad in ideas, calling the authorities would you found the damn thing. Best Halloween costume ever, though. If it does kind of overtake your form or it's like from like suicide squad, right? Get some ancient artifacts from that part of the world, and it doesn't work out for you. I don't even care if it's like venom, you know, if I stumble across the black oil sucking that crept down. You're really excited if you once again nowhere to go, but up in you hate the beach. Sure do. Yeah. Okay. All right. So Rodney that parasite Ross is all about the ancient burial mask made from a meteorite. Don't even get me into the alien implications there, right? You saw the last Indiana Jones. You know, how that could work coming to work in money. Like, where's your head? So weird looking more than usual. Let's like an egg. Like, crystal skull. All right. It is forty five hundred one envisioned that seven forty five we'll get to the best thing that ever happened to me gets. It's wolf story. You're excited about something. That's never going to come to pass. And and frankly, I wanna see somebody wearing that. Just so we know that's an obligation. All right next thing. We'll find out it was in a black Surkov against to open it. Yeah. So that's that's a horrible idea. Who did we guys Ken Boone today or? Roll the dice. Yes. Hey, I knew the tomorrow's the switcheroo. Right. Yes. That is correct. Okay. Jeffey? No will be with you tomorrow. Well, it was sideways raining on my way in this morning. So that was nice..

Florida Ross Melbourne Florida Spain Mark Melbourne Beach Jim Carrey Peru Mike Torres Ken Boone treasurer South America California Jim Carey DEA MIT Indiana
"norte chico" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

04:36 min | 2 years ago

"norte chico" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"And welcome to the podcast. I am Tracy b Wilson and I'm Holly fried. It is time for part two of unearth in twenty eighteen and this installment includes a lot of the favorites. Among our listeners, we've got the shipwrecks and the edibles and potables and exhibitions mations and the repatriations and every time I put one of these together, I also wind up with this collection of stuff. That's not the Mattingly related at any way. But it just seemed really cool, and I call that pope ary like the jeopardy category. And that's where we're starting today. Archaeologists in Peru have found thirty eight hundred year old wall with reliefs that depict four humans heads with snakes slithering between them in the middle between the snakes heads in the humans heads is a face that looks like neither with wide eyes, and he very wide mouth and five finger like or perhaps tentacle like appendages underneath. And they have speculated that this represents a seed putting down route. Roots? And that the snakes represent a water deity that irrigates the crops after people plant the seeds that's more likely hypothesis than what some of the internet's speculates, which is obviously foolish. I mean, that's what I believe. It's also just a really striking relief carving because like the four human faces are all in a row. And then there are these sinuous snakes in between them and the thing in between them that might be a seed this area was home to the Carl civilization, which is also known as Norte, Chico. And that's one of the oldest known civilizations in the Americas. I think part of why the association to Kasulu is show strong is not just the tentacle mention. But also the relief mention which comes up a lot in. Oh, yeah. Love crafts writing. He likes to particularly in at the mountains of madness. It's all descriptions of relief. So there's a some conscious Tien I think that people aren't aren't necessarily aware that they're making archaeologists with the National Institute of anthropology and history. That's I N A H in Mexico have been excavating a set of twenty-six pits in Mexico City. They are about twenty seven hundred years old and are between one point two and three point three meters below street level. Some of these pits seem to have been used to bury. Human remains. So they were affectively graves, but others were used for storing things like, grains, and artifacts. And two of them might have been used for tasks related to caring for babies and young children. One example that was given the right up of all of this was making steam baths for newborn babies, one hypothesis is that this whole area was used for activities related pregnancy and childcare backing up this hypothesis is the presence of more than one hundred thirty figurines a few of them representing babies, but most of them depicting pregnancy. So it's possible that the site was something along the lines of an ancient prenatal care center. I like that idea to like the idea that there was a place where all the pregnancies were happening. Really, it's where Kasulu was making. Archaeologists in China have found a miniature terra cotta army are a lot like the famous terra cotta warriors. But on a much smaller scale. So for example, that infantry figurines are about eleven inches or twenty eight centimeters tall. These were probably created about twenty one hundred years ago, roughly a hundred years after the terra cotta army, and they might have been created for emperor Wu's son, Liu hung in eighteenth century. My sore leader Hyder Ali developed rockets for use in warfare. His son and successor t poo Sultan, improved on his father's designed to make a rocket that came to be known as the my saurian teepee Sultan used these to fight the British East India company, successfully until he was killed in seventeen ninety nine this year. Excavators. Found what they believed to be teepee sultans rocket stash in an abandoned. Well. The well smelled of gun powder. And once they excavated they found more than a thousand rockets now we are coming to the section of things that are unearthed by amateurs starting with a dog named Monty who dug up more than twenty bronze age objects while on a walk in the Czech Republic in March in September. Archaeologists who examined the objects announced that they were all more than three thousand years old and included to spear points, three axes several bracelets and thirteen sickle shaped objects..

terra cotta army Tracy b Wilson Hyder Ali rockets Mattingly Peru Chico Holly fried Mexico Kasulu Americas Mexico City Czech Republic Tien Monty China National Institute of anthropo India Wu