20 Burst results for "Norman Mailer"

Author Michael Murphy on 'Golf in the Kingdom'

GOLF.com Podcast

14:12 min | 9 months ago

Author Michael Murphy on 'Golf in the Kingdom'

"This is Alan ship. I am delighted to be joined by Michael Murphy author of Golf in the Kingdom still going strong eighty nine Michael. Thank you for doing this well. It's a pleasure. You have such a unique place in the game Euro Golfing Kindo as in your early forties. I'M NOT GONNA say it was a Lark but it was a you're not you're not a Gulf writer. You're not a novelist it just emerged from you in ever. Since you've been this Oracle you've been this grand old man of letters in the game you you tell shape how think about it. So are you still tickled that all these years later people are still finding this novel enjoying it? Well I I love it. I could say channel that because it was not only the first book I wrote the First Book I never tried to ride and I started it as I was turning forty and it was published in one thousand nine hundred ninety two forty seven years ago so when I was forty one so here we are now forty eight years later and it has. His Life Taught Me. I could ride so that in itself was an enormous pleasure and a big force to shape by subsequent life. I never thought of myself as a writer. My brother Was the designated writer in our family might and he had been a successful novelist and my grandfather had delivered John. Steinbeck and Salinas or you and I were both born and You know rules can get us. Signed the kids growing up and I was supposed to be a doctor and Than the more for me Thought I'd be a psychiatrist. And then got to Stanford and found myself in class on comparative religions of that led me to the philosophy and the way of life that shaped me ever since when I was nineteen and twenty but never along the way there was thought. Start writing books so anyway. When I sat down to write this book really did come in a flood. And it's Been living in me ever since I've written eight books now but that one If it were to be one of my children Children it would be among my books. It was my first child by far the most successful and I would say influential. Books are mysterious things. I like to say sometimes. Ufo's identified writing objects you W os or you are os. Son identified reading objects that can open worlds to people. And that's what's actually happened with this book with golf in the Kingdom one of the things about our shared hometown of Salinas which is just a dusty little farming community in the Central Valley known to John. Steinbeck doesn't have that much else to recommend it. It's not that far from pebble. Beach Golf links which figures prominently in my life story and and was important part of Gulf education. So tell us about your early days of playing pebble with with your brother and of course guys would haunt the Cosby Klanbake back. When he was really a big deal with Hogan snead Nelson and Bing crosby's the star in the world so is important from Stamford but it starts with your golf education before that while. That's right I mean we've had very fortunate childhoods you and I and my brother and Yes we would there be there at the crosby so I get to follow Ben Hogan around and watched him up close and personal before and after his accident. Which was in I guess January of Nineteen forty-nine so he missed that whole year in the hospital but he used to partner with Bing crosby and that was fun and Johnny Weissmuller who was the Great Olympic champion of became Tarzan. And the movies anyway. It was those great events and of course plane pebble which to this day remains by far my favorite course and it has to be. I mean there's of course in the world I think more beautiful than pebble. There are others that when you look at them would be beautiful. But to match the incredible range of moods it gets into with the shifting light the shifting fog the filaments of fog that cut across the fairways and all but anyway quyen pebble seen Some of the players in particular Hogan up close definitely was an influence on on golfing. The King wrote about it will hoge himself makes a handful of cameos in the text. Including what was it? The moved you so much about him well his magnetism on the course then he won eight out of eleven majors. He played over that period from forty eight to fifty through fifty three and he After the accident he paid just eighteen tournaments through fifty-three thickening one ten of them. He won virtually every major so he was the top of the game. He was to golf then way. Tiger Woods has been also the quality of his presence and when he would crack this out Just by the second hole at pebble for those who have been developed. Now it's then built up but there was a big field of practice in the pros as well as the onlookers. Got To sit down and watch him. Maybe there'd be hundred. Fifty people big big arena there watching him practice and it was a sight to behold because he had an immense repertoire of shots to fade to draw low high and the silence and that meant a huge impression on me and. I'm sure that as I sat down to write though I didn't plot the book or shape the book deliberately around him that influence. I'm sure was like an acorn growing into this conscious. Us of what the game could be as a kind of If you WANNA call it Yogi you can call it contemporary. You can call Chamonix even exercise golf itself is what in the eastern martial arts. Would you could call a Kata which is a series of movements. That trigger it is said are esoteric anatomy that is the complete person we are both in the flesh and in our soul are in the consciousness itself and golf swing. You could argue is an unnatural. Act It's not like running or throwing which are species learn to do and could do To survive. But you don't take a tee up a ball and hit it at the on charging tiger you know as a member of the tribe so it's an acquired skill that requires the most gypsum concentration and commitment to play it. Well and for this reason he and other reasons it evokes corresponding states of mind which can be interfered with with strong emotions whether rage or grief or sorrow which can produce by this fiendish challenge to get this small ball into this tiny hole and to go after four five hours over the course of four miles. You know. It's on the face of an absurdity. A why are we doing this? And that can occur to while playing. Why am I doing this but you do it? And you have these incredible pleasures and experiences and then as I've discovered through Responding to the book experience you have to call super-normal Mr Cool or cold. In other words the game can do that and It helps to be in a beautiful place like Pebble Beach. The you bring to this conversation. Just leaps off the page. I mean that's I think why the book is in bird because as you say it's this pursuit of ours is is maddening. It makes no sense but we do it anyway. And we were able to put a voice to having a correspondent. Brad faxon about the book and he said what I love about it is it made it okay to to speak of these things and you gave us in vocabulary to this experience at the golfers of had. But I you can get those tools so you matriculate to Stanford and as a fellow Salinas Person. I know it's not the most open minded place to Nag towns little conservative. But you have sort of a life altering experience stafford and what exactly happened well. I was so inspired by this professor. Frederic Spiegelberg he them a born and raised in Germany and Taught was teaching Stanford Comparative Religions so I got exposed to eastern philosophy and meditation contemplation than and particularly the world view of Indian philosopher. A named Sheera window who had been educated in England very elite education. His family had instructed his patrons in England never to let him speak any Indian language so he wanted to English but he was a philosopher and writer kind of a renaissance figure and developed a worldview. That's been the most basic influence on me. There are many influences of prompted me to do what I've done and of course the mystery is. Why chose this story? I could have gotten so many other directions but I consider myself very lucky. A Norman Mailer. The writer argued that every aspiring writer is given one free one by God and that was my free one and it was the first one and it in turn golf in the kingdom has shown me that this birth of new capacities is much more common than most people realize because immediately upon publication people started letting me know about their mystical experiences called experiences on golf courses. I wrote the book on some inspiration but I if you had asked me then that people would be having experiences you know immediately lawyer. New York wrote to me and was just couldn't get over this book. It helped him understand that. How on this particular occasion he'd been standing on the T. of four hundred yard and there were no players between him and his forces have been the green said he could see clear. A ball marker the size of a dime on this whole quarter of a mile away. Two of his playing partner couldn't even see the green. I got it was there. So he wondered. Is this the sort of thing you're talking about or a woman rights to me right away and says the yearbook helped me in? Because not long ago I was playing the eighteenth hole of at my Country Club as the sun was setting and when we got to the green the sun had set but it was still shining through the green and I felt that maybe this was some after glow on my is some retinal shock or something but when they went into the clubhouse who shining through the walls and it shown like that for three days and I was in an exaltation and thank you for writing the book because I found author who bite understand this experience so when you then I started getting these things. It pushed me in the direction of seeing the genius of sport to elicit this experience but not reported by sportswriters very often. You know there've been a few writers who have glimpsed this John Updike. He recognized this and Bernard Darwin. You know the great writer grandson. Charles Darwin he read the links of either down one of his short stories. I mean he certainly could see it. The mystery of golf by Arnold Hall Taint. So there's been a vein of golf writing that shows this power of the game not only to enchant but to reveal these capacities so that in turn has led me into other sports. And so I've been out to meet with coaches and players of ever since about what you would call the inner game of Sport and that Inter has led me to appreciate how prevalent it is in everyday life but not commonly discussed and recognized until recently. Thank you God for giving me go for the Kingdom as my first book.

Golf Writer John Updike Salinas Steinbeck Bing Crosby Michael Murphy Partner Ben Hogan Pebble Beach Oracle Alan Bernard Darwin Tiger Woods Charles Darwin Country Club Brad Faxon Stanford Johnny Weissmuller Cosby Klanbake
Lawrence Weschler: And How Are You, Dr. Sacks?: A Biographical Memoir of Oliver Sacks

Bookworm

14:19 min | 1 year ago

Lawrence Weschler: And How Are You, Dr. Sacks?: A Biographical Memoir of Oliver Sacks

"Today I have a special guest his name. He's been on the show before is Lawrence Weschler. He's writing a book about someone else who's been on the show fight a few times. That's Oliver Sacks. Oliver one of my favorite guests and I had the excitement of learning that he was one of Lawrence. Weschler 's coasts Closest Friends Godfather to Lawrence. Wash lers daughter Sara. Yes yes. Of course you're going to want to read Oliver Sexes owned autobiographical writings. But you will learn something both about friendship and the interaction of two minds that in thirty years I never really parted company. They were talking constantly and at a time when we're forgetting what it's like to have friends that you don't fight with without making up within twenty hours. Think of all the people you'd stop. Stop being able to talk to Gore Vidal or Norman Mailer Susan Santen. And they're they are Lawrence Weschler my guest and end the great neuro physician. What did he call himself? He called himself a clinical oncologists. What did we? We used to go on rounds. Rounds Ed Ed We would be dry in those days. This is back in the early eighties and by the way it's with knowing that the when I I was getting hanging out with him I'm in one thousand nine hundred seventy nine hundred eighty one. He was largely unknown. AWAKENINGS had come out but nobody had read it ten years after it had been published in Nineteen in seventy three. I interviewed the publisher in England. Colin Hay craft the first edition had been fifteen hundred copies and they had not yet sold out. I mean it's it's amazing but anyway the point is we would go on on rounds and he in those days was and pretty much through his life was mainly going institutions and poor houses and so forth you will gospels. They were status poor houses. They were you know places where people are warehouse where he specialized it you know. And and he said that's where where the jewels are. You know you have all the time in the world. Nobody's expecting anything but any case So he would be driving between them and what you know I think of myself as a clinical oncologists apologist you know analogy is the philosophy of being. You know what. Why is there something rather than nothing and so forth? And he said my I am somebody for whom the diagnostic diagnostic question of the kinds of people I see is how are you. How do you be? What is it like to be you and here we are? This is the title of the book. And how are you Dr Sour you doctors and it's an autobiographical memoir memoir and my guests. Lawrence Weschler is a specialist in the creation of what he calls writer writer Louis Nonfiction. Which I think you know we've discussed on the show in the past literary nonfiction what what I call readily nonfiction is non-fiction in which the writing matters you right if the reading matter and you read the writing mattered? That's my definition. You do classes. Yes you teams this and you see I knew Ren Weschler when he was a young man in Los Angeles Los Angeles was home. There were people like Carole Eastman who wrote five easy pieces who called US invaders. Jack Potter's she felt. We were here to to rob the natives of their do I used to see Lawrence Weschler in a bookstore called intellectuals and liars tires wonderful place who was a wonderful wonderful place once upon a time and not very long ago a bookstore was a place ice. Will you hung out. You sat around may be ready chapter of something you were considering buying where you crease the pages in the poetry books will you read it out loud. Everybody so I I met Lawrence Weschler and he'd written terrific things was it mostly for the weekly I would right. I was the only person who was awry. Loud right for both the L. A. Reader and the L. A.. Weekly the Qazir writing was so good and no Alan would turn you down and it was fascinating because he went off to New York not yet thirty years old. I had unwritten. I'd spent three or four years with Robert Irwin. The artist who was who was already then probably one of the top ten artisan America but the one who was least known because he never allowed his work to be photographed. He most of the work didn't exist anymore and and I had an occasion. Why that happened? And then I wrote a book based on the conversations nations and are manuscripts forgetting seeing is forgetting the name of the thing one sees was the title nine thousand nine hundred eighty. I had six or seven Rave Steve Rejections from all the New York publishers. All them saying they wanted my next book. But how could they be expected to publish a book on a California artist. That's that's nineteen eighty But I said at the New Yorker and it was accepted kind of over the transient which was extremely. You know lucky on I mean. I always say that he does that. They get fifty thousand manuscripts year of this type and maybe a hundred of them are worth publishing and they published two of them and going that hundreds of that too was just luck and there was the famous lunch with the top editor. The head of the shocker. Mr Shawn was at the Al Gunk Right Hotel by the way. Says you know it's Apparently I live in California. We're going to hire you but we're very live in California. Can you but I mean where were you born. I said Ben is and California Baby. Where'd you go to high school? I said I'm high and I could. College Judge Santa Cruz either. I just didn't make any sense at all but he kept on drilling until he was able to establish that all of my grandparents were released. Jews which case okay. That was okay. You mention a name name that I haven't seen her thought about in years. Maurice Natan Somehow he was Donald Barthelme. These great world was amazing about him. I used to go to classes and Santa Cruz. He has a phenomenology as a philosophy professor and he looked like Martin buber looked like God basically but that I would go go because it was like sitting in on Donald Martha Stories one after another you. It was just an entertaining. No not when I was taking the cats had just go there and years later when I saw Barthel may I asked him. What does your great influence that? When I was at the New Yorker Enescu was becker? He's I had this professor. At the University of Houston Maury Dayton said and had they abide melted was really. I'm talking to Lawrence Weschler. Who is also known by his friends as Ren Weschler and We're talking about around his book. And how are you Dr Sex. You know we were of the generation. Yes you got. Talk to be close to Robert Irwin and to our mutual friend art spiegelman on I got to be coast to Donald Barthelme. John Barth was the time with wonderful. Nobody had read awakenings as I was graduated. Maurice Natan said I'm graduating seventy four. The book had been published in seventy three mornings and thrust this book into my chest and said read this us and and I get around to reading it right away but when I did read it in seventy nine I sent a letter to Oliver. That's how how we begin the influenza right right. After World War One killed more people than all of World War One it probably affected hundred million but twenty million were killed of those who survived live particularly young people age that we were back in the days of intellectuals and liars five or six years later began suddenly in the middle of their day's Day's coming to stop you know and they were in trammelled in this statue like Situation for thirty years they were just warehoused and then Oliver came upon this population and began to realize that. Some some of these people at this institution. We're we're different than others and had the heroine notion that some of them were that these people were completely alive inside something he knew because he had these incredible experiences and so forth which is a different story but the point is that the rookie writes about their situation about giving the Mel dopey about their coming alive about the horrible tribulations afterwards. His great theme of of Fate and freedom as he used to say when he got his is bound galleys awakening in one thousand nine hundred ninety two. He sent it the first copy of Bengali. To auden and Auden who in those days Osha the days of thank you fog and so forth Is a master of adjectives and auden sends back a letter. Saying I WANNA thank you for your delightful manuscript which is the most amazing thing to say about awakenings. But it's true. There was an invasion long. Before the British invasion of the Beatles was an invasion of the Brits to America and that including W.H. On Thom Gunn and Tom Gun and Oliver Sacks ax here you have this legendarily kind. Man Who wears leather across across America period crosses American motorcycle. lives I up north in the bay area. And then then down here where this neurophysiologist. But let's say more this genius this eccentric this beautiful unaccommodating person who could only be his self. He was very close to his mother. was the first woman she was the first woman. Surgeon in England She she was formidable character and they knew they had a prodigy on by the Orthodox Jews and her husband was also Dr They knew they had a project. Didn't know what to do with him and she would do things like when he was eight years old. She would bring home Stillborn fetuses 'cause she was an OBGYN surgeon For him to dissect because that would probably be interesting for him and when he was twelve she took him along to the autopsy of a twelve year. Old Boy who committed suicide that would probably be interesting. They had a very close relationship of and then when she found out that he was gay she tore into him. She called him an abomination. I wish you had never been born. And went on like that. And that was when he was eighteen when he finishes his Medical School at Oxford he is a bat out of hell. Getting out of England. Finally when he's out of England he is in motorcycles. He is On the fringes of hells angels where. He's known as Dr Squat because he is also the California state heavyweight lifting champion. Yes he used to hang out at muscle beach and must do all the body builders. He'd come to California because of Tom Gun. Actually who was okay with US homoerotic imagery and so forth in the Patriot. Way that he oliver wasn't yet are never would be actually but But in any case for three or four years I I up there then down here in. La He was led this extravagant and especially drug-fuelled life. The reason was able to recognize those guys at the the statues. I choose as being alive with because he'd been there too and in each of the pieces that I've heard of yours. You begin with a strong subject if you are out there wanting to ride writer Lee nonfiction. Don't think you can do it with just anything. And and Oliver Sacks does not come on every day of the week and Lawrence Wessler my guest hand the the great talent of interesting the people who interested him and so all of her sacks by the time they'd spend time together wanted a profile by the young Lawrence Weschler who was this new at the New Yorker The New Yorker. Let me give you some history. Here was famous for hiring people from Harvard. When he asks Excu where you went to school when Mr Shawn asks the it's because he's expecting Harvard to crop up somewhere in the itinerary? What are you doing going coming to school at? UC Santa Cruz And so in a certain way you are as original and strange a presence as sunny about Santa Cruz and my graduating class at Santa Cruz at Calle College to under people in one thousand nine hundred four three of them became New Yorker Writers Bill Finnegan allocation has also. Oh I love Bill Finnegan. We were classmates all the way through.

Lawrence Weschler Oliver Oliver Sacks California Santa Cruz Oliver Sexes Lawrence England United States Donald Barthelme America Robert Irwin Maurice Natan Mr Shawn Writer Professor Gore Vidal Bill Finnegan
"norman mailer" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

04:13 min | 1 year ago

"norman mailer" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"We disagree pretty aggressively on facebook. Whatever I mean we dropped a few you know a few didn't make the cut after a while but you know some can meet him for breakfast and we we laugh? We have been time and I it's so. Did you have a sense that you wanted to be a writer at that age. Yeah you did which is ridiculous just. I don't know why I don't know why I don't I think some people are drawn to writing because they have a pulsing gnawing need to tell a specific story right. <hes> could be a story of pain from the youth of abuse <hes> it could be an immigrant story that involves a lot of challenges and uphill battles. I mean speaking candidly. I'm not coming from that place. I was drawn to books because I loved language. I just loved stories. I love sentences uses. I found them exhilarating. <hes> like the Lawrence Furlan Getty Booker Frank O'Hara book. I like the words were jumping all over the page I like that they were breaking the rules of punctuation and grammar that was that seemed fun. That's kind of punk rock and like you know and I just I started to see you know Joan Gideon Tom Wolfe Gay Talese John mcphee who was a teacher of Mine College. They would do these incredible pieces for magazines sometimes profiles of stars but sometimes more reported essays about cultural movements or whatever that's a that's one hell of a job I mean it's basically subsidised adventure like you get to weigh in on the culture or you get to move the needle. You get to meet all these captivating people and somebody else pays you. Let's do that there was a golden era where magazines really led the way in those kinds of things visas from the John and didn't Gore Vidal and Norman Mailer nor exactly normally on James Baldwin wrote for Esquire esquire was really the tip of the spear when it came to that I mean Vanity Fair was like that for a while and for whatever reason season esquire has survived the collapse of the magazine industry. I mean you know how I can't imagine how difficult it is to remain relevant in this culture as a magazine like it's a dying thing and yet esquire seemed to have figured out a way to survive and still maintain some foothold in that you know in in an era in which that's being disintegrated. We'll knock on wood. You know it's the same. Is there a sense of of of like we were responsible for shepherding legacy. There's definitely a sense of responsibility to regarding this this the heritage of the magazine and all the incredible bylines that have been in you know dispatches from Vietnam Tom Nora Ephron original column everything from very dark disturbing investigative pieces to some of the best light entertaining reading ever and budgets are tight. I'M NOT GONNA lie. Hires have money to really make my case anytime vision visiting a city for escort best restaurants research or something we find ways to make it work speaking candidly when I went to New Orleans Pablo Johnson a friend of mine. I slept on his couch when I went to San Francisco Omar Moon. Let me as apartment I mean if it was nineteen seventy eight the Ritz I would I would have been up hill at at at the Fairmont or whatever the top of the mark. You know like I mean in fact I even experienced that in the nineties. It was pretty profligate. I stayed at the best hotels in the world. They would just send me to them so hey you don't need that to me. What's important is the work you know and I will tell you? This is interesting like I. I should've brought one but I the the recent issue that's out. The summer. Issue Has Brad Pitt Leo DiCaprio and Quentin Tarantino on the cover has her best bars issue. It has just one page after another no filler really good stuff and I'll give this issue to people and they'll say my God..

esquire Omar Moon Lawrence Furlan Getty Booker F facebook Joan Gideon Tom Wolfe Tom Nora Ephron writer Brad Pitt Leo DiCaprio Mine College Quentin Tarantino Vietnam Norman Mailer Pablo Johnson Gore Vidal James Baldwin New Orleans San Francisco John
"norman mailer" Discussed on American History Tellers

American History Tellers

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"norman mailer" Discussed on American History Tellers

"Two podcast together to investigate the nineteen sixty eight democratic national convention, and the legendary courtroom clash that followed the trial of the Chicago eight joining me to tell the story is the host of legal wars hill Harper. Hey, Lindsay great to be here. And I'm very excited to share the story with your listeners, the trial of the Chicago eight goes back further into history than we've ever gone before on legal wars to nine hundred sixty eight it was a time of immense, change, activism and turmoil. Both the American history Taylor series on the civil rights movement and the history political parties covered this period, but he was in Chicago, August nineteen sixty eight. Eight that race politics and protest collided. Violently for five days and nights. Thousands of protesters were gassed and beaten by police hundreds were injured, and it was all broadcast live on national television in the aftermath a federal grand jury convened to investigate possible criminal charges. They concluded their six month inquiry by charging eight police officers were civil rights violations and eight protest organizers with conspiracy to incite a riot. The ensuing trial lasted for months and was a circus from the very first day the defendants use the courtroom to amplify their protests. They was so unruly. The presiding judge ordered one defendant gagged and strapped to his chair. Testimony was heard from counterculture heroes like our low gut three Norman Mailer, Allen Ginsberg and Timothy Leary, and the trial became a public referendum on Nixon the Vietnam war. War and racial oppression. But it wasn't clear that Justice was being properly served. So for these episodes hill, and I will be telling the story together, he'll bring you the protests and the courtroom drama, and I'll step in with the history. This is episode one. The whole world is watching..

Chicago Lindsay Norman Mailer Justice Timothy Leary Allen Ginsberg Nixon five days six month
"norman mailer" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

02:47 min | 2 years ago

"norman mailer" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"And it typically, you know, you get a lot more of these examples with science fiction writers and comic book writers. And this is something that we you mentioned Jeff cripple earlier on the program. He's he's done. The most research on psychic experiences in the lives of comic book and science fiction writers, and I make. Sorry. Go ahead. I was gonna ask do you end up? Do you become a science fiction writer because something influences you from the future or vice versa? Yeah. That's that's exactly the question. I mean, are you more inclined to right in that genre? Because those kinds of experiences happen to you a lot. I think sort of Jeff Crepeau sort of conclusion, I I don't know. I mean, I it could also be that that that science fiction writers their lives. Are there are more full of kind of remarkable experience in simply in the form of the books. They're reading, and they may notice they're pre cognition more because they they they pre cog, neither peacock ising the kinds of strange stories that they typically are reading and sharing with their colleagues. I don't know. I mean, it's it's an open question. But, but yeah, I like the Norman Mailer example when I came across it really struck me, partly because he's not a science fiction writer is not someone you'd associate with with free cognition at all. You write in the book that time loops make interesting messes of our lives. We're going to break in about a minute. So can you explain what you mean in a minute? Yeah. Well, this gets back to Freud because you know, Freud he he was sort of a pioneer in studying neurosis, the ways that we kind of we're we're kind of at odds with ourselves, and we make messes in their lives without you know, we intend the best things we intended to do the right things and to act in ways that are beneficial to us, we always somehow board it, and we always are kind of governed by these false, beliefs and perceptions and lingering. What are you thought? We're kind of lingering wishes and desires that we couldn't face, and what I argue in the book is that that no he he he he had he had it. Right. But he he put the unconscious in the wrong place. Unconscious isn't sort of living underneath us or behind us. It's in front of us. We're talking with Erik war. Go about his book time loops in a moment. We'll come back and take calls questions. Comments from you, our listeners, we go into the break with the highwaymen basically saying what comes around goes around find out more about tonight's guest. Log on to coast to coast AM dot com..

Jeff cripple Freud Jeff Crepeau Norman Mailer Erik
"norman mailer" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

02:49 min | 2 years ago

"norman mailer" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"And it typically, you know, you get a lot more of these examples the science fiction writers and comic book writers. And this is something that we you mentioned Jeff crepe blurry on the program. And he's he's done. The most research on psychic experiences in the lives of comic book and science fiction writers. And I make you one. Sorry. Go ahead. I was gonna ask do you end up? Do you become a science fiction writer because something influences you from the future or vice versa? You know? Yeah. That's that's exactly the question. I mean, are you more inclined to right in that John because those kinds of experiences happened to you a lot? I think sorta Jeff Crepeau sort of conclusion, I I don't know. I mean, I it could also be that that that science fiction writers their lives, are there are more full of kind of remarkable experience is simply in the form of the books. They're reading and they made notice their pre cognition more because they they they pre cog, neither peacock ising the kinds of strange stories that they typically are reading and sharing with their colleagues. I don't know. I mean, it's it's an open question. But you yeah. I like the Norman Mailer example when I came across it really struck me, partly because he's not a science fiction. There's not someone you'd associate with with free cognition at all. You write in the book that time loops make interesting messes of our lives. We're going to break in about a minute. So can you explain what you mean in a minute? Yeah. Well, this gets back to Freud because you know, Freud he he was sort of a pioneer and studying neurosis, you know, the ways that we kind of we're we're kind of at odds with ourselves, and we make messes in our lives without you know, we intend the best things being tended to do the right things and to act in ways that are beneficial to us, we always somehow it, and we always are kind of governed by these false beliefs and perceptions and lingering what he thought we're kind of lingering wishes and desires that we couldn't face, and what I argue in the book is that that no he he he he had he had it. Right. But he put the unconscious in the wrong place. Young conscious isn't sort of living underneath us or behind us. It's in front of us. We're talking with Erik war. Go about his book time loops in a moment. We'll come back and take calls questions. Comments from you, our listeners, we go into the break with the highwaymen basically saying what comes around goes around. Find out more about tonight's guest. Log on to coast to coast AM dot com. I was a highway.

Freud writer Jeff crepe Jeff Crepeau John Norman Mailer Erik
"norman mailer" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

03:31 min | 2 years ago

"norman mailer" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Well, you know, and then of course, it's natural. You know, people don't have. Suitable metal categories for sort of understanding these things so he naturally gravitated that idea like telepathy, well, somehow, telepathy explained it. But you can't explain it because he doesn't you know, he wasn't in that building the time. He wrote the novel had no connection to the the Russian spy at that point. It's it's a another clear case of of pre cognition. This case being expressed in the form of creative art work or a novel. Yeah. So that's a beautiful example. And it typically, you know, you get a lot more of these examples with fiction writers and comic book writers. And this is something that we you mentioned Jeff cripple earlier on the program. He's he's done. The most research on psychic experiences in the lives of comic book and science fiction writers. And makes you. Sorry. Go ahead. I was gonna ask do you end up? Do you become a science fiction writer because something influences you from the future or vice versa? Yeah. That's that's exactly the question. I mean, are you more inclined to right in that John Rao because those kinds of experiences happen to you a lot. I think sort of Jeff Crepeau sort of conclusion, I I don't know. I mean, I it could also be that that that science fiction writers their lives. Are there are more full of kind of remarkable experience in simply in the form of the books. They're reading and they may notice they're pre cognition more because they they they precaution. Either pre conferencing, the kinds of strange stories that they typically are reading and sharing with their colleagues. I don't know. I mean, it's it's an open question. But, but yeah, I like the Norman Mailer example when I came across it really struck me, partly because he's not a science fiction writer is not someone you'd associate with with free cognition at all. You write in the book that time loops make interesting messes of our lives. We're going to break in about a minute. So can you explain what you mean in a minute? Yeah. Well, this gets back to Freud because you know, Freud he he was sort of a pioneer in studying neurosis. You know, the ways that we kind of we're we're kind of at odds with ourselves, and we make messes on their lives without you know, we intend the best things we intended to do the right things and to act in ways that are beneficial to us, we always somehow it, and we always are kind of governed by these false, beliefs and perceptions and lingering. What are you thought? We're kind of lingering wishes and desires that we couldn't face, and what I argue in the book is that that no he he he had he had it. Right. But he got he put the unconscious in the wrong place. Unconscious isn't sort of living underneath us or behind us. It's in front of us. We're talking with Erik war. Go about his book time loops in a moment. We'll come back and take calls questions. Comments from you, our listeners, we go into the break with the highwaymen basically saying what comes around goes around. Find out more about tonight's guest. Log on to coast to coast AM dot com. I was highway.

Jeff cripple Freud John Rao Jeff Crepeau Norman Mailer Erik
"norman mailer" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

03:30 min | 2 years ago

"norman mailer" Discussed on KGO 810

"Well, you know, and then of course, his natural. You know, people don't have. Suitable metal categories for sort of understanding these things. So he naturally gravitated that idea like telepathy. Well, somehow, telepathy, explain it. But you can't explain it because he doesn't you know, he wasn't in that building the time. He wrote the novel had no connection to the the Russian spy at that point. It's it's a another clear case of of pre cognition in this case being expressed in the form of creative art work or a novel. Yeah. So I thought that's a beautiful example. And it typically, you know, you get a lot more of these examples besides fiction writers and comic book writers. And this is something that we you mentioned, Jeff crepe alario the program, he's he's done. The most research on psychic experiences in the lives of comic book and science fiction writers. And I make you. Sorry. Go ahead. I was gonna ask do you end up? Do you become a science fiction writer because something influences you from the future or vice versa? Yeah. That's that's exactly the question. I mean, are you more inclined to right in that genre? Because those kinds of experiences happened to you a lot. I think sort of Jeff Crepeau sort of conclusion, I I don't know. I mean, I it could also be that that that science fiction writers their lives, are there are more full of kind of remarkable experience is simply in the form of the books. They're reading and they made notice their pre cognition more because they they they pre peacock guys in the kinds of strange stories that they typically are reading and sharing with their colleagues. I don't know if it's an open question. But, but yeah, I like the Norman Mailer example when I came across it really struck me, partly because he's not a science fiction. I there's not someone you'd associate with with pre cognition at all. You write in the book that time loops make interesting messes of our lives. We're going to break in about a minute. So can you explain what you mean in a minute? Yeah. Well, this gets back to Freud because you know, Freud he was sort of a pioneer and studying neurosis, you know, the ways that we kind of we're we're kind of at odds with ourselves, and we make messes in their lives without you know, we intend the best things we intended to do the right things and to act in ways that are beneficial to us, we always somehow Ford it, and we always are kind of governed by these false, beliefs and perceptions and the lingering what are your thoughts? We're kind of lingering wishes and desires that we couldn't face, and what I argue in the book is that that no he he he he had he had it. Right. But he put the unconscious in the wrong place. Young conscious isn't sort of living underneath it or behind us. It's in front of us. We're talking with Erik war. Go about his book time loops in a moment. We'll come back and take calls questions. Comments from you, our listeners, we go into the break with the highwaymen basically saying what comes around goes around find out more about tonight's guest. Log on to coast to coast AM dot com. I was a.

writer Freud Jeff crepe Norman Mailer Jeff Crepeau Erik Ford
"norman mailer" Discussed on At The Movies with Arch and Ann

At The Movies with Arch and Ann

04:58 min | 2 years ago

"norman mailer" Discussed on At The Movies with Arch and Ann

"Shame table never seen less Tango. Okay. And I don't know if I wanna see it. Now, I don't know. Seen it in a very long time time, I re I saw it. And you know, it's it's not very good. I I don't remember it terribly fondly. Probably. The kill him is its biggest thing is that it was just sort of the shock value that it was an x rated film. Nineteen seventy two and as someone who was a film lover in nineteen seventy-two just let me say that it broke new ground. It sort it was sort of like deep throat, except more acceptable. And it was championed by Pauline kale. And in those days, you know, when you wanted to be cool, a film that she championed, and I think also Judith Chris to used to read in New York magazine, really admired, and so for its time it broke ground because those were the days when the movie's could do things that television couldn't, but they would not make a last Tango in Paris today. And it's doesn't hold up. I don't think it holes. I like I said it's been so long. I don't pave the way for allow something like midnight cowboy. It it. It broke open like arch set it did it did break open and we area. And so you could make x rated films and midnight cowboy won the Oscar. Physics rated and it it kind of fused. You know, there's this long tradition of exploitation in in films. But it fused good old fashioned ballyhoo. You know, like we're gonna show you an art house prestige kind of brought those two ideas together in a way. Like, I was reading this Norman Mailer Norman Mailer wrote about it. And I mean, the I'm sorry forgive my French. But the b s he was ladling on it. Are you kidding? And of course, he is just it is I wrote a little thing about berlioux cheese. Loved it. Well, thanks. Male gay. I really do think movies kind of that kind of exemplify the male gaze, and how embitterment is a female critic. It has to be about go into stealing beauty, right? Which is the first one. Yeah. That was actually the first time I met him. And I was just just between us kids. I that are a little uncomfortable watching stealing beauty like, you know, as well. As did. I the thing about stealing beauty is that I remember at the time talking to Susan my not who wrote the screenplay for him that live Tyler unlike Maria Schneider live Tyler kind of she makes it her own. She doesn't let herself be just a passive object of of male lust. She is she delivers a performance that. I think is very self aware and a little bit more sophisticated and a little bit more has more agency to it than just that the woman who's being manipulated by the mail director, the male coast are so I do think there's more nuance in stealing beauty, and I also think his own age his own. It's about an older. Man. And so I think it's more self self-aware on blue cheese part. But that's always a part of his he he just put everything in those terms. It seems to me like if he was deeply political, but it was always sort of extruded through this kind of obsession with sex and women's bodies. And I just like you have to I love the beauty of his work, especially the conformist, I think is one of the most exquisite films ever may conformance as that Joe. Louis trio Lee. Yeah. Yeah. There you go. Day. Top on car. Maybe not a new. Anyway. So yeah that that's Bertel. But he was a lovely, man. He was very courtly very late. The last emperor. He raised the amp and the show's guy, I love the sheltering sky the land. I love conformist conformance is a one movie film class like you can learn everything about craft just from watching that film, the bride ING this Mataka fee. The ACA, it's a nineteen seventy movie rights seventy and so I don't want it dismiss him at all. Because I think he was a huge towering figure, but but he was of the seventies. And so I think that's that's the last emperor was so good. I went to twice the, oh, that'd be great unison..

Maria Schneider Norman Mailer Pauline kale New York magazine Oscar ACA director Judith Chris Bertel Paris Joe Susan Louis Tyler
"norman mailer" Discussed on The Flop House Podcast

The Flop House Podcast

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"norman mailer" Discussed on The Flop House Podcast

"A rifle Nieves because he's landed gentry. It was poachers. And they're and they're going after a deer. It's like wait do you own the deer? Like you're like, I'm not a fan of hunting. Because I just don't like the idea of doing a blood sport in general accepted, unless it's bloodsport which van Damme, but deer are kind of a nuisance animal that he's like he's like, no, no, they they're shooting up my dear. If it's not in season. I mean that the regulated for reason. But yeah, the idea like does he does he run like animal preserve like what the deer farm, theoretically is a deer farm, but it doesn't seem like killing here on like a farming area killing of a sacred deer seen that movie. It is he Norman Mailer. Big, Dan, I have no idea. Let makes the deer sacred. It's been blessed by a priest. I mean, that's how things get sacred. I guess so he, but he start shooting at the mini goes and Bruce doesn't time out. Yeah. The police they think they can find these guys eventually and the dad is like people rely too much on the police the police only come after the crimes happened. It's like adding more of an accent to him than he actually has. It's like trap in the FOX while it's leaving the hen house. Well, yes, human beings, you have to wait till they commit a crime do arrest them. Unless you wanna minority report this like that's how that's how reality worth. Maybe we just had a gun pointed everyone all the time. No one would make mistakes. I think that is literally the platform party volition get to politics. This is death wish house. This is the most disturbing stacked movies. There's a lot in this movie. That's like, yeah. It's very it's a very politically like trying to have it both ways sort of movie, it feels a little bit like we'll get to this. I guess, but like wild things where with wild things it was like if you like it it's because it's like a crazy thriller. If you don't like it it's supposed to be comfy in stupid come on. And this is a little bit. Like if you grew with Bruce Willis, then you're gonna love this movie. If you don't agree with Willis, we threw in a couple of jokes about guns you like make make it like we think we're we're really criticizing him. But this guy is just he's literally he is the mission objectives of the movie when he says this any never appears in the movie Gan, which is like people rely on the police too much to solve their problems..

Bruce Willis van Damme Nieves Norman Mailer hen house Dan FOX
"norman mailer" Discussed on Something You Should Know

Something You Should Know

03:49 min | 2 years ago

"norman mailer" Discussed on Something You Should Know

"I'm things we need for for home and something relevant comes in catches that goal catches it. A catches the opportunity, and it affects me affects you know, what I'm going to do next. And that's an instance, where I've got a motive or a goal operating and things that Rovan who it top into my mind and say, oh, yeah. So I often tell them this is what I was writing this book. I wrote it a lot. Of it, like six months, and I was really into it. I was writing a chapter almost every ten days when I really finally got down to writing. And what I would do is to when I finished when I wouldn't just say, hey, great. I can take the rest of off relaxed while I did that. But before I did it. I got the next chapter material out, what am I going to be doing tomorrow? What am I going to be thinking about tomorrow and trying to get that goal operating? So that it would work on it while I was relaxing or doing something else. But also, if if I had ideas, you know, things that happened around me that I could use they would catch those, and I write those down, and that kind of thing so you you would finish a chapter and and start thinking about the next chapter for the purpose of what just getting a headstart. What was I didn't quite understand? What the point if? Yes. Sure. Well, this this comes from a book I read by Norman Mailer where he talked about how. When his words he used his unconscious to prepare the material for the next day. What he would do is to sort of give his mind assignment saying when I come down to work in the morning right in the morning tomorrow morning. I want this material prepared for me. And it was like this kind of issues about characters or plot. Or whatever it was. He said it worked rate as long as he held up his end of the bargain and showed up on time. And didn't just take the day off. You know, he he actually had a worked on you actually had stuff was prepared. And I found that out too. I would load up and get the ideas of here's general ideas, and content. I wanted to work with tomorrow, and it would work in the background. You know, it's sort of like that Eureka experience where you're not thinking about something or or trying to remember somebody's name it. You don't have later on pop into your mind out of the blue, and is because it was working in the background trying to help you solve that problem. Even though you might not consciously aware of it was it was important, and it was still working. I had that same experience. I've come down and be really charged ready and get on and really would get going on that next chapter right away. As if you know some of the work been prepared for me in advance. I wanna go back and talk about because you mentioned at the beginning of our conversation, how for example, feelings of fear and safety can affect your political beliefs that if you are feeling particularly fearful that might make you lean more conservative, and you also talked about how like for example, getting a flu shot can affect your feelings about immigration. So talk about that. Sure. For one thing of the flu shot works because there's a very deep analogy that are physical experiences. Are physical motivations like to be saved and to be healthy. Avoid disease actually affects things like our moral judgments in our political attitudes. People who are in a actually dirty room condemn immoral behaviour more strongly than people in a clean room the flu shot works because. There's an analogy of immigrants into our country being sorta like germs bacteria into a human body because that analogy is so basic and deep that having actually having a flu shot changes people's attitudes towards immigration. If you're remind them about the threat of the flu, and they've had a flu shot their attitude actually becomes more positive towards immigration if they haven't had the flu shot yet. Their attitude actually becomes more negative. If you remind them about the flu their attitude towards Gration. So that's one example, another example is basically how we form impressions of people..

flu Norman Mailer Rovan Gration six months ten days
Enron fraud architect Jeff Skilling released from prison

WBBM Evening News

00:35 sec | 2 years ago

Enron fraud architect Jeff Skilling released from prison

"Updated news minute by minute NewsRadio seven eighty and one zero. Five point nine FM an Enron executive with ties to the Chicago area, is. One step closer to freedom former Enron CEO Jeffrey Skilling. Was sentenced to twenty four years in prison in twenty six for his role in the financial fraud scheme that led to the. Collapse of the energy trading firm. Skilling had been serving his. Sentence in, the federal prison camp in Birmingham Alabama he. Will be, transferred to a halfway house near Houston his sentence was later reduced to fourteen years. After he. Agreed to give forty million dollars of, his fortune to victims of Enron's

Jeffrey Skilling Enron Tennis Chicago Gary Councilwoman Reagan Hatch Tom Skilling Skilling Attorney New York Fraud Richard Hatcher Norman Mailer Houston Birmingham CEO Aurora Executive Indiana Alabama Navy
"norman mailer" Discussed on Showcase from Radiotopia

Showcase from Radiotopia

04:40 min | 2 years ago

"norman mailer" Discussed on Showcase from Radiotopia

"They had Eric, could John dressed in a big to two. I think it was all a little elephant. I can't remember what rose surrounded her husband with friends and sparkling conversation and good food. Then they had a Norman Mailer full of tattoos in a little Speedo. Rose had learned that moments of pleasure, could keep her husband on an even keel. And so when Williams starin- found out that he had won a French literary prize rose insisted that they fly to Paris for the ceremony, they were not going to give them an award. They were carving his name into a wall was a big deal. She thought this would be just the medicine for him. How could he stay depress with all of those French intellectuals making a fuss over him, but that plan backfired. Her husband was so adult by despair that he dropped the prize money a check for twenty five thousand dollars. Everybody was crawling under the tables into the flood check, and we finally got home and depression was clearly rented. Here I was ten years ago so that height of my so-called career. I was, you know, success. I'd made money of that critical acclaim still with all of that. I felt like an absolute loathsome, complete worthless object who hadn't done anything and whose entire trajectory of my life had had gone up and then was plunged down into absolute zero pit. But soon he realized that if he didn't get help, he would die, had suicidal thoughts all the time. I went to this guy. Doctor, how long do you think this will last? He couldn't have been more accommodating, but he looked at me with these jealous is and he said six months to a year. Now he committed an atrocity upon me at that moment. Because twenty four more hours was was hard nut Cinco. Styron wanted to seek refuge in a mental hospital. His psychiatrist told him, no, the doctor warned him that he would ruin his career and reputation. This was after all the nine thousand nine hundred eighty s if you were depressed, it was a terrible dork secret that you hid from the world and in the more open environment in which we know leave. It can be difficult to remember how onerous that secrecy was. Andrew. Solomon is a writer and historian, no one was going to keep you in your job and nobody was going to let you come to their house and play with their children. If you had a mental illness, there is a tendency to lump together all the mental illnesses and those people are dangerous. They were crazy. They were unreliable. They were prone to possibly hurting someone and they were pathetic. And for many people with depression secrecy could be deadly by and large. What it meant was that people with perfectly treatable conditions went untreated. So in the house near the graveyard Styron did his best to white knuckle. His way through it rose was his nurse, and we went through the house and hid all the knives, and we found a BB gun down in the garage, and we hit that and we because we didn't know what he was doing because he'd been threatening suicide. Later in his book darkness visible, he wrote about his obsession with suicide. During that time, many of the artifact of my house had become potential devices from my own destruction. The attic rafters outside maple to a means to hang myself, the garage place to inhale, carbon monoxide, the kitchen knives in their drawers had, but one purpose for me. But then one night as he listened to a rhapsody by Brahms, he stumbled back into sanity. That music, he later wrote pierced my heart like a dagger. The next morning. He checked himself into a psych ward at the yield New Haven hospital..

rose Styron depression Norman Mailer Brahms New Haven hospital Williams starin Eric Solomon Paris John Andrew writer twenty five thousand dollars six months ten years
"norman mailer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"norman mailer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Culture wars tomorrow about obama and the culture wars on thursday with donna brazile today how much did george w bush contribute to the culture wars before the election of obama in two thousand eight my guest for today is longtime bush supporter and someone who you might say has two generations of culture wars experience john paradores is a staple of the conservative press a new york post columnist weekly standard contributor and editor of commentary magazine some of you know that his father norman patriots was also editor of commentary from nineteen sixty to nineteen ninetyfive and norman was a major culture wars figure in his heyday he was one of the original socalled neo conservatives that is people who used to consider themselves liberal but then got disillusioned with the left in fact let's replay before we bring on john part of a clip that we had last week in this series of norman paradorn talking on c span in one thousand nine hundred nine about his book whose title says a lot ex friends falling out with allen ginsberg lionel diana trilling lillian hellman hannah arendt and norman mailer i was hated much more than people who were then to the ride in me say like bill buckley since he had always been an enemy i was i was a new enemy and i regarded my all my old friends as a continuing threat to what much of what i now believed in hell deer and so it was kind of non negotiable difference and not just of opinion about small matters or particularities but if a whole sense of life a whole sense of the world you know but mainly focused on the nature and character of.

obama donna brazile john paradores editor commentary magazine norman norman paradorn bill buckley george w bush york post allen ginsberg lillian hellman hannah arendt
"norman mailer" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"norman mailer" Discussed on KCRW

"Moved me as much as did recalls i love cats and i have still now with age i think sixteen although you lose track my vet would know his vet would know he's a feral cat and for many many many years well how many could it be he's only sixteen but he wouldn't let anyone touch him but me i had to collect that now some things happen i have a new assistant and my cat has made friends with them and he will not only not my sister don't touch him he'll per and bite and continue to per while biding very intimate very intimate you know and one i found in these essays was a quality of feeling like that that there's anger and fried and acceptance and change won't going on at the same time because what you are saying in essence after essay isn't literature when it manages to do the thing that literature cantu it's braiding opposites it's opening the door to the possibility of an opposition that should be unacceptable and you had some hell lives and thrives and i think great works of literature make us more profound people when we open herself to them if we can yeah i think you're putting it in a really interesting way but what you said about opposites finding an affinity i talk about that explicitly in the article but norman mailer but but yeah i think that that's to me one of the most powerful and.

norman mailer
"norman mailer" Discussed on Think Again

Think Again

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"norman mailer" Discussed on Think Again

"Was just an enclosed world i wonder whether that's a phenomenon of the increasing popularity of the novel or simply a phenomenon of the professionalism of publishing you know and the way that publicity has metastasized and professionalized what's responsible for it i'm sure is the expansion of the media and that happened in about nineteen eighty because i remember my fest three novels you know did find but we're not the focus of any media attention and then suddenly the the newspapers got fatter infanta and the extra material was not extra news it was extra features right and suddenly they ran out of all the other types of so called celebrity and found themselves often to that dismay in britain interviewing and writing features about serious writers that appetite for content has led to a kind of exhaustive prurient interest in every aspect of every writers yeah life and when they go to the bathroom at cetera yes that's on the debit side right right it's very nice to make a dent and to feel that there is a intense curiosity about the creative process the novel dramatizes that process and when norman mailer wrote is really brilliant book about how a novel is made he called the book spooky out there is a lot that is very spooky about how knowles put together and it's all to do with the subconscious and and that's i find it fascinating and i also find it very hard to understand how it works and the wrist assaultive magic about putting a novel together that i still find absolutely mysterious and fascinating a long time ago i asked a friend of yours salman rushdie on this program sort of how you he described writing a novel as a kind of marathon.

norman mailer knowles salman rushdie britain
"norman mailer" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"norman mailer" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Of our youth are dying had 87 ninety ninety five that sort of thing but these astronauts are up above them i've had the honor of meeting alan shepard and buzz aldrin and a couple of others but uh they are all soon to be gone all the all the people as norman mailer who stepped off the planet are gonna be gone i mean stepping off the planet to masing working here of our lifetime the cowboys and it was uh you know these bull then brave men that went out there and and you know went on to those the new frontier and curb you know people like us they were a euros they worse so important in our lives and there were people that we looked up to and for the most part they lived up to um that you know that of being idolized in that way good men good what did you watch ago no i just didn't think as his comparing actors and astronauts there's a big difference but you wouldn't know though you'll button we we i had to watch it but i watched the reaction on twitter and i had to admit that i've never watched oprah ever in my life lawyers speech next hour evidently it's a is i haven't heard a yet i just know that it's a blockbuster yeah well i ain't here comes a new era in our lives that'd be yeah i mean it it it the oprah era schumer we'll see selena's ito always a pleasure follow me on twitter selena zito i call the barred behind of the country she's a younger reporter every single monday and i appreciate it very much don't go anywhere america lots ahead including the jake tapper stephen miller knocked.

alan shepard cowboys twitter oprah schumer reporter stephen miller norman selena zito america jake tapper
"norman mailer" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"norman mailer" Discussed on WTMA

"Wind and understand that vietnam is the tragedy in front of all of us he sees it first buckley might not ever see it in this conversation but the writing letters back and forth to each other so they get to observe how they are conducting themselves when mehler picks up on vietnam do we know the mall but he recognizes the weakness in johnson he was never a big fan of johnson um although it didn't necessarily have to do with vietnam he sort of thought johnson was gonna come in and all this sort of energy and uh liveliness and intellectual playfulness that that mehler detected in kennedy he saw that is completely absent in johnson he's sort of imagine johnson to be the biggest figure in postwar boring american liberal life and he was very uh worried about johnson from the beginning and this just amp's up with uh sort of significant increase in the american commitment to go fight the vietnam war mehler had been a critic of the vietnam war from the early 1960s and it was just part of his criticism of the cold war four he thought that this was not the best way for america to devote its energies and it was gonna rob the country of its riches and steal it from its moral authority uh lots of things that lots of people still believe uh happened in that war today and he saw this very early on and vietnam was just the next part of this and what happened how he became such a staunch advocate was the students that uc berkeley in california they invited him to come give a speech protesting the war and protesting linden johnson's escalation of the war and mehler was not always the best speaker but this was definitely one of the best speeches he ever gave you roused the crowd for an hour and he transfixed at many taught them wrongly are rightly about what was going on why we were fighting vietnam and the explanation he came up with was that the american elite was hollow and out of ideas and they needed uh props themselves up in the way they were going to do that was to fight a war and win a war against people who maybe didn't necessarily have the materiel to fight us properly norman mailer norman mailer takes his experiences in nineteen sixty seven with the march on the pentagon and writes the extremely famous and successful armies of the night which wins all the no.

vietnam buckley kennedy vietnam war cold war america berkeley california linden johnson norman mailer pentagon
"norman mailer" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

WPRO 630AM

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"norman mailer" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

"In competition with norman mailer he or other heroes so norman mailer attended that party that night with his fourth wife is that right beverley bentley she was there in a very fancy dress norman mailer got the worstdressed man at the ball why was mehler there what did he want after all this is a man who hate his pugnaciousness and his ability to offend the elites that was a driving force for his fiction so why did he go that well again invite amid 1960 he hid ray couldn't be stature that he was becoming a predominant boy mostly on the left uh arguing against the vietnam war in support in parts of the civil all right movement he was a great writer and he had been famous as a novelist sense his first book came out in the late 1940s um which is the naked in the dead of course and he because he was in new york because he was involved in politics because he was involved in the literary culture it was assumed of course that norman mailer which show up with whoever happened to be his wife at the time you're right it was his fourth beverley definitely and of course he showed up he um was never of course is elegant doors graceful as the sort of tall um wellcoiffed william f buckley he showed up in a sort of ragged it was raining the day of the black and white ball and he's wearing a sort of dark over raincoat there was all crumpled up and when uh photographer took a picture of him outside he was sort of beginning to hunt down and covers hair because of the rain and because of that picture he got voted the worst dress man at the ball he also picked a fight with nick george bundy who was a member of the club of the kennedy administration and the old uh on the johnson administration at the time and lilian helman broke up the fight what was the fight about it was about vietnam uh norman mailer had been arguing against the vietnam war for as long as almost anybody in american life it stemmed from his profound distrust and mistrust of the federal government's involvement with the cold war uh he thought the cold war was a.

beverley bentley ray vietnam war writer new york william f buckley nick george bundy kennedy administration johnson administration lilian helman cold war norman mailer vietnam
"norman mailer" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"norman mailer" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Despite the fact police shot and killed the man believed to have driven a van through a crowd in barcelona last week killing thirteen people authorities are apparently are continuing their efforts to crack down on anyone linked to the deadly attacks most of the twelve alleged members of the extremist cell believed responsible boone killed or captured where we are today police in catalonia searched a house in a cyber cafe in two different northeastern spanish towns sunny burgess one of the earliest rockabilly singers and guitarist has died at the age of eighty eight sen peers andrew limbong reports he was one of the many influential artists who came to son records in memphis signing first came out swinging with his first thing on sun records we wanted the since down it was a raucous that by his in his band energetic live showed which involved jumps in cakes and a human pyramid and it's easy to see how they got pinned is being wild alber sunny burks was born in jaffa county arkansas 1929 never got superpopular but that was okay with him in a forward for the book rockabilly the ghtwing heard round the world the wrote we did it for fun you felt good playing it he got high after music angela mbang internees known for its counterculture stance and longtime new york presents the village voice now says will become an online only publication cofounded by norman mailer and several others and greenwich village a nineteen 55 newspapers been distributed free the new york city area since nineteen ninety six.

barcelona boone catalonia burks arkansas new york norman mailer andrew limbong memphis jaffa county