35 Burst results for "Nordstrom"

"nordstrom" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

05:00 min | Last month

"nordstrom" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"You know there's this. There's this sort of lure that you always hear about. How occupy wall street was not effective because there weren't clear policy outcomes to that work and you hear a lot even in progressive circles and. I think that my main advice is that i push back on that notion because the thing that occupied taught me. Is you just go and do the thing that you're able to do in an activist role and so if you are good at writing if you're a good storyteller than like congratulations you have one of the most important advocacy skills that you could possibly have. I think there's a sense that you have to be like good at directing an organization to be a good advocate. And that's absolutely not true. It's a completely different skill. Set i am terrible at the sort of like executive director side of being advocate. I am a good storyteller. I'm a writer. That's what i do for living. And that is what. I found allowed me to be effective in these roles and i think. Also there's this sense that like first of all if you're you get a lot of patronizing advice when you're young. Trying to be an advocate and a lot of that advice i just ultimately had to ignore because a lot of it was designed to prevent me from. Actually you know. Sort of like taking on the roles that i knew i would be effective at and then the other advice that you always get is you have to fund. Raise i and aid in funds at all for this project. I did it because it seemed like an important thing to do. I just you know. I spoke out and then i asked my friends to speak with me when that was necessary. I relied on media relied on social media. I relied on things that would be free to do. In order to get the word out about this and as much as money helps and resources help of course they do. I think a lot of the time people are dissuaded from even starting something because they think that the first step has to be you know to to start fundraising and they don't have family members or friends with deep pockets which you know a lot of people don't and especially people who are in situations where they need some political action often. Don't so i think that my my sort of big takeaway. That i want people to have from my might lame attempt at giving them activists advice is just that you probably shouldn't take anyone's advice too seriously and you should also lean on the thing that you know. You'll be good at the thing that you know you can get away with and not worry so much that you can't follow in the exact path of other advocates that you admire so we're coming up on the twentieth anniversary of nine eleven Which i i'm sure is going to be difficult for for you. And the the people in your community. How would you like people to mark the occasion or not. Mark the occasion. Perhaps i think you know i would like us to mark the occasion as an opportunity to think about what we can do for each other to protect each other. I don't think that it's helpful to spend more than twenty years. Just thinking about this one world altering event he because we are currently in the middle of a world altering event and so obviously world altering events permanently alter the world because other things come along in alter it again I think a lot of the time though the thing that frustrates me about the way that we commemorate nine eleven were so obsessed with hashtag never forgetting we're solemn and we don't use the opportunity to think what could we have learned from the way we responded to this event. And what can we move forward knowing. We wanna do next time and i because we haven't done that i've seen a lot of the same mistakes get made again and again after crises. I see you know. I see the exact same arguments that were used to justify sending me back to school in an unsafe zone getting used to justify sending kids back to school without cove precautions being taken i in the same words even and so i think like for me. The most important thing is that. If we're gonna mark this day. I know there was an attempt to turn it into kind of like a day of service and i would almost rather we turn it into a day of reflection where we think about what we want to take forward from that experience as opposed to just what changed on that day. Because i think if i've learned anything in the kovic period it's that every generation has a moment that changes everything for that generation in life is never the same and i never related to why. My parents were so obsessed with the jfk assassination. Until i went through nine eleven and thought okay that was like a life altering event that changed everything about the way people conceive where they lived in who they were and that is what happened on nine eleven and that's going to happen to this kobe generation to all of us in the aftermath of kobe. And so i don't think necessarily harping on one. Particular incident is the answer. I want to talk about the connections that the survivor community. The the nine eleven community in general has two other disaster communities not not not special and unique you know. So how can people get your book. You can get my book at all. The major internet booksellers you can do it at bookshop Amazon you can do it. I think you know. India bound in books. A million that those kind of places. You can find links to all of this on my website which is lila nordstrom dot com. And then if you are in a major metropolitan area you may also be able to find your local bookstore. You can always order at three local bookstore..

Mark lila nordstrom Amazon India
"nordstrom" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

08:13 min | Last month

"nordstrom" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"Write a book in someone like me. Explain the connections between you know what what the government can do for people after a crisis and what we expect them to do which is often much less so so yeah the. The community dynamics on on the hill and elsewhere were often a little frustrating. I would note for your listeners that the survivor community is three or four times. The size of the responder community. It's a much larger community it's a vastly more female community. It's it's it's a community that includes lots of young people. There were nineteen thousand public school students that were in school in the exposures zone. There were likely twenty five or thirty thousand other either students or kids who were not of school age who were attending community colleges and other places in the area and so this is a huge population of people. The survivor community as a whole is estimated to be three or four hundred thousand people and so this is a large community of people to represent often being represented by fewer representatives than respond or community. You know a. I testified before congress. Twenty nineteen there was a panel where there were four people to speak for the responder community. I was the only person to speak for the survivor. Community on the panel. That blows my mind because that was the exact opposite proportion of how many people here wearing these communities. But you know that. I think is also one of the reasons that i am really I really advocate for people to put pressure on their state governments to collect as much disaggregated data about cova deaths in cove. It almost is in their state as possible because the the way that we got excluded from a lot of these conversations with that no one thought to get data on us in the first place and so when we showed up to the conversation but firemen had data. We did not and that really made it hard to advocate for ourselves and you so poignantly in the book about how a lot of this population of three to four hundred thousand people is people of color immigrants that you know and but it took white high school students to be the one to sort of get attention in an can you sort of expand on that a little bit like what what that tells us about the people who are falling through the cracks after disasters about you know and it's all sorts of disasters. Right you flint's there's katrina. There's all sorts of things that happen that that it's difficult to get attention on an and to get people to to provide the resources in support that we need to. There are certain kinds of agency that you have access to as a white middle-class person even an in a community that's being overlooked that you don't have access to if you are someone who doesn't speak english well if you are someone who cannot introduce yourself as a vassar graduate if you are someone who can't pull together the funds to walk to washington and if you were someone who just can't speak with inherent authority about community issues. I mean you know the the exposure zone that we're talking about it includes. All of chinatown includes a lot of the lower east side and the communities that were able to get the ear of the politicians. Who were eventually you know who became our advocates. Were communities that had access to them in the first place. Those are communities like tribeca and battery park city that are primarily white middle-class in. That's you know. Is somebody who i am not from those communities but i am sort of from that larger community i had certain kinds of advantages just because i also came from a community where i had been trained to speak to politicians in the first place My mom used to washington. When i was a kid and we would go visit our representatives and that was its own kind of education. I'm one of the few people who got to have a civics class in you know in high school. And that's only. Because i was going to this very well funded public school. That had that as an elective. I'm somebody who you know who's only days off from school that i was allowed to take to protests in so i was aware of kind of how an activist can interact with the government and what the dynamic is that allows activists to be effective. And these are all you know advantages. That largely came because of my background and these are also advantages. That while theoretically i guess could be open to. Anyone are tremendously easier. When you know that you're going to have the funds to go to go find the politicians where they are when you know that media is gonna take you more seriously than they're gonna take somebody whose whose english isn't very good or who cannot speak. You know who doesn't speak this dialect of you know like university english. That are that that that we all begin in like. I think that is why there are two reasons that i think that we didn't get fully overlooked. One is that there were middle class and wealthy white people that were affected by this disaster. And that is of course when you look at who actually gets attention after a crisis. You often don't you. You hear sort of like tragic human interest stories about other communities but you hear action in white middle class communities. And i think the other advantage that we had was that we had the coattails of men to ride. We had the coattails of first responders to ride. When i think about what's happened in flint. Where how long have we been talking about. The flint water crisis. It's it feels like my entire adult life and you know why haven't we seen. Why didn't we see immediate action on that. Well that was a community who had no coattails to ride in addition to being a community that was largely disenfranchised for other reasons for for reasons of race for reasons of economic advantages. Things like that. And so i think a lot of the time the the kind of the communities that end up getting effective results in the communities that end up actually getting their voices heard ended up being communities that have some sort of cultural economic capital. And that i think is why i it's why i was able to stay involved in this issue for so long. This has not been my job. I this is not what i do for work and oftentimes. I mean i'm a freelancer. I often times have been living at a loss. But as i say in the book i knew someone would bail me out if i ran out of money. I knew someone would make sure. I got to washington if i needed to get to washington and just that inherent advantage makes your advocacy work. So much more effective. You know. I did a lot of this work without any sort of budget. I didn't fund raise to do this work. I i did all of its On a volunteer basis for many years and I was able to do that. Because i had other resources. I always like to focus on sort of a action steps. And you have this great the end of your book. You talk about sort of how how did you this kind of advocacy work. You set it up as like. I didn't know what i was doing it up so learn from me. So what are some of the things that that people can learn from from your experiences about how to go about doing this kind of work. Well i always described my parents. Night's chaos people because we don't work well in groups and that's just like a family a family issue that we have But my my mother is an activist sort of in her bones. And so a lot of this was modeled on what i saw her. Do and get away with my mother's also four seven so she's teeny tiny. She's adorable and because she's so adorable. She can get away with a lot of things that other people can get away with. She can totally lose it at a meeting of the chelsea antiwar whoever whatever involved and she can go in the next day and everyone's nicer quick so i think part of what i learned is that everyone has to sort of figure out what their secret thing is. That makes them effective. What their unexpected advantages. Because part of the reason my mother does this has learned. This is because no one listens to her otherwise if she doesn't completely lose it in a meeting. She is talked over and ignored the entire meeting so she has to do that. To be heard. Because that's what it's like to be bat small and a woman but it kind of mean it also means that she has figured out how to use her ability to do that to her advantage and has because of that always been able to be active in a lot of actress muniz..

washington battery park city cove flint katrina congress muniz
"nordstrom" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

06:59 min | Last month

"nordstrom" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"Data on this population we don't have coverage for some of those concerns so there's also a lot of a in terms of women's reproductive health cancers there's a very uneven coverage where you're covered for cervical cancer but not uterine cancer like i don't know why that how could those possibly have remarkably different causes when it comes to environmental exposure. But there's kind of like a. We're sort of behind the eight ball out of the time in terms of discovering what conditions were Were going to end up seeing but luckily we also have the model of the first responders to sort of see what we're going to see trickling down into our community. But at the moment you know the the cancer rates are growing the autoimmune disorders are getting reported at much higher rates those primarily affect women's. Those are also something that you don't see a lot reflected in the data but are pretty significant in the community and then the other area where we're not really sure what to expect and we're not really sure what isn't is not linked is in a developmental health related concerns like in a ways that this kind of exposure shape people's underpin systems and things like that. There's not good data on that because there was no tracking of the people that were exposed children and so we expect that this has had consequences for our health. A lot of us have bizarre. Health concerns that we can't really articulate as as a kind of general condition but Those are things that we also expect are likely linked to those exposures. So i think people who have heard about the the legislation the fight for legislation for world trade center related diseases probably not heard that much about the survivor community. That it's mostly been what the first responders experience and how do we cover So can you talk some abou- your advocacy journey. And sort of just trying to get. This is not a small community of survivors. A lot of people who are affected but how hard it's spin to sort of get attention on that particular community. Yeah there's something about the way. We like conceive of healthcare policy and who deserves healthcare protections. That is very much based in a sense that like you should make a sacrifice in deserve it as opposed to a sense that just everyone like inherently deserves some sort of healthcare protect health protection. And so we've come up a lot of the time after something like nine eleven. I think we've seen this a lot with the kobe crisis. We kind of lean on war metaphors we lean on the the sort of symbolism of who sacrificed in who rushed in and who were the heroes and you know we see that a lot where we're constantly glorifying doctors. Who of course are doing heroic work after kobe. But like also if your uncle was lied you and didn't realize that wearing masks protected him than like that is kind of policy failure as well and your uncle doesn't knock deserve protection just because he wasn't quote unquote hero. He's a person who lives in society whose government was charged with protecting him did not Anything in the same way. We faced a lot of challenges as as the survivor community. Because there was a perception that as people who weren't heroes we were speaking out of turn in asking for access to some of the benefits that responders head. I think know. And there's also there's the issue of self identification in a community like that as well because responders by large very proud to have been part of this rescue effort. You know. i've spent a lot of the time. A lot of time on the hill with first responders. I know that community really well. I have a lot of great friends that i've made in that community and all of them are incredibly proud of the work that they did at ground zero and the survivor community does not get to feel the same way because we were just straight victims of a bad policy and and i you know i wanna know. It was victims of a bad policy not necessarily victims of terrorist attack. I think there's also a sense that you know. This was sort of enact of active. Got homeless like an act that we couldn't control that just sort of fell on our doorstep the decision to send us all back into that area though was made by the. Us government was not made by foreign terrorists and so And so a lot of the fault for what ended up happening to our community really belongs on our own doorstep not on some sort of like doorstep we can't control out yonder. And so. I think you know our involvement in this advocacy work has always been there but it has often been overlooked in part because we couldn't access a hero narrative and i would say that's also very gendered narrative that's the narrative that requires. It often leans on metaphors about rushing into things in being strong in both risking survivors out of rebel. And things like that. And that's just like not you know. They're only six women in the fire department on nine eleven. That's not a narrative that necessarily Reflects woman and i've actually spoken to a lot of female first responders who are constantly coming up against the problem of people not believing that their first responders because they're women and so that's already a challenge that the community cases because community advocates by enlarge. And i would say in a lot of crises not just after nine eleven and being women they start as moms and then you know other women from the community step up when you think about who steps up for communities after a crisis it is almost always women first and then if you're lucky cement step up because then you get taken seriously. But it's really hard to get hurt. As a community of female advocates and so on the hill we had to kind of rely on some interesting dynamics. I mean one of the more disappointing dynamics that was helpful to my work but also just like horribly depressing to think about was the fact that at a certain point i started relying on first responders to repeat everything that i said in our lobby meetings so that they would actually be heard because i think even bay noticed that no one was listening to me and i was being mistaken for a staffer everywhere and i had to kind of think you know. I had to rely on some theater to get over that. I had to start dressing down on the hill to stop being treated like a staffer which is such a funny dynamic defenders open on. But i'm you know i'm a woman. I was much younger than the other advocates. I'm the youngest. Advocate has been really active on this issue. And i look like a first year stack her on the hill and always have and continue to even the women in my late thirties. And so you know. There was some dynamics like that that i had to rely on just to make sure our story didn't get lost but there were also a lot of times where for political reasons we were asked to step back and for reasons. That maybe weren't gonna benefit us because there was also i think an understanding on the hill and elsewhere that it's really hard to sell a story about communities. People don't care about civilians in the same way that they care about heroes and i i always think that's so funny because most people are civilians in so it feels like you know if you can see yourself reflected in any part of the nine eleven recovery effort. It should be my story that you see unless you are a fireman. You know it is most likely my story that you see yourself reflected in. It's one of the reasons. I thought it was important that someone like me..

cancer uterine cancer cervical cancer kobe Us
"nordstrom" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

06:18 min | Last month

"nordstrom" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"Had a gap Speak about this in my life. So the story. That i was telling in two thousand six when i became. An advocate is has been remarkably consistent because roy started telling it only a few years after it happened and i because of that have kind of been able to remember it all the way through so. I think that's why. I was the person that thought i should write this book. And you know. I know a lot of people have written memoirs of how nine eleven affected them have written memoirs of their lives. Since nine eleven. You know a lot of the memoirs in this category are about overcoming personal obstacles like addiction recovery. You know the loss of family members are things like that. And i wanted this to be more of an inclusive story about you know what it is to be part of this community so there. There's sort of two things that affect your life. There's the the actual event. There's nine eleven that happens into and presumably most of the people who are in the school that day and in the area they have have some form of ptsd from that. But that isn't where most of the other health problems happen. It's not that day. That is the problem for you right. It is when you come back into your high school less than a month later Having been told this is safe. It's fine you can gather that is actually what causes the the health problems for your community. So can you talk about Some of what sort of the the environmental. I think for those of us. Who weren't there who haven't lived that like wet. What the environment was you know. Why why was it suit dangerous. What what was it about it. That what caused health problems. And what are the kinds of health problems. Presumably huge range of that came out of the collapse of the twin towers was kind of a unique building collapsed because the buildings kind of fell in on themselves and so they they base all the building. Materials got pulverized and so i think you know people remember those images of like steel girders. You know smoking top pile but what a lot of the debris was was just dust and dust gets everywhere and so not only. Was it a fire that burned until january. So you know. I think a lot of people who weren't at the site don't realize how long that site was on fire. But there was a consistent fire that burned at ground zero until the end of january of two thousand two People residents office workers had been back in the neighborhood for four or five months by that point and then on top of that the cleanup effort required them to move. Huge amounts of pulverized building material around the neighborhood to barges. Manhattan is a small island. There are not landfills on manhattan so all of the debris had to be taken to another island which meant that all of it had to be put on barges and transported to another to staten island. And that meant that they had depart the barge somewhere and the barges were parked right next to our school. So what began as you know a a disaster already because obviously there were these huge dust. Clouds that cody people in dust and also coated one side of my school in dust but there was actually no reason for people in my situation to be exposed to. The you know the pulverized building materials because most of us did not end up caught in that dust cloud. I was able to evacuate that day without being caught in the cloud. What happened was the dust cloud just dot continually whipped up by the cleanup efforts. They they were transporting just dump trucks filled with these polarized building materials back and forth all around her school. They were dumping them right next to our school and that was creating sort of new dust exposure for people and that was you know our building was already not adequately cleaned when we arrived but the building got contaminated fairly quickly because of the way that they were cleaning up the site and so i think a lot of people don't realize like i said that the fires were burning but they also don't realize the cleanup effort as it was going on was continuingly Contaminating the whole neighborhood. It wasn't just saying contained at the site. So that's why so many of us got sick and also it wasn't a school children. Obviously people who lived in the neighborhood cleaned up their residences without proper safety precautions because at the time largely for political and economic reasons we were being told no. Don't worry it's safe. I guess you have nosebleeds but those will be temporary. Don't worry about that. There will be no long term consequences to the headaches. and nosebleeds. you guys they're experiencing so just. Don't worry too much about that. Obviously there is almost no time that continual smoke inhalation does not cause long-term health complications and this was an additional it kind of smoke because it was mixed with this dust you know that included a lot of toxins. That are you know parts of building. So you know early on they. They were very obsessed with finding out if there was lead and there was let it turned out but lead was really the least of our problems. There was like a whole cocktail of dangerous chemicals in this dust So you know the the health issues began fairly predictably with respiratory health issues Headaches things like that. I began experiencing respiratory health concerns right away and then overtime we found that our community lags a few years behind first responders in terms of what kinds of serious illnesses we face because we were much younger when we were exposed. But you started to see first responder cancers pretty quickly and then a few years later you started to see those same cancers in our school population and that's kind of been the trend that's continued so you know what began as more common cancer in young adults and Kansas with shorter latency periods like thyroid cancers and blood cancers and things like that has since transformed into rest cancer prostate cancer. And this is. I would remind you in population that is entirely under the age of forty. Most of them are unafraid to five. So we're not talking about. People who are in high risk categories for things like breast cancer normally and the other issues that we have our that. There's not a lot of good data on the survivor community. So we know anecdotally that we're seeing high numbers of cancers in the same areas that first responders or seeing high numbers of cancers but the first responder community doesn't have a lot of women in it and so a lot of women's health concerns are not well documented we anecdotally hear a lot about auto immune disorders but those are not covered by the world trade center health program. They're not connected. They're not officially linked to the attacks. Autoimmune concerns are linked to the kinds of exposure that we had..

roy staten island cody Manhattan manhattan cancer nosebleeds thyroid cancers blood cancers headaches cancer prostate cancer Kansas breast cancer Autoimmune
"nordstrom" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

06:29 min | Last month

"nordstrom" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"Broads talking politics. Today's guest is lila nordstrom author of the new book. Some kids left behind a survivors fight for healthcare in the wake of nine eleven. Are you. I everyone. This is to pods talking politics. I am kelly and the other broad with me. Today is lila nordstrom. Who has a new book out called. Some kids left behind a survivors plate. Healthcare in the wake of nine eleven. So hi lila. Thanks for having me. Yeah thank you so much for joining me So let me just say. This is an incredible book. It's such a a moving warm. Sometimes funny unexpectedly funny memoir but also discussion of politics now. Politics works so i i'm really grateful that That you wrote it. That i wanted to start not by asking. Why why this topic because that will become obvious to people but but why why read a book and why right now. I think i've been thinking a lot. About how i want to move forward with the story being a nine eleven victim on the twenty th anniversary. 'cause i think commemorations of nine eleven are often very rear-facing. It's very much about the experiences of this one day itself and how world changing that day was for those of us that have lived with health consequences from that day. This is really a much more present story in our lives than it is just a commemoration of time. Twenty years ago. That a thing happened. And i i think that you know i live in california though. I'm from new york. I know because of that. There's not a really clear. Understanding outside of new york city of how wide ranging the effects of the environmental disaster of nine eleven were and. It was really important to me that i validate that story. So that future survivors no to see themselves in the story and also that i provide a road map of what i've learned because there are so many disaster communities that exists in the united states. I would argue that in the era of kobe. Were kind of all part of a big disaster community and it was important to me that we start thinking about how to take the memory of nine eleven and look forward from it instead of just thinking about it as this unique special thing that happened to only some of you know twenty years ago. I think there's a lot to learn from the way that we responded to nine eleven. There's a lot to learn from the experiences. We had advocating for ourselves. And i wanted to kind of lay that out. Yeah so let's sort of set the stage then for people who haven't yet read the book but they should You were a senior in high school during nine eleven And were three blocks from from the twin towers and it through the windows side happening is. You're thinking about writing. I mean i'm sure this is true. Anytime you write a memoir but writing a memoir about you know in part about an event that happened twenty years ago when you were high schooler. That has gotten so much coverage so your own. Memories are probably overlaid with that you've seen and heard and read since then how do you how do you. What is the process for that. Like how how do you go back. And try to reconstruct. What happened to you what you experienced both from your own memories but are there other things that you're consulting as you're thinking through that absolutely i think for me in particular. It was really important that a lot of what i write in the book also be verifiable that they're that this also act as a kind of memory of the events as they occurred to people like me. You know it was. It was important to me that there be a record of the event from the perspective of someone like me. Because i just really haven't seen much of that in media and so although there is a huge amount of coverage of what happened after nine eleven not a lot of it focuses on how an event like that touches individuals in an ongoing fashion and can kind of reroute your life but i also felt like the community story after nine eleven had really not gotten a fair telling and so it was important to me that in the course of telling my story i also create kind of a historical record of what happened to the community after nine eleven and where missteps were made in where the community was mistreated or overlooked and so i approached this a little differently than i think i would have approached a more traditional memoir project first of all remembering a detailed account of what happened to you over. The last twenty years is very difficult. And i actually. You know my first draft of the book. I just tried to write everything down that i remember and some of it it turned out. I remember because i've seen it on the news and some Turned out. I remember because it was my actual memories and some of it turned out. You know contradicted accounts of other people that were with me on the day and that was something i expected because traumatic memories are notoriously unreliable and so this is a pretty common occurrence with people who are recounting a traumatic incident. But i felt like you know if i could get my account out first and then go back and find ways to verify that everything happened which i was able to do. Thankfully there were there. Were two sources that were tremendously useful to me. One was that though. The new york times has really not done much coverage of the survivor community. Since nine eleven they actually did a really detailed account of what the community was going through right after nine. Eleven so a lot of that was in the newspaper and so that was useful. Because i was able to verify a lot of things i remembered through that but then also my mother kept basically. Every document she'd ever been handed that year from the parents association from the city from there are all these letters back and forth that year that we're about the air quality and she kept everything and so i had this store of information that was just think Thanks to mother's sort of pre planning on that. I was able to consult and that also able to verify a lot of what i remembered. It's also been helpful to me that. Because i've been an advocate on this issue for so long i have had some continuity with telling the story whereas a lot of people have had big gaps in their lives where they really haven't spoken about this..

lila nordstrom kelly kobe new york city california new york united states The new york times
Shen Beauty's Jessica Richards: People Want Clean, But They Also Want Results

The Glossy Beauty Podcast

02:26 min | 2 months ago

Shen Beauty's Jessica Richards: People Want Clean, But They Also Want Results

"The real sort of shift came in realizing that not every woman shops organic clean natural. Whatever you wanna call it Because not everything from that. Category mainly works for their skin and and our issue was that because it was so long ago and there were no other retailers in this space. Certainly none i would say my only competitor at the time was whole foods right like and that's not even a competitor of mine sephora. Ulta bayden want clean organic natural beauty and certainly not what is now in the or niche. You know smaller brands nor did nordstrom's or you know any of these other retailers. They just wanted the mass marketed brands. And so what i realized was that people were coming into the store and they were having a really hard time. Grasping a cleanser. That was one hundred twenty dollars from a brand. They'd never heard of because they were still focused on brand recognition and buying marketing. I mean magazines were huge. Still eleven years ago now. Is there even a magazine in your house right. So i called bobby brown. This is about a year and a half in the business was struggling and she's A really good friend of my ex mother-in-law's and i said look you're not sold anywhere in brooklyn in brooklyn is a new in thriving neighborhood for people that are exiting manhattan. All with families. I really would love to talk to you about bringing your products in. I don't want any of your holiday or your skin care or any of that. I just want your core. Launches your lipsticks nor shimmer. Bricks things that people really know in us and all have Especially the eye gel pot so she said yes and it took about six months for them to figure out how to service my account. Because i'm so small. And i wasn't taking all their holiday launch units but once we brought in bobby brown and that was like about year to what i realized was that it made people more confident and okay wish shopping brands. They had never heard of before and they also wanted the heavy pay off of the pigments. That mainly come from non-clean beauty brands and so that was sort of the catalyst for me in realizing that people want organic natural clean. Whatever you call it but they really want

Sephora Bobby Brown Nordstrom Brooklyn
Joy, in the Words of Ron Burgundy

The Ron Burgundy Podcast

02:26 min | 3 months ago

Joy, in the Words of Ron Burgundy

"What i'm talking about. Is that happy spiritual feeling of being alive on earth. Everyone deserves it but not everyone knows how to find it. Joy i'm talking about. I hear you i do. I mean to be honest listening to you and besides like the sound effects in any of that i think ought to be a really helpful. Episode of the podcast. I think everyone right now needs more joining lives and i think that maybe we could you know. Give some people some active tools to help them with. I'm going to tell the how to get joy if you would just shut up. Okay yeah but first we need to understand what isn't bringing us joy right so yeah. Yeah the flipside exactly. I like to play a game with my dog baxter. From time to time where we throw the most plainly joyless sentences we can think of back and forth regular sentences. You might say that. Have no joy in them. It's a lot of fun and you can play at home to. Would you like to play carolina. Yeah i'll try it okay give me a joyless sentence you might say or here in real life okay. Let me think here's one. They're having a sale on tube socks at nordstrom's rack. Oh that's good that's awful and joyless. That's really okay. How about this one. I'm on my way to the dmv. Terrible yes the worst Okay what about this. My name is carolina that c. a. r. o. l. i. n. a. Oh yes spelling. Your name out for. Any reason is the opposite of joy. Here's one baxter. Always says they need to fix that hole in the road. how about. I should try and learn spanish. This bread got wet. The dripping noise is coming from under there. Have you seen the vacuum cleaner. Let's get on a zoom call at eight. Am by need to remember to call the insurance company. This bottle is empty. I'm proud of my tofu. Salad how much gas should i get. I need a new belt. My cat just died. Hold the both their carolina. You cross the line. I the games no fun. If you bring in sickness or

Baxter Carolina Nordstrom
Zscaler Q3 Earnings and Revenues Surpass Estimates

MarketFoolery

02:00 min | 5 months ago

Zscaler Q3 Earnings and Revenues Surpass Estimates

"Z scaler cloud-based cybersecurity company. Out with a strong third quarter report. Revenue was higher than expected. Their full year guidance was upbeat. They cited increased demand for cybersecurity products and services and shares of z. Scaler up fifteen percent. This morning yeah. So so let's talk briefly about about z. Scaler says you mentioned there. Cloud-based cybersecurity platform that offers its services on a subscription basis. They provide protection no matter where users are. This is increasingly important in our remote work. Lives and as the company noted in their call increasingly important as more and more companies find themselves dealing with ransomware and other cyber attacks So for the results so keeping to note here before we get into the results. Z scaler is primarily focused on getting new customers and increasing their current customer. Spend for their services so if you're looking at their results you'll notice that they're operating expenses so sales sales and marketing are in d. general and administrative they're all increasing In fact there they increased about fifty three percent year over year. This is because these scaler is aggressively targeting growth They're building out their sales teams investing in their engineering teams and building out their teams to support their growth So as a result the reporting net losses instead of net income. Again this because they're focused on this aggressive growth so since they're focuses growth. Let's talk about it. The company has more than five thousand customers and our revenue for this quarter crew. Sixty percent year over year. Two hundred seventy six point four million and it's important to note here that their sales come from both new and existing customers so platform upsells are really important to their strategy which is like a lot of Software as a service companies. It's a land and expand strategy. So you look to get new customers. That's your land and then you look to get those customers to spend more that's your expand.

Scaler
Casper Sleep (CSPR) Reports Q1 Loss, Tops Revenue Estimates

MarketFoolery

01:35 min | 5 months ago

Casper Sleep (CSPR) Reports Q1 Loss, Tops Revenue Estimates

"Year after their first quarter loss was smaller than expected revenue in. The first quarter was higher than expected and this was looking like it was going to be a really good day for shareholders and it has not turned out to be a really good day for shareholders a pre market. The stock was up close to ten percent it reversed course. It's basically flat right now. A start wherever you want. But i'm curious what you see when you look at casper sleep so generally positive things chris. I haven't listened in on the call. So i don't know what management might have said to kill the enthusiasm. They created with this earnings report. This is a tough industry. I am a big fan of a company called sleep number which is a competitor of casper. Sleep casper sleep is starting to impress me a little bit though. Well let's work through these numbers and then we'll talk about the stories behind them. So as you mentioned revenue increased. It was up twenty percent to one hundred seventy eight million year over year. They're direct to consumer revenue so this includes their retail stores and their online sales that increase eleven percent but north america retail partnership revenue. This increased fifty four percent. So what is this. This is casper. Sleep selling through partners. Like nordstroms ashley. Store sam's club. It is gradually getting into really great venues to sell their price point of mattress. Which isn't super expensive. I thought that number was great. The other thing Which is

Casper Chris Sam's Club North America Ashley
Getting Your Product On Store Shelves: How to Wholesale with Katie Hunt

eCommerce Badassery

03:53 min | 7 months ago

Getting Your Product On Store Shelves: How to Wholesale with Katie Hunt

"Hey guys. My name is katie. Hunt i run. A company called proof to product. We had our tenure business birthday. This month will in february when we're recording. This and i decided. I wanted to be an entrepreneur. Twelve years ago actually. It was when. I started my stationary brand. That is no longer around. Iran that for eight years and i was selling to stores all over the united states and canada i was exhibiting at trade shows and i loved it but in my first couple years of building that brand i was looking around and my community of other designers and product makers has like. Oh my gosh. These people are such talented artists but they really are lacking knowledge. They just don't know what to do and then they're doubting themselves. They're not moving forward on things because they're unsure whereas my background was in business and i was self taught in art so i'm looking at them going. Oh my gosh. Your work is amazing. How do i do that. You know and i'm sitting here. Like i know the business side of things but struggling with the art and they know that are side of things but they struggle with business and i said there's an opportunity here for all of us to learn from each other so let's bring it together. Let share what we know and then we can all just grow like path is going look different. Our definition of success will look different but we can help each other with our shared experiences in resources. And things like that. So in two thousand eleven i started proof the product. It was under a name at the time. But that's what my company does. We basically work with product based business owners. We help them sell wholesale. That's our primary core programming Are people sell to target and nordstrom container store. It's mostly consumer gift brands that we work with people in stationary Textiles candles more like the smaller gift. Items know we've got courses and conferences and membership and all of the things that people have. My goal is to help five hundred thousand product business owners and make a very positive impact in not only their business but their life. So that's where we're working towards. I love that you have a number on it. I need to put a number on my goal. But it's very similar to my story really. Is the people that i work with. They have a product that either. They created to solve a problem. 'cause they couldn't find what they were looking for in the market where they have a boutique because they just really love close but they don't have a retail or e commerce background and. That's what i've been doing for twenty plus years so it's really fun to come in and give kind of the backbone business piece to just help them push their craft or their side forward and having that foundational stuff. So i love that you do that thank you. I feel like it's rocket fuel. Righty leg the already have amazing products ideas and they just need that foundational piece to set them up for success because it amplifies all that they're doing on the marketing side on the production side even just little tweaks to their praising or to you know their fulfilment or whatever it just makes such a difference in the overall strength of the business yep and one of my biggest or my most exciting things that i get to do is just like help them save time so instead of the business running them. They're running the business like a true. Ceo and then they can get back to doing the whole reason. They went into business for themselves was to spend more time with their family. And do all that kind of stuff. So when i get to be just like a teeny piece of that might is just makes me so happy. I could not agree with you. More it's my favorite thing in the world to hear updates from our alumni community. And i actually just talked with a woman the other day and i hadn't heard from her and a couple of years because they knew she's had a couple of kids and she was like eighty. I'm in like a ridiculous amount of stores. I started working with sales reps. I have these two young kids at home and you know she's just exhilarated by how her business has grown even through this life transition of growing her family at the same time. So it's just so fun to watch and to see their hard work come to

Katie Iran Nordstrom Canada United States
(02/27) HOTL Hour 2

Handel On The Law

04:12 min | 8 months ago

(02/27) HOTL Hour 2

"This is handle on the law. Bill handel here telling you have absolutely no case california where i live i. There are two states that are there within the united states but not mentally because the people the legislatures are well california the crazy legislature florida. More the crazy people where you get these wild stories. So i love to talk about crazy. California that laws the legislature which is a supermajority with a super democratic super majority and a democratic liberal governor. You put those two together you have. You have a disaster a recipe for disaster. So here is optically good one. There is a bill that was introduced by two democrats of course and it would require retailers to offer their toys and childcare products in a gender neutral format which means no boys section no girls section it all has to be unified and everything for sale is for children not for boys and girls and you can't eat put up a sign that even indicate whether a product is intended for a boy or a girl and well that is i can see we're taking now gender neutrality to a kind of a level that is beyond a not reality but certainly beyond that part which makes sense and it's i i think the issue here and i am totally in favor of lgbtq rights. There's no question about it. And for the most part i'm in favor of gender neutrality. For example restroom single use restrooms. I have no problem saying gender-neutral. I truly don't but when it comes to retail spaces not even recognizing that there is a gender that their gender differences now The good news. Is you still in stores. They are still allowed to put men sections boys sections Girls women otherwise. You've gone to the retail stores target. Uganda Major retailers Nordstrom's we're talking about department stores and you have the signs say boy section men's etcetera and we haven't reached the point yet where you have signs they just have question marks and then eros that we haven't done yet but when it comes to toys sections we have those days where you differentiate between boys and girls are gone and accepting the fact that They're really that kids yet. Have not yet determined what their sexuality is. And i happen to be a believer That number one there is gender. Dismore fiesta where there are there are plenty of people who born male and identify as females and then later on it Transitional surgery and these people are very unlucky to do that to be born in the wrong body. I truly believe that happens. And i truly believe that happens more often than we know and i truly feel. Sorry it's a horrible way to live. You know being trapped and having to live ally Why i get all that but you know how do you take it. What not even recognizing there's a gender difference. Do you move towards that. That is going to be the point of in department

Bill Handel California Legislature Florida United States Dismore Fiesta Nordstrom Uganda
Nordstrom to move out of one downtown Seattle office tower

Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

00:31 sec | 9 months ago

Nordstrom to move out of one downtown Seattle office tower

"Is leaving the downtown Seattle office building that's been its headquarters for 20 years. Como's Who Romero with more in a statement, Nordstrom says the covert 19 pandemic has pushed the company to learn how to quote effectively manage a remote corporate workforce and therefore has decided not to extend its lease on the office tower at seventh and Olive, Nordstrom says. Instead, it'll make use of 700,000 square feet at two of its other corporate office buildings in downtown Seattle. The decision does not affect operations at the flagship. Words from store at sixth and Pine Sue Romero CAMO NEWS

Seattle Office Building Nordstrom Como Romero Seattle Pine Sue Romero
Nordstrom shares drop as retailer says holiday sales tumbled 22%

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:19 sec | 10 months ago

Nordstrom shares drop as retailer says holiday sales tumbled 22%

"Of 22% for the holiday period as foot traffic fell during the pandemic. Digital sales grew 23%. But the company says it faces pressure due to heightened shipping surcharges, and it's growing e commerce. Business. Nordstrom shares fell more than 3% and after hours trading. There are 312 incorporated

Nordstrom
"nordstrom" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:52 min | 11 months ago

"nordstrom" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A very extensive wardrobe from Nordstrom and I just covered up all the shame with materialism. That was how Tammy dealt with her issues. With money until everything changed in 2006. If you remember there were some early warning signs of a massive housing bubble for Tammy Those warning signs came in the form of a phone call from her brother. It was his 40th birthday. And he called me and it was so interesting because I was like, Hey, in birthday, you know, and, you know, let's get together like to take you out to dinner and he was like, No, no, no, no, no, not gonna do that. And I said, what's up? And he said I'm just really in dire straits. You know, I'm just really and I was like, Okay, okay, and I didn't know where the conversation was really going. And then he said, I need to borrow money. I need to borrow $7500, which You know, $7500 is a lot of money. Um, it was just a breaking point for him. And I said, Well, I'm happy to lend you the money. But let's get together and I'd like to know what's really happening and see if I could help and it in some other way because you knew he knew you were good with spreadsheets and budgeting and things like that, and I had been in the mortgage business and part of what was he was saying to me was, you know our mortgage is so high, and we've got the short term arm. You know, back then it was these two year arms because his credit had dipped, which meant that the payments would skyrocket within a couple of years, right? And his credit score was low, so we didn't have a lot of choices because he couldn't keep up with the payments have late payments and And so, um, I really wanted to get together with him. And so I did within within a couple weeks. I met him and his wife at us at a Starbucks, You know, close to where they lived and It was a very long Meeting..

Tammy Those Nordstrom
"nordstrom" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:24 min | 11 months ago

"nordstrom" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Store every jewelry store. And the big anchor tenants. That's what's the difference in the United States. United States you think about the anchor stores, Macy's or JC Penny or Dillard's in the South or belts in the Southeast or in the West? Nordstrom? Those big stores anchor the malls and therefore because they are so big and they take up so much space and they spend so much rent, they get a lot of priority in the mall. Because having those stores there will bring in all the other stores because they bring in traffic so much. So you ever think when you pull up to a mall? Where is the best parking Right in front of Macy's, because Macy's insists. I want my customer to come into that mall through my store, and even if they aren't shopping in Mason's that walking through Macy's demands it because they're buying so much real estate in that mall. And that makes sense. How many times have we gotten into Roosevelt Field Mall? You go through Macy's. You can't even figure out how to get through Macy's to get to the mall exactly. Exactly. Well, here's the Here's the thing that I'm confused about, you know, mapping out a mall before it's built malls change constantly their stores that are closing their new stories that come in. How does that work? Very good question the most built with the best intentions. When I selling the space to all these retails, they lay him out the way they want to lay him out. That's their plan. But as you point out the store closes, Victoria's secret may have closed in one mall or Nike. I remember Nike closed and Roosevelt Field they did their best. To put another store like Nike. But if they can't 50 be expedient, they have to put in what makes sense and that ruins the town planning per se. So when you see it sometimes, after a while, it's a little bit of a mish mush, and it wasn't delivered the way it was intended. But I can tell you one thing. The moles in China are And malls that commit whether it's Belle Harbor of crystals. Whether it's Manhasset, or whether it's Fifth Avenue for the first five blocks from 59th Street to 50th Street or 55th Street there laid out the rest could be well, whatever the market will bear. I got another one for you. Just before I give up on this subject. Do you know That all psychology work that has been done every time you walk in the store. You know, they.

Roosevelt Field Mall Macy Nike United States Nordstrom JC Penny Manhasset Southeast Dillard Victoria Mason China
Department store shares surge amid Covid vaccine hopes

Bloomberg Markets

00:16 sec | 11 months ago

Department store shares surge amid Covid vaccine hopes

"Seem ready to go back to the mall. Shares of department store operators Macy's and Nordstrom surged as Continued progress in the hunt for a vaccine against corporate 19. A string of decent earnings reports bolstered Wall Street's optimism that in person shopping will return next year. The gap is up 7.8%.

Nordstrom Macy
Do Checklists Make People Stupid?

No Stupid Questions

05:44 min | 1 year ago

Do Checklists Make People Stupid?

"Duckworth. Our question today comes from a listener named chris. shipman. I work at a place. That thrives unprocessed chris rates thrives in quotes which i guess connotes iranian suggests that this workplace doesn't actually thrive so anyway. Chris goes on. But i feel like checklists deaden critical thinking that brings us to christmas. Actual question do. Checklists make people more stupid so angela. I like this question because it is a specific procedural question but it's got much broader implications if wanna go there so do you want to go there. I wanna go there. I've been thinking about checklists actually long before. Chris shipments sent us that question. I read togo on days. Checklist manifesto rape book right. It's just is even if you think it wouldn't appeal. It does appeal. Because he's a good writer in a great human. As you know. Stephen go on day is the harvard surgeon who also somehow ends up moonlighting as a world class writer for the new yorker and also of books and the checklist manifesto. I should get the gist of it just so there are tons of studies about how surgeons as smart as they are after more than a decade of training. They do stupid things like they leave. Sponges in the patient's body hoops and you know days later. The person has sepsis. You realize that a stupid mistake was made and so. Checklists are away to avoid mistakes when the procedures are straightforward. But they're so complex. There's like nineteen things that you're supposed to remember and you remember eighteen out of nineteen but that's not good enough. The model for this is far. I recall from the book was flying airplanes. That starting to get much more complicated back in the thirties and forties and so on. Yeah i think in the back. There's even a photo the checklist that pilots have to use in order to take off and land. Of course those are the parts of your flight. That are most likely to kill you. Because there's all these things that are pilot has to do. I mean look if you were a student in school eighteen out of one thousand nine hundred a but unfortunately we are searching or pilot if the pilot of a plane. Eighteen hundred nineteen is dead. Yeah exactly so all learns about this things about his personal experience and he says why aren't we using lists in the operating room. There have been some large scale trials to see whether this improves patient. Outcomes do surgeons make fewer mistakes than do patients live healthier and longer lives because of it. And what would you guessed. Stephen is the result of this research. Were i think. I know the result because i actually care about this stuff a little bit. So i think the result is that it works and the take-up rate of checklists in let's say operating rooms is quite strong in some places in the kind of hospitals where there's good administration and good adherence to protocol in a lot of other hospitals especially poor countries. The checklist was not taken up. Even though if i recall the world. Health organisation made the checklist manifesto part of its manifesto yet like sleep exercise their great if you do them they don't do anything. You don't do the okay. But checklists are great for certain kinds of activities or enterprises lake flying an airplane or surgery where there is a list of things that should or must be done. But and this. I guess gets to chris's question. We don't know what kind of work chris does. But i can imagine that. There are a lot of kinds of worker. A lot of activities whether they're more creative or academic work checklist might be useful and look. I like checklist. Personally i use them. But i could see where an over reliance on them would routine is or bring some kind of more creative activity down to a level that you don't want because the very nature checklists means that you're not thinking that you're following a procedure mechanically. You're not on item. Seventeen of the takeoff checklist and thinking. Well would i actually think about no flip a switch and you get to take off so i think that's right. I think that when you have complex tasks that are straightforward even though there are nineteen steps that don't require judgment judgment. Have you ever looked into the training. Nordstrom's shoe sales people. I have to admit. I have not okay. The reason i looked into it is because i have bought plenty of shoes at nordstrom and it's famous for its service and in particular a surplus around shoes. If you look into the training of nordstrom salespeople the first and maybe only role that they're really asked to follow is use your judgment and. That's kind of like anti checklist manifesto. A customer comes in and they've worn these boots obviously for two years and they say i'd like my money back full refund please. I don't like the color instead of a checklist. Like do this. Look at their is. Its use your judgment. And i think that's a nice counter to the benefits of checklists. Use your judgement. Like i believe that. If i give this person what they want they will kill me and therefore i should do yeah. I think that's right. I think that there must be certain scenarios where you just can't create a procedural checklist because they're too many alternatives. If you just go down the list you're gonna miss something and in the case of a really angry customer. Who might do something either untoward or even dangerous. I think you do want somebody who's human and who is thinking

Chris Rates Chris Shipman Duckworth Stephen Togo Sepsis The New Yorker Angela Harvard Nordstrom
How to Find Inspiration in Doubt

Duct Tape Marketing

08:28 min | 1 year ago

How to Find Inspiration in Doubt

"Hello and welcome to another episode of the duct tape marketing podcast. This is John Jansen, my guest today is Carol. She is the founder and CEO of hint water a flavored water brand she founded in two thousand and five. He's also the author of a new book called. Daunted overcoming doubts and doubters. So thanks for joining me. Thanks for having me. So in your bio I, read that you were one of the I don't know about original. You've spent some time at AOL. My father-in-law still hasn't AOL account and he thinks he's he thinks it's the Internet that AOL's. That's I I met. So my real question though is, do you still have any of those CD's? You. Know what I do have a couple of the CD is that I kept and I have a few. AOL Jackets Memorabilia that I stuck in a plastic bin. For. can't can't throw that away I. Mean it was a great time. I mean it it's a you know it's sort of an iconic brand that really Steve Case. Bill Right. There were a lot of people there and I played a part in building out the e commerce and You know there were a lot of people that basically felt like. Was the only place to shop. I mean, we were kind of a very enclosed safe place where you could go and You know I really fortunate opportunity to help build out I always viewed it as like a virtual mall and so I would I would like actually. Study Mall's people would ask like, how do you not like bring in Lake J. crew and into. Building out the small and I'm like I go down to the Stanford Mall and actually figure out what other stores are sitting there. Do you know Neiman Marcus and Nordstrom's and some of the others and and that's essentially what we were doing and A community for people. It's funny too because and and we'll get look into the book but I think it's fascinating because it was really it was really a closed place originally got AOL and it wasn't the same as getting to a website that you could. Then just you know punt go somewhere else for a long time it was a very much a contained. As. You said, yeah, and it was also a place for brands to really reinvent themselves I. Mean I remember there was this one catalogue company that we were dealing with called celebration fantastic and pretty small catalogue and and They weren't doing great on the service I mean they were up against like some big guys they weren't getting the promotion. So I remember Valentine's Day rolled around round one day and You know they had this product that was like a chocolate sauce and and they were like we have this idea that we want to do one of your pop ups, those pop-ups screens come. and. They and they called it a better than sex chocolate entrepreneur and and you know people went crazy over it and and so I think it was like it was the first place where you know you could really reinvent yourself in this new channel by showcasing certain products that you have and I mean their sales just off of that product were millions of dollars and just it was absolutely insane but it was really the first place where I saw that you could build brands you know in a non traditional way which you know frankly I go back to our business, my my main business hint. My my day job, you know we fifty five percent of our business is direct to consumer and a world where Soda Is. You know that's just not the way that. Are Sold I mean if anything if they are sold online, it's through an Amazon but it's not through their own site and so I think it's it just little examples like that on my journey make me believe and make me think like how can we just do things? How can we try and how can we do things a little bit different and ultimately better. So today hint comes in twenty players if people aren't familiar with it sparkling and caffeinated. It's a non alcoholic beverage, one of the maybe the largest independent non alcoholic beverage in the world hundred. This is estimated I haven't looked at your books, a hundred and forty million dollars or so in yearly sales, two hundred employees and no famous investors involved in the company, right? That's ten today. Did you start hint to solve a problem or disrupted industry. a little bit of both. Actually you know it's I think back on the journey and you know I call myself an accidental entrepreneur because I wasn't a typical. I'M GONNA go and work for myself or I'm going to be an entrepreneur one day My Dad had actually kind of been frustrated entrepreneur and side a large company He had developed a brand that you may know called healthy choice and inside of Armor Food Company, and then ultimately they were acquired by Conagra but I i. so I had a little bit of learning working for him but I think also when I. Had grown up and tack and in many ways and being at AOL before I decided to start this company and while I, was. Really trying to solve a health problem for myself after I had had three children I wanted to lose the baby weight that I had put on and. Develop terrible adult acne I realized after looking at everything that I was putting all the food I was putting into my body that there's diet. Soda was had more ingredients in it than like I mean I I I talk about it now as I. Cared more about what I put in my car than what I put into my own body and I thought like why is that and a whole story around labels like Diet and you know there's low fat and vitamins and things like that that equated to health in my head but you weren't alone in that address. After switching from my Diet Soda over to Plain. Water, I two and a half weeks lost twenty four pounds got rid of my acne God my energy back and I said Gosh, there's just like a lot of people who are trying to figure out obviously how to get healthier and it's not. Right and and. Like if they could just actually enjoy water again, then they you know we might not have the brand new thing that cropped up about the time I was starting hint type, two diabetes you know things that are. Really. Dangerous chronic right and I thought they need to ultimately enjoy water maybe they need to do other things but that's a first step and so that's when I. Recognize that I didn't like water I aspired to be a water drinker and I start slicing bruton throwing in water and that's when. You know I thought I'm not even sure this is a company I think it's like A. I I don't know I think it's a product I'd worked for companies before right and so when I decided to take this product to whole foods and my local whole foods in San Francisco friends were would come over my house and I tell them. You know it started this little thing I wasn't even calling in a company and they're like that's so cool that you start a company I'm like is it a company? I don't know if it's a company like I have three skews like I'm not sure it's actually a company. But. That's when I really realized that I'm starting something that could actually help bigger range of people get healthier disrupted industry that doesn't care about health back. Then there was nobody calling companies mission driven I was mission driven from day one because I really wanted to help a lot of other people.

AOL Founder And Ceo Stanford Mall Bill Right John Jansen Steve Case Neiman Marcus Carol Armor Food Company Bruton Lake J. San Francisco Conagra Nordstrom Amazon
The Obviously-Going-To-Die Stocks

MarketFoolery

19:19 min | 1 year ago

The Obviously-Going-To-Die Stocks

"We're going to start with the stock of the day. Don't call it a comeback bed bath and beyond has been here for years. It's just all that time someone else was running the company but now that Mark Trittin has been in the Corner Office for about a year. We're seeing days like today second quarter profits came in exponentially higher than expected. Same store sales were positive for the first time in four years. The stock is up more than thirty percent this morning. I'm assuming at least part of what we're seeing with the stock is some shortsellers saying that's it. I. Think. I'm. Probably. Bed, bath, and congratulations to march written and Beth by best buy bed bath and beyond. For this quarter, March, written formerly of target, of course, and a few other places before that, I think Nordstrom's and I believe. He had a stint at Nike to could be misquoting. This bed bath and beyond is in a group of companies retailers that I like to call the obvious obviously going to die crowd. And the funny thing about companies that are obviously going to die when they get the right mix of management decision making and in some help from the environment and you know just a little bit of because no one's more aware of a company's struggles at least no one should be more aware of a company struggles then the people inside the company. And that's when you plan your strategy. What are our tools? How can we navigate our way through whatever we found ourselves in business is not easy and certainly for this group retailers that I'm Gonna I'm GONNA hold up. Bed Bath and beyond as one Chris. But you know how about Game Stop Game Stop. The seller of video game systems and Software that of course is going to be the next blockbuster. Right if they writing that headline since two thousand and nine, how `Bout Michael's the craft store everybody knows I. Y has an Amazon run over. And the granddaddy of all of these. Companies that are obviously going to fail. They're obviously going to be taken bricks and mortar is dead is best buy which just before the podcast we were talking about how? How many listeners? Realize, that best buy has been at ten bagger over the past decade they went through some struggles they brought in new management. WHO had a plan? and. I'm sure they were mocked and I'm sure people were skeptical and they executed on that plan and best buy, which was a sub twelve dollar stock in. Two Thousand Ten two thousand eleven is today roughly one hundred twenty dollars stock. And so when you see. I'm a kick myself a little bit on dust by iron best buy bed bath and beyond his too many bees. Bed Bath and beyond. I actually did a little bit of work about a year ago as I was discussing with one of our with one of our foolish coworkers. About this basket of Taylor's who are sure to die. And we had this one. We had game stop we have Michael on the docket and I went through you know what this company's history of cash flow was and what they've done with it and how they've raise capital, and this is before Mr Trenton came on but I. It laid the groundwork for someone with. A better vision to come in and knocked the ball out of the park which you've seen today and and best bed bath, and beyond is as we speak it's now a six th bagger since March of this year and so in the a roughly a year ago when I did my work because I was vigorously debating co I pointed out that in the previous six years here was bed bath and beyond had produced four point two, billion dollars in free cash flow. They had also issued one point five billion dollars in debt and debated smart about the debt because the debts. Basically staggered I think is a ten twenty and thirty years. and. They have to pay it back anytime soon, and they had gone on a massive buyback program. They've they've retired a ton of their shares. Now. Slowly melting ice cube no one's going to want to own this business what have you. But at the time the stock was about ten eleven dollars the company is training but four times enterprise value of free cash flow. that. That is rock bottom fools that is something that is going to go away. That's what the market is telling you. Flash, forward, to today and oh positive cops. Oh. We have a plant. They've they've suspended their dividend they've they've halted their. They've halted their. They suspended the dividend halted their share buyback plan I believe in. April. But with this. With this. report, they have generated a ton of cash flow. They've deployed it smartly they took down some temporary which they had out as part of the PARCO vid. They have bought back twenty percent of that long dated not in any danger to come calling debt they bought that back at a discount. Which is brilliant. They. So they're down to their down net debt down by about thirty percent from where they started the year. They have a store optimization program, which is something that a lot of these retailers the slowly melting ice cube crowd will call them. They are reducing their store count 'cause they don't need it because they can move to ECOMMERCE, which they've done a little bit they can move to. The geography is able he served by less stores and you see a lot of. Traffic that previously went through one store transitions to another and. They are steal a Ron grosses them here they are firing on all cylinders and I'm not sure. Anyone. Thought is coming. I am I am both thrilled that they are doing this they're having success because everyone loves a comeback. I'm less thrilled that you own it and I don't. But. That's mainly because I had this in my hand a year ago Chris and I'm holding it up. The skull of York. And and I'm looking at it and I didn't at least put a little field position because as I said, at the time training for four times free cash flow that is close to no-brainer territory for me. So two other quick data points before we go to our next story. Not. Surprisingly digital sales of big driver this quarter. That goes hand in hand with the store closures so Another smart move by Trittin and his team. And also Happy to see that they're you know suspending the dividend that they're. Suspending the sticking with the we're not going to buy back shares. I'm also happy to see they're not offering guidance. Their New Orleans. No need to at this point. Let's move on the third quarter sales, for Pepsi, grew five percent and. Kind of like we saw three months ago snacks and some of the beverages particularly the Seltzer. Part of their portfolio helping to make up for the fact that somebody restaurants are closed. So many sports and entertainment venues are closed and. That's that's the stock is basically flat and this kind of flat for all of twenty twenty but. Nice to see that the the salty snack part of the business is making up for the sort of the tried and true Pepsi part of the business. Gilead household particularly the soon to be sixteen year. Old Member of the Gillies household has been doing his part to. To to help with the salty snacks portion and shareholders. Thank him. Yeah I was GONNA? Say. You know dude. There are other food groups other than Doritos. Look it was a perfectly acceptable boring quarter from a perfectly acceptable boring company and and I think you know Chris but maybe some of the listeners not know. For, me to call a company perfectly boring from for me. That's a compliment because I like businesses that are boring. Not Terribly exciting person myself I enjoy. Investments in companies that just actually do what we expect them to do, and essentially just get it done quarter after quarter. Pepsi is not GonNa. You know if you'RE LOOKING FOR PEPSI TO BE A. Ten bagger. You know anytime soon like the aforementioned by we mentioned earlier. That's not gonNA happen. They are just a steady bedrock performer for your portfolio and we all need a few of those. So we can go after the more exciting things in our portfolio. Yes. So it was it was A. It was a boring it was a boring quarter but boring is nice because boring boring says, oh, we end up four four plus percent on. Organic revenue growth total revenue growth went up five plus percent. EPS Is up ten percent year-over-year just for the quarter. It's still down for year to date, but of course, Mindy Stan why because the previous quarter? Cova. no-one no-one was new what was going on? So we kind forgive that. They are they're pointing towards the full year. They did give guidance their point point to a full year of approximately four percent revenue growth approximately five fifty core earnings. Stocks at about one hundred, forty bucks. So it's not cheap. But it's not terribly expensive, and again, this is one of those widows and orphans stocks. You can buy put it away and we'll see you when you retire. Hugh Johnston, who's the CFO at Pepsi? Granular on CNBC this morning talking about because when you think about all of the food and beverages they have across their portfolio he got granular talking about the new cheetos macaroni and cheese saying you know they're trying to keep up with demand as a fan of both cheetahs and macaroni and cheese I haven't tried it yet but I can see why it's popular. Any. Do they give any color on the? Two. Portals that they were direct to consumer sites that they launched earlier this year snacks dot com and Pantry shop dot com. Sadly, Chris they did not at least in the conference call or the press the presser maybe in the ten Q I haven't read the ten q yet obviously but. Yeah no snacks dot com I can confirm both of those sites are open and accepting offers as of this moment. SNACKS DOT COM and Pantry shop I think is an interesting one because they are. You know you are buying your you're you're buying all of your Pepsi Slash quaker products. Simultaneously in in in the various groups. So if you want your everyday Pantry, you want to get your your oatmeal and your healthy. Your healthy Chia bars and your rice cakes do people still eat rice cakes and if so why? You can get all those delivered at the same time or your snack package your breakfast package You know it's it's interesting to to have it delivered. I I'M NOT A. I I'm one of the three people in North America is still doing own grocery shopping. So I'm probably target here but I know a lot about the people how to use it and I think probably if I let my as I mentioned a sixteen year old note that this thing existed. It might be his only source of nourishment. So yeah, don't don't. On, the first time I went to that website I kind of went crazy to the point where in the box showed up to two days later even my kids were just like. This is a lot of snacks and was like, yeah I may have ordered too many but but I regret nothing. Playboy. Enterprises is returning to the public markets after nearly a decade and because I was are out of fashion, playboy is going to be doing this through a speck. Mountain Crest acquisition is a current special purpose acquisition company that is going to be taking playboy public through a reverse merger and wants to deal is done that company where the ticker is MC. ABC? Is. The playboy name and the ticker symbol P L B Y? I guess I, I saw this story and I thought, okay I'd that's one way for playboy, which is a private company and has been since twenty eleven. I. Guess That's one way to raise money. I, I, I'm hard pressed though to think that. The second round of playboy being a public company is going to go any better for the company and for investors than it did the first time around. That was my initial take as well, and you say it's one way to raise money I'd say it's one way for insiders to cash out. Tomato Tomato. The more I think about this though. I could be spectacularly wrong and it wouldn't be the first time. This might be quite this might be interesting I can see. I can see a number of thing, and I just find this interesting from a number of re. I as you point out. Yes, playboy. Is private the SPEC the Special Purpose Acquisition Company Mountain Crest Acquisition, company. It's out there. Now it's got. It's a walking wallet got a bunch of cash their stocks over ten dollars specs go at ten bucks. There's nothing you can. You can go buy today Chris if you want. And You can just sit there and wait until the transaction is completed in q one. If. You WANNA own playboy. So, playboy today is not playboy of the past for thing, magazines have died. So, there are no issues of the iconic famous magazine. These no regularly published issues and I believe they went to quarterly publishing versus. Monthly publishing before that. So what playboy is trying to be or this new iteration trying to be a licensing company and they're calling it across four major categories they're saying sexual wellness, which I'm just going to skip to the next one, which is style and apparel which is. Apparel. and accessories for men and women globally gaming and lifestyle also digital gaming hospitality and spirits. So you can get yourself some playboy-branded Bourbon. And beauty and grooming, which is fragrance skin care grooming cosmetics for men and women. Okay. That sounds interesting. They're not a publishing company more avoiding that and I guess they have a bunch of online stuff as well which. Tell people they can go look on their spare time but. They are calling themselves a streamlined high growth business. The company has four hundred million in cash flow contract through the next eighteen years. and has products available for sale and in ten thousand major retail stores. In the US, this is a brandon company. Now, now, what you think of the brand and what you associate with the brand, the iconic a bunny ears brand, of course. Is Is. is going to be probably a nuanced and varied. I can understand why some people. Would not want to do with this brand I completely understand that is not. Bend the most shall we say progressive brand in history? It has fostered some. Attitudes, particularly women that. I think it's fair to say some would find distasteful and I I completely understand why? And for those people, they're just not going to be shareholders and that's that's fine. But what I find interesting about this if this, if the licensing deal and we have, we've already had a certain dry run of this in. Do you know the magazine Maxim? It was. So it's a men's lifestyle magazine, girly pictures, and whatever it was bought by an entity called big holdings. I'm going to say eight nine years ago. With the goal of they went into change it from the the lad magazine into more of a lifestyle brand licensing deal what playboys doing. Now. I mentioned earlier it's important to have You know leaders businesses, you respect and trust big lorry holdings is not one of those businesses but I do know that they even though they're circulation sales are down significantly there they have turned that profitable on a small scale with the licensing strategy. I suspect the playboy will do a better job. And It will depend on the valuation coming out but you know when analogy I might throw up as. As a comparison is. Franchising businesses in the in the restaurant space. So a restaurant brands international, which owns importance and Burger King. Dunkin brands, which of course owns your beloved Dunkin donuts. Those are those are check cashing businesses, they they sell the franchise to a Franchisee. And then take tax six percent of their gross sales and royalties every month plus x percent for advertising they sell you a system and so those are very asset light cash-rich capital Genita- businesses. And part of me wonders here it's obviously not the same as selling. Coffee and whatever. But part of me wonders if that is what this business will look like, and if they are truly in the growth business and the cash generation business, this might be an interesting opportunity. And you just hit on what I think is the most interesting thing to watch. Once it becomes a public entity again, the high growth aspect of this because now we're going to see Now, we're GONNA see through quarterly reports. Okay. Are you growing? Because that's one of those things where we investors and the market in general get to decide what we consider to be high growth And I again I had I had your initial take which was. Oh please. Like if it didn't work the first time. It's going to work less well this time. The more I read about like. I'M GONNA keep an eye on this. Curiosity. Jim Gillies always talking to you. Thanks for being here.

Playboy Chris Pepsi Mark Trittin Jim Gillies Michael Mountain Crest Acquisition Nordstrom Nike Beth Corner Office North America Amazon United States Taylor Hugh Johnston Cnbc
Nobody wears fur any more

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:33 min | 1 year ago

Nobody wears fur any more

"It's time to talk business. Now, with Dana Thomas, who's the paris-based? All of fashion operas the price of fast fashion and the future of closed Dan. Thanks so much for joining us. I must tell you that I have a relative who works in fashion and a little while ago. She very generously I thought started gifting me all these beautiful firs which she said she wasn't going to wear again I now understand why nobody's wearing her. Nobody's wearing for it took pita the people for Africo treatment of animals what thirty years to get this message through the heads of fashion industry players. But it seems like they're finally getting with the getting on board and they're slowing down or or banning. Nordstrom the. The American Department Store Big Department Store one of the few that. Actually is not completely shattered by the pandemic they managed to pull through Is Giving up selling furry will not be selling for I don't think for was a huge part of Nordstrom business. Nordstrom is a very middle market, suburban shopping mall kind of department store. So the for that they would sell would have been like the trim on your Parka or a little trim on a cough as opposed to a mink you wouldn't go to Nordstrom to buy a full length mink coat, but nevertheless there there disavowing vote as has macy's and Chanel a lot of brands have finally given up on it. I don't know what this is doing for the for instance, which is powerful and big industry and the for industry has made. Big Advances in over the years because of the pressure from Petah to make sure that that the whole. Farming, side of it was as humane as possible given you know in the end, you're killing animals for to wear clothing. You know more more humane certainly than the industrial agriculture side for cowhide for our handbags. But you know nevertheless, it seems like you know when they banned fog is in certain states. In the United States, this band for first serves feels like the same we're going to ban for not that anyone's really wearing it right now or that any can. Really afford it right now because they've all lost their shirts during the pandemic, but it's a good idea and maybe we should do it. So they're doing it and I think we're going to see a lot less than the streets but I mean all does and you point out that the house bill shoes I mean we're not talking about banning leather shoes. But you know. Gucci famously put out. mink trimmed Mules Apple seasons ago when I said Rubel Kelly took over the house and they were really popular. I remember seeing a woman on an airplane and I thought wow, that's really decadent. and. It feels really calm. It looks like it's probably really comfortable for an airplane to you WanNa you WanNa, wear something cushy on your feet. Right? I thought that is so decorated it feels like Louis Kettles and we won't be seeing at least being sold at Nordstrom. We won't be seeing those shoes anymore more. Then, and we don't have a lot of time but a very quick look at where we are in this case between tiffany and lvmh. Well, tiffany has decided to countersue. So I mean everyone's suing everybody else and it's it's just back and forth and back and forth tiffany says it did not experienced a managed material adverse effect during the pandemic and that basically lvmh trying to get a better deal, which is what we all believe it is and it says the lvmh's specious arguments are yet another blatant attempt to evade its contractual obligation to pay the agreed upon price for Tiffany and you know they're go to just fight this and see what happens I'm I'm interested to see how this plays out absolutely tiffany needs a sale and Wants it. Somebody's going to figure out the middle ground now? Why does tiffany need to sail? It's it's been in play for some time and it's it's kind of an a stuck place. They redid the store somewhat in New York. But it it a point where it needs to grow change or evolve at. It's kind of stuck an lvmh with its synergies and it's and it's specially it's retail network but also its whole marketing department everything would really give the brand a boost in a way that would take it to a new place tiffany's sort of motoring along but not great. Yeah. That's why it's been. The object of you know it's been. Looked at as a possible takeover lvmh just going to swoop in and buy a bowl the stock, and they still just may do that

Tiffany Nordstrom Dana Thomas Lvmh Big Department Store DAN Africo American Department Cough United States Petah Macy Louis Kettles Gucci Rubel Kelly Chanel New York
17 companies pledge to add a Black director to their boards within 1 year

WSJ What's News

00:55 sec | 1 year ago

17 companies pledge to add a Black director to their boards within 1 year

"Of companies including United Airlines. Nordstrom and Zillow are launching a new effort to accelerate diversity efforts in corporate America for some that includes a pledge to at least one blackboard director. Our reporter and steel has more after the killing of George Floyd and others. This summer at this sort of national reckoning that we're having with race issues is making a lot of companies look at themselves and examine the diversity or in many cases the lack. Thereof in their Tom Breaks a lot of this is coming from employees to executives say they're hearing from employees who say they wanna see diversity at the executive and board level so that people of Color and folks from underrepresented communities can see a path for career advancement and see people like themselves in these leadership positions. So nationally, we're having these conversations and companies are starting to realize that racial diversity is a blind spot for many of them.

Nordstrom Zillow George Floyd United Airlines Reporter Executive Director America
Aleksei Navalny Out of a Coma and Responsive, German Doctors Say

TIME's Top Stories

04:20 min | 1 year ago

Aleksei Navalny Out of a Coma and Responsive, German Doctors Say

"Poisoned Russian opposition leader Alexey Navales condition has improved allowing doctors to take him out of an induced coma. The German hospital treating him said, Monday Navan any of high profile critic of Russian President Vladimir Putin was flown to Germany last month after falling ill on August twentieth on a domestic flight in Russia. German chemical weapons experts say tests show the forty, four year old was poisoned with the Soviet era nerve agent prompting the German government last week to demand that Russia investigate the case. The patient has been removed from his medically induced coma and is being weaned off mechanical ventilation. Sherry t hospital said in a statement. He is responding to verbal stimuli. It remains to early to gauge the potential long-term effects off his severe poisoning. It added that the decision to publicly released details of his condition was made in consultation with Navales wife. Nirvana had been in an induced coma and the Berlin hospital since he was flown to Germany on August twenty seconds for treatment news of his gradual recovery came as German Chancellor Angela Merkel's office indicated that she might be willing to rethink the fate of a controversial German Russian gas pipeline project a sign of Berlin growing frustration over Moscow's stonewalling about the case. German authorities said last week that tends showed proof without doubt that Nevada any was poisoned with a chemical nerve agent from the Nova Chalk group British authorities identified the Soviet Era Nova Chuck as the poison used on former Russian spy Sergei script. Paul and his daughter in England in two thousand eighteen. Russia. has denied the Kremlin was involved in poisoning. All knee and accused Germany failing to provide evidence about the poisoning that it requested in late. August. German. Foreign Minister Heiko Moss said Sunday that the Russian reaction could determine whether Germany changes its long-standing backing for the Nord Stream two pipeline which brings Russian gas to Germany under the Baltic Sea bypassing Ukraine. The chancellor also believes that it's wrong to rule anything out MERCKEL spokesman Stephane. Siebert told reporters Monday after being asked about mosses comments. Previously Merckel had insisted on decoupling the of all case from the pipeline project which the US strongly opposes in August three US Republican senators threatened sanctions against the operator of a Baltic. Seaport located in Merkel's parliamentary constituency for its role as a staging post for ships involved in building Nordstrom to Siebert caution that it was premature to expect Moscow response to the matter within a few days. But made it clear that Berlin wants answers soon? I can't express a clear time-limited station except that we are certainly not talking about months or the end of the year he said. German diplomats rejected the Russian suggestion that Berlin was to blame for any delay in investigating the case noting that navalny was I treated for suspected poisoning in the Siberian city of. On August twentieth. All evidence witnesses, traces, and so forth are in the place where the crime was committed presumably somewhere in Siberia said German Foreign Ministry spokesman Christopher Burger. The CO leader of Germany's opposition Green Party Robert Habat called on the government to take a stronger stance and buried the pipeline. The project divide Europe it is economically nonsensical and oversized, and it is wrong in security policy terms harbut said. Completing it would mean that Russia can do what it wants. This signal must not be sad. Mikhail Lubinov. The Russian envoy international organizations in Vienna voiced suspicions about the timing of demands to link the pipeline with an ovonic. Ace. Suspicious Coincidence Nevada case and the final stage of Nord Stream two construction which some states desperately wants to be closed I am not fond of conspiracy theories, but it is obvious that the tragic events with the Volney are very timely and helpful for opponents of Ns to he tweeted.

Germany Coma Berlin Angela Merkel Alexey Navales Nerve Agent Russia German Government Nevada Nord Stream Siebert Chancellor German Foreign Ministry Vladimir Putin Berlin Hospital President Trump Mikhail Lubinov Baltic Sea
Drinking is Expensive

Recovery Happy Hour

04:30 min | 1 year ago

Drinking is Expensive

"Hi Everyone. Welcome to recovery happy hour where we talk about life beyond the bottle and what happens after we stopped drinking I'm your host Tricia and in almost four years of not drinking I've saved over twenty grand. That's enough money to buy either a used Honda civic or two, thousand, two, hundred and twenty four packages a frozen meatballs from Ikea. Thank you for joining me. Guys drinking is expensive and that's the topic of today's introduction. Drinking is expensive. I, have a tracker APP on my phone that tells me how much money I've saved by not spending money on alcohol and today it says twenty, thousand, three, hundred and seventy dollars. But I think that number is actually a estimate and that it could be closer to about twenty six thousand dollars, which is just nuts. So a little back story when I quit drinking also owned business that I had just put a bunch of money into to expand our kitchen space that we were in. That's actually one of the reasons why I got sober because I was about to take on this huge project and I knew that I wouldn't survive if I kept drinking the way that I was drinking. So I started getting into recovery and spent my first full year learning how to not drink. I ignored a lot of the rest of my life. You know I, let my debt continue to build without. Really thinking that much about it. I kept working on business and I learned how to be sober. That was my number one priority in after your one when not drinking was my new normal I poked my head out of the sand and I realized that even as someone who considered myself as a highly functioning alcoholic and fairly responsible I had neglected some major areas of my life, my finances being number one. This is also a reason why I think that year two of sobriety is sometimes harder than the first year because usually have to do a lot of cleanup. The new shiny feeling of early sobriety wears off and you got to learn how to just live your life now. So I continued to work my ass off on a business try to be financially responsible but by year three of sobriety I realized I was on the way to needing to close my business. There are a lot of reasons behind that. That aren't super important to get into. But what is important is that closing a business especially one that you can't sell it takes a lot of difficult decisions to do. It is responsibly as possible when it comes to finances. So in between consumer debt and business debt, I have been plugging away at this giant number for close to four years now. I've had a second job for almost two years I changed careers late twenty nineteen. I lived with my parents for a little while which had its own set of challenges. But still is an opportunity that I was incredibly grateful for. And I closed my business at the end of last year I started a new job and I continued to chip away at the debt. You know thinking back when I was drinking wasn't just about what I was spending on booze. It was also about what I was spending money on when I was drunk Nordstrom. Saw Me at my worst. Also, what I was spending my money on to help myself feel better when I was hung over again Nordstrom saw me at my worst and I have the designer shoes election approve it. It was the things purchased online in a blackout. It was all the Times I said August this round when I, was happy hour with my friends blissfully ignoring the fact that I couldn't afford that next round it was the last hours spent being hung over not being able to be a productive human being you know not working not coming up with new ideas not contributing to the world. I. Dug myself into debt financially. And emotionally and physically and spiritually I mean. Alcohol puts you into debt in more ways than you ever realize I was basically in the red in always possible. But as of this past weekend. I in finally debt free. I paid off my last payment on my credit card. My business is behind me a completely closed chapter financially, and as an unmarried woman who lives in my single income household. This feels like a really big deal that I've worked incredibly hard for. But. I wouldn't be anywhere close to where I am now how they not stopped drinking.

Nordstrom Tricia Honda Civic
COVID-19 and E-Commerce Changing Retailers' Real Estate

Bloomberg Businessweek

00:35 sec | 1 year ago

COVID-19 and E-Commerce Changing Retailers' Real Estate

"Like Nordstrom and Nike. We're focusing on the digital space before Kobe 19. But now companies are taking an even closer look at physical versus online shopping really reevaluate their realize. You know how much is too much in terms of your count? How efficiently were stores running before the pandemic? Mentel retail analyst Alexis to Solve a Caylor Take Microsoft. It closed its 83 stores in March. As of the virus. Now the software maker decided to keep them shut permanently and focus on digital instead to solve a

Nordstrom Kobe Nike Alexis Analyst Microsoft Mentel
Girl, 15, wounded in Braintree mall shootout near Boston

WBZ Morning News

01:00 min | 1 year ago

Girl, 15, wounded in Braintree mall shootout near Boston

"Are under arrest. After a shooting at a Braintree mall yesterday were a 15 year old girl was shot. W. B C TV's Christine erects with more police and SWAT rushed to the mall, placing it on lock down with hundreds of shoppers inside on authentication amongst two groups inside the plaza. The shots came from right outside Nordstrom in the malls, hallway. Police say two groups were in a fight. Then two men in their twenties fired about six shots at each other, hitting a 15 year old girl in the crossfire. Wayward told shoes. They actually not even near the group when she was struck, So we don't believe he had anything to do with it at all. The suspect ran from the mall, prompting area neighborhoods to shelter in place. Nearly two hours later, they were arrested. Then, after nearly three hours on lock down the final people inside the mall. We're let out, still shaken and holding their kids tight

Nordstrom Braintree Christine
"nordstrom" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"nordstrom" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Forward jokey. Nordstrom spoke to the media today via conference call. Nor he was asked about the NHL's Corona virus testing policy and what it's been like. For him. The testing is every other every third day you go in, and there's a saliva test and you ship it out. And then the day after You completed the test. You get an email with the results, and so I've tested three times and they've come back. Negative. All of them. And Patriots wide receiver Julian Edelman welcome Cam Newton to the Patriots today on social media, posting a photo shop of the two of them together in Pat's uniforms with the Hashtag. Let's work. Brian Antonelli. W B Z Boston's News radio 6 43 time once again for traffic and weather together, Subaru Retailers of New England all wheel drive traffic on the threes, Mike, what's happening now? Well, we've got one interesting spot on the Cape Nicole delays on Route six eastbound. It is Chand up just over a mile basically from sandwich. Into Barnstable as a crash. Cleanup continues before Room 1 49 Exit five. They're working on this cement truck roll, or it's been there all afternoon and continuing into the Early evening now, anyways, roots sixties delays. You want to stay to the left to get by there elsewhere, things. We're good on the expressway and Ruth three, which runs along this how shore up to the north Highways are good, including the upper stretch of 1 28 Route 3 93 and 95. Up towards the New Hampshire. Lina's well, downtown. Nice and quiet for you. As you come in tonight, the lower deck of 90 three's wide open, Same deal with the Tobin Bridge and Storrow Drive, and the Mass Turnpike is.

Patriots Nordstrom NHL Tobin Bridge Julian Edelman New Hampshire Brian Antonelli Lina Chand Subaru Retailers Barnstable Cape Nicole Cam Newton Boston Ruth Pat New England Mike
"nordstrom" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

Newsradio 600 KOGO

05:13 min | 1 year ago

"nordstrom" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

"They made a better ball cap simple as that and they are you can see them everywhere in all of this in the Ascot shop over in over the whole house Nordstrom has some surf shops that we can also buy online with respect that you had a pretty big interest with for a bit of a company called old high which do which is a footwear company how did that come about where they came home they finally find you guys so tandem bike are fortunate enough I started realizing that when you have triple digit growth and your product margin there and that sixty to seventy percent range at bass that you always have operating expenses in a cover and that if you're growing by double each year gonna double the cost of goods to produce that product and anyways we're we're running out of cash year over year because of the growth of the company and I was looking for a strategic partner had befriended the founders of many brands in an effort to kind of have them rub off the good JJ Saturn so one of those brand owners about the company and mired was Dan Machen Ernie who is the early part of quicksilver and I co founder of ola chi premium footwear and Dan had become a great mentor to me always kind of venting to him about some interest to her that I had from several other coal kind of brand that potential strategic partnerships and then one day decide whether we are to backing what if we wanted to get involved with you guys and I was kind of caught off guard so let's figure it out so we worked there by Jane operation and kind of he does everything is kind of a line they understand creamy and they build arguably the best single in the world and are now expanding into some great kind of premium water friendly footwear and boots and take away let's just understand maintaining brand integrity and the value of exclusivity and now holding here your premium promise and it just worked out until at the end of twenty sixteen or U. we had them basically taken a majority stake investment partnership in the mail and and we've been scaling it together with them kind of on the back the backside of that operationally helping us and support us there for the last three years and it's been amazing it's been really really cold that's interesting we had a far more digital distribution strategy or their direct to consumer call Kevin at a far better understanding and pre built existing wholesale brick and mortar business so I feel like we've both been able to learn from one another and take expedited clan certainly certainly elevating the brand and of course it will be asking I guess to be honest the unanswered question is what is it been like running a brand that was a fun Brandon I will tell you I gotta hand it to you because one of the things you did in that your advertising very in the very beginning was remind us that they're still going to be fun to be had yeah in it although you're respectful about was going with covered your advertising reflected Hey we're gonna be in the water again Hey we're gonna be outside playing golf again Hey we're gonna be out doing stuff again we don't what's it been like have you had to change our advertising structure we we definitely had to kind of modify like most brands that are built for outdoor fun we're obviously a ball cap which means typically outdoors under the sun and that's that's what we like to be a cell I think it was important to kind of create a modified marketing campaign our team's great and our marketing team Cameron and David a couple of people on the team came up with this concept that our body that has a higher rate than Amazon was kind of Rhode Island and so just saying now congratulations on creating the coolest the young calling sensory aber and I was like you know what that's kind of true like you're only on your video calls from the shoulders up like this is the only way you can just kind of show your style your ball cap right now and so we we shot a campaign that was and work from home David and Cameron Pollack or videographer basically kind of creative directed it came up with it executed it and when we deployed in our digital advertising it's just landed and says you know the world understood here coming from the place that everyone's head we're kind of in and still not saying it's the end of the world we're just saying let's have fun while we're at home for a little bit and so granted you know you've you've all dead they've slowly open things back up and for now kind of all of our future campaign than the ones are just about to run around showing you where you're hopefully going to be in the coming months and getting back outside and doing all the things that you may be kind of sick of being turned up missing out on well it worked it obviously remind us remind us that the hope that there is going to live in the television slowly and oh by the way any any usage your advanced Brian Kelly to have you back again millon brand dot com if you ever see.

Nordstrom
"nordstrom" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

04:36 min | 1 year ago

"nordstrom" Discussed on KOMO

"For a lot of these big retailers like Nordstrom right here along with the in Bellevue is really assessing how much they lost and how they start to move forward because we have to remember we are still in the pandemic were retail has taken such a hit and so this is just another blow to them and particularly their bottom lines and the morale because Kelly Koopmans reporting published twenty harder spending today in the south and tracking the damage from overnight success here of call now at the Renton landing this was a sign of some organized looting overnight as those who were intent on stealing from different retail shops made their way throughout much of the south and ended to Bellevue what I can tell you right now is here at the landing you don't see any smash outdoor windows there are people who are going about shopping the shop that would be closed because of the stay home order those shops are still closed but otherwise people peacefully making their way around no sign of any demonstrators nor of any looters or rioters in Renton Charlie harder come on it was also a rough night across the mountains in Spokane which was under curfew overnight marinating Woodward says hundreds of people moved through the downtown area after a peaceful protest over the death of George Floyd with a broken buildings and looted businesses this is not who we are these are people who stay behind or are here only to cause trouble the Spokane county sheriff's office was called in to help the city police department KXLY reports police used tear gas and rubber bullets to force those looters to disperse no new covered nineteen deaths reported here in Washington but there are three hundred thirty two new cases that's the biggest one day increase since may first when they're three hundred fifty seven the health department doesn't know why there was such a big increase but many counties are moving into phase two of the economic reopening plan which does mean more social contact thousands of students were allowed to return to school in British Columbia today the schools Brian Calvert tells us not everyone was on board now before we go too far because not everyone saw I'd I'd this was volunteer only to finish the school year students in British Columbia have the option well actually their parents have the option of making the students stay home and continue learning on their computers or returning to school from what we know children are not the transmitters the super transmitters that we maybe thought they were carriers that we thought they were the cold cook sent her kids back today in parts of the world where because kids have gone back to school as long as they are really strict distancing measures in place handwashing things like that there haven't been you know breaks and in schools Patricia colon also a parent can't believe that Canada is pulling this covert trigger we're creating a situation in which we are asking our children to be responsible for the health and wellness of our communities and that's an unfair **** remember one of the main arguments around here for counseling school wasn't necessarily to protect kids it was to protect teachers and other adults because kids are carriers of the coronavirus is fine he was somebody who had compromised immune system I would be terrified that my well being is in the hands it's an interesting debate to keep Iran and many school leaders admit that since there's only a few weeks of school left in British Columbia this is really a practice run for scholarly social distancing before the fall Brian Calvert komo news at ten forty side to check into the holy exterior sports desk and many voices in the world of sports chiming in after the weekend of protests in many cases the but people are talking about the killing of George Floyd Michael Jordan one of them saying he was deeply saddened truly pained and playing angry he said I stand with those who are calling out the ingrained racism and violence toward people of color in our country we have had enough Mets star Pete Alonso chiming in on the death of Floyd posting on Instagram that his heart has been broken and says he won't remain silent on the subject Alonso says he'll stand with those who have been discriminated against based on the color of their skin chase Elliott enjoyed a gun collided as they approached the final lap of yesterday's NASCAR Cup race at Bristol that allow Brad Keselowski to speed right past him during his second win of the season the first driver to win multiple races in the five Cup events since NASCAR resume to may seventeenth which exports attended forty past each hour traffic and weather is coming up is it a you're ready to get back to work or do you think controlling the spread of the covert vote nineteen viruses still of more importance will talk to a Washington post reporter who is weighing both those issues Scott Clement coming up next here on call Capital One those life doesn't alert you about your credit card.

Nordstrom Bellevue
"nordstrom" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:38 min | 1 year ago

"nordstrom" Discussed on KOMO

"Mall's Nordstrom is CEO of the department store chain Nordstrom he tells ABC news it goes way beyond just cutting down on the number of spots in which to shop it's a massive acceleration of the changes that have been in place for industry for a few years now and those are most towers are great cars not just to be calmer specs are really of the millions digital assets in physical assets that include using stores more and more as warehouses to fill online orders to get shoppers back in person workers will be wearing masks and putting social distancing rules in place an order from says his company still learning how to adapt to new ways of doing business certainly have all of our stores close yeah we've been around for over nineteen years and it's just never happened for what it's worth Jerry Preston ABC news drivers continue taking advantage of the extra room on the roads with so many people staying home state patrol tells komo they're begging and pleading with drivers to just slow down last Monday and so how much county five motorcycle officers for state patrol ticketed sixty two drivers going between eighty and a hundred miles an hour change of Ryan Burke says they're seeing the same thing in Pierce and Thurston county thing about two weeks ago hundreds or miles an hour right it's happening on a daily basis out here several drivers have been stopped going a hundred twenty hundred thirty miles an hour common these days as drivers apparently cannot resist opening it up on the open road state trooper heather acts you know you can look at the state patrol's Twitter account and every single day out there is banging the drum on slow down his home is county earlier this month driver of a corvette was arrested for reckless driving and D. Y. the thirty one year old man was going one hundred ninety two miles an hour Carly Johnson come on news traffic the crash and totem lake on northbound four oh five just before northeast one sixtieth street it's taking up the right lane see what I. see to the left to get by it's it'll still watching some police activity on south on Third Avenue and James street blocking the right lane and in shoreline the northbound five exit eastbound highway one oh four is closed until five o'clock tomorrow morning for overnight road work our next couple traffic at eight thirty four the como forecast from the eco roof weather desk Golmaal whether good evening arts Sanders becoming mostly cloudy tonight slight chance of rain late lows near fifty tomorrow partly sunny in the morning then becoming sunny highs the sixties Saturday mostly cloudy slight chance of rain in the morning then a chance of rain in the afternoon lower seventies Sunday rain likely in the morning rain at times in the afternoon highs topping out in the upper sixties Monday mostly cloudy a chance of rain in the morning chance of showers and a slight chance of thunderstorms in the afternoon highs in the upper sixties for Tuesday partly sunny slight chance of afternoon rain upper sixties overnight lows around fifty that's your latest weather from the Cobell forecast team B. C. entertainment news the lady singer to postpone a twenty twenty world tour because of the cove in nineteen pandemics for where we go track was due to kick off in Mexico and South America at the end of may followed by some run through Europe then a trip to Asia she got in three U. S. shows in March before everything shut down strong ratings for Wednesday night's season finale of survivor on CBS the most watched season Anderson's fall two thousand seventeen topping the night in total viewers but the mask singer on fox continued its domination number one in the all important demo of.

Nordstrom CEO ABC
"nordstrom" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"nordstrom" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Near the Nordstrom entrance where the currency exchange kiosk is located investigators were back inside north bridge this morning apparently looking for more video evidence and speaking at length with an employee at the kiosk the offender from last night may eventually returned to a currency exchange since the bag he stole was said to contain about twenty four hundred dollars in euros and British pound there were no reports of injuries there politics now Democrat Kamilla Harris's dropped out of the race for president among the Democrats her brightest moment might have come after the very first debate but she never built on that she made the announcement in the staff call today and in central Indiana police say one person is dead another hurt after two vehicles collided with the same train in separate crashes the first car was struck by the train in in Indianapolis suburb there while they were cleaning that up those said S. U. V. a second vehicle ran into the train while it was stopped the driver of the SUV was killed WGN sports college basketball northwestern is at Boston College tonight the pre game with Dave ended at five forty five the Tippit six right here on seven twenty WGN and W. G. and radio dot com your money on WGN the Dow was down three to twenty one points the nasdaq down sixty nine in the S. and P. five hundred down twenty five checking in at the merc nearby cattle contract down twenty five cents hogs up two dollars and twenty two cents trends in today's grain trade week down eight and a quarter cents a bushel corn unchanged in soybeans up three quarters of a cent I'm Steve were trained on Chicago's very own seven twenty WGN for Chicago news on demand northwestern medicine brings you WGN radio flash briefing all Amazon smart speakers set your news preference for.

Amazon WGN S. U. Indianapolis Indiana Nordstrom Chicago Steve north bridge W. G. Dave Boston College Democrats president Kamilla Harris twenty four hundred dollars three quarters two dollars
"nordstrom" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

04:43 min | 2 years ago

"nordstrom" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"At Nordstrom by one measure those strategies are working after years when it seemed as if Amazon was swallowing the industry many large old school chains like coals in Macy's have largely stabilized they're lagging sales but reporter Michael Corkery at The New York Times says those victories may be short lived because retailers are caught up in a seemingly never ending race against Amazon Michael explained on a treadmill feels like you know after years when it and what it looks like they're you know our main source like a Macy's there are you know businesses were in serious trouble they have now shifted cut you know built after ecommerce operations you know you can return your I think you buy online in the stores like they've they've created a a seamless online and in store experience and yet as the act more customers all of these investments and really cost them in profit and so it feels like each time they catch up with Amazon we have to spend more money catch up with the next advancement that Amazon makes so it's it's a bit like being on a treadmill for the old line retailers what's the Amazon advantage Michael well it's it's a couple of things but the big thing is the Amazon is valued by investors as a growth stock so for decades the shareholders of Amazon as long as the company was growing it didn't need to make so much money didn't need it but so that means that the other retailers that are valued like most companies will you know that the company make money or not they didn't have a chance of competing with that because Amazon could spend sweetly in building up their warehouses in building out there you know new technological gadgets like Alexa you know investing in in in one day shipping even if it was costing them money and that grew their customers and grew their dominance online and the other retailers that were you know operating are still operating on you no way in reality he still had to try to do all that and not a problem yeah we speak with Michael Corkery business reporter at The New York Times this piece is called chasing Amazon retailers are in a never ending arms race so you referenced it I want to ask you about that stat equal in your story from Morgan Stanley which says the typical order for one day shipping is eight dollars and thirty two cents an Amazon spends ten dollars and fifty nine cents to fulfill and ship it so they're losing money on many cell how does that so how does that square yeah it's it's really when you see that that and you look at just how much money they're they're willing to lose on each item you see just how unprofitable you commerce can be and you know that's okay for Amazon because they're gaining so many sale and they're growing their dominant online so quickly and so significantly but if Amazon is faced with those numbers so is every other retailer and yet they're not growing as fast and so it really does you know raise the question I mean what if they said you know I mean does it does it really and I mean when you're up against the company yeah the company that is still considered one most valuable enterprises in the world and yet it's losing money on a on a core much of the core business how do you compete against that it just doesn't seem to be a fair fight for the other retailers I thought it was interesting interesting if you can't beat em join em type thing lease on a small scale you referenced Coles kind of partnering with Amazon how's that work tools is a strident what it DO regardless you know the biggest initiative of the year which is putting the kiosk in all of their house in stores we for free you can come and pick your Amazon return get packed and shipped out to Amazon they'll do it all for you but meanwhile the idea that you have now come to Coles and so while you're there presumably you're gonna buy something cold that seems pretty great and I think that's the big thing that people don't like about all that shopping is the returns and cost and hassle of it but I mean how many incremental sales that will generate from Kohl's I mean it it it's a big bad at it it remains to be seen what that's gonna do the guy traffic but it really speaks to I think the desperation of some of these people to retailers thanks Michael Michael Corkery at The New York Times it's twenty minutes now in front of the hour on this morning coming.

Nordstrom Amazon Macy reporter one day twenty minutes eight dollars ten dollars
"nordstrom" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

05:00 min | 2 years ago

"nordstrom" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"At Nordstrom by one measure those strategies are working after years when it seemed as if Amazon was swallowing the industry many large old school chains like coals in Macy's have largely stabilized they're lagging sales but reporter Michael Corkery at The New York Times says those victories may be short lived because retailers are caught up in a seemingly never ending race against Amazon Michael explained on a treadmill feels like you know after years when it when it looked like there you know Armen stores like Macy's there are you know businesses weren't serious trouble they have now shifted cut you know built after ecommerce operations you know you can return your I think you buy online in the stores like they've they've created as a seamless online and in store experience and yet as the act more customers all of these investments and really cost and profit and so it feels like each time they catch up with Amazon we have to spend more money catch up with the next advancement that Amazon makes so it's it's a bit like being on a treadmill for the old line retailers what's the Amazon advantage Michael well it's it's a couple of things but the big thing is that Amazon is valued by investors as a growth stock so for decades the shoulders of Amazon as long as the company was growing it didn't meet Ted make so much money didn't need it but that means that the other retailers that are valued like most companies will you know that the company make money or not they didn't have a chance of competing with because Amazon could spend sweetly in building up their warehouses in building out there you know new technological gadgets like Alexa you know investing in in in one day shipping even if it was costing them money and that grew the customers and grew their dominance on line and the other retailers that were you know operating are still operating on you no way in reality he still had to try to do all that in turn out a problem yeah switch because Michael Corkery business reporter at The New York Times this piece is called chasing Amazon retailers are in a never ending arms race so you referenced it I want to ask you about that stat you quoted in your story from Morgan Stanley which says the typical order for one day shipping is eight dollars and thirty two cents an Amazon spends ten dollars and fifty nine cents to fulfill and ship it so they're losing money on many cell how does that how does that square yeah it's it's really when you see that that and you look at just how much money they're they're willing to lose on each item you see just how on profitable you commerce can be and you know that's okay for Amazon because they're gaining so many sales and they're growing their dominant online so quickly and so significantly but yeah Amazon is faced with those numbers so is every other retailer and yet they're not growing as fast and so it really does you know raise the question I mean what if they said you know I mean does it does it really yeah when you're up against the company yeah the company that is still considered one most valuable enterprises in the world and yet it's losing money on a on a core much of the core business he gets that it just doesn't seem to be a fair fight for the other retailers I thought it was just an interesting if you can't beat em join em type thing at least on a small scale you referenced a Coles kind of partnering with Amazon how's that work cool who's a strident what it DO regardless you know the biggest initiative of the year which is putting in all of their house in stores we foodie you can come and get your Amazon return it packed taped and shipped out to Amazon they'll do it all for you but meanwhile the idea that you have now come to cold and so while you're there presumably you're gonna buy something cold that seems pretty great and I think that's the big thing that people don't like about all that shopping is the returns and cost and hassle of it but I mean how many incremental sales that would generate from Kohl's I mean it it it's a big bad I it remains to be seen what that's gonna do the guy traffic but it really speaks to I think the desperation of some of these people to retailers thanks Michael Michael Corkery at The New York Times it's twenty minutes now in front of the hour on this morning coming up next experimenting with orchestras and wall casts had enough Turkey yeah me too and I'm pretty sure so a lot of people on your gift list so all.

Nordstrom Amazon Macy Michael Corkery reporter one day twenty minutes eight dollars ten dollars
"nordstrom" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"nordstrom" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"All. what happens tomorrow after today I have no idea. wouldn't. if if form rings true probably gap up two hundred. but guess what there's nothing you can do about any help that happens. that was sarcasm. but again. I don't doubt anything anymore. with the mountains and the sea and central banks and trump. we just let you know before today what we you know we were telling you already half the market crappy. then we'll just stick to the other half by the way the good half of the market's been doing nothing it's just been holding off. every day I'm looking for real outperformers in the market there a minute. over the past few months. here I have been out having to do. my job easy right now. my job is easier now. I'm a spectator. if I see. one or two names show some of. I'll have my first clue. member I told you value was getting a bit over gross. the growth was out of there but I mean I'm not talking Nordstrom off its lows. few of the things. I believe it was trial swamped today announced stuff free traits..

Nordstrom
"nordstrom" Discussed on The Chalene Show

The Chalene Show

03:34 min | 2 years ago

"nordstrom" Discussed on The Chalene Show

"Your butt off. Like, I'm dripping in sweat, usually by the time I finished. So you also can't wear anything that, you know, the colors changed under your arms when you sweat. It's a whole thing. The whole thing you got to wear a special bra, if you're going to hook the bell pack on the Mike pack, and so what usually do is. I hate shopping. I hate going to the mall and shopping I like shop online. So okay. Here's how I do this. I I ordered a bazillion things. I usually order from Nordstrom dot com. I order from sometimes Neiman Marcus, but mainly Nordstrom and site called revolve R E, V O L V, E dot com. I'm gonna apologize to you right now. Because if you go there, you'll spend hours and hours and hours. And then I ordered a massive amount of clothes, and then I try on everything and the things I like keep what I don't I send back, and then everything has to be altered because that makes the difference in fit, especially if you're you know, I'm five two. So almost everything us we altered. And if it's better, it looks more classy, I don't I don't alter everything that I buy. But if I'm going to be on stage just just looks more polish. So I have everything altered and that takes a while. And sometimes I will buy things, and I'll try it on like, oh, this will be really cute, but we're like sleeveless. And so I've got this great seamstress shadow to ISA ISA, Laura. She's also a designer to and I can just go like, hey, there's this were sleeveless, and it was cut here. And we put a sash around it. And she can just like she's taking things that I bought off the rack and then totally super cool, customized pieces. So sometimes when you guys asked me, hey, Where'd you get that? I don't know how to answer because it's like, you're not. Going to be able to find it because it's been you know, crafted by ISA, she's better touch on it. And then she also I can find like a blouse or a pair of pants. I absolutely love. And I'm like, hey, can you make these for me in like five of their colors? Just so dumb. But I do that. And she's like, sure. So that's awesome. Okay. So this marketing impact that's in February really excited about the, you know, preorder zip been happening with the book and thank you for those of you who already preordered the book one through one method super excited about that coming out. So what I've been doing this month is I want this book to be so not just the book. I want the whole experience to literally change people's freaking lives, and you can't do that would just a diet plan or an exercise program you've got to start. With mindset you've got to start with the whole person like what makes people struggle with their health and their weight and their horn. Moans isn't just food. It's your stress. It's your relationships. It's the way you beat yourself up. It's this, you know, sick you're thinking where you just get stuck on a loop. And so I want to help people by really coaching them with mindset. And because you know, I do a lot of that inside the one three one program the online program, but like I didn't have the same ability to do that in a book. So what I've been able to do with my publisher is anyone who preordered the book actually will receive as a bonus my audio trailing. I'm creating this audio training program right now, all about mindset, it's all brand new Audio's. So if you have pre or the book, or if you want to and you like this bonus you just go.

Laura ISA Neiman Marcus Nordstrom publisher
"nordstrom" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"nordstrom" Discussed on KOMO

"There's word that Blake Nordstrom has died. Komo's Bill O'neil has more. We're told the fifty eight year old who led the Seattle based retailer with his brothers died. Early Wednesday morning. The company says it's executive leadership will continue under the direction of co-presidents Pete. And Eric Nordstrom last month. The Seattle times had reported Nordstrom plan to reduce his travel schedule in the coming months while beginning treatment, but told the securities and Exchange Commission he had otherwise plan to continue working through the process below Neil. Komo news and Nordstrom stock today. Taking a little bit of a dip. When that news was announced back to its previous gains higher by close to two percents. Takes us toward our propel insurance money update with Jim Cesco. The first Wall Street session of two thousand nineteen was similar to a lot of those from two thousand eighteen volatile trading. Stocks spending much of the day in negative territory. Did finished slightly higher. The Dow Jones industrials rose eighteen points. The NASDAQ gained thirty the SNP edged up three points. Wall Street is coming off its worst year since two thousand eight but some market watchers are confident we'll see a better twenty nine thousand nine for US. Stocks warden school, finance professor. Jeremy Siegel said on CNBC earlier today that even with slower economic growth, he expects a rebound between five and fifteen percent for the market index is this year. That's your money. Now, local stocks were mixed today. Again, we mentioned Nordstrom stock higher by about two percent, Microsoft. Starbucks Expedia down by close to a half percent, Costco, Boeing, Amazon and Alaska Airlines all higher Amazon the big winner of the day up by nearly two and a half percent. Aaa traffic is straight ahead. Are you ready to get in every day? I wake up at five to give dad his medicine. Every day. I wake up at five to.

Nordstrom Eric Nordstrom Blake Nordstrom Komo Bill O'neil Jeremy Siegel Seattle Stocks warden school US Jim Cesco Amazon CNBC executive Starbucks Costco Exchange Commission Microsoft