20 Episode results for "Nordisk"

Beyond the Pill: How Pharma is Being Challenged to Innovate for the Patient with Amy West, Head of U.S. Digital Transformation & Innovation at Novo Nordisk

Outcomes Rocket

25:30 min | Last month

Beyond the Pill: How Pharma is Being Challenged to Innovate for the Patient with Amy West, Head of U.S. Digital Transformation & Innovation at Novo Nordisk

"Everyone this kyle signi host. The outcomes rocket pharma podcasts. In today i have the pleasure of welcoming amy west back to the show. Amy is head of us digital transformation innovation at novo nordisk. She leads novo nordisk in identifying transformational digital opportunities and breakthrough innovations that enhance patient healthcare experiences and outcomes she oversees opportunity exploration testing and market validation through novo nordisk internal incubator as well as with partnerships including startups entrepreneurs and third party accelerator incubators to test pilots and scale viable solution. She has over twenty five years of strategic marketing and business development experience including work in both the client and agency environments across a broad range of disciplines. She's a twenty eighteen and top forty healthcare transformer in two thousand thirteen. She was awarded the pm. Three sixty trailblazer award in the diabetes metabolic disease. Category amy. welcome back to the show. Thank you for coming on thank you. I'm excited to be here. Awesome amy maybe to kick things off. Tell me a little bit about yourself. What drew you to working in the pharmaceutical value train. Sure so it really kind of goes back to something. I'd shared on an earlier. Podcast i did with you guys a couple of months ago but it really speaks to the fact that i you know. I'm a patient just like we all are and when it comes to whether or not you're working in the healthcare space or not. You are a patient and you have your experiences. And i think the engaging in the healthcare ecosystem never been like a wonderful pleasant experience. There's a lot of red tape. A lot of a lot of challenges there and it can be very frustrating. And i'm actually going through some things now with of aging parents and trying to manage their sort of journey right now. Even you know being in a couple of states away it's it's very challenging and there's a lot of opportunity to make that experience better when we think about what's happening with digital virtual data disruption and. It's we're seeing a lot of it. Obviously with louis been tree with co the data acceleration has really taken off. But i would say that we've got a lot of work to do because they're still with all with all of that progress it's clunky. It's still not really working the way we needed to. There's a lot of opportunity there. And that's why it's kind of things that make nearly passionate being a patient myself and being a caregiver to others your patients but then also seeing that this opportunity that we have with innovation whether it's technology or a combination of high tech in traditional thorough ways that we can make engagement in the healthcare ecosystem so much better so much more productive and so much more efficient from a time resource and money and cost standpoint so trying to find those solutions are. It's what really excites me in what i'm really passionate about. And what. I have the honour and pleasure of of leading never notice for our us organization. I love the you know thinking about ways to leverage technology to really focus around the patient and make a better experience for them right. Because i ended up today in healthcare. It's all about the patient or at least should be right. Yeah and i think we we all mean that we all say that but when you really get down to the nuts and bolts a lot of the times the approaches that we take really there's so many factors to include i think sometimes when the business considerations come into the logistical considerations coming enjoyed the resource considerations The patient need really gets lost at times. And i think that's kind of where we are. We are kind of this this precipice right now. Trying to to really tip that point back to really. How do we really builds an opportunity. A regimen Pharmacotherapy and services that are going to really meet the needs of the end user first and then all the benefits to the broader ecosystem will follow focus on the patient. And so tell me about. What's most exciting today in your day to day work. Are you focused on at novartis. Sure so again. My area of focus is not really in anything. That's going to deliver a solution in next couple of years or really looking at that longer term disruptive area of innovation when we think about all the changes that are impacting healthcare and the demand that we're seeing from our customers. So would i. You're looking to do is really kind of in some ways. Take off the novo. Nordisk pharmaceutical manufacturers hat and see what is the true pain point of our end user customer. And how do we. How do we develop an experiment with a hypothetical solution. They're going to meet the needs of the customer potentially beyond pharmacotherapy. And so that's where you're thinking about. When i think about the place that i'm coming from with novo nordisk. We are very strong. Portfolio in diabetes obesity chronic metabolic disease areas that there are so many great medications therapies solutions. That are lifesaving and important but these disease states are very behaviorally based as well and so medication alone isn't going to be enough to get us to the right and state the right quality of life for the individual and the rights outcome for those in ecosystem who are paying for the stuff so you had we think beyond pharmacotherapy. And i would say that. Obviously the traditional business model for pharmaceutical companies is to manufacture and sell medication. and you'll pharmacotherapy. But now there is the strong impetus to move beyond the proverbial pill and that's coming from a couple of different considerations set. This is really where my team is focusing. So it's based on these notions. That medicine alone is not enough for the patients. To achieve their optimal clinical outcomes and quality of life particularly in these chronic health disease states. Another notion is that you'll beyond pale. Services are becoming an important element of achieving differentiation in a very competitive market they become essential because many of our pharmaceutical products are not highly differentiated from their competitors. You'll based on the clinical data alone so these adjunct and support services can enhance the value and provide a competitive edge for the product potentially into the future. And then really thirdly it's you know. Our our pharmaceutical pipelines are being challenged beyond the pill offerings can deliver new and diverse value and potentially new sources revenue that we can then invest into future innovation. We really need to look at what's happening in other parts of the healthcare system where digital leaders that were your traditional healthcare players like the amazon's google's are really seething these opportunities to develop virtual platforms for personalized convenient patient communication coordination. They're not playing in the pharmacy space. But they're playing in the service base because they know that that is an integral part of getting to the right outcomes and also that we can also look at you. Know there's a live disruptive alliances that are happening in the space to like the merger of cvs aetna where they are really forcing traditional Healthcare companies to bring patients services to the forefront in addition to the medication absolutely loved that you this the subtle but significant transition from pharmaceutical manufacturers. Just developing these. These great products and assets avid significant impact to ensuring that the patient takes it and then also how we provide wraparound services to really make sure that the patient's health is the key outcome right that focused on and it's not just taking a pill and that's that's not enough there can be more that's provided to the patient to ensure that they stay healthy and stay out of the hospital. Yeah and i went you. Add there to that joint. You're saying is that the really important point of this. You know the service offering again is it has to take a person. Centric approach in order to deliver the value that the end users going to recognize acknowledge and use a knee. The beyond postitions cannot just be cannot be a business solution has to. It requires a clear understanding of our our patient. Customers needs and to get to that we have to take an empathetic human centric. Not patient or business centric approach to develop those services that are gonna really need the knees and end the pain point four for the end user and that means we have to start with the individual customers problem to solve i and as far we had to start thinking of involving our end user patient customers in areas that we never considered before like get them involved in early clinical trial design decision making processes obviously within the confines of the regulatory space. We certainly wanna be ruined comply with all that but we can bring you know those mindsets into that development process because they're the ones that are going to have to work for at the end of the day so it's important to bring them into all these different aspects that are part of the pharmaceutical value chain of development. I absolutely love that. And so maybe you could speak a little bit about some of the challenges that you have specifically identified and then some these wrap around services that you have created to address those challenges. Schorr me obviously. There are tons of challenges out there but when i think about a work that my team and i are doing for in this sort of disruptive innovation space and looking at you wanna top challenges that we see you know are also opportunities right so it's this rise consumerism in health care again. You digital technology has really gone a long way to create these great experiences for people as customers in other industries whether it is you know retail or financial services. Travel leisure all that good stuff but it really hasn't taken hold and health for yet because of the complexities that we have. But there is an expectation that this changes people want a better healthcare experience. And especially as i mentioned earlier you know we've seen the acceleration of digital virtual coded. That's not gonna go away. And i expect a better experience as as you our customers. So how do we. How do we respond to that. And how do we acknowledge that. Make it easier for them because our patients are vulnerable. And they're being asked to spend more money towards their healthcare spent and pre curve. It you know poor patient. Experience in rising to burden necessitated people to be more engaged in their healthcare management decision. Making but again that's only accelerated now as we are emerging or trying to emerge from this this code as but by virtue of deaths were seeing increased engagement by end users as they're navigating the system making choices based on personal preference convenience and desired experiences so again. This is consumers is an expectation that they're applying to healthcare. And this is where. I see with a lot of opportunity but we and we can learn a lot from those players that are not traditional healthcare the amazons and the goals because they understand customer expectations in actions they know how to use data and insight to create a good experience now and into the future that can support things like better habits behaviors that can support prevention. And things like that and you were also. There's a lot to be learned also from the telecommunications industry because they're getting into this space they have a lot of understanding from your obedient to consumer point of new. And they're looking to see how can they leverage their technology in this space. Because they know that they know how their customers without journey and experiences and they understand speed and they're trying to go for that versus you know they're trying to eliminate all the red tape and all the things that were always stumbling around in the healthcare space so i think take those those btc type typos mindsets and applying them in healthcare and transferring. That is a huge opportunity. And that's where when you think about that challenge of derived consumerism. I kind of you. How can we leverage digital mobile. Iot technology and create. Would i kind of call this portable ecosystem for the individuals so that we can shift the locus of control from the healthcare clinic setting. Who's calling the shots as to when you can come in when you can talk to the doctor when you're gonna get your lab results to shifting that control to the patient. Hey i'm gonna engage. When wearing how i want you because of my connectivity in my home environment or because of my remote patient monitoring access or my voice technology i can now engage in ray the puts me more in control is a better experience for me. It's it's more convenient. It's less intrusive and it creates a better relationship from me with my healthcare team now. I think that we've got a long way to go to gut there but that is sort of in my line my vision for how we can start to really address this rise of consumerism address. The expectations around convenience. I don't want to think about my health all the time. Because i'm now immediately surrounded by this technology that can catch us information and help coordinate the care that i need without me having to really even do a whole lot. It's such a challenging problem right. Many people are saying know. How healthcare is archaic technologically and from a consumer experience. But i think there's real aspects of regulation and complexity around including the doctors and the decision making and patients don't always have all the information necessary to make a decision that it just creates more complexity around how to design a world class experience but at the end of the day this is going to have a outsized impact an individual's life right if you amy when you solve this problem it's going to have a far greater impact and the you know the one click purchase on amazon through their website. And this is. This is really transformational. When i think it was really interesting to about this concept of portable health. Is that everybody's different. And so we mentioned you know the decision making peace when we when we think about digital technology. That's all about collecting data and there are people that are going to want to have that data so that they can use it for better decision making for their own personal reasons and then there are the people that they don't want the they don't wanna make the decisions but you can still capture it into your care team or give it to you. Give it to your doctor. Give it to your your son or daughter. That's helping you and let them make decisions. But the choice is yours. Because the connectivity is there and it's going to work for you based on when where and how you want to engage and that's the beauty of it and it's it's a big ask and it's certainly something i'm going to be able to solve on my own. It's going to be a lot of these players across ecosystem coming together and working together and kind of even displacing some of these sort of silo of business models that we have is really going to be an integrated sort of co creation and collaboration process to be very interesting to see how how come together absolutely interesting to say the least was going to be a very exciting less and so when you think kind of in the future for novo nordisk and from your perspective. How do you think this is going to transition. What are some of those integrated solutions that are going to have to be provided to really support the patient through their healthcare journey. And i think this is where again kind of like you know. It's not a one size fits all it's about you know. How do we create the connectivity that everybody can benefit from so an a lot of it in some ways an example i would give is not a future where we all live in a smart home or smart city and the environment in which we live is is connected to capture information about us from the time we wake up in the morning to the time we put her head down to go to sleep and then even why we're sleeping the environment around us is capturing information whether it's a wearable is an environmental sensor of some sort or robotic type of component or voice technology. But it's going to be a way to capture information across all these different sort of modalities that can then bring it all together and consolidated in a way. That's going to give a data picture of what's happening with me. And then you marry that up with potentially dna genetic information and your social factors the environmental which live and those aspects of who. I am as a person Again the social determinants of health and because those are miserable things that have an overwhelming influence on. You know your health your potential health outcome as well and so i kinda see it as this. This sort of connected world the challenges that are part of that those if collecting this data. You've got consider the the privacy elements the interoperability permissions. Those types of things as well. There's a long way to go there. And en- data very can be a very tricky tricky area because then it's like if if there's information is being collected how's it been used which is being used for me if i truly own my data and i'm w. access to it will. Am i going to charge you a fee for that because you are now using my information for these reasons or is it going to be you know the way it is now i as an individual in theory i dated but i have no way to monetize it or own that it's it's just kind of out there being used and we all certainly know that there's a lot of Sort of the various die of things where people are reaching data using it for for things that are going to cause problems. So there's a lot to be challenged there but i think over time as we advance this and the advancements are really growing exponentially will be able to get to this place that again that the information is going to be collected in a very convenient ambient ways that we're not having to take somebody actions and being so conscientious about what we're doing and then we can use that information fruit for different decision making whether it's health related or well his related or whatever you in this future that you're describing right now when data's ubiquitous there's an opportunity to prevent diseases from progressing to really focus in on those individuals and ensure that the right decision is being made to keep them out of the hospital to keep them from progressing too high cost specialty drug any thoughts on that and that transition yeah it's on whole notion of well-cared versus the care and or health versus to care and i definitely think that the industry is talking about a lot of prevention relaxed however the reality is the. Us healthcare ecosystem is still primarily incentivized based on reactive. Sick in acute care reimbursements but we are headed toward a significant paradigm shift more toward that prevention in productivity model right now just hasn't been prioritize or compensated and recently. I attended a reuters health conference and there was a great quote from matt aisles. Who is the ceo of a hip. Which is the national association of health insurance plans. You know the payer side of things and he said it's all about moving from sick hair to healthcare shifting care upstream with preventative healthcare models. And you'll payers the payer bets on the future of the. Us healthcare are things like leveraging digital to address the social terms of health emphasizing preventive care population hope management in whole person healthcare and those are all required us to think much more holistically about our customers and howard going to support them again beyond. Just the pharmacotherapy or the pill. We have to do more than that. Because we can't achieve any of those focus areas or those priorities for those who are paying for it. If we don't do that. I think there's going to be so critical as the us. Healthcare system and really healthcare in general progresses and. Try to move forward. And i think we're just highlighted is conference is is going to take collaboration between payers and pharma manufacturers. It's not just one entity or part of the value chain that will be able to solve. This is really going to have to be a group effort absolutely and because the current modest is not economically sustainable and we are going to be looking more toward this predictive preventive curative personalized approach to healthcare. And it's gonna require partnership it's going to require partnerships across pharmaceutical manufacturers across technology organizations to startups of the world. And maybe even the dc companies that are out there but you know farm a really hashed Scary space for for farming because that's not model and but we do have to really think as pharmaceutical manufacturers we have to decide if our mission is to provide health or provide medication and if our mission is to provide health and i would argue that. That's what i'm hearing that. We need to move you on the pill and in order to do that we are going to have to partner and we're going to have to find new models in new ways of working in order to deliver the outcomes and the quality of life and their customers are expecting. And if we don't do that and we just stay a we're just gonna do Pharmacotherapy we're going to be very we're going to be pigeonholed because others are going to take over in those areas that we are not engaging in and whether or not we want to acknowledge it. You can argue that. The pharma industry is is. We're in the business of behavior also. It's not just pharmacotherapy. And that's an uncomfortable place to be. But when you're playing in these. Chronic health spaces where behavior and psychology at habit and routine and social factors. Come into significant. Play in your ability to engage in your health and wellness. You have to think about your business differently. I love it. I love it. I'm excited to see that transition. And so amy maybe to wrap things up. If you give us a closing thought. Sure well i would say that you know something that i think the last podcast that i have with you guys but i think about like every single day. It is a quote that i heard from peer gemologist. Who is a founder of singularity university. Which is the exponential thinking group organization. Which i recommend everybody look into about as much a futurist basically and he talks about whether it's health care or any other major challenge global challenge that we have. It's you know disparities in food and energy and things like that. The way to address and identifying opportunity is to become a namur of the problem. Not the solution. And that's what. I try to do every day with my team. We've really tried to embed ourselves from empathetic approach. What is the problem of our our customer. What is their pain. Point and use that as our north star to find keep us on the pacifying the right things that are going to help them and help novo nordisk be and continue to be a trusted credible partner when it comes to your health and wellness and so this idea again of become a name number of the problem not the solution down is going to lead us all to success. I love it amy. Thank you for coming on the show and sharing your expertise and have a wonderful day awesome. Well thanks so much. I really enjoyed talking with you guys and i appreciate the opportunity and stay well and hope to speak again. Flu take care.

Nordisk novo nordisk kyle signi amy west obesity chronic metabolic dise amy metabolic disease diabetes novartis amazon Amy Schorr aetna cvs louis us google national association of health reuters matt
Manufacturers are having a hard time keeping up with vinyl record sales

NPR's Business Story of the Day

02:01 min | 2 d ago

Manufacturers are having a hard time keeping up with vinyl record sales

"This message comes from NPR sponsor Wells Fargo, Wells Fargo's small business checking offers greater efficiency and control over daily finances so you can bank without missing a beat. Learn more about Wells Fargo's small business checking at Wells Fargo dot com. As some people will know vinyl records are popular again. That's right, according to the recording industry association vinyl is now the most profitable physical format in the business. I guess nobody's buying tapes anymore. Some manufacturers can't keep up. There's other companies. We just don't answer the phone. We'll at least tell you, we're not taking new clients. That's Eric Mueller, AKA Skippy. The president of pirates press. He says record sales took off, you guessed it during the pandemic. Chris Bell runs a smaller and more specialized manufacturing operation called one grew vinyl in wimberly Texas. In the 15 years plus that we've been running the business, the average turnaround time is probably about 14 business days. But right now, we're pushing like 5 months for black vinyl. Like Mueller has turned around time is also going up. But since things are jammed everywhere, bell says the situation is leading to more business for his small operation. The other day I just had a call from a band. They're like, can you just make a hundred to tie us over? Because a lot of these plants aren't taking orders until May of next year. That is not worried people will abandon vinyl like the sourdough starters in the back of their fridge. I think once you hear vinyl on a good turntable compared to say Spotify and stuff, it gets addictive. It is said to be a richer sound, and as for the long turnaround time, Mueller of pirates press says true fans will wait. This message comes from NPR sponsor, novo Nordisk, working to improve the lives of people with obesity through knowledge, science, and compassion, because obesity is a matter of biology, not just willpower, more at truth about weight dot com.

Wells Fargo recording industry association Eric Mueller AKA Skippy NPR Chris Bell wimberly Mueller Texas bell novo Nordisk obesity
White scholars can complicate research into health disparities

Short Wave

14:40 min | Last week

White scholars can complicate research into health disparities

"You're listening to shortwave. From NPR hey there, Maria goy here, guest hosting on shortwave for a few weeks. I'm a correspondent on the science desk. I cover health. One of the stark realities of this pandemic is it's uneven impact by race and ethnicity. COVID-19 has exposed long-standing and massive health disparities, resulting in people of color dying a disproportionately higher rates than other races in the U.S.. Stories about it are increasingly in the news across a wide variety of organizations and institutions and in academia and scientific journals. But science correspondent for statin is uly mcfarlane says research into health disparities has been around for a long time. You know, it dates back to WEB Dubois, you know, more than a century ago and generations of researchers of care deeply about these disparities that are really obvious and clear if you look, what she says is the collective national reckoning with those health disparities, which comes amid a broader reckoning with race that followed the murder of George Floyd. That's led to increased funding for studies and new interest from top journals. And that's leading to a mentality where people are just clamoring to get into the field. Some of them with no background. And the scientific publishing world is also having to confront its shortcomings. Jama, the journal of the American medical association dedicated an issue in August 2021 to racial and ethnic health disparities. But ocean noticed something. There were 5 research articles not a single one of the lead or senior authors was black, and just one of the co lead authors was Hispanic. So this issue while trying to address systemic racism in medicine is really recapitulating the entire problem. Usha reached out to jama for an interview. They declined. What they did say through a spokeswoman was that they don't consider demographics and who they publish. They just want to publish the best science and what critics would say is that's too neutral of a stance. You really need to. If you're going to fight racism, you need to intentionally push back against it. Today on the show, we're going to talk to usha Li mcfarlane about her reporting, how this new funding and interest has led to increased attention to the topic of disparities in healthcare and health outcomes, but also left out or pushed aside some researchers in the field. Many of them researchers of color. This is shortwave, the daily science podcast from NPR. This message comes from NPR sponsor, novo Nordisk, most people think obesity is just a matter of willpower, but it's a biologically based serious progressive disease with severe complications and decreased life expectancy. Novo Nordisk is working to change how the world sees and manages obesity. The first step in turning the tide is recognizing that obesity is a disease, all to help improve the lives of those who suffer from it, and to remove the social stigma. More at truth about weight dot com. So I want to start off by talking about el let one of your sources. Tell me who else is and what happened to them three years ago. Elle's incredible, she's a statistical epidemiologist, doing a postdoc and is working on her medical degree. Three years ago, she with her mentor a paper examining the lack of black physicians in the workforce. And the lack of Hispanic physicians in the workforce. And she had published this paper in PLOS one, which is sort of a good journal, but much smaller. In the jam a special issue that just came out in August, there was an article on the lack of black physicians in the workforce by a white physician. And what she told me in our interview is that she had submitted that work to jam a three years ago. They had absolutely no interest. They didn't even send it out for review. Wow, so when it came from L there was no interest three years later, it's up there in a special issue. Right and now because it's this new articles in a much higher profile journal, that will be the one that gets cited. That will be the one that people turn to. So she is expecting to be literally erased from the record. NL is a researcher of color, right? Yeah, she's a black trans family researcher. You write that health equity researchers welcome the new interest in their field and their new white allies, but it's complicated. Tell me about what you call health equity tourism. What does that term mean? Yeah, and that's actually L let's term. So we'll give it let's give her credit for it. But basically, this is a field that prides itself on being inclusive and not turning anyone away. So these are really hard and difficult conversations. A lot of the researchers entering the field are white, very well funded, you know, from top research universities with all kinds of support behind them. But too many people are coming in without background without knowledge without humility and just thinking they can just read one article and do a study. And this has been a field up until now dominated by people of color, right? It really has. I mean, there have been some excellent many of the top health equity researchers are white. There are people of all colors. But it's one of the few areas where minority scholars have really been the leaders. And if they get pushed out, you know, it's especially painful. But to play devil's advocate here, you know, someone might hear this and think, wait, isn't it a good thing that racial health disparities are finally getting the attention they deserve? Why is it a problem to have all these newcomers? And you mentioned something that bad science is getting done aren't from top researchers? That sounds confusing. Yeah, no, it's true. I mean, you don't want to push people out and sometimes maybe it's good to not have a background and bring an entirely new perspective. You might have like a breakthrough thought. But the problem is if bad work is done, that will pollute the scientific record and as many of my sources put out, then they'll have to spend all these years sort of overturning that back work. You know, this is really important work because literally these people are trying to save lives by ending health inequities. So you can't have people traipsing in, publishing one or two studies that aren't good and leaving. It just could harm this field we're literally lives are at stake. There's one example you gave in your article, it was offered by Jorge caballero who is a researcher and he was pointing to one high profile study, looking at COVID death rates that were higher in black patients than in white patients because they were more likely to get treated at poor performing hospitals. I mean, that sounds important. What was the problem with that study? Well, yeah, that study was widely covered in the media and a lot of people were like, well, this is good because it's exposing systemic racism that, you know, the quality of hospitals, which is based on the quality of a residential area, which is a huge issue that's involved racism and redlining and why certain neighborhoods are poorer than others. So we really need to highlight this. But doctor caballero looked into the data and just found that the study, even though these are sort of top researchers in their own field, he feels that they're not really schooled in health equity research because what they did was they pulled together white and Hispanic patient death rates and compared those to Black Death rates. And we all know that COVID death rates were very high in Hispanic populations. So that you shouldn't add them to a white group and compare them to black. So that underestimated the actual higher death rates. And they feel that this was poor work, and that any basic health equity researcher would have seen that right off the bat. And so there's many, many studies like this that are kind of sneaking into the literature. And once they're published unless they get retracted, which rarely happens that they stay there and they get cited and they continue, they continue on. And people, you know, people look to these journals to jama, the New England Journal of Medicine and others, doctors look to these for guidance and to make decisions. So if there's poor research in there, it really trickles down into patient care. And well, one thing we talk about is, who gets to do the research and who does research has to do with who gets the funding for that research? And one thing you wrote is that the new funding for health disparities research that's coming into the field, some of it is structured in a way that favors better resource researchers which often means researchers of color get left behind. Can we talk about that? You gave an example of new NIH grants. If you go to a big research university like a University of California campus or Harvard or duke, they have huge offices of people that are there to help you fill in your grant, make sure all the details are right. These grants are really heavy lift to submit. Research is that smaller universities or historically black colleges and universities, they often might have like one person to help or have to submit the grants on their own, you know, all while teaching and trying to do the research and working on community based research, which involves a lot of meetings with the community and very slow and labor intensive. So they're kind of already behind. To begin with. So they're really calling for NIH to equalize the playing field and make it easier for people who don't have all those resources behind them. Another thing you mentioned in your reporting is that some grant applications are phrased in a way that seems sort of geared toward white researchers. Yeah, this is from another amazing source of my doctor Whitney sewell, who's a lecturer at Harvard. She works on HIV prevention in black women, and she's filling out this grant. And in addition to all of the other things you have to fill out, there was a whole section, how will you contribute to diversity efforts at your new institution? And she said, hey, wait a minute, you know? I'm an only, like I'm a black woman. I'll probably be the only one in my department. I just contribute by existing. This was a specific grant for underrepresented minorities. So it was already targeted to people who are underrepresented. So her feeling is that's that added burden. It's what people call the minority tax. You have to not only get the job and do the research and get the grants. You have to be the chief diversity officer as well. You write that researchers of color feel, they pay a minority tax in another way, too, in the sense that they're often being asked to comment on or contribute to the work of newcomers to the field, but they're not necessarily getting any credit for it or advancing their own careers. Tell me more about that. Yeah, it's a really important point. And I don't think people are asking for a quid pro quo, but they're saying, if you want my ideas if you want me to review your grant on health equity research, if you want to use my data that I collected, you know, COVID vaccination rates and minority populations. Maybe you should also ask me to be on the grant with you. Maybe you should ask me to be a co author. Their field is much more collaborative. So they are used to working together and not just getting asked for something and never hearing from the person again. And I think some of the white researchers may not even realize because this is how they've operated may not even realize what they're doing is problematic. Do you think the journal editors are becoming more conscientious thinking about whose voices get heard because of course journals play an important gape keeping role in science in terms of what research they publish and whose research they publish. And who they asked to review that research. I think they really are. And I know Jim has been a lightning rod for a lot of these complaints, but many, many journals have been problematic in many of the same ways. The bigger journals that have budgets for hiring are changing, New England Journal is hired a deputy editor that has experience in health equity research. Health affairs has made a focus of this and is using established writers to mentor new and young writers of color so that they can get published. Well, I talked to a journal editor of a nursing journal who said, you know, it's been a problem. It's hard to find people to review. And with the minority tax, you know, many people of color are overloaded and they're being asked to do so much. But, you know, people are out there. My source is like, we are willing to review. We're willing to help. We know this is important. We're not being asked. So there's some kind of disconnect where the editors of journal saying there's not enough people. There's no one out there. And people locked out there raising their hands. They call on me. So I think as Alan while of health affairs told me, it's not about giving more work to the few people we've let into the club. It's about inviting more people in. And the question is, are you looking for those people? Because they are out there. Any last thoughts and reflections on your reporting? You know, what would you want to listen or do walk away with after hearing this conversation? Yeah, thanks for asking. You know, I hope people don't think this is insider baseball, like some academic medicine, journal intrigue, this work is, you know, we have a country where people of color are dying at higher rates of almost any disease you look at, whether it's COVID, diabetes, Alzheimer's, cancer, this kind of work is so important because it's trying to end these disparities and it's trying to save lives. Thank you so much for taking time to speak with us. Thank you. This episode was produced by Thomas Lou, edited by gisele Grayson and fact checked by Russia ridhi and Margaret Serena. I'm Marie goi. Thanks for listening. Support for this podcast comes from IBM. Today, we live in a world of the unexpected, but your customers still expect things to be simple and personalized. With IBM, you can do both businesses can automate IT processes across clouds. So employees can spend more time on customer needs. So whatever comes your way, you've got it covered, saving time and improving customer service. That's why so many businesses work with IBM. Visit IBM dot com to learn more. How do we reinvent ourselves? And what's the secret to living longer? I'm anush zomorodi, each week on NPR's Ted radio hour, we go on a journey with Ted speakers to seek a deeper understanding of the world, and to figure out new ways to think and create. Listen now.

Maria goy obesity uly mcfarlane George Floyd usha Li mcfarlane NPR Jorge caballero Usha Dubois novo Nordisk Novo Nordisk Jama American medical association Elle NPR NIH Whitney sewell NL caballero Harvard
The New Walmart Insulin: Everything You Need to Know

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

30:15 min | Last month

The New Walmart Insulin: Everything You Need to Know

"Diabetes connections is brought to you by Dario health, manage your blood glucose levels increase your possibilities by jibo kaipo pen the first premixed auto injector for very low blood sugar, and by DexCom, take control of your diabetes and live life to the fullest with DexCom. This is diabetes connections, with Stacey Sims. This week, the term Walmart insulin has always referred to cheap older formulations. Until this summer, a new agreement with novo Nordisk means Walmart is selling its own branded version of novolog. Real sense of fried for us at Walmart to hear the great feedback our pharmacists and pharmacy teams are very excited about the product and how they can help support patients. That's Michael Burke, director of brand pharmacy merchandising for Walmart. We'll talk about who can get this how much it costs. Why now? And what's next? This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your healthcare provider. Welcome to another week of the show, I am your host, Stacey Sims. And we aim to educate and inspire about diabetes with a focus on people who use insulin. My son was diagnosed right before he turned to back in 2006 and my husband lives with type two diabetes. I don't have diabetes, but I spent my career in broadcasting and that is how you get the podcast. Earlier this summer as many of you probably remember, Walmart announced its new agreement with novo Nordisk. It is selling the same insulin that they make under the Walmart brand. So it's called rely on novolog, and it's sold at Walmart at its Sam's clubs. This is not the older $25 so called Walmart insulin. That includes older versions such as regular and NPH, which can be used safely if you know what you're doing very rarely used in pumps and very rarely prescribed as a matter of routine. They're not the standard of care for modern day diabetes, but people do certainly use what many of you refer to as Walmart insulin. They still do use regular and NPH. But the vast majority of people who probably listen to this podcast and a regularly singing endocrinologist and have been diagnosed, let's say when the last 30 years are probably using novolog humalog and the newer faster acting insulins. So because Walmart is selling novolog, we might have to change what we mean when we say Walmart insulin. And now that the dust has settled a bit, I thought it would be a good idea to find out how it's going. And what it really means for people who use insulin. Unfortunately, I don't think it's changed the marketplace a lot. What it did prove at least to me is that the retail price of insulin with or without insurance is as arbitrary as most of us suspected. I mean, pardon my cynicism here, I do appreciate the folks from Walmart coming on to talk about this and I appreciate that they're doing something. I'm sure this new pricing will help some. It is $73, though for a vial, when the estimated cost of producing that vial is maybe four to $6, so it is still quite high. And that is the cash price by the way, with insurance as you'll hear it is likely a lot lower. So going in, please know, and most of you already know this. Bottom line, ask your doctor, ask your pharmacist, make sure you are getting the insulin that costs the least for you, according to whatever plan you have. There is so many hoops to jump through to ensure this if you don't have great insurance, you may want to go to get insulin dot org that's clearing house put on by beyond type one and all it really does is bring all the coupon programs together, so it's one place where you can find out what you can get. Get insulin dot org I will link that up in the show notes. We used it because as you'll hear in the interview and I've shared this before, our current insurance does not cover the insulin that my son uses and wanted to keep using, and we needed to use coupons for that. It did help us. If you're struggling, if you can't find these resources, post in the diabetes connections Facebook group, you are more than welcome. We have a lot of great people who could help you figure this out, but you know, do what you need to do as frustrating as it may be. Don't rush in your insulin if you can possibly help, but I know that sounds ridiculous to see them say that, but look one in four people in this country do rash in their insulin, so maybe there's something that we can do to kind of help you, as I said, jump through those hoops. All right, Michael Burke, director of brand pharmacy merchandising in just a moment, but first, diabetes connections is brought to you by Dario health, and we first noticed Dario a couple of years ago at a conference. Benny thought be able to turn your smartphone into a meter was pretty amazing. And I'm excited to tell you that Dario offers even more now. The Daario diabetes success plan gives you all the supplies and support you need to succeed, you'll get a glucometer that fits in your pocket unlimited test strips and lancets deliver to your door and a mobile app with a complete view of your data, the plan is tailored for you with coaching when and how you need it and personalized reports based on your activity. Find out more good to my Daario dot com slash diabetes dash connections. Michael, thanks for joining me a lot of information to get through. And I appreciate you coming on. Thank you so much for having me. Let's just start with kind of an explanation if you wouldn't mind. Take us through what Walmart is doing here. What's the new version of insulin that Walmart is selling? So we have recently launched analog insulins. We can get into second. The difference there, but it's an extension of our current line of influence. So the insolence that we've had at Walmart for some time now is the human insulins or the noble end products are extension and new launch now is an analog insulin, which are the newest version of fast acting insulin and can help better regulate someone's blood glucose levels. Very excited that we were able to get into this. It's been a large topic in the industry for a while on why we were just at human influence as a private brand offering and what more we could do. So very excited that we got into the analog insulins. It is the insulin to be used for a type one diabetic and preferred in most cases and type twos. Can you share a little bit about what happened here because this isn't something that Walmart could just do, right? This is a version of novolog. I mean, this is an agreement with novo Nordisk. Can you kind of take us through what the process? Yeah, so we have had a long-standing relationship with novo. They are the manufacturer of our human insulin, the noble end, rely on products that we had on the market. And so we see changes of recent in the industry and a real focus. I'd say from across the board from legislation to patient advocacy, the patients manufacturers, to pharmacies, to prescribers. There's been a large focus over the last two years on what more can be done in the space. And so it allowed us an opportunity to work with novo and expand what we are already had on the market as a private brand offering and bring a new private brand and new reliant offering in the novolog and novolog mix both in a flex pen and vial and offer a lower cost option for patients who had struggled with affordability to this point. This is a branded insulin. So you get rely on a brand, novo log, only at Walmart. Is that right? Is that how it works? Yes. So, like everything healthcare, it's got to be confusing, right? So novolog is the branded name that is the FDA filed and trademarked products from novo Nordisk. What we have done is partnered with novo Nordisk to launch a rely on novolog and a rely on novolog mix, same product, manufactured by novo Nordisk, manufactured here, actually in the U.S. and comes off the same production lines. Is the same insulin. The difference being that it is branded with Walmart's private brand of rely on, which enables us to bring that in-house to self distribute to our stores, helps support our customers. And so it offers us the opportunity to cut out some of the middlemen lower the cost, but still the same great product manufactured by novo Nordisk, still the same as their branded novolog and novolog mixes just with a private brand twist for Walmart. So this was announced in late June, as I remember, how has it been? Is it out now? Are people able to purchase it? What's the roll up in like? It is. So we started with the novolog vials and the novolog mix in our rely on brand. Sorry, the novolog vials and the novolog flex pins in our private brand of rely on. And then this last month we were able to launch the mix in rely on flex pins and vials. So the regular novolog has been out a little bit longer. We're seeing really good traction cut wonderful feedback from patients prescribers, various members of the industry and has been a really good reaction to this point for real sense of fried for us at Walmart to hear the great feedback our pharmacists and pharmacy teams are very excited about the product and how they can help support patients. We've heard lots of testimonials on where we've been able to save patients money and where patients were able to come to us and afford their insulin and not make different choices. And so it's for us been wonderful since launch now. We want to keep that momentum going and make sure that we are reaching as many patients as we can and providing as much value and access as we possibly can in the influence. It's some interesting questions from my listeners if I could bring them to you. And the first one was, is there a limit to the amount that you can purchase per person per month? There is not. So these products, the newest launch the rely on novolog and relying over log mix, our prescription required. So as long as there is a valid prescription, there is no minimum or maximum that a patient can get dispensed at a time, a little bit different than our human insulin, which did have some limits on how much you could purchase at a time without a prescription, just due to some varying risk and edibility to keep in stock. You've mentioned the mix a couple times. What is the mix? It's a 70 30 mix of analog insulin. So it's a fast and intermediate acting. And so for some patients, it is a better way to manage some of their peaks and valleys. Is to use an analog mixed insulin rather than just a single type of analog insulin and fast acting. Is there a part of ignorance? Is there isn't there a 70 30 human insulin? This is different. This is, yes. Okay. Influenza, a bit of a rabbit hole in the various types of insulin. There are also mixes within them. So there are also long acting insulins and there's some mixes and long acting or the brand aisle influence. They're seeing influence, which were the original insolence on the market that have mixes as well. And the analog insulins have mixes. And it's really just help provide variety for patients and prescribers that may not be seeing the right results with a single insulin. Sometimes mix, depending on what type of mix it is, is more beneficial in lowering blood glucose or maintaining the proper levels. Sometimes it's helpful in patients with that peaks and valleys and struggle with that. I just didn't realize it's my ignorance. I didn't realize that there was a 70 30 analog. All right, another question from the group? At another question, are they going to encourage providers to prescribe? Or is this solely an option for people with high deductible plan slash no insurance? So wherever there was a prescription, we will process whatever type of insurance where our goal is to have the lowest cost for a patient we possibly can. So may that be on our private brand insulin may be on a brand or a different branded insulin. Every time a prescription comes to the pharmacy we do our best to make sure that we're going to give the lowest price. So our branded influence continue to have some coverage today, our private brand does as well. So best opportunities is for patients to work with our pharmacy teams and make sure that they're getting the right influence at the lowest cost possible for them. So I'm going to ask you a question you may not be able to answer and that's fine. But for clarification. So my son, our insurance currently, covers novolog and doesn't like human law. It doesn't prefer it. So if I were to get a prescription and go to Walmart, would my doctor have to write it for novolog? Would they have to write it for rely on novolog? Would I have to know? Could I possibly be saving more money if my doctor knew about rely on or does the pharmacist look at this at Walmart and say, oh, you want novolog, but it's gonna cost less if you use the rely on version. Right back to Michael answering my question. But first, diabetes connections is brought to you by gvoke, hypo pen. And you know, low blood sugar feels horrible. You can shaky and sweaty or even feel like you're gonna pass out. There are lots of symptoms, and they can be different for everyone. I'm so glad we have a different option to treat very low blood sugar. Jibo hypo pen, it's the first auto injector to treat very low blood sugar. Jibo kaipo pen is pre mixed and ready to go with no visible needle before gvoke people needed to go through a lot of steps to get glucagon treatments ready to be used. This made emergency situations even more challenging and stressful. This is so much better. I'm grateful we have it on hand. Find out more, go to diabetes dash connections dot com and click on the debug logo. Shouldn't be used in patients with vehicle or insulinoma. Visit gvo glucagon dot com slash risk. Now, back to Michael Burke, answering my question about how much the pharmacist can do for you if you bring a regular old novolog prescription to Walmart. Yes, for a novolog prescription are rely on novolog, private brand is interchangeable by the pharmacy or by the pharmacist. So a patient who has a current Nobel log prescription, our pharmacist can check to see if our private brand through insurance or other means would be a lower cost for that patient and can do that interchange themselves for those products. So just novolog to our private brand over log. If a patient has a prescription for another type of analog insulin that is not interchangeable with our private brand insulin, the pharmacist can verify insurance coverage for the patient and work with the prescriber on is it appropriate to switch to private branded novolog or to remain on the insulin that they're on today. So we can't interchange with the novolog branded products themselves. But for other products, it would be a conversation between the pharmacist patient and prescriber to make sure they're getting the right insulin at the best cost for them. Mike, you're going to have to forgive me as we move forward. We're going to start moving into more of a cynical part of the questions here because as you've already alluded. Not a problem. This is the rabbit hole. And you know, I mentioned novolog and humalog. I mentioned that our insurance doesn't like humalog to the point where and I've shared this story on the show. My son has done really well with it for many years . So when we changed insurance, I did not want to change insulins. So we took it took a long time and some fighting, but I was able to use the coupons for humalog, and we get humalog for about $35 a month for all of the insulin that my son needs, which would be less, I believe than if I were to use my insurance coverage and get novolog or rely on at Walmart. I still feel like even though this will save some people some money. It just kind of feels like we're moving pieces around on the board. I guess my question would be for Walmart is how did you arrive at this price? Did you have to and do you know did you have to set at a certain way to get the deal with novolog? This is going to sound terrible. Do you throw darts at a board? I mean, because for some people, it's going to be more expensive than what they're paying now. And I get some people will save money. But how did you come up with the price? Yeah, so for us, we are one piece of the equation, as we've mentioned, healthcare is very complicated, especially the financial flows of healthcare. And so Walmart is one part of the financial equation as the dispensing pharmacy. We also have a distribution network and other assets that we utilize within Walmart. And so what we have done is taken all of our assets tried to remove as many of the middle man as possible and put all of that back into customer savings customer pocket. We can't control all the levers there are in healthcare, but where we can, we put it right back into the customers price. We truly mean it and Walmart and especially Walmart health and wellness of the lives better and save money. Save money live better, Walmart from the core. It's the only way that we could do so was to take where we could remove some of the excess costs and put it into that cash price. Very complicated on the back end of who's making what decisions on formulary and additional savings and eligibility for manufactured discounts and coupons and on down the line. We can't control all of those, but what we can do is continue to take whatever we can out of that cost that inflation cost in the insulin and put it right back in to the cash price. And in that effort, hope to continue to drive down the overall cost to insulin to the marketplace. Can you share? Is this an exclusive contract with Walmart? This was another question from one of my listeners. In other words, could other providers like Express Scripts, or even Amazon? You know, one of these folks that's getting into the pharmaceutical medication supply side. Could this be a first step toward other people doing something similar or is this exclusive? So the rely on private brand is exclusive for Walmart. That is our trademark brand at Walmart insulin and diabetic supplies products. So others couldn't utilize our rely on, but we hope that this is part of other stepping up and also looking to see how they can impact the space and how they can drive down costs. For us, it would be a great win if there was competition in the space. And we started to see insulin prices across the board come down because the competitive market only benefits the patients and that's what we're looking to do. So we'd be happy if others were able to get in the game and figure out different ways to drive down costs for customers because at the end of the day, if there is an affordability issue, we won't be able to curb the growth of diabetes. I'm curious, again, this might be ridiculous question. But with your answer in mind, do you have an agreement with novo in terms of how low you could get that cost? Because let's be honest, if you knocked the cost down, what is it 72 88 per glass vial or 85 88 for 5 flex pens? If you could knock that down to $35, I mean, you'd basically corner the market. No coupons or anything like that. Was that even discussed? Our focus is always on how can we drive the lowest cost lowest price possible? We'll continue to focus on that. Like I said, there's only so many of the financial levers in healthcare that we own at Walmart. And so we will continue to do our part to take out everything we can from our end to make sure we're driving down prices and costs, but we only own so many of the levers. So we continue to look to novo and other partners to help us continue to drive those prices down. With the pricing that I just mentioned a moment ago, are any coupons accepted for that of people have no vlog coupons? Are they good for rely on novolog or is that something completely separate? Yeah, that's completely separate. That's for qualified programs for their branded product. We don't have those today on our private brand product. What we continue to look at is how do we take the cost of those programs and put it right back into our pricing? Because every day, transparent low prices, what we're looking for, as you mentioned earlier, the different insurance coverage and copay assistance and discount cards and manufacturer discounts on down the line just makes healthcare so complicated for the average patient. And so our goal is to not continue to build those additional steps and needs and trapdoors and not put that pressure on our patients to need to go out and hunt and find those, but rather continue to put that right back into our cash price and make sure that we're offering as low as we can, price on these insulins in a transparent way that will continue to be our focus, just making this more complicated isn't going to help patients with affordability access, continue to simplify a very complicated healthcare arena, especially in insulin is to the benefit of all of our partners. Just to be clear, and the prices that I mentioned, is that someone who doesn't have insurance, that's just the cash price? Yes, that is our cash price. And that is the starting price. So if a patient has insurance or a different type of coverage, then we will process and see their eligibility and what their coverage will do and where that will bring down the price. We're seeing pretty good coverage so far since launch across the board. But that continues to change and as you said, there are different formularies and different pricing tiers out there. So what we say is the highest you're going to pay for that box in vial is those prices, but will try to everything can run insurance and check for every possible way to save money from those prices. Here's another question from my listeners. Are there any plans to offer the in pen cartridges, which is a different product than flex pens? We don't have that today. We continue to look in the space for whatever we can continue to offer and do, but today we do not have that as a product offering. Any plans to do this with other insulins, long acting or different brands or humalog or placebo any other types of insulins that are out there? We continue to look for opportunities kind of across the board from our generic team to our specialty team and to the branded team that I'm on to figure out what are the best ways to save our customers money and make sure that they can be adherent to their medication. So I can say that we'll continue to look at opportunities, diabetes is obviously a growing issue in the United States. It continues to create barriers for our customers, our patients, our families. So we'll continue to invest time and effort and space and make sure we're doing everything we can to do our part to help increase access, decreased costs and support our patients in their journey and diabetes. I appreciate you taking on my questions. I mean, I know you hear the frustration in my voice and my listeners comments and questions because it just seems and I can't say this is Walmart's responsibility. But it just seems like we've been told for years and years that the price is because of research and development and then to just suddenly say, well, you know what? We don't need to sell it for $300. We can sell it for 72 88. It kind of seems absurd from where we all sit. And I know it's complicated. And I guess there's no question here, Mike, but I could just say to you, please, as you move forward, I know everybody needs to make money. I know that's how this system is. But if Walmart really wants to, you know, improve lives, improve access. Please keep pushing to lower the prices because it does make a difference. One in four Americans is rationing insulin right now. And while this helps, it also points out how frankly broken the insulin pricing system is. So I appreciate you doing what you're doing and I appreciate you taking these questions on and really just thanks for listening to me, talk about that as well. Yeah, I appreciate your time. I appreciate you having me on. Like you said, we're here as Walmart to continue to do our part. We're invested in making our communities healthier both from a customer standpoint, employee standpoint, community standpoint. So thanks for having me on glad to talk to you. I understand the frustration. I've lived in this world for a long time. So I've lived in the frustration. I feel it. I'm a pharmacist myself and this has been a very complicated space that quite frankly, we'd love to add some light to and make easier, make more affordable and continue to drive better outcomes for patients. Mike, thank you so much. Appreciate you having me on and tell you, we'll continue to do our part. You're listening to diabetes connections with Stacey Sims. More information at diabetes dash connections dot com, of course, there's a transcript along with each episode now. And I will link up more information about the Walmart program. I'm also going to link up a column I thought was fantastic from the LA times by David Lazarus. He wrote all about this earlier in the summer when it first came out. He lives with type one. He gets it. And it's an interesting look at the marketplace and what he thinks with Walmart entering what he thinks it shows about the price of insulin. He's a great writer. I'd love to have on the show sometime, but I'll link that up. All right, diabetes connections is brought to you by DexCom. And you know, it is hard to remember what things were like before we started using DexCom. I mean, I really haven't forgotten. But I guess what I mean, it is so different now. When Benny was a toddler, we were doing something like ten finger sticks a day, even when he got older, we still did at least 6 to 8 every day more when he wasn't feeling well or something was off, but with each iteration of decks come we've done fewer and fewer sticks. The latest generation, the dicks come G 6 eliminates finger sticks for calibration and diabetes treatment decisions. Just thinking about bring these little worn out fingertips makes me so glad that DexCom has helped us come so far. It's an incredible tool. And Benny's fingertips are healthy and smooth which I never thought would happen when he was in preschool. If your glucose alerts and readings from the G 6 do not match symptoms or expectations, use a blood glucose meter to make diabetes treatment decisions. Learn more go to diabetes dash connections dot com and click on the DexCom logo. Before I let you go, a couple of housekeeping things, please send me your dear doctor banting audio if you have not heard me talk about this. I am collecting from you what you would say to doctor Frederick van ding, the man credited with the discovery of insulin, of course, there were many people helping him, but the banting house museum has an exhibit of print dear doctor banting letters. I thought it'd be really fun to do an audio version. So let me know, I'm gonna link it up in the show notes. There's a whole blog post on diabetes dash connections dot com about how to do it very easy just use your phone, but you gotta get those three by the end of September. And looking ahead, I'm doing a little bit of where are we going because we're starting to go places again? A little bit here and there. I got some virtual and some in person stuff coming up delta permitting. So the virtual stuff, I'm really excited. Next, Tuesday, so if you're listening as this goes live, it is Tuesday the 21st. My JDRF local, but I think this is open to everybody nationally and I'll put this in the Facebook group. JDRF is starting something for older people with type one. And I say older, very judiciously because I believe I'm in this group with not what the diabetes but in the older. You're basically there's a lot of issues that people are facing as they hit middle age and older age and it's not just Medicare. I mean, you know, but there's a lot of questions people with type 1 may have, and interestingly, I do a lot of research for this show, my listenership very dedicated older folks. Again I'm in this category now as I'm turning 50 and the month of October. But who are interested in issues pertaining to type one in their health as they get older? So I'm doing all of this to say next Tuesday the 21st JDRF has an online event that you can join in. I'm going to be doing a little bit of my in the news for this group, but it's going to be news that I have curated that is all to an older crowd. And I'm probably going to do it for 60 65 and up. I think that the insurance cut off their makes perfect sense to try to find things that work for that group, but there is a Facebook group I believe that they've started as well. So more info on that, and then later in October, we've got the sheep podcasts conference out in Scottsdale, Arizona, that's the other group that I take part in quite a bit. I'm helping them out. It's women podcasters, obviously. Big group really excited to hang out with them. And we'll see in terms of how many in person events happen in the weeks and months to come. Hopefully they start picking up again. But lots of virtual stuff going on as well. So if you want me to come speak to your group online or in person, please let me know. I'm always excited to do that. And we gear it to, you know, whoever I'm talking to parents or adults with type one, whatever you need. Thank you as always, to my editor John Buchanan from audio editing solutions. Thank you so much for listening. We've got in the news live on Facebook every Wednesday at four 30 p.m. eastern, and then that becomes the in the news episode that you can listen to right here, every Friday. So I'll see you back here soon until then. Be kind to yourself. Diabetes connections is a production of Stacey Sims media. All right, reserved all wrongs avenged.

Walmart diabetes novo Nordisk Stacey Sims Dario Michael Burke jibo kaipo Sam's clubs Jibo kaipo Benny Michael novo Facebook FDA Influenza Mike
IMF report to shed light on what's interfering with the global economic recovery

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:17 min | Last week

IMF report to shed light on what's interfering with the global economic recovery

"This message comes from npr sponsor wells fargo wells fargo. Small business checking offers greater efficiency and control over daily finances. So you can bank without missing a beat learn more about wells fargo small business checking at wellsfargo dot com the international monetary fund or the i. m. f. is set to unveil its latest world economic outlook today. And it's expected to show just how the delta varian and supply shortages are slowing down economic recovery across the globe. The result is financial turmoil for billions of people and joining us now to explain. All this is kristen. Myers editor in chief of the personal finance web site. The balance kristen just a few months ago the. Us economy was surging other places. We're seeing strong recovery and there were a lot of optimism about the economic outlook. What has changed well the. Us economy does still continue to recover. But we're seeing that recovery. Really lose it strength now the recovery you know globally but really also here at home has really been stymied and really stumbled over inflation. That's really continued to run hot and frankly has been a little bit more persistent than many have hoped we've seen labor shortages that continue to weigh on companies. They right now cannot meet that consumer demand. I heard rachel talking about those squint game costumes. That's not the only thing that's going to be impacted by some of those supply chain shortages. And then we also have those labor shortages that are being impacted and then of course last but not least we really have to mention here. The pandemic the delta variant that continues to way not just on the united states but really on a lot of countries globally. Especially as we see. You know this vaccine. Divide a Really that exists between these richer and poorer nations that is definitely going to impact the global economic outlook. But of course you know. We don't exist in a vacuum so what happens. Abroad does impact us here at home. In what way what what's happening overseas that affects the economy here in the us. Well as i mentioned it doesn't exist. In a vacuum so as we see global inflation that impacts global currencies goods and items essentially become more expensive now unemployment that rises and other nations for example does impact some of those global supply chains which impacts our ability to get goods here which impacts the prices that we pay for some of those goods. And then you know we also see the us markets being impacted. What happens in foreign markets and then not to mention rising debt levels. You know we've been talking about for example the debt ceiling here and how that would impact the global economy well. Rising debt levels and other economies can also impact us here in the united states. I keep hearing the term stagflation stagflation. What does that mean. What's the risk so stagflation essentially is both inflation and economic stagnation. Which typically you don't think should exist at the same time especially because dealing with inflation and dealing with economic stagnation has to essentially diametrically opposed solutions So again essentially economic stagnation and economic growth And also stagnation in the labor market plus that inflation now the risk here is essentially how to keep the economy growing without taking measures that are at the same time going to really constrain that growth. So you know for example if you let inflation run too hot you might do something like raise interest rates to raise that inflation and we'll raising those interest rates again could have those negative knock on effects for example to the labor market and to the growth of the economy And so we're seeing right now. Really economists in the united states particularly at the fed. Really trying to thread that needle and walk that line of monetary policy. How to how to make sure we rain in not inflation but still keep the economy growing myers editor in chief of the balance. Kristen thanks a lot. Thanks. this message comes from. Npr sponsor. Novo nordisk working to improve the lives of people with obesity through knowledge science and compassion because obesity is a matter of biology. Not just willpower. More at truth about weight dot com.

wells fargo wells fargo kristen united states international monetary fund wells fargo npr Myers rachel Abroad fed Kristen Novo nordisk Npr obesity
In the News... Smart Insulin, Pixar Features Diabetes, T1D up K2 and more!

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

07:14 min | 3 months ago

In the News... Smart Insulin, Pixar Features Diabetes, T1D up K2 and more!

"Hello and welcome to diabetes connections in the news. I'm stacey sins and are the top diabetes stories and headlines of the past seven days as always. I'm going to link up my sources in the facebook comments where we are live. And in the show notes at diabetes dash connections dot com. When this airs as a podcast. So you can read more and then follow up when you have the time in. The news is brought to you by inside the break through a new history of science podcasts. Full of digital stuff. The top story this week one step forward one step back on a lawsuit involving all three insulin. Makers a federal judge dropped antitrust claims but the case will move forward under federal racketeering laws. That means eli lilly. Novo nordisk and sanofi face organized crime charges. The judge says the plaintiffs plausibly alleged schemes of unlawful bribery and mail and wire fraud the other defendants in this case our pharmacy benefit managers express scripts. Cbs health and united health lily. Novo and sanofi are accused in the lawsuit of inflating the official list price of insulin. While the actual prices negotiated by pharmacy benefit managers remained flat. Due to massive rebates from the drug companies. In a separate story lilly announced. They have spent one billion dollars on promos technologies a company. That's been working on what they call smart insulin. These proteins can sense concentrations of specific molecules and then. Adjust to create variable doses. So the insulin. Product adjusts to different glucose levels in people with diabetes and twenty twenty lily led an investment round. That gave them. Fourteen percent of the company in this deal gives them the rest. We've heard about glucose responsive insulin or smart insulin for a while now d. r. f. has funded a lot of the research a spokespersons says this significant milestone brings the promise of the game changing technology. One step closer to the clinic mixed news from prevention the makers of to plaza mab the us fda says no to the drug shown to delay type one diabetes those most at risk it made through an fda advisory panel earlier this year. We reported on that. But the full fda issued what's called a complete response letter or c. r. l. which means they've completed the review and won't approve it in its current form however earlier this week the company. That's good news from the uk to please him. Up was awarded an innovation passport. A new designation that is meant to fast track investigational medicines through the regulatory process there. An australian study shows good outcomes with closed loop therapy for older adults who've had type one for a long time. This small study looked at thirty healthy adults aged sixty and older who previously used. insulin pump. They use the medtronic six seventy g either in manual or auto mode for four months at a time. They switch to the other mode for another four months at everybody. In the steady spent more time in rain. When in the closed loop stage the biggest benefit was seen overnight. Less hypoglycemia a big benefit for this group. These researchers say they want people to know that older age is not a barrier to close loop therapy and close loop has important clinical benefits of an editorial here. I would not call the six seventy g or really any current commercial pump offering a closed loop to me if you're still bulleting for meals. That is a hybrid. Close loop or a partial loop but maybe it's potato potato. Pixar released the teaser for its next movie turning. Red and eagle eyed members of the diabetes online communities spotted. What looks like a. cg that's on the right any purple insulin pump if you look closely where the purple arrow is you can spot it. Maybe an older model medtronic. Now i've been looking into this. And i heard from a source at pixar with type one. Who says this is absolutely on purpose. Quote it is definitely intentional to include better representation of the real world whether it is wheelchair users crutches pumps. Cgm's hearing aids and more this initiative is largely creditor or characters art and crowds departments. I am working with the pixar. Pr folks at. I hope to have more information may be an interview as the movie gets closer to. Its release a class of drugs. Widely used to treat heartburn and stomach ulcers improved blood sugar in patients with diabetes when added to their usual treatment. these drugs are known as proton pump. Inhibitors include pilots and members all they suppress acid and affect certain hormones that are important glucose regulation they did not prevent diabetes but these researchers save. Somebody's already on a p. p. i. and they're doing well it might also be helpful for their diabetes those with higher a. one cs benefited the most more to come. But i i want to tell you about one of our great sponsors helps make diabetes connections possible inside. The breakthrough is a podcast that mixes historical wisdom with modern incite. It is a science show. That's also very entertaining. I love it. They cover everything from accidental discoveries to famous names in science too old myths about handwashing and even the horse poop crisis in new york city. Luckily averted and all of this actually does relate to diabetes. Listen to inside the breakthrough. Wherever you listen to podcasts. I knew attempt to climb k to the second highest mountain on earth. Something accomplished only one person with type one diabetes before right now jerry gore diagnosed as an adult is acclimating at the base. Camp gore is sixty years old. He's been climbing for forty years. He hopes to raise money for his charity. Action for diabetes which provides health care and support to disadvantage. Young people with type one diabetes in southeast asia and congratulations to sebastian cecil who just bite across canada in fifteen days. We told you about this trip when he kicked it off two weeks ago. I don't think anybody expected the weather to do what it did. Canada broke several heat records. There storms a lot of wind sas villas with type one. He did this to raise awareness for access to technology. He has climbed everest and has completed several grueling extreme racist. He posted this on his instagram. This was the hardest thing i've ever done. I could not have done it without the crew. They kept be safe and alive. I will be forever grateful. We did it. Boys chase life experiences and create memories with people. You love that as my best advice for a fulfilled life. Congratulations to sebastian. And crew and that is diabetes connections in the news. If you like it please share it and feel free to send me your news. Tips stacey at diabetes dash connections dot com. Please join me wherever you get podcasts. For our next episode. Coming up on tuesday a conversation with just a great guy. He is eighty one years old. He's lived with type one for more than sixty two years. He has an awful lot to say. Thank you so much for joining me. And i will see you suit. Diabetes connections is a production of stacey media. Alright deserved all rungs avenged.

diabetes sanofi united health lily promos technologies fda Novo nordisk eli lilly stacey Novo pixar lilly Cbs facebook medtronic Cgm Pixar jerry gore Camp gore
Bonobos and the evolution of nice

Short Wave

14:26 min | 2 weeks ago

Bonobos and the evolution of nice

"You're listening to shortwave from npr. Hey everybody emily kwong here. Today we are talking about how humans evolved some key behaviors like sharing with our brain guy. Npr science correspondent. john hamilton. high john emily. Hi okay john. Are you saying that evolution somehow made us nice. I'm saying evolution gave us a brain that is capable of being nice. Of course our brains are also capable of being. You know not so nice important distinction. Yes so where did this. Kinder gentler side come from. I actually went to a place where scientists are trying to answer that very question. This was before covert. I should say. When travel was a bit easier. I went with my colleague. Scott hensley. the place we visited is an animal sanctuary in the democratic republic of the congo. Oh this is beautiful. What are we listening to. That is a group of bonobos getting ready to have a meal how would you describe the noboa's within the world of primates what they look like chimps and genetically they are nearly identical but bonobos don't act like chips for example they don't kill each other they welcome strangers and they like to share food. Those are some shoddy bonobos. What is all this shrieking about. That was my question too. So i asked susie quit towanda. She's a biologist in charge of bonobo wellbeing at lola yup bonobo. That's the name of the sanctuary. So this is some is a way it immobilization to see that food is coming. So they saw battery was going to feed them so he just a signal to say. Ready food is coming. Isuzu you saying. The bonobos are sending out a dinner invite pretty much and within a couple of minutes all. He's bonobos started coming out of the forest and then they all sat down together and eight peacefully. These been all those what role models for all of us. Well susie would definitely agree with you. She she told me that years of watching. Bonobos has made a realize something about her own species people can also do the same to stay on the same table and sharing ideas and the trade to listen to each other and to be more Patient tolerant today on the show. How our ability to share and thighs and cooperate. Shows up in vigneault bows to these remarkable creatures. John got to know very very well. And why a species that embodies. These traits is threatened by another species us. You're listening to shortwave from npr. This message comes from npr sponsor. Novo nordisk most people think obesity is just a matter of willpower. But it's a biologically based serious progressive disease with severe complications and decrease life expectancy. Novo nordisk is working to change how the world sees and manages obesity. The first step in turning the tide is recognizing that obesity is a disease all to help improve the lives of those who suffer from it and to remove the social stigma. More at truth about weight dot com. So john tell me more about this. Sanctuary visited in the democratic republic of the congo. Lola bonobo means bonobo paradise and it is. It's in the forest about ten miles outside of kinshasa lots of birds. It's got a river running through it. Which is convenient. Because bonobos can't swim the adult bonobos do leaving fenced enclosures but they have enough space so they can pretty much disappeared into the forest when they want to and how many bonobos live here. There are about sixty at lola. Several dozen more at a second location. Where bonobos who were raised here are being released into the wild. And that's that's a big deal because there are only about twenty thousand. Bonobos left in the world and the drc is the only place where they live outside captivity and john scientists are interested in bonobos because they are a close relative of ours right yes. Scientists considered chimps and bonobos are closest living relatives but but nobles haven't been studied as much as chips because they are so rare and they kind of flew under the radar. They were really only recognized as a separate species in one thousand nine hundred twenty nine got it. So what new things are. Scientists learning about bonobos. One thing they're learning is just how different they are from chimps when it comes to behavior with chimps aggression is pretty common and physical strength is key so the animal in charges invariably dominant male. Bonobos are like that here's something dr. Jonas mukamba told us. He's the lead veterinarian at the sanctuary. Who new book. It's only the familiar to mean sea left for melchior shift. You what he's saying. Is that with bonobos the females dominate and that a female is always the head of the group and we saw lots of examples of that. I mean one day. We were watching a caretaker toss pineapples to the bonobos in one group. It was very organized. Each bonobo seem to be waiting. their turn. Adults were sharing their food with babies. So i asked susie twin the to explain the dynamic and she started looking around for this one particular female them. Yeah so she's coming. This is big mom. Tough mom and as against issues in the front just to show that jesus Very concerned by all organization in the group. So the big mama is in charge and all the males follow the males are bigger than the females but if a male gets too aggressive all of the females will go after him and bite him and they might even chase him into the forest for a day or two john. This is more than bonobo. Paradise this is paradise paradise. When i want to come back as a bonobo. It's very different than the females goal is to maintain harmony in the whole group so like heating time they make sure that everyone shares and suzy topi they. They have another tactic. And the as you see. There is many many many many actual sex many negotiation but make peace so the rumors are true. Bonobos really do have a lot of sex a lot a lot especially at meals okay. And how do scientists go about studying bonobos. How do they even know about these. Traits of there's bonobos in the wild are almost impossible to study so scientists has spent a lot of time at lolo a few years ago. A researcher from duke university named brian hair did an experiment there. That really surprised a lot of people. Suzy told me about it. I want to show you. This is not only the love as you see has. It's very late and we have many rooms. We have the scientists would put to bonobos in adjacent rooms then they would give one of the bonobos some really special food you must be the favorite food like apples. They love as and most of times. We will like we normally trying to put one of sauce. I remember it was the mic. Cram mail this all sounds so delicious. It does but the question is. Would you eat your special meal alone or would you share it with your neighbor depends on the day depends on the nature of humans. We could go either way and the scientists really weren't sure what bonobo would do in elamine. We thought that because of nice food they would. I eight but we are surprised to see. That roommate is more important than food than favor food. The roommate was more important than the food interesting. The the noble with the plate would invite their neighbor in and they would eat together Sometimes there was sex too. But then the scientists did the experiment again with three bonobos including one who was a stranger and most of the time the bonobo with the food which share with the stranger first then the friend. Wow so when humans are nice. Are we topping into our bonobo side. Maybe we know that humans can be clever and aggressive and those are behaviors. You definitely see in chips but we also can be remarkably tolerant and empathetic and those are behaviors. You are much more likely to see in bonobos Okay because going back two chimps for a second. I can see why cleverness and aggressiveness would be advantageous passed on through natural selections survival of the fittest but sharing. What difference does that make to the survival of a species. What remember brian hair. Who did the sharing experiment. Yeah he and his partner vanessa. Woods wrote a book called survival of the friendliest and it makes the argument. That what they call pro. Social traits are what gave homo sapiens. An advantage over other early humans. You know the idea. Is that being the smartest or strongest only get so far. It's cooperation that has allowed us to farm and form governments and send people into space and cooperation requires a brain that is able to empathize and trust and communicate shared goals. I mean it kind of sounds like there's a lot to learn about how we're stronger together but john. I'm also thinking about how being nice hasn't worked out so well for the bonobos themselves i mean this is an endangered species after all. Yeah they've they've been the victims of human behavior. That's not so nice of worse. Humans have encroached on their habitat. Also bonobos in the wild have been hunted for meat and poachers have killed adult bonobos so they could sell their babies as exotic pets but bonobos friendly side has won them a lot of human friends i am including on three and i am the founder of lola bonobo the paradise of bonneville quasi grew up in the congo. Her father was a veterinarian and she been more than twenty years trying to make sure that bonobos have a future she's also which you might call the alpha female lola. I love men lot. I'm a banana boo. That you know in into sanctuary is more woman than me. I should mention that. The sanctuary is partly an orphanage. Most of the bonobos were brought here when they were very young many of them actually saw their mother killed and bonobos are are like human children they they need many years of parenting. You know they have tantrums. All baby bonobo sounds like a human each baby minogue. it's a human mother someone who carries them around and plays with them and teaches them until they're ready to join the adults. It's kind of like visiting bonobo daycare. I was interviewing one of the surrogate moms mama. Yvonne one day when a baby named asaka decided she really wanted the microphone. Gotta watch your gear. John you so this is to be done say that she was what stands out when you visit. Lola is just how socially aware noboa's are cutting. Andre told me that that is what. I got her attention. I cross is of one bonobo when the in ninety one in the zoological garden of contests. And i think i fall in love with this species quoting told me that for her it was all about the is if you look to chimpanzees every three sieglinde attorney size bonneville. He wants to know why are you. What is the connection we can have. I mean these creatures are so remarkably intelligent and clearly important ken. This one sanctuary in the drc really save an entire species. Sadly no i mean fortunately the government has made it illegal to kill or own bonobo in the drc but the entire nation will have to embrace this idea that bonobos are a national treasure so low has its own educator on staff and they've brought thousands of school children to the sanctuary but he told me they get calls from some of these kids years later and they're calling to report a bonobo who needs rescuing while the folks at lola are really thinking about how to pass on this work to the next generation. John thank you for sharing this reporting and your stories from this trip. It has been such a journey. Always fun to talk emily. This episode was produced by brett. Hansen edited by giselle grayson and fact checked by russia aridi. I'm emily kwong. Thanks for listening. To shortwave from. Do what is your name. John boys you miss it john. This message comes from. npr sponsor. Ibm say for sporty. Modern or reliable. We want both. We wanna hybrid. Well so do banks and that's why they're going hybrid with ibm a hybrid. Cloud approach helps them personalized experiences with watson. Ai while helping keep data secure from banking to manufacturing businesses are going with a smarter hybrid cloud using the tools platform and expertise of ibm. The world is going hybrid with ibm. Visit ibm dot com slash hybrid cloud. Hey this is ray from carta que with an exciting announcement about the car talk. Podcast are steam. Producers have decided to go back almost to the beginning of time when you goes roam the earth and my brother had only two ex wives back to the early days of car. Talk to share with you two shows a week. That's right. we'll be rooting your week twice. Join us for the best of car. Talk now twice per week.

drc npr susie emily kwong john emily Novo nordisk Scott hensley obesity john Jonas mukamba john hamilton towanda suzy topi brian hair Isuzu kinshasa melchior John lola bonobo
What Indigenous Peoples' Day means to Native Americans

NPR's Story of the Day

02:52 min | Last week

What Indigenous Peoples' Day means to Native Americans

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from the university of virginia darden school of business. Learn more about darden's dc area based mba 'em spa and executive education programs visit darden dot. Virginia dot edu slash npr. It's a historic day. Today marks the first time indigenous peoples day will be observed across this country this year president joe biden made it official proclaiming the day of federal holiday shared with columbus day for dr susan faircloth. Today is much more than just the monday of a three day weekend. It's critically important for me. That indigenous peoples day not just be treated as a day off. Faircloth is director of the school of education at colorado state university. And she's a member of the harry. Tribe of north carolina for me is an indigenous person. The president's proclamation is critically important in that president biden noted specifically the sovereignty of native nations. The proclamation walks align still acknowledging columbus day in the contribution of italian americans shaping this country but in it president biden also recognizes. The atrocities committed against native people by americans of european descent specifically the proclamation says as follows quote centuries a centuries long campaign of violence displacement assimilation and terror. I think that in doing so he speaks to the ability for both of those those histories and for both of those groups to exist and to being knowledged simultaneously. There are more than six hundred different state and federally recognized. Native tribes across the united states indigenous. Peoples day has been recognized for more than three decades but only in twelve states and washington dc. Dr faircloth says today offers an opportunity for educators to rethink how they approach american history when we teach about indigenous peoples native american peoples. We tend to teach about us as being in the past so we tend to be relegated to something that happened hundreds of years ago or decades go and it creates the appearance. That native peoples are no longer here. Faircloth says no matter how you decide to mark this holiday. It's important to take some time to celebrate. The past and present lives of native americans. We are the original people's of this land and that should never be forgotten that we should never be forgotten. this message comes from npr sponsor. Novo nordisk working to improve the lives of people with obesity through knowledge science and compassion because obesity is a matter of biology. Not just willpower. More at truth about weight dot com.

university of virginia darden Faircloth dr susan faircloth president biden columbus darden npr joe biden colorado state university school of education Dr faircloth Virginia biden north carolina washington dc united states Novo nordisk obesity
In the News.. Dexcom and Garmin partner, faster insulin tested, once a week basal and more...

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

07:00 min | Last week

In the News.. Dexcom and Garmin partner, faster insulin tested, once a week basal and more...

"Hello and welcome to diabetes connections in the news. I'm Stacey Sims and I am on location this week. I'm at the sheep podcasts live conference if you are watching this as we are live on Facebook. You can see my beautiful hotel room. This is really some special 70s decor. I will put a photo of this in the Facebook group when we go live as a podcast later this week. My goodness, so you can see the special room. But the news doesn't wait, so these are the top diabetes stories and headlines of the past 7 days. And as always, I'm going to link up my sources in the Facebook comments where we are live. And in the show notes at diabetes dash connections dot com. When this airs is a podcast, so you can read more whenever you want on your own schedule. In the news is brought to you by real good foods, find their breakfast line and all their great products in your local grocery store target or Costco. Our top story, there's a lot of buzz around adjunct therapy for diabetes, basically another treatment along with insulin. Earlier this year, a drug so far just named TTP three 9 9 got FDA breakthrough therapy approval a new study shows it works well to keep people with type one out of DKA. This was a small study 23 people, but they found that TTP three 9 9 can help lower blood glucose without increasing the risk of DKA. It's important because other adjunct therapies such as SGLT2 inhibitors do help lower blood glucose but the FDA has said they cause too much of a risk of DKA in people with type one. Those are brand names like in volcano and jardiance. Pivotal trials of TTP three 9 9 begin later this year. New partnership announced today DexCom and Garmin. You will still need your phone. I know you were going to ask, but with the new DexCom IQ apps you can now see your DexCom G 6 info on your compatible garments smartwatch or cycling computer. Jake leitch a chief technology officer at DexCom says Garmin is the first partner to connect through the real-time API, which we told you about a few months back. Basically, you're going to start seeing more connectivity with different items like this different product. Without having to use a third party community sourced workaround, which a lot of people already do right now. The name here is interesting, right? Connect IQ very similar to tandem's control IQ, but since DexCom owns a bit of tandem, maybe that's no coincidence. I've requested an interview with DexCom, maybe we'll find out. New study about time in range hybrid closed loops and faster insolence, the headline here is that using fa asp with the Medtronic 6 70 G system resulted in greater time in range. How much? The physic group spent 82.3% time in range, the novolog group spent 79.6% time and range. This was over 17 weeks. The participants mostly bolus at meal times not before so no pre bowl listing, which was interesting. The researchers echo what I was going to say here, quote, while the primary outcome demonstrated statistical significance, the clinical impact may be small, given an overall difference in time of range of 1.9%. So just a heads up if you see headlines screaming about how much faster phi es is because of this study. This one is interesting. People who have tried a psychedelic drug at least once in their lifetime have lower odds of heart disease and diabetes. This is a University of Oxford study published in scientific reports. These researchers examined data from more than 375,000 Americans who had taken part in an annual survey sponsored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, participants reported whether they had ever used the classic psychedelic substances, including LSD, mescaline peyote or psilocybin, they also reported whether they had been diagnosed with heart disease or diabetes in the past year. The researchers found the prevalence of both conditions was lower among psychedelic drug users. While no one is recommending and start taking mushrooms to avoid diabetes, there is a growing push to start serious research to investigate any link between psychedelics and cardio metabolic health. Got an update on the once a week, basal insulin, I've been reporting on for a while, both lily and novo Nordisk are testing their own version of this, the most recent study looks at the lily version called trace appetite, these researchers found it to be safe and effective with lower rates of hypoglycemia and slightly lower a-one-cs than daily basil's like lantus or tresiba. A lot of studies ongoing here for both brands of potential once a week dosing, including a large phase two program that includes people with type one. More to come, including how rugby and diabetes education may go together. But first, I want to tell you about one of our great sponsors who helps make diabetes connections possible. And that is real good foods where the mission is be real good. They make nutritious foods, grain free, high in protein, never added sugar, and from real ingredients, we like their breakfast line a lot. Although Benny, my son rarely eats the waffles or breakfast sandwiches for breakfast. It's usually after school or late at night, do your teens eat breakfast? Let me know how you do that. You can buy real good foods online or find a store near you with their locator right on the website. I'll put a link in the Facebook comments and as always at diabetes connections dot com. In fact, to the news now, getting out of the doctor's office and into something that people can actually relate to, diabetes Australia is using rugby to teach men about the risk of type two diabetes league fans in training or league fit is based on a Scottish initiative that used football teams to deliver exercise and nutritional advice to overweight and obese men. The program includes education and goal setting and a rugby league based exercise session delivered by coaches and some of the club players. But I really like about this is that from what I can tell, they're focusing on small changes. I'm not telling these guys to give up everything they like to eat and drink or that they have to become professional players to get a little bit more fit. Imagine, if NFL players had a clinic for fans to come and learn a little bit about fitness and nutrition. Again, not to be prose just to live a little better and lower the risks of type two. All right, on diabetes connections this week on our interview episode. We're talking to a mom with type one who has had two children during the pandemic. That's right. One last summer, and the other in 2020, summer of 2020, and the other just a few days before our interview in the fall here of 2021, she had two little kids, and she's written an adorable children's book about type one. And that is it for in the news this week a little bit off kilter in these new surroundings. But if you like the show, please share it. Thank you so much for joining me. I'll see you back here soon. Diabetes connections is a production of Stacy Sims media. All right, so our rungs avenged.

diabetes DexCom Stacey Sims Facebook Jake leitch Garmin FDA U.S. Department of Health and Costco heart disease volcano rugby University of Oxford novo Nordisk hypoglycemia Benny Australia
While COVID still rages, anti-vaccine activists will gather for a big conference

NPR's Story of the Day

03:21 min | 2 d ago

While COVID still rages, anti-vaccine activists will gather for a big conference

"The pandemic continues to claim thousands of lives a week, most of the people dying are people who have not been vaccinated. The data is clear both on how effective vaccines are and how safe they are, and yet deep fierce pockets of vaccine resistance remain, and disinformation about vaccine safety sweeps around social media every single day. This weekend, anti vaccine activists and some conspiracy theorists are all gathering together at a conference in Nashville. Page flager of member station wpln reports. The event is orchestrated by two tennesseans, Thai and Charlene bollinger. The couple have been labeled as some of the nation's biggest vaccine misinformation super spreaders, though Charlene disagrees. We're super spreaders. We're super spreaders of the truth. We have countless testimonies of people that are alive today because of our work and this is straight from heaven. God has put us on the surfboards such a time as this. The boundaries started by promoting unproven alternatives to chemotherapy. They later started selling DVDs, pushing falsehoods about vaccines for hundreds of dollars. Bollinger calls Tennessee, an ideal place to host an event like this one. She says, the state has recently become home to many conservative pundits, who have questioned aspects of the COVID vaccine and vaccine mandates. Right here in Tennessee now we've got Candace Owen. We've got Ben Shapiro, Tommy lehren, a lot of local freedom fighters. While the event is called the truth about cancer, it will cover much more than that from COVID vaccine conspiracies to falsehoods about the 2020 election. In fact, the bollinger is hosted a rally in Washington, D.C. on January 6th, to support efforts to overturn the election. Among the speakers this weekend are Donald Trump's son, Eric, and longtime adviser, Roger Stone. In a lot of ways, they're forming kind of this community of belief. People like us believe these things. Lisa fazio is a misinformation researcher at Vanderbilt university. She says some people may show up to this conference for one conspiracy theory and learn about another, giving misinformation, the opportunity to cross pollinate. And you can't believe some of it and not others kind of, if you are a part of this community, you believe the entire. The gathering is taking place in a state with one of the lowest vaccination rates in the country. Nashville's mayor downplayed the possible public health impacts, calling the event an echo chamber. Plus, the city's vaccination rate is higher than the states. But doctor Alex jahangir, who leads the city's coronavirus task force, says it could still be harmful. Well, worries me as people who really want to learn about the vaccine who want to learn about this disease who are going to an event that they think will give them factual information. That is not what they'll get at this conference. The venue, Nashville is famed opry land resort, asks unvaccinated workers and guests to wear masks. But that's unlikely to work with this crowd. From here, news, I'm page flieger in Nashville. This message comes from NPR sponsor, novo Nordisk, working to improve the lives of people with obesity through knowledge, science, and compassion, because obesity is a matter of biology, not just willpower, more at truth about weight dot com.

Charlene bollinger COVID Candace Owen Ben Shapiro Tommy lehren Nashville Washington, D.C. Tennessee Roger Stone Lisa fazio Charlene Bollinger bollinger Donald Trump Alex jahangir Vanderbilt university Eric cancer novo Nordisk NPR
Kabir Siddiq on the Sleep Economy & the Need to Invest in Rest

Advertising Is Dead

42:25 min | 2 months ago

Kabir Siddiq on the Sleep Economy & the Need to Invest in Rest

"I just wanted to ask a ruined for a quick favor. Running a brasserie right now and really appreciate it. If you could let us know what you think about the advertising on vm go to ibm podcast dot com slash survey and. Do let us know as part of this will be selecting ten random participants and sending them some. Ibm strike so. Do fill out those surveys. When was the last time you had fun buying metros and when you actually start thinking what your sleep and the verdicts that supported the focus on these questions. And the conditions are nip economy have led to the evolution and do juvenile of an often ignored and mostly commoditised category of products and services. But that's fast-changing with all due to see landscape as all this space dig deeper into this kabasic the founder and ceo sleepiq instead this week. Wind miss teen wrist is a focus spoonful him and his company i'm going outta and is instead read back ripped copied one hundred bucks. That's what it takes the beginning of journey with bitcoin. No with going switch you can start investing in over one hundred skipped currencies with just one hundred rupees on top of that that cdo charges for deposits and withdrawals so you can buy sell however and whenever you want all of this plus that extremely intuitive interface makes coins which the prophet at begins in the space. But don't take my word for it just download points which for me and tried out via says if you'd like more information on vip gut and sees hunan a show about crypto with me johan joshi my new adventure vm. Podcasts coin. Switch good stove. League come back to advertising is dead Took we'd we welcome to the show. Thank you thank you for having me. I wanna start off by uh slightly broader question. I decided their categories which you look at single. This is pretty much big forty to see The live things that what. Your product focused on doesn't come up with minor. Things need to see. So how did the tapas start for you. Build it out and also like what you have to look beyond work is prevalent in this space as you said to start the company into great question because sleep has been ignored for many years. I think especially in india. The reason being was that it been very difficult to purchase you spots. We haven't had too much education at what's inside. Let's say mattress how to How much spend on it and a huge amount of He would actually coming from. Bes- mattress suits This is something that you should buy. But what's happening now. Is that the last mattress was bought by bands in the next one will be bought by us so when that shift is taking place right is sixty. Five percent of the population of endeavor gender the age of twenty four the realizing the need to invest invest monia comfort. You know they they also aside from the hustle. Gulch realizing that okay. You know what's sleep is involved in gunnedah. Instagram but age. And then they realized that and head. Out to the market the unorganized sector. Something they can't deal with associ- low quality material which dominated most of india and still does in terms of is chasing bowel. Was still it that something gone with in quality in haggling and go to these stores and traditional retailers big big-name players being dealing with these products for ages but commodity. It hasn't been fun like you don't you. Don't have any funding mattress shopping. and you. When they go places. I ended up going and buying mattresses roman there never were like. I was reading an article it so that it feels like something. You'd go to where i in a movie. You certainly have someone come onto. The chainsaw added an article. Avoid the super bowl. So that's the problem with matt to gently was this welcoming. It's not fun. People and you spend money on her rights and need based product unique a mattress of of below conforto. But there's no join going mattress shopping. I get is in the best new when you move into a home in india. You have joy buying a team for your house for your house. But it's draining twenty one and it's just been ignored in commodities and it's largely because of how it's being sold i think traditionally data plazas though that growing in band mattresses it's mattress is the most expensive item Square for the listed industry. Because it's just that lodge and everyone in the chain requires a margin from manufacturer to distributor data sudan retailer. Even he needs a certain amount to deliver the product. You in its open. Stayed than flows up so the entire chain made a mattress very expensive to in today's world when the young audience is looking for a better quality sleep product and a hotel bed kind of feeling they go to a store to try to achieve that the dish Salespeople who have saturday which is very less for them to even understand what's going to back and to the entire chain. they go from store to stole spent dime. They don't know what's inside of it. Do any choices. The just settled for something and it comes home. They don't like it at the end of the data. Spend a bomb. They're stuck so. I think it's not being welcoming installed being fun. And that's the reason is changes taking place and the two things which are taking place. And i always mentioned to people wanted said changing the way you shop for this foster beddoe cheaper direct from factory in a smaller box. Nordisk can while you can done it if you don't like it one hundred percent. The other thing is very important. That hasn't been changed in what you consume as now in terms of what firewood fabric with climate performance is for you so these are the things that we are moving forward with a focuses very heavy on innovation and quality so that people do realize that dime of rest and want to invest in it and not more important any other time that now you mentioned comes in a book that that is not something i would associate with the mattress Medicines would generally investigator from store to your house on a there was a way to get it than they will get into the lift. They was lifted in harrogate upstairs. All those things said many look at consumer today was his son who around on a couple of generations back. Do think it's almost in meat. I can get everything to the convenience. Why can't have this on one. And obviously the the other side is that we also looking at how we sleep a lot better. So many do the mix of things how do wear them or or other. How are we going to find that mixing board we focus on this side of things to focus on their on the spot. It's it's a huge value proposition for could you think about is cdc daily booking dot from before it existed. Everyone go to the train station to booker ticket. Now no-one So the same thing with mattresses offering of very high value proposition. That is making it. Much simpler for people to purchase distraught up. It is simplified. You don't have twelve choices. You won't go to a store and see maroon color fabric mattresses lined up white and you have no idea what's inside of it you come online. It's simply explained. It's an instagram. you can relate to. It's a website that has already easy cross section of doom actresses amateurs available in all sizes bus with all the features is delivered now in forty eight hours across the country. That's that's how we set up in a lot of people do said at the end of the day. It's a dumps into a small box in the way the reason or does instead because we're able to compress high-quality form into obey ten sheet in order to a box. Imagine a slightly. We all have that on. If you squeeze it as much as you can release it. It'll go back to its original show so essentially a good quality mattress. The same thing can happen with one hundred tons of folks and putting it in a box enabled us to cut out all limited amount so we manufactured at a factory and we did actually ship at your doorstep with zero two very nil. Logistics costs compared to the industry. So that's what makes it an easier Joanie for consumers something he can relate to and now he's buying into much higher quality product at quarter of the price of the industry and on the other and nothing's gone addition and you testimony initially How looking at sleep differently at almost all this. Okay sleeping does a day. That's pretty much. I don't think there's any other mention on sleep at least through Recently beyond that it was numbered Just make sure your sleep. Benny looking at how products on sleep in the term knows is sleep economy Kind of been created what you're gonna see remorse looking for or see them looking forward just from the quality of sleep. They wanna get an award. They're kind of looking for. I think now people realizing their own need for the kind of quality of sleep that did require. That's a super important part of it because people didn't realize they own need for how i want to sleep. They will just provided with sleep products from generations or something that already exist at Flat and Delivered it but now they realize the need to own their own comfort in terms of okay. How well do. I enjoy my diamond bed. Even when. I'm not sleeping during the day the sunday evening spending watching naturally reading a book. What makes me People what makes me better heads. The which products i think from that perspective. A lot of people are realizing that. Okay i'll better pillow. I wanna hold like field the travel. They've had experiences. They wanna mattress at soft enough that they can stay in bed for long enough so people realizing what suits them and to invest in that that that was missing during this time and now because the instagram will age be paralyzing the need for steep and the importance forest in their body it's becoming increasing the becoming increasingly aware of what works for them. That's the exciting now. And how do you white ovals did to. You mentioned the term commodities early on doesn't industrial because there are many categories of products that have been commodities. And so when you look at those products and you see that hardware kind of you're not just appealing to someone was linked to buy it now. Actually look at someone who has had a mattress in a different age group of how about packaging hurricane and at communicating with them. How are you going to be start building a relationship because another question someone martavis or to make sure there's a long term thing how to make sure it's not a one off which is an curnow and then disappeared as a customer for you. So are you going to communicate with them and make sure that the relationships is good. It's a good interesting point because last mattresses and usually seven to ten years as a max of Use it much. Longo here in india but Wit people right now are your licensing. That mattress is not the end of it. You have so much be boches by byproduct. Nb from associate company like see the. I realize it's going to be that much comfortable as the entire sleepiq on me. Comprises of let's say mattresses come photos pillows. All of these are need based she. You can't sleep without them writing. And no one has looked at it from a point of happiness enjoying holiday want to build their own space in their own bed so hence it's being promoted where people just go to the market to complete the budget. As in haven't had any fun butchering these items. Not till you can deliver them on the internet. Del damned okay. What you know be simplified this journey by factory. I make it for you. This is the fiber inform. Chosen for your this is what's going to suit never loving Climate right If they follow you on marketing the fallen instagram realized the need to sleep better. They realize what it can do fail body the next day. You know you feel better. You win the next day. So through that journey there is a lot of investing happening all sleep products hit but we have. We have everything from a mattress. Let's say even dog beds night. Recover sleep behind me a vivid sitting. 'cause i i will liliek who who needs one yeah. Elderly dogs need orthopedic bed. 'cause they like a hip joint problems and that's that's the coverage which needs to take place and people spending more time at home in realizing the need for that the realizing the nfo weighted blankets pressure-point Bettered hugs you. It adds to weight while you're sleeping soul people especially the younger generation of very aware. And that's exciting. Because when once they are they are really looking for a company to fulfill. These needs combining all of these products together. It's a huge basket of products for india. Convert step back in What what got you started in this space work. 'cause i do know that you you're gonna root of being misprint banker if i if my research does justice and then you kind of kicked off his jaw nian also wanna know orbiting needles. Were we should or other. What are the considerations who came into this with and then what kinda changed north surprised. You actually have an interesting journey to that. That's how i stumbled upon ski. Get so investment. Banking was around shifting eldest. Join family business very different into modern furniture. So i'm from calcuta game back and taught what should i be doing something by Mile wide woking family business. And that's when i realized that. Okay in what. I spent time in america when i was studying the and had so much fun by mattresses saint louis i have never heard i have never had the inter. They don't now expedience scenario. I have never heard someone say in morgan. Does i had such a great experience buying. So i'm like that's i'm happy. It's sad and that's what we want to change. So in america so much fun right Voters in billows and Down in federal It makes database so we used to enjoy buying these products. Invite so when i came back to calicut up ahead of traditional retail brand new roof and they want someone josh to quit cycle on the franchisee for that for east india and tokyo and what that is a need because people do spend a lot on their homes in terms of the living room the kitchen and every other furniture Maybe they don't have a brand to go to to fulfill the needs of their bedroom and provide these luxury products being getting abroad So that's fanatic governor tradition away setup sleep studios renton regular distributorship bookie on hotel projects. New and i started that dolphin at on two thousand sixteen beginning and six months through the journey. I was severely finding a troublesome because i went through the bane myself i should be on the retail flaws on days as chief gust was walking in and they would have eight mattresses laid out even though the place really nice. It's like a spa. It gave you that feeling right but they would go from one mattress to the other industry confused and then go to the next dole Just trying to bog into c. Which gets the best price and amid you don't need so many different kinds of masses for different people right. It's what it most want to mattress Ninety five percent of the people just really something different. Go out looking forward. So people will be confused. I've been seeing so much choice. And they have no education what to spend on a matches. What's inside mattress. Being being coming from the age of violence where everything was basic like. I got out whatever you give me at that at the nfl. So the shot looking for mattresses didn't know how and they don't know for what and what pricing i see them being confused if they ever made up their mind. They will be wondering. What is this good matches. So expensive amna. Yes and then realized white so expensive. When i was working to these yoni after that though just sticks i used to be a bomb for the mattress to be sent from the manufacturing facility through me and i had this experience once there was there was a customer. Butch is due mattresses and the deputies with the luxury mattress For one like each do mattresses for through lax came after three weeks. I had to hire another squad truck. spend money you don't have soviet elevators admire people to walkup twenty floors to deliver the magnus kuni realize is twelve inch thick string mattis went to reaches his doorstep. It cannot get through Bedroom door because it couldn't bend and there was a message on the ray so i was like dude. This is crazy man like it's so difficult. It's all these pain points. I remember one day. I just wrote them down on paper of shabunda like these have to be solved and i stumbled upon. What's happening the west. But the west was disrupting an existing out jury marketer. See that okay. Mattress solar four thousand nine thousand dollars but in india the mattress. That was at all so it will be idealised. Health do love and maybe trying to shop at the same time. So i failed in that journey of mine. And that's when i loaned keano what must make the decision now. It was six to eight months with that. Johnny castro change i stopped. I traveled to factories. That johnny jokes over everything about mattresses informed and then started begaid in. Its smarter way to solve this problem. What you spoke or is that they do things i picked from that at one is that does it all companies kind of start off bendit. They know how to scale 'cause of the problem in many ways. Leave the problem across all touch points including the consumer sade and on the other end. It's almost a gap right. It's a gap. There wasn't really a best. Because i think anybody even saw that as a gap it came up and and kinda spark up something. They'll start. they unpleasant saying it is. It's not that thing about the guy looking up in the air and everybody's looking up in the air but in this case did actually make sense. 'cause we've we've never been attention that we all worried bag of wondered aboard by back pain whenever come in the morning as mid-next which soprano myself over for us and sean and so forth and so when there's a problem also the delivery problem which i think is the most interesting part of what you just said is because it's just so much complication and if you can actually customize it yourself then it just makes it simple. I think makes some level you as well right the way you are able to retail now Online that makes him blow. Do see that being simpler. In in most good waiters have diffucult would flip question. Yeah no i mean it. It does become what makes it. Simpler for us is also simplifying joyce which is actually much better for consumers 'cause he comes on board and he's he's okay Two kinds of mattresses. I know what my need is. It has all the features possible. I just have to choose by sites that simplicity which we wondered deliver to consume and of being simple So we just focus on high quality innovation but okay the perfect mattress. The buffet five Memory foam bill. You can choose from each one of them and We spent dine on innovation quality but this simplicity for consumer looks out much better for us is better and this enables us to have less number of skews hence red housing dutch finds all the country where we can have those skews inside his For delivery. Which if you had today a huge catalogue of products. It's an immense amount of money being spent on inventory in working capital so dying to solve the problem for a consumer and that's how be look at business Back that we have on someone else and not necessarily ourselves but with the impact that you have for someone else. That's way you gain. It said a bunch of questions in especially on the sleeper gunman goes been by in recent years But i know any goal break. I've just got my first prom saying we need to go breaks. We're going for a break and be right. back with. advertising is dead. Do check out our show tech life into it hosted by sheila. She talks to guide through billable director product development as principles often engineer at intuit india. Us what they have to say about into its transformation from a monolithic system of tech architecture to a more modern era micro services architecture and to be very honest. We didn't answers to all the questions. Dobie either direction view. We didn't our next click details and that's one of the principles that we also said that. Hey let that could do the talking. Let's debate over cord not woller documents. Let's see who can write beautiful code among those who can write biscotti among us. They thought it was a combination of all of this eight and the system that we were in from a point of view was one other architecture not to say all the challenges that have with that so truly Remote from politics stem which are like twenty plus dependencies into a modern era of microscope. Reactive architecture all the goodness of cloud catch episodes of tech life at into it on the podcast app website or rarely get your podcast wrong but combat where. His dad whistled upcoming. We wanted go little broader on the sleep economy because the connotation streep is is nascent. We're all certainly leading aborderait with listening to park. Gus aborted we hitting stuff to then in matthew walker seems to pop up everywhere. You look with him talking. What how you should sleep and many should have coffee anything. That's when all of that focus is happening beyond physical sales of exports. Coming everything ward. You see the opportunity like in the sleep economy in a broader sense foot. Setting is just super exciting space which goes beyond these products Trying to solve the first lebanon Mitch's how you consume in what you consume but there's a lot more of sleeved exciting jesse's buttocks you know when you talk about you. Don't flush your device sleep. Do phase actually longley charges and shortly judges longley judges. You know your eight dollars of stephen. And what about shot john. What an steep on the moon. What flight. You know what about sleep that you can step out in that it can be comfortable. Visit a lot to do with the sleeping on me. There's not with technology people ever ending need to realize. How do i sleep better. How do i wake up fresh of via testing technology on that front to see if you can vegetable devices in southern mattresses so that people realize and get get a complete package together and then realized how the sleep beddoe it dies up Systems if you can step out of your mattress and it recognizes your spot light bulb and the night. Light comes on moment was reality. Just jumped out of your Maybe with the bochum at night. So i think sleep requires a lot of talk. Igic wires from the long recharged from the shortage ideas to sleep technology. And beyond that. There's so much to be built within the sleep community as you know you wanna have a platform where people can exchange get on outweigh lead. What's your nighttime routine. You know sleep is important that you even distinguish it from the day to the night having a hot shower and putting a Temperature having your dna book day on the side of you getting to bed by silver dime. It's it's it's better for the body so for us it. That's how we want to touch on the different dutch finds of sleep. That catered to you and as you mentioned it's not only about products but that's the first step that we own this factors but we have a long way to go and what's supplies aboard the consumer Through johnny so far because you would have gone insane. Okay you know. Maybe in consumer hasn't due to certain point we all we. All i think most of us don't zuma's they're doing dumps of how they can you behave lake So what. I'd actually want to hear from using water in terms of what incites. Have you gotten about this aboard. The indian consumer especially focused on this space since started started of. I think one is that the consumer so well educated in a rare right now to by mattresses online Great thing last thing you would think Kickoff languages such a dutch duchesne feel so. It's necessary that obviously in the future that it has the nominee janet approach but what does excite me is people coming online and having discovered i to try a mattress buy online but ultra excites me. Is that you see that. Ninety five percent of people quiet just one kind of mattress you know so industrial to What people otherwise off that. I need hard mentors. I need a soft manual is what i also love is that you don't abroad you get a residents diagnose you get these fluffy comforters. You get soft mattresses. I see that being widely accepted. As but i just feel that people didn't have the opportunity and now an avenue to buy these talks earlier right like no one selling these large for those of twenty by thirty reset president citing People regular ones do regular pillow cases. But there's a demand fall ball the demand for you to come into your bed own space and just sink into it and they want products that can give give that to them even like with weighted blankets. You would assume that it's something that won't kick off. People are not ready for people. Don't know about it but it will super bowl so i am actually surprised and very excited. Digitally the indian as being quite adventurous and are ready fault drugs. Actually it just didn't have to do it for them. No categories When we were expecting daughter brand find a the lodge below that any woman who's beg needs to have sorta look everywhere and triggered one small dealers on where who was selling it and correct curricula wrong. Most look those as okay. How many people will buy it. Let's not make it would have been the reason why available of the the dog food just getting an old mattress cut it up but the an elderly dog request. Certain kinds of matters a. I've seen the fact that either people knowing more now or or. Why do you think these these. These won't even around contradict. we had so many matters. Mattress does before. Why weren't these See i think. It's not people. Because i think a lot of brand located from the point of sale tonight like hey hummy. Am i going to set up this. But when you saw for product from perspective of need that what is it quiet for consumer that i wanna make an impact. Someone's life. I wanna make sure that they can live better. They can be more comfortable and you look solving from that perspective than it works the other way around then. Let's his hands gums cheater. Because you are solving problem with a dog beds you know even the fabric Like ten months developing proof. Waterproof shoe proven. It's older too distant. These opera right. It's not just a regular. Ed goes always made the worst like they were like. New northbound one meter radius of that absolutely. I mean this same headed need to solve a problem. And that's what we live by. Betty excited lie innovation Ah that we have some nights so up products have taught after from that perspective. This weighted blankets. Whether it's this the pregnancy gutted Call it and i god. That's amazing. I can't see without her. Do it is just so going so people realize that. Okay they sign's behind it as bad. I is hug therapies. Especially being you sleep longer when you see with bit like that so once you look at it from that perspective and you want to fulfill the need. It becomes much easier because your first solving broken. You might not fair. Ask you this An s. most entrepreneurs there. What do they. Let's yourself through this journey. Because i feel it also makes you realize how you function what you learned and all that stuff so i. I'd love to learn to this process aboard yourself. Evan how you function and what have you learned along the way yeah. I mean on off work on work. It's separate but i've also learned how important it is for me to invest in mind racing. I think that's that's really a point to any entrepreneur. Joni you know discipline diming separating night from the office from home right through the process of these products. I've learned how to use them at different times for different bogus right. You can use your bed by date. You can use bed for the night differently. pow to cut off and the importance of addressed. You know the more you learn about the movie reading about it the moby keep backing Science when we are doing innovation and quality Realize how we should be uneducated of ourselves and that made me introduced comfort. I the deemed domes of its culture. Redoubt beeping that you know. Everyone has option not to be comfortable in coming to you. Know work few days at home if you want to conference starts at home if we don't back to sit us says reconstituted to consumers on that front so that's fairly dot we how daycare dove Everyone who's not organization and conflicts dot said. Well that's one aspect of it. And i think that that both of at miss mostly covers my own folk. Anthony william barden. You know a large part of the of the spark gust is up people at different stages in the career of people kicking it off people who are looking at finding a mid career opportunity etc and muslim tend to look at the standard degrees under rules and stuff like that. What do want noise more. Could i do especially in sectors like. Oh which is which is gonna opening up now. What if you look career option. An order if i want to walk in to sleep on bought or check on of massive for more triggering alone and oh what kinda from weinstein deniro to come in with the do areas ashley judd. Participating trusting Wireless customer experience and by that. I don't mean the support of having a seaside skull dishonoring goal or just working on nbs but it's building a relationship with consumer that when they call you it can be like. Hey how you doing. What baxter sleep unless i know how. Well you do sleep last night. We are looking for a lot of people that can come and build a relationship and be able to be an advocate for sleep in help people through their journey not product. But at any time say they have a difficulty sleeping. Just wanted few dips. you know. Our goal is to die but let's say sleep. Experts wanna come join us. We can actually provide information so that is a very. I think there's a large need which is nascent league covered in that area So a role like that is something which is super exciting. People can kill themselves on. 'cause there's a huge community to be built on that front and the other exciting products. We actually would mattress a will. Just build sleep on them until only go. This is good when we're gonna love this or the Amazing going to we do that all day. And it's super excited. Someone who has knowledge these or do you sign up for their job. Like please help me any many. Find it on the internet. But it's it's it's a super botany and having re since a focus is brought up we have a lot of makes dot com. You're excited if someone can coming bid and understandings medina's Later part of every episode. I guess a lot of questions aboard import them and Our kicked off by asking you. What do you spend time doing outside of work. What what keeps you excited award other. Dick's your diamond is of avaz. Damore interest you outside or two other than learning in reading which i think we ought to do upskilling. I think the most exciting thing for me sports. I love playing them. Golf xioaming football. I woke out. I think i did that all throughout the years of my life over st. I have time to do that now. But you would still find me at least two days a week waking up at like five forty five and heading to the golden goal goals for a quick nine holes coming and joining work I love running allows swimming big adventure. Freak and dad's spend a lot of my time like if it's any sport. I'ma put a text Any sport is distant category. 'cause i if you blew enjoy sport generally enjoy any sport And on the other indo people who will try and find. Okay what can i do And we will lose certain category I don't know if i'm generalizing here. But i on the other side. I have a few sports. I enjoy but you gone into every sport which is why identity agendas on this front. I'll tell you why. I think that the it does exist with certain people who play i. It's also because. I think i had a lot of facilities Growing up thanks to my parents. Thanks to the school. I went to so we had access to everything. Betty's Doctor about better swimming boots. football fields or god and which is not easy for everyone have access to once who have access to all of them men as a kid. You wanna see all of them you stick to one through you wanna play. Played all wants you do you. Just get a knack for a certain amount of racket folds so hand-eye coordination but just heads you jump into another one much easier in all your directed towards you spend your holiday in the club displaying sports. That's what happened for me. And i think that's how it happens for a few days. But if they are few of them who just. I enjoy playing on sports Because you enjoy sports Seen some of that seep into how you function day job. If that's the way to call. I walked latin while working. I take all my calls while walking. I think that has something rarely do But other than that during the day. I have to make some dime out because i think that's only vacuum. My hand people have their own way For me it has to be something activity out being out in the sun blade. Watch to listen to recently that treatment. I mean right now. There's a lot of focus within our teams to reshape. Okay ours and so. I'm currently reading reading this book. Measure what matters. And i think a lot of people out there who haven't attempted okay yet. I think it's is the holy grail of so next thing. Doing i believe was who has no idea. But i think it's a okay is is of betty fantastic way for an organization to have an aligned goal and people to collaborate clearly towards it the transparency of the goals being listed out for you make said simple it makes it attractive and gives a people a huge sense of reason that at every stage. Whoever it is whether it's it's the head all rare of an executive working you all working towards a certain goal it being contributed that so okay is essential objectives and then gives. I think it's a very exciting new list on the country. Objectors you wanna achieve than than how what. What does achieved them. It's a lot of alignment all the way to the bottom. And it's very exciting for me. But i think should be done for your Crew in your company. And what did you my last question which is spin off on the name of the show Why do but isn't it grew to sleep sleep. Economy will not die the groups in the speaking. The sleep economy will day. Why did i think man. We haven't even go so much to do out him. And that's the exciting baden diabetes. He space and then it's got a diag- on Bought bought offended when it hits going head the so much to do and also sleep. Never been in front of the condensation. It's always when. I need to buy a mattress about it. When i need to buy piddle so i take sleep. I had to come in front of the conversation and then days a lot of growth do it and as i told you when we spend a lives on it. It's not only going to be a lot more beyond In dire Asleep community that bit sleep on the move outcome foot how you perceive comfort and i think that would have. Comfort is not just to be used for eight hours of sleep at night. So i think there is a lot to be invented in this space and just holding onto that excitement. I feel. there's a lot of growth ahead of us. Thanks inquiry Thanks thanks for coming on the show and And i think you almost convinced me to to have like a twenty minute nap in the afternoon. Every which is which. I've seen anybody do when i was growing up and for some reason we've all stopped doing it so you're almost brought that point of it's important and thank you for having me if you like this podcast or listening more podcast like this podcast website at podcast from all acid. I've you mix the some really fun stuff is not a great week on the podcast network on the first episode of last standing. Learn all about the intrigue battles between two motors maruti-suzuki with those ambi- host of other shows on the podcast besser vesa and the sponge podcast. Great great great show. That i think is really enjoy. We would also like to announce. Our collaboration with hunts and yes most widely read magazine on bondi is now available in audio version on. Ibm podcast do check it out on the show tells us how people live underground in. Turkey's came up. We city for generations veteran. Introduces us to the world of audio advertising with statistician. Ski on advertising is dead. How can influence their shift from advertising to content so that this book tells us on smarter which said and on the talks talks to eighty sing about how badly restaurants are hit during the lockout to follow social media were. Ibm podcast on twitter. facebook instagram and lincoln. I remember if you're enjoying this show or any other show for that matter. Please do tell a friend and finally we'd like to thank our sponsors on the network this week at credit banco baroda quarter going switch quebec and intuit india. Thank you so much for making this possible. Don't you think that if everyone around you is getting smart. You better be smart. Hey there. I'm traveling professor sadat dish milk. And i'm back with season two of my podcast to make you smarter smarter. Said what's this season's focus about. Well it's about ten minutes nuggets. That will make you standard work. It's time to go from smart to smarter. June every tuesday and thursday and become smarter said.

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How To Help Someone At Risk Of Suicide

Short Wave

15:55 min | 3 weeks ago

How To Help Someone At Risk Of Suicide

"Hey everybody to chatterjee here. September is suicide prevention awareness month. Now while data from the cdc shows that overall suicide deaths declined. You're in the pandemic. More young people especially teenage girls did end up in hospitals last year after attempting suicide and a number of studies show that the pandemic has taken a huge toll on mental health and significantly increased suicide risk factors such as social isolation drug and alcohol use economic stress. So today we're going to encore episodes from earlier this year. About suicide prevention. How someone can help a loved one who may be struggling and if you or anyone you know has been having suicidal thoughts. The twenty four hour national suicide lifeline. Is there for you. The number is one eight hundred two seven three eight two five again. That number is one eight hundred two seven three eight two five five and now. Here's the episode. You're listening to shortwave from npr. Hey everybody i'm kwong here shortwave reporter and i'm through chatterjee. I cover mental health for npr. Today we're going to talk about how you may be able to help someone who is suicidal now. My mom is a suicide attempt survivor. And this topic is really meaningful for both of us. Because there's so much shame and stigma that can make people who are suffering unable to safely talk about suicidal thoughts and feelings but as a society these days retu- we seem more open to talking about it. Certainly i mean we have a long way to go but yes we are becoming more open to talking about it. Yeah let's talk first about how prevalent suicide is right now. Well it's the tenth leading cause of death in the united states in two thousand and that's the most recent here we have data for About forty seven thousand people died by suicide and according to the american foundation for suicide prevention. About one point four million people attempted suicide that yet. But here's the thing about suicide. Research shows that suicide is preventable. Yes and there are things that friends and family can do that are genuinely helpful to someone who is struggling with suicidal thoughts. A lot of times folks feel like suicide. Prevention is only something that professionals can do. That's decay quincy lassine. He's a psychologist and has struggled with thoughts of suicide himself and he chairs that lived experience. Division of the american association of suicide allergy and lean says that suddenly getting help from a mental health professional is a very important part of preventing suicide but there are things that each one of us can do when a loved. One is in despair and feeling hopeless. Often it is that simple stuff of showing that you care but in showing up for somebody and being there for them so on today's episode. We'll talk about the science that someone you love. Maybe thinking about dying and talk about ways you can support them and possibly prevent them from going down that path. I'm reading strategy. And i'm emily quang. And you're listening to shortwave the daily science podcast from npr. This message comes from npr sponsor. Novo nordisk most people think obesity is just a matter of willpower. But it's a biologically based serious progressive disease with severe complications and decrease life expectancy. Novo nordisk is working to change how the world sees and manages obesity. The first step in turning the tide is recognizing that obesity is a disease all to help improve the lives of those who suffer from it and to remove the social stigma. More at truth about weight dot com. Emily kwong here. I'm joined by a review chatterjee. Npr's mental health correspondent. So i want to start this conversation in a place of awareness. How can you even tell if a loved one may be feeling suicidal. Well lassine says. Watch for cetin. Warning signs was obvious is probably just talking about death in talking about suicide bitching it either casually or even jokingly or specifically talking about it for themselves and then there are the less of your science like sudden changes in behavior there would be changes in their mood usually towards greater agitation or greater sadness increased anger and irritability changes in substance use so Radically increasing the amount of substance use or beginning to use substances. If they hadn't done that before there are some changes in sleep or eating now. During the pandemic a lot of people may be experiencing these changes in behavior sleep patterns mood. It doesn't mean that they're all thinking about dying but having mental health issues does increase people's risk of suicide but it can take a wild before someone goes from being depressed feeling so hopeless that they don't want to live anymore and this gives friends and loved ones opportunities for prevention right. The way to think about this is to identify and help people with these mental health problems before they get to a point of crisis exactly You know. I spoke with psychologists or sula whiteside. She study suicide prevention of the university of washington and also started. This website called now matters now which feature stories of survivors of suicide attempts. And she says it's important to pay attention if someone is withdrawing from friends and family and their regular activities meaning. They're not responding to phone calls or they're not joining in on. Maybe zoom call with family or they're not on social media. That's one time that it makes sense to get curious about what's going on with your friend when people start to disappear and she says when. Somebody's really struggling. Feeling hopeless and overwhelmed. Keep your eye out for more subtle signs. People often use fewer words and have a harder time communicating They say things like. I can't do this. i'm just so stressed. They might just sit there quietly for long periods of time sort of spaced out. Yeah so let's say you've noticed some of these warning signs. What do you do next. I thing why says is checking off of there okay. let them know. You're there for them if they need you. She says if you're unable to talk to them directly leave a voicemail. Write a letter sent a text message. It seems small but she says it can have a big effect a message like that might say something like in refer to a memory that you have of them like a positive memory and say that you miss them or say that you're rooting for them. Also whiteside says be prepared not to hear back but keep checking in especially if they don't respond because remember not responding could be a strong sign that they're struggling mrs away to just kind of keep pulling that person back to the reality of your friendship or your or your family. I love hearing this because it does take some loving persistence. I think to reach for a person who is withdrawing and if your loved one response or just decide to share with you that yes. I am feeling depressed overwhelmed. Hopeless or you just worry about a sudden change in their behavior reach you. How do you know if they're thinking about ending their own. Life experts say just awesome directly and and. I know this can be really hard to do. And here's how white says she would approach it. I might say you know. A lot of people. I know have been having suicidal thoughts during this period especially when they're going through this thing similar to what you're going through and i think it makes sense that some people just you know want want to not feel this way anymore Is that something. That's going on for you because i'd like to see if there's some things i could do to be helpful. That's great absolutely. She says asking about suicide does not make it more likely that they will attempt to take their own life. But she says if you broach the topic. Listen calmly with an open mind. You're asking because you wanna be helpful. Not because you're going to call nine one one yeah. This is a really important point to talk about. Because we've been taught to call nine one one in emergency situations. But i know that's not always the best approach when a person is feeling suicidal. That's right emily. Suicide prevention experts. Say that if your loved one tells you yes. I've been thinking about dying first of all. Stay calm but if you're worried about them. The first number to call is the suicide prevention lifeline because trained counselors. There can connect you and your loved one to support in helping your community now if someone has already heard themselves or if they're an imminent danger and are unwilling to keep themselves safe. That's when to call nine one one but experts say that calling nine one. One of the mere mention of suicide often takes away the present sense of agency or makes them feel scared of the police get involved because calling the police can escalate things re to we know that during the pandemic suicide lifelines and crisis text lines have been flooded with calls and texts which means a lot of people are going through this right now. That's right but whiteside says the vast vast majority of people who have thoughts will not go on to kill themselves. I think there's a lot of hope in that and that's great. But how do you know whether your loved one is at high or low risk of acting on their thoughts right so researchers at columbia university have developed a handy set of six questions that can help you figure this out whether your loved. One is higher. Low risk of attempting. So how can you find those six questions. All you gotta do is google columbia protocol and that protocol has questions like have you wished you were dead or wished you would go to sleep and not wake up As well as have you had any intention of acting on those thoughts and someone who answers yes to that. Last question is at high risk in which case you should ask them if they have a suicide plan if they know what means they might use if they attempted and if they tell you about the means then you have to prioritize removing those means to make their environment safer for example. If they're thinking of taking medications make sure those locked away or if they plan to use a gun make sure the gun safely stored to the con- access at in a moment of crisis. And isn't there a lot of research on how removing lethal means can prevent suicide exactly. That's in fact. One of the shortest waste prevent someone from attempting when they're in crisis because for people struggling with suicidal thoughts the urge to act on them can come very suddenly and the good news here. Is that these. Intense feelings are usually fleeting. The last about a day or two to endure job during this time is to help your loved one comedown down and not act on their feelings. White says you can help them relax by literally cooling them down get an ice back for them or if you're on the phone with them or on feast time just get one yourself asked them to get an ice back and give them company in like applying that ice back to Your face and neck and their face and neck and you can have the same effect by using paste. breathing isn't paste breathing. Just deep breathing. Yeah it's when you breathe in and breathe out really slowly in through your stomach and try to make your egg sales longer than that. That's right and once you've calmed your loved. one down. the second step whiteside says is to tell them to make no important decisions especially deciding to die so not panicking ignoring thoughts that you don't care if you die. Stop using drugs and alcohol and weight and the third step she says is make eye contact with them There's not much else that grabs our attention. Like looking in someone's is It can drag you out of your like deepest almost edge of sleep when you're sitting in a classroom and the teacher looks into your eyes like it'll just jolt you awake but also can be used to drag yourself out of a negative brain space and if you're with them if you can stick around with your loved one until the crisis has cost. Yeah the sticking around is important because something else may come up. Exactly that spurs another difficult moment right and you want to be there for that sort of fleeting you know during the duration of that fleeting urge and for somebody who's feeling completely hopeless to know that your loved and valued can make a huge difference. You know the first. I'm lassine had his most intense Suicidal thoughts he told his close friends how he was feeling and he says most of them told him. I love you. And i totally want you to stay around. I want you to be here. I think that you have a lot. That's possible to live for and limousine starting a conversation with his friends. He's what helped him get treatment for his depression. His best friend made an appointment for him with a therapist and even went with him for that first appointment. That's a good best friend. That's an amazing act of love. Absolutely last thing re to this is the hardest thing to acknowledge in this episode. But it's real many people do take their own lives. So what do you mental health experts say to those loved ones who may not have been there or we're not able to intervene because i know there are millions of people out there carrying that grief and the many feelings of that. Yeah would they told me was that you can do all the right things and still lose the person and it's not anyone's fault and you know the most important thing to do here under any circumstance is to also take care of yourself because this is hard work. Make sure you have social support and if necessary seek mental health care for yourself. Yeah like you've pointed out re to. This is daunting and exhausting to walk this road so being open to seeking help for yourself along the way is key. You can't help someone unless you get help for yourself and if you're overwhelmed and you don't know what to do next you can actually call the suicide prevention lifeline. One eight hundred two seven three eight two five five. That's right emily. And they're pure support groups as well for the loved ones of those struggling with suicide and good place to find a peer support. Group is nami. That's the national alliance on mental illness. And you can reach out to your local chapter. What's available in your area. Re to thank you for having this conversation with me in getting the information out there. Thanks for having me emily. This episode was produced by thomas. Lou edited by giselle grayson backtrack by russia or reading. The audio engineer for this episode was gilly moon. I'm emily quang. And i read the chatterjee itchy. And you're listening to shortwave daily science. Podcast from npr. This message comes from npr sponsor. Ibm say for sporty. modern reliable. We want both. We wanna hybrid. Well so do banks and that's why they're going hybrid with ibm a hybrid. Cloud approach helps them personalized experiences with watson. Ai while helping keep data secure from banking to manufacturing businesses are going with a smarter hybrid cloud using the tools platform and expertise of ibm. The world is going hybrid with ibm. Visit ibm dot com slash hybrid cloud.

Novo nordisk obesity emily quang Division of the american assoc npr npr Emily kwong cetin whiteside sula whiteside american foundation for suicid kwong chatterjee cdc Npr university of washington united states mrs columbia university white
Friday Flight - Getting Paid On Demand, Sneaky Internet Bill Increases, & New Cheap Drugs #384

How to Money

33:15 min | 3 months ago

Friday Flight - Getting Paid On Demand, Sneaky Internet Bill Increases, & New Cheap Drugs #384

"Owning a victorian era home doesn't mean that you have to be stuck with victorian era technology because back then controlling. Your house would have been magical now. Sink is making it practical with new jebron sink smart home products from the convenience of the sink app. You can easily adjust house lights and ceiling fans set schedule so you never have to come home to a dark house at night and look in on your kids and pets through indoor home cameras and more new. Ge brand sink experienced life in sync. Imagine having absolute control over your phone. Bill no contracts no extra fees plus friendly customer sport if needed telo mobile offers notch. Phone plans without the premium price tag on a new nationwide four g. five g. Lt network prices range from five dollars a month for a basic line to thirty nine dollars a month for unlimited everything all plans include free hotspot and international calls. Switching is a breeze order online at tello dot com pop. The sim in the phone. And you're done so go to telo dot com slash. How to money and get yourself a fifteen percent discount on any plan you choose happy savings with telo. Welcome to the money. I'm joel into i in that today. We're discussing getting paid on demand. Sneaky internet bill increases and cheap drugs bads right joel. This is our friday flight episode where we cover some different headlines that we came across this week and differ stories in the news and specifically. We're gonna talk about how they pertain to our personal finances but before we get to that last weekend you spend some time on the road right. You in visited some family last week. Right yeah so we all actually met up. We stayed at a cabin together for one night. Just outside of knoxville. outside of dali would which is actually where we went Wrote some roller coasters. Nice good time and you're explained to me in my mind. I picture dollywood being sort of like this. Like a like a fake town basically elements of that. But it's more six flags then. Yeah exactly you're saying there's actual rollercoasters. They're really good ones. Well that means that dollywood like bumped up slightly my book but again it's been like decades since i've even been to six flags worth a visit. Say it's a little expensive though so But yeah it's a fun trip and it's pretty right there in the foothills of the smokey but you'll get family right there as well right meeting up no doubt so but i wanted to mention yet. The second night we ended up staying in hotels my first time staying in hotels since the pandemic began and it was great. Good who's a totally fine experience But then i read this story about how hilton hotels are going to stop doing daily housekeeping. Oh and i was like oh that that's interesting You're so used to while you're way during the day Not in your room. Someone comes in and makes your bed. Tidies up you know cleans the bathroom and then you come back near like. Oh it's all fresh untidy but Yeah apparently this is kind of something that's going away housekeeping costs a decent bits and people don't necessarily appreciate it to the extent that you would expect and so i was wondering what your take if you could pay less to stay in a hotel But not received the daily housekeeping. Would you do it. Oh yeah well. If i could opt out of that and that actually that i'll saving money. I would have one hundred percent do it. Because here's the thing. I'm one of those people who isn't used to Room service coming in and you know putting fresh towels up and you don't have that at your house just two plus the thing i don't go and stay in hotels all that often and so honestly literally anytime i go to a hotel. It feels weird for for becoming in doing it for you. Because i mean at home i mean we kinda clean up like once a week or every couple of weeks like that and so i just don't feel the need for there to be cleaning up like that. That has to happen every single day right like. That's not how often. I clean my bathroom. And so i'm not expecting that what i'm saying hotel. I guess they do a pretty good job. Just like not destroying the place. When i going to stay in a hotel but like yeah. I take my towels. I hang them up so they dry is not like. I need a brand new freshly laundered towel because mine just wadded up in a wet ball in the corner like who. Does that mean. I don't do that at home like that or i mean. Obviously people live like that because they're used to doing that now hotel but but that's just not how i roll in honestly the privacy aspect of it too. You know like you're staying airspace. I've got all my stuff out and especially to be honest. They don't want your stuff man. Nobody wants somebody else's stuff like maybe like a laptop camera not my phone. I will say yeah. It is is a good feeling to come back and your room is tidy. But it's also an awkward feeling. I agree and if it meant that i could save money by you. Know avoiding having someone coming to clean the room. If it meant that my room cost less. I would be one hundred percent all about that. Yeah and i'm for it anyway because of the privacy. Yeah somebody like. I don't know it might space. Who i don't know Especially if like all the kids stuff is out as well as just like well. You just just leave it there. We know where everything is. And we'll take care of it later but it'll be interesting to see if that's something that catches on and if you know some hotels make that like a calling card saying hey exam stay here. It costs less money. Because you know we don't offer this burger this perk and sometimes it's all about the proliferation of perks and i'm like no. No give me fewer perks. If it means that. I get to pay less money for it. Exactly that's like a difference between flight flying delta versus flying southwest or frontier right. It's like well. I don't care to have free checked bags. I don't want to check a bag. That's not how. I'm gonna fly exactly so if there are tears and and different rates that you can pay based on what you're willing to receive from the i'm one hundred percent for that dude. I think that's great agreed. Yeah i'm totally willing to do the backpack on builders if it means that i can spend less on the ticket and then also avoid some sort of check bag fee. I'm in kind of comes down to the money. Has it always does here out of money. Yup yup let's keep getting on matt. Let's Let's get to the friday flight in the sampling of stories. We found interesting this week. I wanna say to congrats on your purchase of that. Super mario game the unwrapped one cashflows at one point six million. That's all that. I didn't know you had that kind of money late. Ridiculous for the best investment you've ever made here's a it was super mario sixty four right that cartridge and it's not like that was like the first one they ever made or anything. It was just one that hadn't been opened. It was extremely ridiculous. People have too much money but I mean if there ever was a game that were fetch that much money. That game was like ground breaking to explore three d worlds. It was amazing. that's true. yeah it was. You seem less enthralled about. I don't really play video games now but back in the day i was a kid i never mind blown even had an antenna sixty four which i feel us was probably the best game best. I always had like the second genesis which was which was fine so it was great. It wasn't it wasn't good. Well and matt. It's important for us to mentioned to the The child tax credit updates. Yeah thirty five. Plus million people yesterday should have gotten money in their account. So yeah check your bank account and see if That direct deposit showed up for you as it did for matt matinee Future deposits are going to happen on the fifteenth day of the month. The payments are between two hundred fifty and three hundred dollars per kid depending on the age of your kid. If you're eligible for the expanded child tax credit yes. Basically the fifteenth is like everybody who has kids. It's like the new favorite day of the money. You know you're going to get that little feels like a little bonus there on the fifteenth. Yeah but but we wanna don't forget to have a plan for this money especially as yeah people are finally starting to receive it Preferably using it to accelerate debt. Pay off if you're in that position or to stabilize your savings if you're in that position or you know even allowing you to invest a little bit more and maybe even into a five twenty nine plan for your child if you're already doing a great job investing in your own retirement accounts and iphone funds for some reason didn't show up head to the irs child tax credit update portal for some details will link to that in the show notes some but not a large percentage are going to be sent a check. That's going to take a little bit longer to arrive but just important to note that money should be In your account Right now at least the first installment of it exactly. Yeah so on. The other note of getting payments earlier than usual many employees no longer wanna wait The standard two weeks for money that they've earned and employers. They are responding to those once. I got there not demands. they're just Once picketing give me my money now to get paid right now but some companies are starting to offer a on-demand systems in the biggest payroll services. Like gusto paychecks are saying that the number of businesses offering access to these daily a services has doubled in the number of workers who are accessing their pay early has also doubled. It's done the same thing not surprisingly walmart. They started doing this back. In two thousand seventeen The big rideshare companies. They followed suit and now there are lots of other companies who are doing the same. This is of course a a major benefit to those who are living paycheck to paycheck. Those folks are the most financially vulnerable and not having the the pay that they're earning from their job the day that they they make it might mean that they would take on riskier measures to to make ends meet like i'm thinking about like payday. Loans or title loans. Those are two of the worst. I far the worst products in existence. And so while it might seem that these are This is helpful right. The benefits may not extend as much as they might appear. Yeah and i think that's because delayed gratification. Is one of the essential building. Blocks of personal finance is something we talk about on the show. Right that saving for your future is essentially doing just that. It's very future you over current and waiting two weeks to get your paycheck was often one of the ways that we learned that lesson to the very small ways that you would learn exactly. It was like ok cool. We'll have to wait for the money that have earns for a couple of weeks and it was forced delayed. Gratification helping us. I think maybe in other ways to prioritize that in our own lives And so yes. Some employers are making early access to their pay a free perk but other employers actually passing on defeat to their employees for that quote unquote benefit. Right so early access to your pay might actually cost you a little bit of that pay so yeah may make sure you know that before we start grabbing your pay early on one hand it is nice that employers are making it easier for employees to avoid just some of the awful methods of getting their hands on cash to pay for rent and groceries matlock. You mentioned but on the other hand it's crucial for us all to be saving something to build up enough in our reserves starting with the number that you and i always talk about two thousand four hundred and sixty seven dollars it's That is the amount that is going to take for. Most people to be able to weather most financial storms that come along without needing to find that money elsewhere and just makes me think matt. There's this video of this guy and youtube. That i gotta say is like really incredible will link to it in the show notes but Diamond dallas page former wrestler. Has this yoga program. And they're vince. Some some people that have done this. Who takes yoga from a former ww. He ruined my friends did it. And he said it was awesome. See wonderful system. I like yoga the free parents yoga associated with the school. Yeah so it's a yoga and a bunch of mom's the only guy there but literally it. There's this really cool video about this. One guy who started doing dp yoga which is what it's called and so forth. He lost a hundred and ninety eight pounds. In one year he was four hundred and seventy five pounds to begin with and just made me think like when it comes to saving two thousand four hundred and sixty seven dollars. It might seem on its face for some people that that's going to be really hard or maybe insurmountable the idea of losing two hundred pounds a year. That's is at least at its outset. Seems like it's not going to be able to happen. Seems like it's a goal that can't be accomplished. But he's worked at it every day and it was just impressive to see his results and i feel like for anybody out there who says well. That's not possible. I need this product in order to solve my financial situation. I mean i don't know that video was an inspiration And i think to a lot of people and yet to me to be. Because i guarantee that he didn't lose nearly two hundred pounds by like eating fat free triscuits or something right. He was actually doing the work. He was addressing the underlying issues of the problem. He wasn't just like going with a simple fix. You know minor tweaks exactly. And i think that's the biggest problem with these pay on demand. Services is that they are only just abandoned. Its temporary fix on something and the underlying issues aren't being addressed in until you address those. Those real problems This is something that's gonna persist in. So i like this. Why i feel about sometimes these these pay on demand services might actually do more harm than good because it might just enable the behavior That has led them there in the first place. And then what happens. Once you've got your pay the day you get paid and we still don't have on that time schedule. You're still living paycheck to paycheck now. You're living like week to week or day to day. If you're if you're getting paid daily right you're not addressing the underlying issue which is doing the hard work of saving a little bit more and having that margin in your life. I gotta check out this video though. Because i wanna see diamond. Dallas page has a yoga instructor. But okay so while we're talking about healthy man. Let's move on and talk about cheap drugs. Every wants to spend a little bit less money on their drugs right not much worse than overprice drugs We're talking about prescription drugs. Of course there's been a I'm a major spotlight shone on the rising prices of some important drugs. Recently in many of the like the most substantial increases have come on what are called these designer drugs. That aren't used by most folks right. They're not used by the masses. But if you happen to to get a more obscure illness the drugs to help you could cost a fortune. One drug that isn't a designer drug but it's one that millions of people across the country need and us regularly is insulin and those prices have skyrocketed in recent years. Some folks have even taken to driving across the border to buy their insulin over in canada because the costs have become prohibitive here in the us but thanks to walmart cheap. Insulin is is actually now a thing again. Yeah that was really exciting news. Really good to see and the starting this month walmart is going to be selling their insulin. For about seventy three dollars vile that is actually substantially more affordable. That's an rice than the three hundred dollars. Which is what the big three pharmaceutical companies charge right and so it. It's ridiculous because they used to charge a reasonable price of forty dollars back when they introduced their form of insulin in the year two thousand. Yeah not that long ago. Twenty years ago it was crazy like substantially cheaper so yeah. The increase is eight hundred percent which is just kinda hard to fathom rank and according to the mayo clinic. Insulin in the us has cost ten times more than what it costs in other countries crazy. So yeah while walmart gets a lot. Of flack i think And in some ways maybe deserved well. I'm really glad to see them. Disrupt these massive price increases by the major pharmaceutical companies. Because this is a drug that people need and many currently can't afford so. Yeah it just seeing the price drop that much Walmart can have a big influence on a whole lot of people's lives with us absolute. Yeah and it's not like this is some crappy version of the drug as well like they have partnered with nova nordisk. Who is one of the major at three pharmaceutical companies right. And so it's not like this is some inferior insulin. This is the good stuff. This is the the rapid acting stuff that people have come to expect that like. you know. it doesn't take hours to actually start working like fifteen minutes. And so just the fact that they've been able to partner with one of the pharmaceuticals is just. I think just a little telling of the fact that those three companies have essentially cornered the insulin market and been price gouging. The past twenty years and walmart has been at the forefront of lowering prescription drug prices for years now starting with four dollars generic drug list back in the day still remember when they first initially launched that. Okay this is a big deal huge. Deal van You know since then others quickly followed but Since we're talking about prescription medicines good rx the announced this deal with door. Nash similar to a deal that was created for usaa members. Jordache workers also known as dashers. They now have access to good rx gold which gives them access to substantially discounted prescription drug prices. But that being said you don't need to be adored ash worker and you're a dasher or usa member in order to pay less for your prescription drugs on the rag using direct is totally free. You don't have to pay anything but if you or someone in your family. It takes a lot of medications Then consider paying in joining the goal program because that could end up saving you a ton of money but even just the regular non subscription could rx is an incredible money saving tool that we would totally recommend and we'll make sure to linked to them and are shown us no doubt all right. Well we got more to get to matt including why your cup of coffee every morning. It's gonna cost just a little bit more. We'll get to that and some other stories right after this break. It's crazy how much we have to pay for outdated impersonal healthcare and even crazier that we all just accepted. It's time to face facts. Healthcare is backwards. Luckily there's forward a new approach to primary care that surprisingly personal and refreshingly straightforward forward never makes you feel like just another patient backed by top rated doctors and the latest tech forward gives you access to personalized care whenever you need it. Using in-depth genetic analysis in real time bloodwork forwards top-rated doctors provide you with in depth insights to better understand your genetics mental and physical health. They then create custom easy to understand plans to help guide you to achieving long-term health with forward you get unlimited in person visits with your doctor and access to care anytime via the forward app offer. One flat monthly fee. It's time to stop accepting backwards. Healthcare and start moving. Your health forward visit go forward dot com today to learn more that's go forward dot com with no fees or minimum on checking and savings accounts banking with capital. One is like the easiest decision in the history of decisions kind of like choosing to listen to another episode of your favorite podcast and with capital one's top rated up. You can deposit checks and transfer money anytime anywhere. Making one even easier decision. That's banking reimagined. What's in your wallet. Terms apply capital one. Na member fdic aren't we are back inside to get to some more headlines that we found interesting this week the friday flights plus that expensive coffee story that you mentioned joel. I am literally drinking a cup of coffee right now. So i am very interested and fearful i think well yeah but first before we get to that met. We gotta get to the ludicrous headline we care you go. You hit it right on the head. Someone on twitter requested that we actually go. I can't believe we actually are came through in the clutch. Try to deliver. I wanna make people happy all right. Well this one is. How internet and tv providers. Get away with jacking up your bill. This comes from the washington post and Yeah the writer of this article describes something that all of us have dealt with at one point or another signing up for internet and getting a bill for way more than we bargained for and way more than we were promised on the phone or you know on a chat right bayton switch tack exactly and matt at actually just happened to me like all we did was moved to a new house. And so yeah. We're literally just moving service. Which means we should keep the same rate because we had our current rate locked through october but our next bill was ten dollars. More little sneaky. Right there right so i had to reach out vedras. Change service fee nobody. It wasn't even that it was like no your rates forty bucks and i was like wait a second you know. It wasn't no not at all. So i reached out to order like we recommend to a lot of people to do that. Sometimes you get the best customer service that way. And then i had to hop on the phone with one of those social media specialist because they can't resolve it fully through twitter which is silly but yeah They finally were able to get my bill back to normal but most of the country has only two options for home. Internet service right so it's not like this vibrant competitive marketplace and you can leave this crummy sneaky company for one of many others like that's just not how the system works in the united states sadly so this lack of competition it's led to opaque pricing and frustrating customer service for many many people myself included. But all of us at one time or another seems like if you have internet you have at some points men screwed over by the comcast the at and t.'s. Or the cox cable companies of this world and honestly if you have just even a couple options that you can choose between your at an advantage because there's a lot of markets where there's only one provider and they don't really have much choice you know you can hop back and forth like that but even still like when it's duopoly is like there's still not much choice in the kind of work together to keep prices high. Yeah sort of like you did getting on the phone with them dealing with these different customer service representatives with internet companies. It takes a lot of a lot of patients going to have to get zen with it. Or maybe put your head in like a a monk like state you're not gonna let stress get the best of humanity because if you start yelling doesn't help anything. But here's an interesting stats. Seventy six percent of americans say that internet is as important as electrician or water coursing through your veins. I made up the last. Yeah you still need your blood. You could live without internet but that was according to a survey by consumer reports feels like. Maybe it's a bit over the top. I certainly will. We'll take water over home internet access every day of the week water into a little more important but since home internet is probably the the equivalent of oxygen to too many these days. Let's quickly talk about how you can pay less for internet. So first of all you got to be willing to go through the song and a dance. Of cancelling your service. Not unlike what you did. Joel this get you the customer retention department which is the the only department that has leeway to offer you better terms. So if you're you're please maybe fall on deaf ears and you're probably going to need a switch to the only other provider where you live for new customer deal and again that's assuming that you have access to a second company and also keep in mind that switching back and forth on the rig is sometimes the only way to save if you have options. You know when you're being loyal to comcast or. At or two cox. That's just going to be a recipe for consistently paying too much. I think loyalties a good thing matt being loyal to your friends your family. But yeah to your company where you're getting internet from. Yeah or your insurance providers. What was what. I was gonna say as. Well sure your car. Insurance rates tend to go up. Don't go down. They don't reward you for being a longtime customers exactly. Also also i think another way to save money on your internet is questioned whether you need the fastest speeds or not right like you could save more by downgrading the service that you get if you're currently like signed up for the four hundred meg service off. Maybe you can switch to fifty or hundred make service. Which is maybe plenty fast enough for how you use the internet I think sometimes people frown on that. But it's like. I don't know man we're we're all with the fifty meg service and we're paying thirty dollars a month and it works plenty fine for the streaming that we do and The ways that we use it but exactly it might not work perfectly for every family especially if you're working a lot from home but it's worth considering. Also get your wireless router out of the cabinet. Get it up high and out in the open placement matters a great deal so you can actually get what you're paying for and if you're still having issues with it not being fast enough connect directly to your modem with the the ethernet cord right like we did this. During virtual school made a big difference. It made the speeds consistently faster and hopefully in the future. This isn't going to be as much of an issue as five g. Connectivity brings us more options and more competitors into the space like t mobile already offers five g at home so that's worth considering if that's offered where you live but you got to fight back against a high prices in the annoying fees and it's not easy right because they come standard in the industry. I know it's a huge pain points for a lot of people. But it's one of those things where we got to kind of stand up for ourselves and communicating back and forth in order to get the price that's right. Yeah and i wanna kinda surprising for a second because you talked about making sure that your your wireless router is in the proper place. People think about that right like they truly do. Stick them in like a closed cabin and they're wondering why their internet sucks. Well with a single has to go through the wall or through a cabinet is not going to work as well and oftentimes folks fits in the front left corner of the house in your mostly in the back rear. And it's like put some more central folks wants to take the seemingly easy path and just throw more money on it and they think. Oh well we need the higher service when to get of router now that cut four hundred dollars in may like maybe you do right but i make sure that you've got your router place somewhere where you can experience like. Essentially the proper flow of wifi around house. Doesn't come down to just pumping more speed behind it. If it can't get through the walls especially me and we live in an old neighborhood and old houses like the walls of drywall. They're made of like rock like the the old plaster walls is essentially like concrete. There so hard. Yeah it's a lot different than the newer construction so especially if you live in an older home This is something to consider Joel while we're talking about technology here. Let's talk about another expensive tech item smartphones See they had this article on the the two year upgrade cycle this week and they said that it's essentially obsolete and we couldn't agree more. It's like this was basically a function of the old Two year contracts that used to be standard with a different major wireless carriers. I'm so thankful that the two year contract thing is gone. It's actually like i feel like it's almost coming back because the phones are getting more expensive. We talked about that not too long. It's true it's like they're trying to lure us back in that system but that is not a good system for us if we want to pay at least some and you don't have to participate with. I'm still rocking the original iphone. Se that was released over five years ago and so while upgrading. Every two years and never made financial sense. It's certainly made some sense from it. Like a tech improvement standpoint Phone cameras in the screens in the battery. Life have all gotten much much better. I don't know how much longer i'm going to last with with my old phone. The difference between i've owned four and iphone five is much bigger than the difference between the iphone. Eleven and twelve. The twelve and thirteen is going to be when writings out. Whatever that increases in technology are incremental whereas phones were changing a lot back in the like the twenty seven to two thousand fifteen range the marketing. It seem like you need that new phone but the upgrades are just so minor that is best to stick with What you already got for a little bit longer. That's how you're gonna be able to say the most money. Yeah that's normalize longer upgrade cycles. Maybe maybe four to five year upgrade cycles right just holding onto that phone longer is going to be a big monetary savings. And you're not really losing out on all that much. It shouldn't be just where when you start approaching that two year window that you think it's automatically time to get a new phone. It's almost been programmed into our minds that that's the case but hopefully when you step back and look at it you realize that it is not yeah. I think. I think the older phone Should be more like a badge of honor for us right. That's that's what we're trying to do and not only are you saving money. But you're you're preventing waste because the us is the world's second largest contributor to eat as we jumped nearly seven million tons of discarded electronics. You know From our homes much every single year. So yeah forget about the size of the notch or the slightly sharper camera doing away with the standard to your smartphone. Ownership timeline altogether is yeah a boon for your bottom line. Good a whole lot of other ways to write. Phones are just not changing enough to justify the expense that cell phone manufacturers continued to try to get us to shell out that money for So yeah we completely agree with c net. Hold onto that phone a little bit longer. And if you're like itching to get something new maybe get yourself a cute little case or something like that. That make sure your phone. Feel a little newer. Shelton love get you that fresh pocket. Keep you from driving thing. Let's talk about inflation. Continues to rise at least for the time being and used car. Prices are a huge reason for that. According to the white house council of economic advisers sixty percent of the month over month increase has to do with either car sales a car or auto parts and car rentals and so just because we're seeing inflation figures at their highest level since two thousand eight. you know just before the great recession. That doesn't mean that we should be overly concerned with it. It seems as if the rise in inflation is leveling off a little bit here. But we'll just have to actually wait and see until july's report comes out next month before we know What the future holds. I think a lot of ways. It's good to see that. So much of that. Headline number released from one section of our economy and as that supply chain begins to get corrected We're going to see the overall rate of inflation Decline so right. Now if you're trying to buy a car obviously not a good time you're experiencing record levels of inflation but for the rest of us Inflation is a concern. But it's not nearly as big of a deal. I think it's made out to be by some people but one sad headline mathis week came from the wall street journal. And it was Bad news for coffee drinkers. Your coffee story coffee. Prices are going up due to poor harvests and increased demand. I guess people are taking back three cups of coffee instead of two these days and i will say the. The price of coffee does impact all of us. So i guess. What's the answer to saving their well. Drinking coffee at home is a big one. The cost difference between buying cup of coffee while you're out and making it a home is incredible like it's substantial out because what. What was the average cup of coffee when you get home. Something along the lines of like fifteen to twenty cents. I if i guess it depends on how nice your beans are drinking less. Coffee out and i'll i'll i'll add to. You can drink less coffee at home. Even though you're spending what like a quarter or something like that on a nice cup of coffee at home. I think you can reduce your consumption of coffee at home by drinking it at strategic points day. We've talked about this before during you something. It's like noon right. Won't even delay your morning coffee by a couple of hours. The the idea. Is that cortisol your cortisol levels spike first thing in the morning. So that's what makes you feel alert too much cortisol. Like that's what makes you feel anxious and stressed out. But that's what makes you feel alert by drinking coffee. First thing like right when you wake up like most people do actually kind of dampens that natural effect of that quarter saw. And so you. You're supposed to wait a couple hours until it starts to taper off a little bit and then you get to pick it right back up with the first morning i personally. I like my coffee rafter. Lunch and i guess why i wonder. Why would anybody with rising coffee. Prices consider quitting coffee altogether. I think well anybody who drinks coffee is like ultimately seems kind of crazy. No way not gonna have it. Although there was an interesting article by michael pollen who the The food writer recently had an article in the guardian and he quit caffeine for three months. And he he said that his productivity declined to quite a bit he was like Standard lisa quicker to get frustrated or angry and yeah. He said that most of us are basically dependent on caffeine these days just to make it to our baseline of productivity. I think there's some truth to that. All of us are going to get ready to pay a little more for our little daily addiction. Here maybe in the coming weeks and months yeah this might be a way that we all as consumers see inflation start to affect our bank accounts just a little bit because coming come on. It's not like coffee costs all that much. It's not a huge part of our budget. Bunia something to be aware of exactly well That's going to be it for this episode of our friday flights well links to the different stories that we mentioned as well as any other resources that we mentioned during this episode up on our website. At how the money dot com We'll have those show notes there for you. We hope everyone has a great weekend and look forward to an interview. This coming monday with ken honda. We're gonna talk all about happiness and money. Kim has a unique approach to how it is that we think about money and we look forward to sharing that upset with you here on monday. Joel is going to be it for today until next time. Best friends out. Best friends out the gap brand you know and love for peril now has designs for the home only at walmart. The gap home collection reflects timeless. American style was super soft. Bedding lux bath. Essentials like plush towels modern dinner. Wear that lets you play with pattern or keeping sheikh for your next dinner party and pillows for days made with the planet mind gap is committed to doing good for the planet that starts at home from betting to bath. Gap home includes items made with organic cotton and recycled materials for more inspired fines for daily life shop at walmart dot com slash gap home with no fees or minimums on checking and savings accounts banking with capital. One is like the easiest decision in the history of decisions. Kind of like choosing to listen to another episode of your favorite podcast and with capital one's top rated up. You can deposit checks. Eight transfer money anytime anywhere making capital on an even easier decision. That's banking reimagined. What's in your wallet. Terms apply capital one. A member fdic.

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Dr. Marianne Fjording talks biomarkers, CROs, and tomatoes!

Molecular Moments Podcast

36:34 min | 1 year ago

Dr. Marianne Fjording talks biomarkers, CROs, and tomatoes!

"Hi doctor chad briscoe. And this is the molecular moments podcast. An ongoing conversation with industry leaders about the various nuances of drug development and bio analysis. We're going to be talking about science. The way the scientists do and in each episode will explore the relationships that help us become the scientists. We are today in today's episode. We sat down with guests. Scientists dr marianne fuelling scientific officer by alleged links joined us all the way from copenhagen denmark. Marianne has more than twenty five years of experience within the industry and before joining the bio. Alex team she spent almost fifteen years at the pharma giant novartis. she's also super involved in the industry. She and i had a great discussion about her expertise in biomarkers making the jump from pharma to sierra and the hobbies that she has used to help fill the time during quarantine so without further ado. Here's the second episode of molecular moments. Welcome to the molecular moments podcast. Marianne just like to ask you a little bit about About your background. How did you land in. The pharmaceutical industry becomes scientist Tell us a little bit about yourself. So i'm located in denmark in copenhagen and i started at the university of copenhagen studying bio chemistry. I think that was a very interesting pattern. I found out very early in the study that i want to go into pharma so after three year. You normally do your masters thesis in denmark. So i started my master's thesis at a small biotech company news asserts. It was very small at that time. And i made a similar kind of esa an it was related to new article. Diseases like pakistan s high. So on so. I actually find out very early that i wanted to work into so early on the assets. I mean i guess su twenty. So years i don't i don't mean to date you and it all here but what were the formats When you first started out in this field it myse- biotech company related to small molecules and it was in the research area. So my Thesis was about to find the a new Small drug compound that could increase the new right outgrowth of sales so it's working with a bosa line and did a lot of sil based essays. And then i was also working with primary cells taking them out from the mice and then grow them as well and then tested if these drunk when they were added to the cell kolja could increase or sustain the new right outgrowth of these cells if a super interesting at that point. Yeah is awesome. Yeah so one of the things again. Still kind of focusing on your early per your career that i find talking to scientists that there's often a personal connection something that is john into the pharmaceutical industry. Very moment like that for you and your career. Yes oh my father. He's also by chemistry and he was also working with a new assigns. So that was of course a hostile me as well on this regard and actually i was also then Laid on involving dot of screening offer like high throughput screening of small compounds in different kind of essay. And that lead me now to signal transaction. So i was working at least ten or fifteen years with the signaling transaction with them my kindness and erk phosphorylation and deacs instead causeways and smell. I know that myself as well as People in the biomedical industry would view you as an expert in the analysis of biomarkers. Is that where you see your expertise as well. What do you really see that you do that. You bring to the pharmaceutical industry. Based on also what i learned in the days on very research par was actually after my master sees elected. Psc or so at a hospital. And then mike. As well. And i was working more with the signals from and i was also working with a professor course. Steam camel soft during the lot from him as well on. What kind of How to proceed in tyrosine kinase signaling and and that late me then into insulin signaling an idea of one signaling and then i. I moved into a job at noon on his gas. Well yeah that's interesting because that area of denmark copenhagen obviously the most populated area of denmark. There's a lot of pharmaceutical industry in biotech research in that area. I personally have a fascination as a chemist who is interested in a lot of physics with the history of nuclear bombs and the think of neal's bore going back to one of the greatest dana Scientists what do you think. It is about that area of denmark or denmark in general. The has made it such an incredible scientific hotbed for pharmaceutical industry. Yeah that's a super good question. Actually i don't know i think maybe we are very Curious by nature. Then mike. I mean we. We like to explore stuff and find out if this new way of doing things and then that has also been some coincident and that time win it all started out mean was also working at leo pharma. The was founded by alcohol. Who was also part of the numerous finding insulin's on mean maybe these guys they also knew each other and then the main all these kind of things. Eventually you will have more hope coming up with more biot- sake and people are curious by nature. I was vidor. I have to think of novo. Nordisk as being a diabetes company and and earth than. They do a lot of other things now. And you know early insulin. it lily. I guess i never really knew which one was first. Were they are out a time right. I really have no here. Mississippi good thing is also. I don't know maybe a little political i think and then and also on the part on on the different time period as well i mean i. Of course saying that was a maybe a. I was cold and the west of these to make Recumbent us well. Maybe they also at that time or had a lot of interaction going to meetings like doing now and getting inspired by china right. Yeah well as. I think many people do that are will type one type two diabetics and so it's wonderful wonderful for everyone and i think insulin is in on early Huge success in the pharmaceutical industry. But i think everyone wins. And i think we see that collaboration across the industry Now anyways so. I wanted to talk to you. Get a little bit deeper Specifically in that biomarkers base We were really excited. When you joined by wedge olympics to bring the expertise in a hole in taking us to a whole 'nother level with biomarker expertise but i what sort of motivated you to jump from a career and a pharmaceutical company over to the service industry of a contractor organization. Yeah thank you. That's also a very good question. So i mean. I have been working at least more than twenty close to twenty five years in biotech and pharma as i said when i started out my master and i've been working with sa development and validation in the research and the non clinical space and then of course in the clinical tries while supporting a lot of my colleagues with kind of things related to essays. And i really liked to have that interaction with a lot of different people and helping them with these kind of troubleshooting and both in as development but also what they need is i mean they. They at least some of my former colleague also at noon or i don't want to put them on top. But i think that many of them were kind of having difficulties in navigating in the space. What should we miss you. I mean should. We measure all these. Sometimes i mean when you are research you get so excited you want to measure like sergio fifty different kinds of bio maga in that trial. And i think it's is rewarding to guide them and help them on. What's and what to go on and then for my move to going to a cro. I think that. I just wanted to broaden my horizon a little more to find out if there was people i could help with this kind of jobs and so on so. It's not so much about the whole things with the sample analysis. More on the process of getting people started on going on the right track for the on. So i think on a cro you get the chance to talk to a lot of different kinds of clients and getting to know a lot of different kinds of drunk modalities deceased indication so it would not just be one. This season dictation. Maybe just more or less the same modalities in different varieties. So i think that could also be. I mean for me. I think that could also be rewarding from you on that while there was a lot to unpack in that answer. That's pretty cool and for me is a career. Cro person it. I've been almost twenty five years only working for a couple of different sierras. I've always had that interest to kinda see the other side. But i really enjoy as you mentioned working with many different companies with many different disease states. Sometimes it really challenges you because you go into a call and you know you have an hour to to read up on this new disease that you don't know anything about and you ought to try to be as much of an expert as you can but you know three hours later your maybe talking about a completely different disease. It might be one kind of oncology in the morning and it might be diabetes or lupus in the afternoon so it certainly fascinating. That way isn't it. It is fascinating but actually thing that also many diseases are somehow also related to some kind of immorality. I mean you have Maybe inflammation or you have some kind of signaling pathways and many of these can also be very much related. So you're not just starting from a totally from scratch. And i think for my background pos working in neurological diseases and also in inflammation diseases rheumatoid arthritis and skin diseases now also diabetes and liver diseases cardiovascular. I mean you get a very broad knowledge of all of the diseases and anyways he's our some of our clients later. That's also that's priorities. Yeah i feel like that's one thing i've learned a lot as i've gained more and more expertise in the biomarker space over the last eight or ten years as the connection between different diseases. You know when we when we look back. Twenty years in most things were small molecule treatments and we are measuring k. And you really didn't have the same focus right. And now now. I see across like you said across arthritis in cardiac disease and oncology right. There's the in that you mentioned. There's you know markers of different types of stress response in the body and it really does tie the diseases together and helps to understand the complexity of the human systems. As well as yeah. How how there's so much interplay. And i've learned a lot from you in the short time that we'd been colleagues. I really A another area. That i found fascinating that you've talked to kneel in our normal work is talking about this different levels of sophistication a different biomarkers and sometimes we talk about okay. There's sort of simple soluble. Biomarkers decided kinds and the other circulating biomarkers and then and then more more target engagement. Biomarkers have become a very interesting topic to explore. An i love you to dive into that and talk a little bit about why that space is so important. What's interesting about it where it's going. Yes because i mean biogas not just a word by a maga. I mean you will have the one that you also know when you go to your doctor. If you're seeing that you have fever you want to make sure that you may be once antibiotic then you get to the cap and then the doctor hopefully silent now you can get antibiotics so that would be a bio minus so. That's the most diagnostic one. But i mean there's also all the one where we're going more into drug related one where you want to make sure that the drug actually that making some of action for that drug how is it. Actually that the drug is working. May be in your animal model and laid on also and for that you would also by a migrant and especially also the targeting gates men by a maga if the drug actually hits its target so sometimes i mean we have several kind of drug also on the market where we know yesterday half as good effect but also maybe only for some persons and maybe not for everybody and that could also be related to how they Hitting the target. I mean so that could be good for people to have more targeted engagement bio maga to make sure that your drug is a on the right path and you can go fossil to the markets as well when you talk to customers about biomarkers you know. It's not uncommon in the conversations as he said to maybe twenty or thirty biomarkers may be needed agent biomarker and of course these are also expensive. They take time. Tell me about how that conversation might go when someone comes to you they say. Hey we want to do these. Twenty biomarkers churry. I will give you a quote. Little run a ball. Or how do you go about advising in that way i think for most part. I mean you again have to ask. What is it that exactly. What kind of answers are they looking for. So again if they Having a new drug that they just simply can see that it is working now here and the animal models it working some disease Model and also now they move into animals in talks and also in human and want to explore more than it is good to have some kind of more on a lot of Suplex and proteome makes to check. How is it would do a bio maga program here so as you can always accorded a fishing expedition. They want to explore. Which one is actually biogas. Going up and down related to that disease for these again is also kind of advise them to narrow these panels down into few again. I mean maybe not thirty. At least maybe ten or something because it's also super difficult to look on these dates afterwards. I mean you have to have a lot of bioinformatics into If this is actually making sense in the whole proteome space. And then i'm also asking again on again related to the targeting gays min- safe for the headphones on that and monoclonal against sideline or something if they also wants to have some more deep dive into that essay for instant for that sidled kind all protein one of the other challenges with those is the stage related validations of biomarkers and qualification in those terms. So sort of guide or could you generally kind of summarize as you move through the development process how that In for that one also used my expand together with the regulators. I mean from when i have intact with sources as well so that would also be. I mean for many first tumen does is an exploratory trials omen you can test more or less all you want than explore from that one and when you're going into mourn faced too. I think that you should definitely narrow it down and making sure that you have some more specific biomarker let you want to mesh also because sometimes when you are going to have a big panel multiplex. It's not. Always you can relate on the exact numbers on the concentration. Of course you will get a concentration labor. Paducah navy not get that confirmed in a single plex elisa laid on so you also look more on pets if it's going up and down and always compared to baseline or placebo once on so it's always relative quantity on these essays. As well and on the state's raid. I would definitely say when you're moving into face to use should be more specific on what you're going into to be honest icing. It should start much earlier all the way to win new league going to find your lead candidate off your drop. I mean if at that time you also need to have a process for which by a mob you want to maintain the clinic. So at bio maga plan should also be in place very early in research and should be in place when you're going to find your lead candidate but of course i acknowledged that it can be difficult for smaller companies to do that as well right. Yeah i guess that's part of where your role can come in now. Right as a service provider is to help biomarker plan right so yeah and then also to be specific. What should it contain. Sort contain that you also looking into immune history. Chemistry should see if you talk to the express winston in the liver. Join the blot. Yeah i mean in that the majority going to target. And then also if you should look into some genomic planners well is it something where you only can measure the missing jonah but never find the proteins and then also figure out is that than relevant from moving forward as well so that should be settled part of this one that you need to look into so yes. It is a lot of different aspects of what to look into biomarkers. Has i think everyone expected. So maybe advice from your experience as a client at nova nordisk in the past of different. Cro's or an innovator company that needs partners but now also coming a little bit from your role in a service providers cro. What should the partners look for. When there are the sponsor of the project sponsors. Look for when they're looking for a good sierra partner. I mean that you're not just taking on the head saying yes. I can do this essay. And then i set up and validate everything just as if it was a peak. Asa you should also look into if One is a biology behind. I mean look into if it should be in ceremony. Plus mass should be. And what kind of plasma should it be should it be. Hillary no did see a or sideswipe. Because sometimes these bio maga only stable in certain matrix. I still remember when i started in his. I had a colleague who was going crazy because all the sanders was what taking in did say plus man that was for him mafia project and he said everybody should know. Of course these calculation factors. they're not stable in. It'd say they only stable inside trait classmate announcing okay. That's definitely a learning for someone here in the place. So i need to look into what kind of mates accuser. Actually know the biology. So when you asking for which service providers should you actually across. It should also be somebody who has actually have some biology experience that they actually also know what your needs off for that on. These can help you guide on these questions for sitting up up the because it's not just to set up an elisa or something oh another kind of essay platform. You need to have asking this question. What what is biology behind it as skin sir. I'm impressed leave. Spoken about fifteen minutes or so on biomarkers and you have not yet used. The terms fit for purpose or context of use which is pretty amazing. But i would like you to unpack those terms for me. A little bit Just it doesn't seem like a complete discussion about biomarkers without without using those terms. So you can just unpack this for me. A little bit in the context everything. Yeah exactly so. When i started doing more regulated by analysis said i did more or less than fifteen years of my career in in research pot. We never talk about fit for purpose like that. Want to buy a my fall. We you just continue on doing your research and getting so excited that you could measure as something in that one. So i attended one of these. Aps meeting in. When i started the at noon what is and then. I heard this fit for purpose on. Say okay that's a cool name and actually the more you actually thinking about that word fit for curb this What you need for your essay. It has actually be. The essay has a purpose. You want to measure that bio maga and then you want to make sure that the essay meditation exercise fitting into that annette release also to the with stages in i mean if it is in talks study you might only need to few parameters tests and i who knows you might not even have all the related the sampras to do a pre study on doing your essay days but you may get as best as you can for your fit for purpose on that so i think using these word is actually very fit by magas because it's a good wording on the context of us is also a good wording is a similar one because it's also on you again have to ask what is the context of us a little more difficult to figure out for people because then they have too late so if it is predictive bio mago appro knocked stake all sometimes when people can make up some of the wording on the context of us but in essence they are very much related these to it for purpose and context of use. You mentioned something that made me think about you. Know the past right in my past and your past and so many international meetings. I would see you all the world trade and we always knew you'd be there and i'm curious not from a business side but i wanted to talk personally a little bit. You have a lump for travel. I think not just business travel right. So maybe we could switch gears a little bit then. We'll come back to you. Know pharmaceutical industry and experience the. Tell me about your travel experience. Maybe there's one amazing trip. Tell me a trip that you want to do. After you can travel post kogel travels that would also be around the world. I guess and now. I think he's also been to be curious right. You can always find a place around in the world. Weather's new interesting people You can learn more about this culture. Though there. i have been around many places. At one point we acted. It's super six months off my family. And i and which around the world at that time. My boys only Six and eight years old. We started out in nicaragua and it was only a five days in that travel in my youngest son. He broke his arm. And then you're sitting there and we were on the absolute most remote place in the whole world on a small island called little corn island. So there's a big corn island and in this on code little corn island nicaragua coast. And you're just sitting there with a six year old. Who has broke his arm. And then okay. What now and you should go all the way back to denmark. Should we find out. How can it be repaired in nicaragua. And i mean. I grew up and then i still remember in the nineties when you had all these kind of the civil war. They assume you still lying. Can they only do about the country and so on but actually it was so fascinated so on this very lonely beach. There was one couple american couple. They doctors and they said to us. Don't worry a six year old. I'm it can always be fixed. I mean you can go all the way back to then mike or you can have it fixed tin and we looked up and then find out that there was a supervisor hospital in managua. So so the rest of the day pack. All our stuff took first small boat two big corn island and then a flight from big corn island to managua in it to the hospitals all that was also arranged by our very small hotel when there was only i think that was only five hots on this hotel it was on the beach and they'll help us with saying aso. It was a touching story and the my son got a super cool. In-vitro x ray set up on his arm so it was never owned by that there was just kind of merged together. It was a super cool super modern hospital. And the yeah you can just only get surprises and we could have got the same kind of thing stone in denmark. So i think from that and then we continue the whole spiral going to australia. He got his could finally stretch his Fully decor on funny story. But i mean you on and especially on people and getting surprises and yeah see. Sings do never talk. You would experience to see little cornell island and i can appreciate nicaragua one of my personal passions or one of the things i've involved in is some of that honduran missions that i was in honduras a couple years ago and so i can really appreciate What you know what you're saying with nicaragua. I think it's not much different to and then you went on to australia. I love that. It's not iraq aric snow and he started feel better while he's probably a tough from an egg new. We ended up in hong kong. And that's a phone thing because at that time we just came to our hotel and we went around in hong kong and then we saw in the news that hotel in hong kong. What now totally closed down due to saas so that was when we had the bird flu at that time and then we were just like. Oh my god what if it was all hotel because at that time we just wanted to go home a little more than half and the kids wanted to be back to the but a whole hotel was closed down due to a choice coming from mexico and he went into that hotel in and apparently he had the bird flu. What are the things. I wanted to ask you about his You're also very involved coming back to the pharmaceutical industry. And you're very involved in the regulatory side and different societies. I think you know. I c. h. And that term a lot to everyone but if you could explain that what that is and you know why you're involved how you're involved and where the documents had i'd love to get an update from you so the is on. Pk drug essays. And it's the metalled validation that is being covered so is on homilies -ation of the current one. We have several guidelines at the moment from fifty. Am and japan and we also have in canada and we have in china as well and so it's a harmonisation of all these documents that we want to have as one document going forward and to make sure that when we Submitting a drug program that it is aligned with all agencies on these process for doing an essay validation and it has been so rewarding. It's a suba cool group that i'm in with if you can say that is a group of more than thirty five regulators and then us from the industry as well. So i'm now the topically from pharma the american association on the stomach and we are having him some really good discussions and also where we disagree of course On different kind of topics so on what we should approach on how to approach. But you actually learn also found out from the regulators when you hear what they're saying that they see these kind of Issues in different topics then. Of course you have to also learn. Where are they coming from. And also they also have to accept where we are coming from and we all have to same purpose. We want to have safe drugs on the market for all individuals is a super rewarding process to be in win and where we are at the moment. It was in a public consultation. Last year and new we've received a lot of comments actually was two thousand comments and we are now going through all of these comments addressing them as seeing. How can we make the guidelines a little more clear in the wedding and also on that and we should also acknowledge that we will make a training material for this one so the document not be alone so that will be an qna section and that will also be training material with will kind of explain on what to do. How should you prepare calibrates and qc than are of two different stock solution and all this kind of thing so that will be explained also in this training material so if somebody wanted to get involved at this point is it more of a whole lot wait finger coming or is there way somebody could help with the training material. Sounds like a huge job even with thirty five people. It sounds like huge job. It is viewed. I saying but we would also get help from the ice age organization on that as well for that but i think it will be a group making the material but of course i will reach out to all my friends around in found men. Say having them whether it's well rain. Yeah that's fantastic talking about working with your friends. One of the other topics. I really liked to explore with my guesses about mentorship and one of my industry mentors was I call her. The mother of fit for purpose was g lee. Y worked for for a while in my first role in zero very fortunate to work with gene. And you can imagine the questions that she would throw at you and really make you think deeper so. Are there any mentors that you can think of now that you're in a little bit further in your career. Maybe you're playing a role as a mentor. Like to hear about that a little bit. I don't think i would call out specific names on that. But i definitely on on the men's apart. I think that there has been many good meetings where people have been a good inspiration among aps but also from evf as well which i have been caught off as well and i mean many of these people are all kinds of super good minta people that can give a lot to the audience when they are doing a talks on that and for myself i always want so fa my mints aurora's my door is always open. I feel like this is the most important part for being a role model or mensa full of people that they can always ask question they. There's no such thing as a stupid question so they can always come in. Reach out to me and i will help them and whatever it is and at the moment also to stand behind the sciences and the project managers now had bioenergetics that. I'm here for them. Kind of just behind them pushing them a little fella so that they know exactly on on the next step and making sure that they are confident in what they're doing so for me. That's that's a good on that palm. That's fantastic has. Certainly i love east of that about your door being opened and i think You know you're somebody. I reach out to questions. Certainly it's a nice group with with yourself. In jim mcnally my partners in a very similar role that we play within the organization. So that's exciting side. I wanna close with asking you about something that he sent me a while ago that i just went. Wow when i asked you for a picture. what some august or something like that. He sent me this picture with the most amazing tomatoes i've ever seen in my life. I've never seen so many kinds of tomatoes. I've never seen such this. Look the listeners to come visit next nick nick. Tell me about the tomatoes. Those started out very small. I own had like two different kind of tomatoes And i had a greenhouse. What was it five years ago. And then i find old is interesting and then i joined the group actually of all places on facebook tomatoes enthusiasm. I learned so much more. So i mean it's not just read and around it can also be oval and green and you can have stripes on the black it can bleed Yellow with black top. And i mean it can have wrinkles can be all kinds of and then the taste also very different so this yeah i ended up maybe due to cove. I don't know what happened to you. But i had hundred different species of the raiders in my garden and my husband he had to build an extra field for me so that we also could have tomatoes outside of the greenhouse with of course is a super challenging thing here and then with the wind and rain and snow son and so on but it actually turned out super cool and i think it's funny. I mean this small little seat can grow into delivering so much joy and my whole family is also now having a tomatoes. Also see them grow and to see different shapes and the callers and so on and also taste mean some of them they can taste like an orange or plum oil a kind of non sweet sour part as well. So that's a very good. I love tomatoes. I really did you. Imagine soured did you. Have you ever had fried green tomatoes for like. That's a southern american Typical southern american dish i love. Yeah exactly yeah. Yeah the other day. I actually haven't the last one here in november. Isn't that amazing. Some of them more so more than greed and i have to yet make them A religious or something like that the numbers also very good as let's fantastic mariam talked about a lot today and i appreciate it so much. I think your insights for me for the pharmaceutical industry and just very interesting in general. Is there anything else that you might want to. Just add like with chatted. Asked me about that or any closing comments from you or no. I think it's has been a very pleasant conversation that we had here today. And we can have a more on session number two maybe sunday and i think it has been very good and wonderful. Well we will do it again. That's all for episode two. If you enjoyed today's episode. Please be sure to subscribe at apple podcasts. Spotify or your favorite podcast app so you never miss a conversation. If you'd like to hang out with us outside of the podcast we have a lot of webinars and other presentations not just for marianne and myself but from others at Bio edge lyrics a few on a visit by wedge dot com to see what's coming up. And how you can stay in touch We're always here so Thanks again molecular. Moments would not be possible without the support of our sponsor bioethics labs by wedge licks global contract research organization specializing in large molecule bio analysis. Based in durham north carolina with labs in hamburg germany and boston massachusetts by wedge olympics provides high-quality by when services to leading pharma and biotech companies. The world they offer assay development validation and sample analysis under gop gop as well as gnp quality control testing. If you're looking to work with a team of highly experienced scientific and qa professionals through all phases of clinical development look no further than bioenergetics for more information or to speak with their scientists today visit their website at www dot by wedge olympics dot com. Thanks for listening to the molecular moments podcast.

denmark pharma copenhagen chad briscoe dr marianne Marianne leo pharma diabetes nicaragua inflammation diseases rheumato liver diseases cardiovascular mike university of copenhagen Paducah navy novartis nova nordisk Nordisk little corn island cardiac disease skin diseases
India 2020 Voice AI Year in Review with Haptik, Slang Labs, Klove Chef, and Women in Voice - Voicebot Podcast Ep 187

The Voicebot Podcast

1:03:17 hr | 10 months ago

India 2020 Voice AI Year in Review with Haptik, Slang Labs, Klove Chef, and Women in Voice - Voicebot Podcast Ep 187

"This is episode one eighty-seven of the voice. Podcast i guess they're accurate from haptic. Kumar rajon from slang labs sarah deep core from women voice india and babu ballots. Shut down from clubs chef. Today we talked twenty twenty year in review for india. Twenty twenty one started off quickly voice by nation. But today we're going to take one more look back at twenty twenty before we moved forward again is that i was doing the review episodes for the us for europe for developers who was clear. We're missing a big set of stories in india so today we're closing that gap with four guests on the frontlines of conversational ai. india before we get started. I want to suggest to check out. Voice insider it's our premium newsletter. Those of you may know about that is for people in the industry. That wanna stay up-to-date not just on the news but also the trend shaping voice. Hey today the controversies that maybe don't make it into the news early notice of funding rounds acquisitions and a lot of useful information data in particular. They will never make it into the mainstream press or even voiced by articles to something. You probably don't know section one of the favorites. I hear from time and time again. That's where we share insider nuggets. That are really only interesting to you if you're in the industry and you're really focused on it but they're really useful to know if you are a members also get access to voice. Pots exclusive slack more than one hundred back issues of voice insider. And it's an easy way to reach me with your questions and thoughts so always something to consider encourage you to check out voice daddy i ford slash insider voice about that day i four slash insider. You can learn a little bit more about it. There and sign up is the perfect complement to the voice by podcast. Okay this week's guests. We have four separate interviews for you. The first is with accurate vice. Whose founder and ceo of haptic thir- leading conversational a company for working with big brands ranging from disney and kfc hp. In jio. that's a lot of interesting things. In terms of background. they were actually had a big big investment. A nine figure investment. Gio awhile back so definitely an important company in the space eckerd's filed by kumar garage. He's cofounder slang labs. I think some of the people who are even in the us but even more in india no kumar and some of the stuff. They're doing their slang. Labs the pioneer software for custom. Inap- voice assistance for e-commerce they're working with p. and g. big basket spicejet and other e commerce apps across multiple industries. It's really interesting things to say about the ecommerce angle going on in voice in india right now also joining me on the mic. Is sarah deep car. She's co founder of women. Avoid india and the conversation. Ai manager for novo nordisk previously worked for accenture digital channels group focused on chat bots and conversational ai platform. So she has broad exposure and slash. Your moved over to novo nordisk takes over expertise. They're wrapping up our interviews today as who shut day. Ceo clubs chef club chef has the most popular cooking alexa skill in india. And they're even first party for alexa inquiries related to cook in india so he has a particularly interesting perspective on what's been going on their next up the biggest voice. Ai transit events from twenty twenty in india. let's get started aggravates. Welcome to the voice spot. Podcast thanks for having me. I'm excited i'm excited to so the topic. Today is the year in review and we really focus on what's going on in india. You have a very interesting. Let's say a front row seat to what's going on with conversational a more. Broadly you deal with chat and with voice as you look back on twenty twenty and you look back in india and the conversational space. What was the biggest story of the year. What stands out. I think the biggest of the if you look at everything in addition i Chad boys todd bobby platforms use cases gov support if you just look at the broader space end for us like you mentioned right. Rear look on the internet of things over. The biggest breakout story has been whatsapp By that what What i mean is that if you think about the decio. Facebook has genuinely taken a number of steps. do enable what's up to become a platform for businesses to do a lot more with it right the genuinely thinking about this was the first yard where they would enough actions that facebook is accompanied to basically say that look deadened mission with what chapters to become like. Ob chat by web businesses and branch can come on and a conversation experiences to enable commerce engagement. Ben support So far for for us. And for me specifically as i think about the landscape i actually you know. I want to go to the extent and say as far as i think in domes of build adoption of conversation in the seven yards that i've been doing this which is like a lifetime in this business. this is probably the biggest route moment that that's happened because of the simple fact that You know if you if you provide in platform read a hundreds of millions of users can genuinely use. Nlp conversational interfaces dude to businesses to get things done for commerce far support it it probably will be can be a genuine battered. I'm shift that. You know people like you and i have been talking about for many rs. Okay so you work with a lot of big brands. Yeah so when you look at when you look at what's app or these brands interested in what's happ before the new features came along. Yes so there is always been a great Interest from start dating back to two thousand seventeen on more street because of the simple logic that you know most of these bands and more of the bland managers or the c. Suite dr day us. What's up like five hundred times a day for everything right. so then i'd choose expansion. What product on my band on this bag form so the interest is always been dead. It's been it's been the case for like i said the red bottle to your four yards. You know it was just a matter of the features being available the platforming available and more broadly in honesty the features started begging big. Started becoming available about a couple of ers by but really your until the earlier question is whether it was the first show. Facebook obliquely came out multiple times in. I talk about the fact that whatsapp is going to be a platform for engagement with businesses. Right unlimited a lot of things down features actions announcements which gave ams especially large brands a lot of confidence that look this is a good platform for businesses to stay and not just something that was been for like monetization got and so we've seen other moves along these lines as well with google also have business messaging feature. What is the general reaction about those. Are those going to be supported as tier two. Are they going to be supported as enthusiastically. Or is it going to be more Something that if if i have to do it i'm going to do it. But what's abbas where i want to invest. I mean i think you do have a but not like a must have sort of need. I mean it's the classic Vitamin was painkiller sort of analogy read. whatsapp is like is like dope. Incommoded solids of very big problem in terms of engagement. Outreach was Assured the good to have that a check box i need to be on those channels honestly similar a little bit with alexa and google has read what we've seen play out over the last two yards. Which is yeah great. I'd love to. I'd love to be on alexa of beyond will so that we can check it off that a band present debt. But it's not. It's not solving the problem of engagement. Would you think about it right on. This applies more than in globally. As well as we've spoken about it several times as saying that You know for the conversation. Space for the voice or our chad The inflection point will be when there is a platform for A large number of users can discolor conversational interfaces easily and be actually be able to have that sort of weighed. I know and saw virginia and problem on just because of the benediction and depth that. But i'd go whatsapp at least in this part of the word. We're starting to see that. So now your customers primarily thinking about what's at for customer service or are they looking at it for marketing and product sales. It's it's been mostly customer service. Start with because that's almost like low-hanging it's also the easiest place to start for land and to convince everybody done leave eight because You know the moment you want to go out and say hey look. We want to create a catalog and and be like sales on this A lot more convincing in. I think service is obviously a little easier to get stockade Bill been something that a but very quickly and Over the last two months is moving into conversations brandon looking at it as a As as as toda channel for Basically overall customer expedience commerce site so By toda mean data website of the app and then and this becomes the Consumer and we're china for them. Do for them to really build build that expedients unsettled. Kara right it. So some of these brands already using facebook messenger. Nobody was using Facebook messenger. I think Look a the only reason for that. And that's where. I obviously india's a different from from the. Us auto. is that most consumers on us. facebook messenger Because of what's being discussed so much deeper penetrated so might were part of people's livelihood so that's why facebook message In this award from consumers is very low in lewis way so facebook has a big team out of seattle and l. elsewhere as well but seattle's one of the big central areas where they're working on their own assistant You know some of that. We see in the facebook. Puerto already some basic features of that are controlled actually by facebook assistant everything else by alexa but The expectation is this year. I after this year that they're going to roll out their own assistant Which will have much broader capabilities. I'm not gonna say that. It's going to be like a lecturer syria. I don't truly know what their ambitions are there but have their own ideas of what that could be How do you see that playing out. Is that going to be important. Because i assume that would not just come out on facebook but it will probably be accessible through. What's happened instagram's well. Yeah yeah no. I think I think is one of those things where you you know how it is with forms like facebook amazon and google. You did the ultimately to invest in a few fernandez see the highest customer. Adoption is hardly settled down right. I mean if you think about again back through google right You know if you think about google if you think about assistant in gender You know the whole assistant. Actions ecosystem You know has been has been something in place for so long Assistant platform announced that. Is you know then died. Google business messaging platform right. Which is the one. That's now coming through We'll be cloud where they messaging within google maps and google search Now you know customers ask us hinton. How did all of this dying together should be starred. What should we do don. So is that look boo. What makes sense for you from your end customers and gonna come in and actually ask for your brand or are they going to on maps I think the same onset allies for like your question about facebook grade. Which is you know. I definitely with assistant. Like a standalone assistant for general purpose on sierra. Will this be something that ultimately will get integrated with instagram and whatsapp. And if it does. Will it be more like a navigational assistant with basically you know. Then deduct your business or direct you to specific china if you wanna call Those questions all of those still still remain to be on soared For me right back to back to what we were talking about. What's really been that defined about two thousand twenty is that the end consumer wants to jews. What's up as a platform to engage with businesses and businesses. Want to be on. Whatsapp to provide is out. Shannon to be able to sell product or service if the if the dentist there from from both sides in the mediums of index should whether they go through lectures centralize Alterra partners facebook made an acquisition of customer. Recently right that's going to art in all of this How that happens. I think that we've have to see okay. So you talk about where consumers are and so brands want to be where the consumers are make sense are consumers using. You talked about google Are they using that. are they. Using it on the phone or they're using on smart speakers. Are they using amazon alexa. If you wanna go onto that. And what's the motivation there for brands then to support those platforms. Yeah so while. I obviously speak very in-depth india night. Now i'm not doesn't apply to even southeast issue all the us the listens maybe be do business but india only fairly little option for any of the voice assistance assistant alexa or on cd for that matter. we see that that is You know us kind of similar to the us where there's this sort of top segment of customers. Maybe ten twenty million hard That have the smart speaker in the homes are now mostly using it for you. Know the things that we all have familiar ridge which is music and reminders and maybe the weather may be connecting their devices But we have not in the in two thousand and twenty. I would say guard. I've seen at least autodesk specific I've seen north more than maybe a couple brand out of maybe Fees that we get a actually mentioned that they want something they wanted something on alexa or who will assist I think from that perspective. The adoption adoptions not there however the one piece that slightly defendants in the voice gone dice. We're not a lot of people. I know you do of the such on this. But people don't think it's be is the such night And that's something that's a whole different whole different ballgame voice search but usually in In local indian languages is off the charts. I think it's again. It's been growing hundred percent on your I think the similar data right now and more than broadly. We're gonna see it on the east. I've seen it on the down. Where red sort of a Non english-language regards which percent in this country when they actually searching for staff and they're finding stuff the tend to prefer to use voice. Search a lot more by even on whatsapp back to the earlier point one. What apps most popular features using this part of the world is actually voiced. North's guard like a message than senate across. Then you can cut it as audio and then you can sort of that tell you can have dialogue so voice. Search is immense It's it's mentioned some point on. Maybe by now might be too. Is that i think May just be not just market How that translates to. Actually you know. More than just being searched net funeral Yeah fair enough okay accurate. That was great. Thank you so much for Giving us the rundown of what's happening in twenty twenty in india around conversational ai. How can the listeners learn more about what you're doing it haptic and keep track of all the things that you are working on right now please go to our website Jin's haptic dot h. t. I the i at least subscribe to a newsletter though we have a little bust a monthly newsletter recent dollars talks a lot about some of these topics. We also have our own Small knowledge heading initiative call conversations dodi of which also relaunched after gus back which is again meant for shedding best practices across just genuinely in what we're doing so would love Listeners can go dead. Sign up keeps shutting. A bunch of stuff aren't great. We'll put that in the show notes as well to make it easier for people to find that for by. Us and european audience. If you're not familiar with that dick dr giant in this conversational space have been around for a while got big big customers affiliated with the g. o. platform which is one of the giants from a telecom standpoint. So i definitely recommend everyone. Check that out accurate. Thank you so much for spending some time and sharing your thoughts today. Thanks a little bit cabrera rajon. Welcome to the voice by podcast. Thanks spread excited to have you on before we get into the questions. Why don't you give the audience a little bit of background on you and slang labs and what it is you do that. Thanks for me. I'm a graduate. I'm one of the phone. Does language of bangalore-based focusing on voice back home. So what do slang be accountable. What they call it was fastest in-app boisterous back fall regarding the Dot com ban. The give you a bunch of Voice assistance aid specific can very easily plug in. Dr application and then deal with concepts that are very abdullah. Trendy you'd tons intense entities lots under those nfl conflicts. Think of your app. Journeys and app states and then our back from translates to the level in begun checks and everything so functional fully functional. Smart model interac- so that's what got it. We would think about this and voice about land as a customer assistant your tooling. To build custom assistance for mobile apps and in other applications correct that willing for customers correction and so instead of the one family defense is interpreting all the low level constructs developers to whatever they want to actually giving them like a shopping fight for voice assistance. You great analogy. It's baby thirty minutes. Isn't that it just plugging occasion on. Then you just have to customize what do you want in your language. I want voice. Such i want aggregation. I want this. She's like you don't think dogs of intense entities and those customers comes to the knowledge and they have more data if you ought to just use it or the walks perfect okay well normally. This time of year would probably be heading to see. Es and maybe we would be doing this interview. Live in las vegas or project voice in chattanooga or somewhere else in the with the ongoing global pandemic. We're doing all these things online and it's a really great opportunity for me to ask you a simple question. What was the biggest story in india around conversational. Ai invoice in twenty twenty so the biggest story in in in specifically in their in their was cut launching their inapt launched at modeling western doctor. First mainstream lodge one of india's largest Company and then they actually lost their voice of languages on the actually. So this is the company two years back and then this was dead Twice assistance and so this was the first one which made it more mainstream. The second one was alexis integration into amazon app becoming more mainstream earlier they are done by a by the drudge and then where does not flee full-on spins now the omitted full on experience so much so that during develey say the ad like a million bucks action a day on the inside the inside the body alexa app. A million transactions a day after being coming today the accident a million west germans inside the alexa expedience inside the giannakopoulos alex experience inside the so there was a million a day so that was not necessarily just shopping. That was all alexa. Interactions inside the amazon app is only got talk. Alexa app but the amazon app using alexa. They were getting a million interactions. A day in the amazon using alexa. Okay well that's that is a big deal. Big number that the same period so there was a big billion dollars. It's like our black friday. Could so yes. Absolutely as well okay. So you mentioned too big stories. They're both voice commerce oriented so this is really interesting so So amazon had add some big success. We'll tell me about flip cards. So they they have a voice assistant. What can voice assistant and flip card do today does use for inside the grassi. subsection Where a bulk of their rice is actually used your such item. You're the search for dependence. Keep keeping so. They've added weissensee. So what it us for us to be able to search for items in the apple is in english. You can such an indian english and then you can add an identical got weiss it up. The gut feeling is where the current expedients. Course to an answer to a few navigational use cases but prominent toward of the gut feeling. And it's it's about product search. It's about the selection process. But it's about consummating the purchase it got Which is auto management and things. But it's but still. I mean a lot of times. That's the the most time. Intensive part of the shopping process is product search and selection. And that type of thing whereas you get to purchase. It's a couple of buttons. It's not that complicated. Usually got that. That is sport for image that just. That's the goal. They want to eventually in his after eighty. So if you use this the flip cart assistant. I've just exactly the same thing as kim. Use them yeah absolutely. So what do you think about. I mean is it is it. Is it a much better experience you think than the normal swipe tap experience yes. I think it's a couple of things are actually makes it very easy. The such makes it easy. It's quite fast and everything that there are few things that they would have done but because plan to continue to you still have to keep clicking the microphone button every time to shape weiskopf right right right. what's initiative. Actually but yeah. It doesn't keep listening. So what do you think about. The future of voice commerce in india is. Do you expect this to be a a a sometimes used a feature by a small percentage of the population. Or do you believe that. Based on the way. India adopts technology indians adopt technology that the voice will wind up becoming pretty dominant and most of the interactions. For shopping. i bought from auto expense. Having commerce we talk about numbers and what other numbers two is like the danish initially about. There's a small percentage of people repeatedly us worse that's That's a sign of success. Trying to small business people using wise in a very infrequent matter in the smartest person that people using voice frequent opposition. Then i think that that then. The next step is to be able to expand that by more to get more and more people coming in india e commerce like as happened all of an especially definitely in india yard spike because during the post pandemic an e commerce transactions grassi e. Commerce has grown four x just last year to this year. Almost four for a golden property. i think on destroying. This is sustainable. Good does not like a one time spy and they got back into non almost six now got used to it. And then you're using it and this is actually coming especially from a lot of universities. What they call the cities this coming not necessarily on the open cities but from the has actually been bidding. I want to be so far. They were a smaller fraction this year. They're actually crossed the bashes so on in that segment is where stronger need for because there are in i am users and not so exciting. Us right okay. So yeah for your customers. Are you providing support in english hindi other languages depot violent ministry english tombergeron land. And so what is the most used language for your customers. English their dominance and often it's in the even if you give them the majority of the people still pick initiative as the on english language. India's got why do you think English is preferred for this use case. Because obviously we've got hindi speakers who are using english instead of hindi that is to educate but i think it's a turco families was like india asp additional campaign so people want to speak english so that makes them feel better off the one site and the second thing i think. There's a general dentist illegal casinos the english english before language. Also you expedients the like if you on the before language that neighbor the deforest language that enable every app it so most likely to get the take on something like this possibly a combination of both and other third thing that english is probably people feel that the understanding better than english. But i think that's i think that's other fair enough. So do you offer both voice interaction and chat interaction for your for your sistan. Three or customers oughta start out because we expect the after abroad. Technically the patch experience and then And on top so in us. Brahmin us whites on then. Do you want to use a non to even use on an odd infections at the bigly marquee modern so you can stop the journey voice on the at some point in you give bruising dutch bed. Make sense okay. Well this has been wonderful. Thank you so coup bar. Why don't you tell the listeners. How they can learn more about slang labs and what you guys are doing. Maybe keep track of what you do it on social media. Oh thank you for this opportunity to be able to talk and ship People can call us at our website www slang latch in and then we also upbeat and follow us on. A handle slaps both on facebook that a picky eater. That's great all right so kumar. Thank you so much for your time today. I love this Slang labs and you Your your key point the big stories of the year in india you really think are the rise of voice commerce and voice interaction around shopping. Flipkart your own customers amazon Yeah so that's that's actually a great boy. I'm glad you're able to share that. With the listeners. Today tribeca sarah deep car. Welcome to the podcast. Thank you so much. Thank you for having to you. I'm excited to have you. So you have a lot of experience in the conversational. Ai space in india. And i'm i'm interested in asking you in this very unusual year of twenty twenty. What was the biggest story in voice and conversational. Ai in india biggest story was that hindi is actually the second. Most language on. Google is to now after english. Which means indians are using a lot of voice and and that's probably the way that we will see it in the future so alexa incidentally also added in the other language so we have a lot of traction. The was so was up till before. Twenty twenty was it. Predominantly voice was predominantly. Being used in english is that is that the takeaway. I should have from that. So so see the way a you know the alexa devices in the google assistant devices. They still orders smart home. Speakers of any upper midwest claws are pink rates and english was the preferred language for that by with google assistant being so easily available on. Smartphones in india already has of any high Internet penetration rate. I think it's now have it. The white has now gone in the hands of people in a two or three cities who are not as tech savvy but ways being the natural interface days up to you know they really picking up so so i think that's that's the reason of us so much of a hindi being used to in a google assistant. Well that's a really interesting point. So i think in in the us And i think too large part in europe to we have slightly different perspective of this where we had voice on siri and then on google now and and then there was s voice for samsung and so people were sort of used to it for very basic utilitarian functions on the phone but then everything opened up with smart speakers and smart speakers have been a really big story for about the last four to five years in both of those markets but and we're starting to see a switch back to voice but it seems like the shift to voice is much more on. Smartphones is much more significant in india and in fact a lot of those people never touched a smart speaker at all. And i are really just taking advantage of all these new assistant capabilities particularly from google. Because it's it's the low end. The low cost phones as well. is that is that the right way to interpret. This agreed i think. That's that's right a Assistance a are. You know i would say a used by people who have as a turning is get it and now we are seeing a you know seeing the usage of smart speakers Because being based martin use for educational and be seeing somebody shnell or direction for smart seeks because but otherwise it's the smartphone and features within the smartphone and not only say the mobilises even the voice sending voice messaging. What's up until right right wife. In addition to the whole conversation on the wife itself as as not even a technology but as a concept is being accused ready. Well i give you another example Retail stores in india. Their foot oppose speaker of the bpm is like you know ism wanted a mobile wanted that you can meet even to right and the photo speed for a deal just announced the drugs action that this much money has been received on your account so the person doesn't have really literally go and check whether the person has transfer the money or not but you know that will be spoken out loud and everybody knows that the money has been transferred or not so that that's a use case i would say that's really interesting so it sounds like in some ways. There's there's a behavior shift about speaking and listening so even if it's not directly with a voice assistant it's sort of back to where humans were we would speak at listen as opposed to all digital communication. We have today correct. It's more natural. Obviously so you know it's it's it's just what people like to do. Well it's easier. They do not. The people who are less. Tech savvy have to learn a language. They don't have to learn how to use technology. It's it's just some blow. It makes sense and i think a lot of people miss that idea that overused term now in sort of other realms but this idea the democratization of the access to technology the as you talked about the upper middle class the more highly educated tech forward people have had access to all these technologies for some time and had been using them to various levels of intensity But when we look at voice. And i really see what google has been doing geo phone and things like that. Just introducing all these new capabilities in one of the things. I wrote about a couple of years ago. They said well. If there's voice assistant on a feature phone does the feature on them become a smartphone now and that's interesting question because you want to pin with the smart film smartphone. Getting to make transactions soth internet and vigo's one of them are assistant as one of them So if you can do that are you. Know on a each afon than that. Does that mean that it becomes a smartphone is is is a is a good is a good point to think about. So who do we have joining us in our call to bury once we have myra. And she's a big fan of alexa and google and i can tell you for one thing for sure that she's learned more stories on google amazon like she knows all amazon accessibility time by hot. So that's another good. Use case of you know i've seen a lot of people You know learning english language students learning english language from alexa speakers. Got it got it. Well tell them. I said hi. I was hoping you'd say she was a fan of voice bot. But i should maybe too young for that. She is okay so you mentioned education. I'm really interested in this. So we've had a lot of expansion of of use of what will come voice apps and voice. Ai technologies related education. That it's been spurred by cova because so many children have not been able to go to school there's been dislocation of some of the learning environments as you mentioned education. Was that already happening. Pre covid in india or did it start after was it accelerated. How does that play out so again. Like i said access to smart speaker is to not very prevalent of needs some high bandwidth into legend. All of those things. What is right. What people have is smartphone. And that's what they use so you know but there have been some use cases van some comes in bihar have alexa as a teaching aid. And this was. I think before prequel valid in all schools. Experimenting edited is experimenting toys. But i think we still haven't reached age and steel where becomes democratized It still needs to enter. Dhec needs to make a lot of progress in this. One thing is sure that it has a huge potential for educate a specifically kids in relates won't have existed teachers only around or especially because of the golden damping in all classes online in the context is on in glasses. There is potential for edgy. Token the winston a the services dada all right so the biggest story. This year has been The adoption the broader adoption voice. I think you talked about hindi speakers in particular. Do you see this is mostly voice search or accessing. Some of the simple voice assistant capabilities are based on what you've seen so far. What is what has been the biggest driver. I a such. that's that's definitely on the top Then there is lots of entertainment content that's consumed by voice. I understand that you know amazon. Alexis kids a you know the entertainment guests the movies and all those are very very common skills that people use of on the. I have not used a lot of them. Because i'm not a big hollywood movie fans. I just a failed. But i think But i think people have been using that really. Well that's that's amongst adult. Entertainment is important to is obviously the invoice. But you know what just seeing is dead. Corporations are only alexa skills. In the the google actions that are available but also seeing is that the companies are adopting voice as as important strategy in their overall strategy in non only customer service but also sales marketing. And that's that's for me is important You know important thing that he's seeing in the industry. Well let's talk about the sales marketing side you. You've you've mentioned a few different things. You mentioned what's app immense at alexa and google assistant. So is that a primary use case now where corporations are starting to say. Yes this is. Where i i need to reach customers. And how might that be different with those different channels train so eventually it all started with piano the box on most websites in what's up in all of that and now this started moving towards google for example. Icici which is the local bank in india of has integrated with alexa and google assistant. So you can do some banking sources using those apps Using these assistance excess abang actually are has has wife or on owner the white spot as the first line of support when you call them on the contact set to end. You know it's it's it's done in a way that you know it's not a glorified it's just not a glorified are but to truly understands the intense Detracting to it right so you customer service is important. Yes but like i said. Kfc that's all that's sales You can now actually order. Kfc ob on on on ways you can track your metal order food tracking on all of you. Can you can track. Made to order are using voice than Garth is obviously a very important use of. We'd seen of good bots coming up into food cars of then those interesting. She don't marketing campaign. That i read about which was done by And few joined in fleet. Ill where are you. The manufacturers of bites ryan dated a contest on google assistant on guests the bryce and they said the Such a good response to understand a uniform response on this campaign which they had not really expected that That he success camping so so the point is that it's sales marketing and a customer service all three areas which are adopting voice. That's great okay. So you have a now. I don't even know we price skipped over it because we didn't talk about your day job and novo nordisk Were you oversee these things. But in addition to that hat you're also A leader in women in voice for india. Tell me a little bit about that. And how that is developing so we me along with a fee other vitamin stockton feminine voice or india chapter sometimes in august this year. Because we saw that did not. There's not enough women. Participation space and honestly the behind of women in the space of the moose founders is seen out interact with one means of developers are mostly males and remarkable really encourage them into this career. And i'm not only talking about the development conversation designed product management platform. And all of that because it it is really a huge scope. And that's why we started this initiative and the already have some people who registered with us unfortunately yup unfortunately because of you know certain up you know i move situations for or the people that bought of the founding committee covert has hit all of us really hard on us. Yeah so we couldn't do too much last year. We just due to events but the plan is that Engage students in this up. Students is really a big a big big of target audience for us on mainly because there's explore technologies of the. They have to find out jobs and unemployment rate is the highest. We equip them with go right to. So that's the plan of women in ways in future okay. So women's should check that out. Where can they learn more about that by the way so you can follow us on lake. Keep up posting regular updates We also have a twitter handle. Visages give india. We beat india and you can also follow me I keep on posting stuff about women in ways and was generous. You can follow me to sudden twitter a yup. That's how you can follow us. And hopefully we planted a lot more this year. So keep keep looking up okay. Perfect so people can follow you. i'll be very interested to see if you do something publicly nordisk. I know you have like a big initiative. They're just based on those types of things. So i'm looking forward to learning more about that as well Because that's i think you guys looked like real innovators in the healthcare and pharmaceutical space. Yup that does not much allowed to speak from no-notice perspective of bite What i can seize. The we do are trying to make a kill from companies are really complex. There's a lot of compliance that comes into place. This hit bucket blind. Says you can't just say that. I want bill a white spot into go live with the because that are just too many just too many things that you have to look at considered a key expe- nantie xp bob of things that you really have to consider so. I can't go into the details of that but that's interesting thing and hopefully we should be able to talk about it. Something just good well. There's a lot of things we can look forward to and twenty twenty one. I think we're all looking forward to a easier more normal year than two thousand twenty boy. Normal would be nice. We don't appreciate that enough. Maybe twenty dollars. Yeah so so. Is there and thank you so much for spending time today and sharing your thoughts with the voice by audience. Thank you so much bread. It was talking to you by who valley satay. Welcome to the voice podcast. Thank you thank you. It spent player to get on a call with you being on your forecast. Excellent well so we first met. I think voice summit two years ago was the first voice. I don't remember what you're that as eighteen twenty. Yeah twenty eight. I mean we. We talked a little bit by email or social media before that So it was great to beat you there. I know you've had a lot of success. Since that time. Maybe even chased the business a little bit. But why don't you tell people what you're doing today tumble skill. So they have a perspective about where you come from here issued. So i'm they see you or go founder of closure a Basically is the world's first choice enabled across the market lays. This is the solution which believed ill-assorted. Cpg companies for brands can use to engage your consumers in the kitchen at the moment van. They're planning their means or planning. That crossley's are trying to cook. Their meals are actually using these. Abc's products that brands etc. So we were in marketing gums in v. capture both zero moment of riches agenda actual artists and also As when the second movement of is actually getting consumed be at engaging consumers at that moment of time enhance. We provide an austin people. Brian's aid to market widely are actually planning be to get feedback from them. He'll time including the sentiment analysis on feedback because it twice based so that they can get understanding Consumers are using when the it's gotta okay super and you are one of the top cooking apps for at alexa in india. I understand maybe the top there. Sonate via the default solution back in india and If you know the one e concept of amazon alexa we won't be around on alexa in india for space. You don't have invoked the skill asking glocer So brand in india Is branded after her michael on better. He's as liberty ship is named And so but user don't have to ask for specific skill again just ask alexa Reality solution Can they ask for the skill as well. Yeah we do get the traffic. Also be monitor. Both the one celebrity traffic but he gets Doing thirty to fifty percent copy a monthly which is coming asking for specific skin but majority it again. In a fifty to seventy percent comes from one traffic great. Okay so let me ask you the question of the day. It's been a long year. Two thousand twenty. It's been a different. Maybe unusual year difficult ear for a lot of people. What was the number one voice. Ai story in india in twenty twenty I think it comes voice. A we saw a lot of Moments of especially few acquisitions by the lead. Alleging slick flipkart In the white space day event ahead than the white solutions in the local languages. Because you know. English is definitely prevalent in india but local languages getting a lot of Release their Option would be much faster than you adopted look languages and the india office of much bigger challenge compared to any other country in the word because it has twenty two different languages right dude get us so and an accident. Pacelli do if you are able to hindi ending list. You'll probably seventy percent of india and that's art unless you're doing right now and so what you're saying that is the story here has been what it's that we've experienced of most your Mostly they less have mentioned indoor space so days on a boston d. And they saw the now white shopping keys the the the future and hence great a few of them in our reliance jio that's another big conglomerate and they have investors doi's technology they acquired startup Blue card did the same thing. That's another combination to walmart is a walmart's Sink on now and they They acquired a start a in the white space again and then dad nevada shopping into their laps and amazon Them started by shopping in india in twenty now. So why shopping is is it. Probably the biggest blessed Bind in other ways in other things like their education and the music entertainment. They continue to be the major use cases on west platforms. but i. Shopping is something which Use case in india right. Now you're coming to us today from canada. Although your focus really has been the india market Supported the us market as well It seems to me that voice shopping voice commerce might have a little more momentum in india than it does in the us or canada. Do you agree with that You're right That sort be obscene. But we believe that. The shopping is the inaugural as much bigger market. I meant to mention into us in a big way which we are doing this year and behold As much market come india but What we've seen in india is Interestingly shopping aspect up quite a bit people aren't buying it on mobile. Not on the smartest because but on a mobile for sure or shopping. These has got a and do you think that it's not as big on the smart speakers mostly because there's not that many smart speaker owners yet or is there something about the experience. It's different which is leading people to biased towards the mobile experience. I it's purely the Smart speaker numbers so I think could As bechtel or more than five hundred million mobile users we just are attainable. Three million speak of smart speaker us which is nothing compared to back though Very early you know betas raptors will have ventured into must be us in india and So it's hard to gauge on back when you talk about the voice shopping in india. Is it mostly around product search and product evaluation as it all the way to purchase and all of us to participate not yet happening but being surge on the voice apps in the apps using device bottles to search the product and being able to pick up on. That is in a begin. Right have you. I don't know how much you've delved into this. But do you have a perspective on whether it's for all goods is primarily for digital goods for physical consumer goods something else. i think it's. It's mainly happening fuller groceries Is what her because Most implementations are the push by bennie dealers ease on the grossly site so looking at that. I think that's where they are seeing that action. I don't have the numbers inaugural just program. I'm saying but looking at the The grossly swinging. You do believe it is more on the crossley's eight. So i remember speaking with meredith corp about this that they saw a big push her a big ramp up and requests for recipes due to the Societal lockdowns or stay at home orders. Where people weren't supposed to leave the house. What was your experience with clubs. Jeff around Around recipe search. Did it go up Liza about forty six listened to trend a brand as soon as Gotta the that constantly went on increasing in fact We used to l. a. In about sixty to eighty thousand users on the platform monthly active which gross to On annuities everybody's in the last six months so sixty to eighty thousand over. What period is that like per month. Monthly six hundred eighty thousand monthly. And that's something like fifty to seventy percent were through the one p correct and it it. It went up to two hundred and forty. Is that correct. Twenty one hundred and twenty. I'm sorry i missed okay. So that you had an initial of forty six percent but then it kept growing and so essentially you've doubled since the pandemic it and did you see that. Continue to rise through the holiday period. i guess it's not as big of a deal because i guess because you wouldn't have the same type of patterns That we have the. Us acute four is not as big of a deal. Correct no actually. It is a big deal there because our holidays starts around august thoroughly Some art Early number and then in a That continues into Patients to so we probably have more longer out your period vacation at an end. Celso people Coach recipe or grant was seen much higher than this enough understood so You have nice position on amazon Will you be going into mobile for example in the coming year or maybe you already have a presence there somehow no i would say we have presence mostly through google assistant. Okay but not really emma by Say but this year we're launching them awhile up because you know we are missing golden India outstanding okay. Well why don't you tell the listeners. How they can maybe try out the alexa skill or google assistant action and learn more about what you're doing club chef So boesch is a Repeats its solution ban. You can actually in start from what you have in your fridge. You could say that. Not have domenico are arab you mushroom something else in Says many ingredients as you have and then can ask. What can i cook with that. Celebi help you. The md of rich lanyo means based on. Do you agree no rich and then it can personalize the sap's And then we also help consumers them with Actions we are Come into play with the same recipe gun days leave but based on the cooking skill in end user fees the nominally user they They know how to read recipes. They will be in your same as in her back but if he is a bigger than we breakdown at as being smallest apps and you step instructions at chef. Tips at the time was undermined stuff. held them in an order the toward the game. Process step-by-step in a detailed manner and a also have a solution bed in just like inaudible. Uk entry the through. The book sec. Lick speed no. You can also browse through Face to drink we all back Plan you mean sending based on that but admitted growth so you could say that bagged ingredients required for apple by to my shopping list and you can then go ahead but use make up into the excellent all right so in what's the how do they access the alexis. Keller google action. Yes oh they just say that. Open glocer are against google dr closure. Excellent by the valujet say. Thank you so much for giving me your perspective on india invoice in two thousand twenty. Thank you thank you but it has been a pleasure talking to you. Excellent thank you. Voice revolutionaries for listening this week. I hope you learned a few things about the voice. Ai market and now it's developing in india. I see this is one of the most important and interesting stories in the industry right. How many thanks to accurate. Kumar sarah and who valley for sharing their insights today. We'll have some of them back very soon for longer interviews about their companies. Don't forget to check out. Voice insider at voiced by i ford slash insider voiced by forward slash insider and most importantly heavy productive prosperous healthy and fund. Start to twenty twenty one. I'll be back next week with another amazing gas. I'm really looking forward to this one. I'm sure you will love it until then may the voice spots be with you.

india google facebook amazon sarah deep alexa alexa novo nordisk us Kumar rajon haptic thir kfc hp kumar garage spicejet accenture digital channels gro todd bobby whatsapp
Ep 404 Final In the News

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

09:07 min | 2 months ago

Ep 404 Final In the News

"Hello and welcome to diabetes connections in the news. I'm stacey sins. And these are the top diabetes stories and headlines of the past seven days as always. I'm going to link up my sources in the facebook comments where we are live this wednesday august eighteenth twenty twenty one and in the show notes at diabetes dash connections dot com when this airs as a podcast so you can read more if you want whenever you want and in. The news is brought to you by real good foods. We are big fans. And i'm really glad to have them here real food. You feel good about eating our top story as the. Us looks into booster shots for covert nineteen. There are a lot of questions about what that means for people with diabetes. Right now those. With weakened immune systems are eligible to receive a third dose of either the pfizer or maderno vaccines and the white house announced a plan just today. Just start covering all americans later this year but right now the. Cdc says people with diabetes who also have one of its listed immune compromising conditions should consider getting an additional dose. The american diabetes association together with fourteen other health organizations has sent a letter to the cdc asking them to consider the health risks people with diabetes or facing cove at nineteen noting. The group has made up about forty percent of all co fit. Nineteen deaths ludzhev gets the us fda. Okay for use in insulin pumps for adults. This is lily's ultra rapid acting. Insulin approved last summer for type. One or type two via penner syringe. It's human log with two additives. One helps open up blood vessels for faster. Absorption the other enhances the insulin's action time. Ludzhev joins novo nordisk faster acting fast already approved for pumps and for kids beta by bionics announces progress with one of its partners zealand pharma. A compatibility study is complete. They are on track to begin. Screening into the islet. By hormonal bionic pancreas pivotal trial by the end of this year. Some interesting tidbits in the recent zealand conference call. They are studying exercise induced hypoglycemia which they call it an area of significant unmet medical needs. They're also looking at obesity focusing on the hormone amazon. They have an analog. That should be in phase one clinical development later. This year amazon is a hormone. That helps you feel full. It's secreted with insulin. Fund the pancreas people with type. One don't have enough of it and people with type two have issues as well. another peptide. this one called mutts see is showing promise in very early testing to prevent type one diabetes and maybe other auto immune disease it helps regulate the immune system these researchers at the university of southern california and seoul. National university found in mice. That treatment with mott's see prevented the destruction of the animals beta cells and kept the mice from developing high blood sugar. The research was published in the journal. Cell reports a new study published in neurology is reporting association between a particular class of drugs. Used to treat type two decreased. Alzheimer's disease biomarkers now. It's unclear how it all works. Alzheimer's experts are calling for large scale. Clinical trials now separately. An australian study last year saw significantly slower rates of decline in older diabetic patients. Taking metformin all subjects were followed around for six years to measure decline over time. Cognitive scores were similar in all groups at the start of the study. All right file this one under shocking. No i don't believe it. New study shows. You can save money with generic medication for diabetes. Investigators in india conducted a prospective study for over six months to better understand the variations between branded diabetes drugs and generic options including complications of type. Two total of eighteen hundred patients were included ranging from younger than twenty years to age one hundred in a price comparison for the most commonly prescribed branded and generic drugs. The investigators found significant savings for patients prescribed the generic options generic mid four men had a forty percent saving. That was the lowest saving differences as high as seventy five point. Eight percent for the other generics. These researchers say prescribing generic drugs is one way to lower costs but the biggest barrier is patient and physician skepticism about their efficacy and quality. Editorial here really. There also may be the fact that there is no true generic insulin. The diabetes market is such a big money maker that p. b. m.'s. Insurers may not always cover when a generic as possible. I know this study focused on type two and not on insulin. But at least in the us most patients with diabetes would welcome more generics. Big day for insulin pricing advocacy at the white house last week. Guild of four a long time grassroots insulin for all supporter sat down with president by and took over the white house. Twitter feed for a few hours. This was as biden unveiled a big policy proposal. That could change. The way drugs are set for medicare drug. Prices are set for medicare medicare can't currently negotiate prices on prescription drugs. Biden's new plan wants to change that for a quote of expensive drugs. That won't face any competition in the market. The plan would then call to take that to private insurers as a next step there is a terrific article but gaels work in her meeting with the president over at health line. And i'll link that up. Thanks for doing the hard work. Gale and for bringing our voices to the white house more to come but i i want to tell you about one of our great sponsors who helps make diabetes connections possible. It is real good foods where the mission is be real good. They make nutritious foods. Grain free high in protein never added sugar and from real ingredients and they keep adding to menu. Line terrific ways to start your day like waffles and breakfast sandwiches great meals made with cauliflower and stuff chicken you can buy online or find a store near you with their locator right on the website. We love ice cream. I'll put a link to the facebook comments. And as always at diabetes dash connections dot com back to the news now and congrats to those diabetes care and education specialists recognized at the virtual. Adc es twenty-one annual conference specialist of the year is doctor. Samuel grossman clinical pharmacy specialist in diabetes care and education specialist at the department of veteran affairs in new york and lifetime achievement. Award to dr steve edelman former guest of the podcast and founder and director of taking control of your diabetes. Doctor settlement has been living with type one since fifteen and he was recently named to the top one percent of endocrinologists in the us by us news and world report. There are many awards given out. Please check the link for all of the names and infant and finally. I want to share a terrific story. I saw in a facebook group and got permission to share. Adam duvall has type one diabetes major league ballplayer plays for the atlanta braves. The achim family lives in new york and decided to make a trip to watch him play. So this game was in washington. Dc it was quite hall for them but it was the closest they could find to go and see him. So here's what christina. Aken says happened once. The game started in the second inning. We've got duval's attention with our sign and loud yelling. And he came over and gave our son who has t wendy a baseball throughout the game. We continue to cheer his name and held our sign up high. He would salute or wave even took out his t- slim to show our son that he had the same pump is him at the end of the game. Duval told us to come over to the dugout. So we met him and he spent several minutes talking to us and was such an awesome guy. He signed the sign. Remade side the baseball. He gave her son and gave the baseball bat. He used a hit the home run. This is fantastic and if you are listening later on. I'm sharing the photos of this family. And out of will post them. In the diabetes connections facebook group into the diabetes community is like no other even celebrities and pro athletes. Who live with it. Get it thank you. Adam divall for doing all of that. And thank you to christina aitken for sharing. Just a wonderful story all right. Please join me wherever you get your podcasts for our next episode on tuesday. You're going to hear from. Kyle banks a broadway performer diagnosed with type one while appearing in the lion king. This week's episode is out right now and creatures my son back home from one month overseas. He was with a youth program not focused on type. One he is sixteen. And you bet i'm happy. He's home but we both learned a lot. I think it's an interesting episode to listen to. And that is it for in the news for this week if you like it. Please share it. If you're watching this replay on youtube. please subscribe. if you're listening via the audio podcast please follow whatever it is called. it is always free. I think that's important to let you know as we're hearing subscribe and follow in all the different terms that everybody's using you know. Come back soon. Thanks so much for joining me. Diabetes connections is a production of stacy's media alright deserve all wrongs avenged.

Diabetes Alzheimer's maderno ludzhev zealand pharma white house amazon medicare bionics facebook american diabetes association novo nordisk stacey Us pfizer hypoglycemia Cdc cdc
282. Qu opinas de pagar por recibir descargas o escuchas de tu podcast?

Al otro lado del micrófono

06:22 min | 11 months ago

282. Qu opinas de pagar por recibir descargas o escuchas de tu podcast?

"Nephew podcast cinta. I load to let me on. Fumed up a india whom predict the hurricane. Maria nitto on the nfl norway alll on your show. Marine years old dominion the booth on there. The adult or other as tara. Wb not companion. Kosgei male compli escargots car garage with retardation bossy. Theo niche and oranges. They'll our platform on podcast in and little bit but this note or other and you saw their knee gas gay meant industrial complain garage us but he rank komo come in davos in la plataforma stable gusting josh dignity Yes we'd been e. plant their own Sam bith by publicity that they will like anita wouldn't even automate elevated the muscle op give see torsion bar really that. Keep us healthy now. See mateus podcast pavon. Botany must be sweeper tanto plus we must discuss the ramos. Kay navy lab seven-party institutions. Podcasts the response. Gus bar years this those in case we alec being broadcast media does this case. Paseo de in allow us this. See that platformer. Dna shoes parameters casinos. See their default netflix origins. Danishes cisco's gambia. And sierra padre graphical brother illawarra they must. Are you close. Podcast disability that ten ramos get donors paseo copello forest but obama's go look lucchino parent by other total mindy cohn. Not really that predicament. In ula or moment dunya or dna weed. But i get stuck in each chart. Soussan must fearless. Ginwala should be focused. East studying wants to locate. Does guitarists doris nor nordisk. Putin into podcast. Bid up the I must be in ages. solo skater. One yester- north skin in north carolina. They must here in delaware speedy. If he could boost they will scarlet salga if the military sea nosy be explorer. Labrada format via la forma bassett colloquial bully avatar ratios means more noble of our auto sales. Because i got an say he up in dumfries quintas c. span or she mutual byron lobbies civil petite entry social colloquial tampa cotton issues patio. Done this book. Your skin muscle scenario in the media reflects you want your speedo coin. Terrorism in the scope of customers russillo tel aviv. Each day don't my shoulders so you're actually his Theories how competitive characters. But i was just both wes was still. She dip miss connecticut comprising camilo the swales at toward watch. I don memento the highest depart blood. But i thought he was a nominal win last if we got into these carries presumed ball bottle. See your face hosted card almost travelers of yogurt butter new miserable. You'd also stay. Nba call to cavs by jim. This tackle oshane ranking on the guys all on me. Podcast literally colorado prosciutto. Ny style down park. Is she your story seminars. Or macy's lucianne nobleman cranky notion on your went out with you may meal galleon ship. On lengthy portends solo shows owners is immune forethought nor said we show them independent other nora gear the parable. Wait chapel history. Nobody interior through this because the ordinary gotta ideas do not form or classic canoga starts to quit the position. I'm in the car. Solomon theon they my. You're visually that. There's anything hammered. The ball ramos rally after the idea for the kurdish poise. What i'm damned rascal. Our who will get issue. No matter low-caste brooklyn she. She narc starting a no not me was he was arrested him. The the hardware stores open unis commentators. Talk this graham finisher manatt dino both gas gasoline or no rankings cares but okay nausea. They got bloomberg video. Assoc- gives then tanto como paraguayan that at lunas commodity off the lunar. Podcast norwegian shintaro taylor. And they'll post cash in the end the tape wound imi barra alad other microphone. That was copied a language. The solomon y'all be equal mccullough via relatio-. Ict on these take shorter telomeres. How mcgruff

Maria nitto Kosgei Sam bith ramos Kay navy Gus bar lucchino mindy cohn Soussan Ginwala Wb tara don memento hurricane anita gambia alec nordisk nfl josh
Diabetes Health in The News: Insulin Companies That Now Offer Discounts for Their Medications

Diabetes Health in The News Podcast

02:52 min | 2 years ago

Diabetes Health in The News: Insulin Companies That Now Offer Discounts for Their Medications

"Hello I'm not Alexandra. Samri with diabetes held. You're listening to diabetes health in the news today story. Insulin companies. That now offer discounts for their medications. If you've been wanted the voices demanding change because having to choose between household expenses medical supplies and insulin has infuriated you. Then you'll be excited to know your voice has been heard easing the high cost of your insulin medication as of yesterday all the insulin pharmaceutical companies offer discounted insulin for your convenience. I've briefly describe the cost and provided you with the links and phone number so you may read the qualifying criteria to receive your insulin at a lower rate. These discounted medications are limited to us. Residents only a frazier offers several discounts for their inhaled. Insulin that range from one hundred fifty to two hundred fifty dollars a month. The program is implemented by Eagle Pharmacy. You must contact the pharmacy directly to complete their qualifying form. The offer is limited to three packs of four. Eight or twelve. Units of a frazier cartridges. A month the offer expires on December. Thirty first twenty. Nineteen to call Eagle Pharmacy. Dial one eight five five seven four. A two six six three ally lily offers up to a forty percent discount. On Their Insulin's the program is implemented by blink health offers expire on December. Thirty first twenty. Nineteen you can call blink health at one eight three three seven nine four one two nine three Sanofi Advantis offers insulin for ninety nine dollars a month through their value program for twelve months. The offer is limited to three vials of Insulin. Or two packs of insulin cartridge pens. You can call Sanofi at one eight three three eight one. Three zero one nine Zero Novo. Nordisk will start offering a generic version of their noval. Lock for ninety nine dollars a month. The offer is limited to three vials of insulin or two packs of insulin. Cartridge pens offer starts on January. Second Twenty twenty call. No vote at one six. Oh nine nine. Eight seven fifty eight hundred. I hope you find this helpful. If you're signed up on the Diabetes Health. Facebook feed made sure to like this article and pass it along to friends and family wishing you the best in health from diabetes. How I'm not out Samri.

Diabetes Health Eagle Pharmacy diabetes Twenty twenty Sanofi Advantis frazier Alexandra Facebook Nordisk lily ninety nine dollars two hundred fifty dollars forty percent twelve months
Listen Again: Revitalize

TED Radio Hour

53:47 min | Last week

Listen Again: Revitalize

"This message comes from npr sponsor. Novo nordisk working to improve the lives of people with obesity through knowledge science and compassion because obesity is a matter of biology. Not just willpower. More at truth about weight dot com. Hey it's new. And i am officially nominating burnout. As the word of the year. I mean did you see the latest jobs. Report a record. Three percent of the american workforce quit in august. Four point three million people. Maybe that includes you. Or you know that exhausted feeling like you need to be revitalized. Well that's what this episode is all about how we can bring something. That is out back to life. This one originally aired in april but it is so close to my heart so please listen again or listen for the first time if you need some inspiration or a different perspective on this topic. Meanwhile little programming note. The team and i are hard at work on a couple of great new episodes. That are coming your way. So i'll talk to you soon and thanks as always for being here. This is the ted radio hour each week. Groundbreaking ted talks. Our job now is during big delivered at ted conferences to bring about the future. We want to see around the world to understand who we are from those talks. We bring you speakers and ideas. That will surprise. You just don't know what you're gonna find challenge you have to acts ourselves like why is it no worthy and even change you. I literally feel like i'm different. I do you feel that way. Ideas worth spreading from ted and npr. I'm a news zama rhody today on the show. Revital is how we restore what is broken. Dilapidated or exhausted. And we'll start with our own psyches when it all feels like another chore. It's because you're burnt out. You're not engaged. You're not excited. You just feel angry and resentful because you just feel drink. This is guy winch. I'm a psychologist and author and speaker. And i write books. I have a private practice. Early on in his career guy had an incident that helped him see that the way he was working was totally draining. Him it was my year of my practice. And when you're starting a practice you work really hard to fill it and you kind of do whatever you need to do and in doing so. I really lost sight of how much i was doing and how troubled i was by doing enough. Am i doing a good enough job with my patients. And i didn't realize that i was getting really burnt out because even close the door at the end of the evening To my office that does not mean. Close the door in my mind and so what happened was it was a. It was the the the one year anniversary of my opening my practice. Which is supposed to be. Celebratory was july. i was walking home. It was new york city. It was really really hot that day. And i got into the building with a neighbor who was a physician in an er and the elevator rose a couple of floors then shuttered and stop and then my neighbor who deals with emergencies. All day Literally started poking all the buttons going like. This is my night. This is my nightmare literally was having a panic attack and i'm usually quite compassionate. Person found myself rolling my eyes and saying and this is my night man and he looked so out. Not just in your head kind of mumbled. It and i and i i i you know. And he just turned i was. I just felt so so bad. It was horrifically insulting and unkind. And i i knew what to say to calm him down. I could've done the thing i should have done. And that's what made me think. Like wow happened than i was. I realized i had nothing left. i was so depleted. And that's what made me realize. I am really burnt out a year in an. I'm burnt out. That's the problem that feeling of burn out. It's become really familiar. It's a sense of being stuck. I as if it will be like this before the end of time. Many of you have told us you're feeling it too. I find myself becoming very high strong cloudy and irreducible at worst. I mean i'm teaching too little like square boxes. Like i don't even know if people are actually behind those boxes of i can't my brain is full like i'm like how did i get here. It really can feel like hope is hard to come by. So how do we start again. See things a new today on the show were exploring ideas about. Revitalization from rejuvenating are exhausted. Mines to abandoned buildings broken down bodies and even sluggish economies. It won't be easy but maybe we can bring what is dormant back to life For psychologist guy winch. That moment in the elevator made him doubt everything. Here he is on the ted stage For a few terrible weeks i questioned. What made a mistake What if i had chosen the wrong profession. What if i had spent my entire life assuming the wrong korea. But then i realized no. I still loved psychology. The problem wasn't the work. I didn't my office. It was the hours spent ruminating about work when i was home. That's the interesting thing about work stress. We don't really experience much of it at work which you busy. We experience it outside of work when we're commuting when we're home when we're trying to rejuvenate it is important to recover ask time to de-stress and things we enjoy and the biggest obstruction we face in. That regard is ruminating and the problem with rumination. Unlike the healthy foams of self reflection is that it actually activates a stress response because the difference between emotional distress and physical distresses. And if i ask you to think back on a time your tooth hurts or you broke your leg. One thing. I can promise you leg won't hurt in the recollection either tooth. But if you think back to something really distressed you either. Irritated annoyed upset. Hurt your feelings and you really get into that. Your feelings will be hurt. You're going to activate that wounds. You're gonna feel distressed and upset again so when you roommate you swirling that up over and over and over and you're not getting anything out of it because you're not learning anything new you're just in this emotional hamster wheel going round and round so you gave your talk before the pandemic but how much do you think that rumination has actually gotten worse in that. We don't we don't have breaks anymore. Especially like i go from one zoom session to another. I don't have my subway ride anymore to kind of sit and think about what's happened. Process it and move forward. Do you think that in some ways that might be exacerbating rumination for some people absolutely. You gave a great example. I don't have my subway ride to process what happened. The idea there is that you do that on the subway ride home. It's a limited amount of time. And i'm assuming you get off the subway and then you shift your mind certain coming home and the kids and the family and all of that and so there was an automatic. Okay once i get home. It's time to start the evening time to pivot to my personal life but without that delineation that becomes much harder to do. And we don't have the intention not most of us to do it so we often forget to do it. But you don't really have the option to not be mindful about that separation. You really have to pay attention to having this break. A psychological break artificial break having some delineation. It's the engagement in the things that bring us pleasure and emotional nourishment and that means relationships and that means passions and that means socializing and that and to do those things well you have to be present and have your mind present now have a change is hard. It took real diligence to catch myself ruminating each time and real consistency to make the new habit stick but eventually they did. I won my war against ruminating. And i'm here to tell you how you can win yours to convert a roommate of thought into a productive. One you have to pose it as a problem to be solved the problem solving version of i have so much work to do is scheduling question. Like where my schedule can fit the tasks that are traveling. or what. Can i move in my schedule to make room for this more urgent thing. All those are problems that can be solved. I have so much work to do is not ground zero for creating a healthy work. Life balance is not in the real world. it's in our head. It's with ruminating. If you want to reduce your stress and improve your quality of life you don't necessarily have to change your hours or your job. You just have to change you. Think all right so take me. Let's let's do an ideal sort of day if i was your client and i was like listen. I just can't switch off at the end of the day. I i'm having trouble sleeping. I'm exhausted what should i do. So a couple of things first of all. I can tell you what. I do festival. I do have guardrails. I have defined for myself. And i think people should to the extent that they are able to with the expectations of their of their work and their employers but people should define when the day ends. You have to be strict about really Staying with at the end of the day is the end of the day now. Let's say people said to me. We'll have to check emails. I'm not great. But if you're finishing six or seven then designate okay. Nine fifteen minutes checking emails and that will be it. So i'll give myself fifteen minutes but the people around me will know it so that we can plan accordingly and if we want to watch a movie and maybe it will be ten. But i'll let them know. And that means that i'm not dealing with it in between those guardrails are important. I also think it's very It's very important to ritual. Is the transition from the end of the day to start at home life and that many people that is. I'm still in the same place on the couch. So not a lot has changed but what can change and what. I suggest you change for example your clothes because we tend to close can have a big impact on how we feel The studies that show that you put a lab coat on someone. They become more thorough. Attention to detail gets better so change clothes. Have the clothes that are your house closed versus your work. clothes changed. The lighting put on music have a way to really change the atmosphere. Especially if you're working from home any don't have those opportunities. There's one person i work with. Who at started the pandemic Left their Finished work at six everyday went outside. Got in the car drove around. The block came in and say oh come on seriously for them. It was really symbolic it just and then. They announced that they were home. The young kids looked up. Like yeah you just left but for them. It was super useful because it was like this is what i'm used to doing this what i say. I'm home they excited about coming home. Even the been homes. It's a mental exercise. They do but it was useful for them. I will say though i mean. I think we need to acknowledge that. It's not always possible for everyone especially people who have had very difficult. Circumstances during the endemic Essential workers parents struggling to also take care of their kids end work and it does you know there just aren't enough hours in the day for a lot of us. How do we find time to rest and revitalize so start by really asking yourself you know if if you could snap your fingers and freeze the world right now and free everyone around you and still out of the day. What would you really like to do. What's the thing that will feel revitalizing to you. What's the thing that will make you feel like you. It's much easier once you've identified that thing that you're missing that you would love to have to then go to the powers-that-be and your home whether that would be your partner or even yourself if you're a single parent or whatever it is doesn't say like. I need an hour or two a week to do this. Where can i find it once. You know what it's four. It's a little bit easier to just things aside. I know a lot of couples that mutually tag team and they take their kids out for long walks just to give the other person some quiet time muslim privacy time You know that there's ways to go about these things then. It will be effort full at the beginning but the goal is to find the things that really do rejuvenate you that really do feel different and really do make you feel at that. Took a break That's psychologist guy winch. He's the host of the podcast dear therapists and you can hear all his talks at ted dot com today on the show revitalize. I'm newsom roti and you're listening to the ted radio hour from npr. Stay with us this message comes from. Npr's sponsor the john templeton foundation harnessing the power of the sciences to explore the deepest and most perplexing questions facing humankind learn about the latest discoveries in the study of hope and optimism intellectual humility and free will at templeton dot org. This message comes from. Npr sponsor dave's killer bread and organic. Brad that's no longer a sedative for your taste. Buds dave's killer. Bread is on a mission to the most of the loaf to rid the world of gmo's high-fructose corn syrup artificial ingredients while planting the seeds of good in all that they bake killer taste killer. Texture always organic dave's killer bread bread amplified. It's the ted radio hour from npr. I'm a newsom rhody on the show. Today ideas about reviving things that have been dormant and our next story starts in the summer of twenty fifteen on a sunday dawn. My husband and i woke up really early. Probably about five or five thirty and we quietly loaded the car with the paint we at purchased the night before. This is amanda williams. She's a visual artist from chicago. And you really have an idea of how much pain i would need needs. I just bought as much as i had money for and could fit in the trunk of our green prius that morning. Amanda and her husband jason. We're on a mission to stage. An art intervention wasn't a station project. And i wasn't exactly sure what was gonna happen. Their plan was to transform an abandoned dilapidated house into a bright -til sculpture. Yes so we should say what amanda was doing wasn't legal. They didn't own the house. They didn't get permission to paint it. In fact the house was tagged for demolition. I've taken all these steps to make sure that the house was not only on the list for demolition but also wasn't valuable in any way to people in the neighborhood even a realtor or developer couldn't save it. Nobody was squatting. Wasn't being used for legal purposes so despite all of that i couldn't sleep the night before. 'cause i built up all these things that we're going to happen we will get arrested. Somebody who's gonna come out and complain somebody who's gonna come out of the house itself. That house sat in englewood a predominantly black neighborhood on the south side of chicago where amanda says for blocks on end. You could see houses tagged for demolition and vacant. Lots warehouses used to be but she didn't want them to stay invisible. These are places that if you drive past in the winter there no footsteps. Nobody's mowed the lawn. They're not any tax list anymore. It's no viable path for them. And so the israeli born out of that kind of frustration over and over again of seeing these environments and seeing little change despite changes in laws or promises from elected officials or quote unquote leaders. So really it was like what happens. If i just go when i go paint it. So then what happened would it. What did you do when you got there. So my husband got out of the car and as he starting to get going the sun is also coming up and the friends and family that i've called to help me are starting to either drive up or up students of mine art friends and family members and we just all got to work and repainting really fast food. Any questions about should something be covered. The answer is always yes windows. Yes stoop stairs on everything We were done within three or four hours soon. And then i wasn't quite sure what would happen next because of course when you imagine things owen an idea is bigger than you can see. You don't really see the end. And i'll never forget this moment after we finish rece- standing there and i think maybe everybody sort of dissipated in the same way they'd arrive. People started to trade off and leave and my husband. And i were standing there. And he's not an artist but i of course it explain the project for a really long time to him and he nodded me says now i get it. Every inch of that house was covered in teal color. Amanda calls ultra sheer and ultra. Scene is unique in that. It's this magical blue color that everyone knows but probably only people like me could describe his so it is the sii any turquoise oh and it just has kind of sheen to it it is an ultra sheen. Hi i'm going to show you how you and ultra sheen confined to fantastic numerous time. It's called and it represents haired grease that was created by the johnson family which is an african american family from the south side. The next time you see me. I'll be wearing an alternate courtesy. Low trashy so it sits in most people's grandparents bathroom cabinet maybe since the seventies but these jars you know what it is right away almost doesn't need a label and so there's a power to have a connection to a color in that way and so. I just knew that one of the entire house shrouded in this color. That was very important to me. And my upbringing in the neighborhood that i grew up in amanda williams continues her story from the ted stage. Now if i walk down seventy nine th street right now and i ask fifty people for the name of a slightly greenish shade of siam. They would look at me sideways. But if i say what color is ultra sheen. All a smile emerges stories about their grandmothers bathroom in sue. I mean who needs turquoise when you have ultra cheap who needs -til when you have ultra she who needs ultra marine when you have ultra sheen. This is exactly how i derive my palate. I would ask friends and family and people with backgrounds that were similar to mine for those stories and memories. Stories weren't always happy but the colors always resonated more than the product itself. I took those theories to the street. Ultra sheen at this point. Amanda showing slides of her color palette which she calls colored theory. It's a pallet reminiscent of places and products of black chicago. The colors of her childhood. If you're from chicago heralds chicken shack a fire engine red pink oil moisturizer chalky light pink currency exchange and safe passage. A bright bumblebee yellow. And finally the boldest darkest purple you can imagine of a crown royal bag. I wanted to understand scale in a way that i hadn't before i wanted to to apply the colors to the biggest canvas. I could imagine houses. I really wanted to understand what it meant to just let color rule to trust my instincts to stop asking for permission. No meetings with city officials no community by in just let color rule in my desire to paint different pictures about the south side. A lot of people can relate to the idea that you drive past something all the time and you remember when it was an ice cream shop and it could be a deli now or it could be an insurance office but in your memory you associated with a moment and often it is really mundane. But it's really foundational to your memory of childhood or family or safety or a time where you weren't burdened and so they those memories hold strong and we make these associations with architecture or environments or colors or sound or smells for me. it's color and so colored theory. Was this project where i wanted to bring some of those colors at familiar even if you couldn't name him immediately. That color palette is very familiar to a certain generation of people and a certain geography and so seeing those colors in that geography but not quite in their context was very intriguing to me but you are bringing those memories. You're adding that splash of color to something. That's going to be destroyed. And actually all the houses have been knocked down by now right. The last house was demolished. Two weeks ago inkwell moisturizer. I cry every single time. Oh at cried as has been said but this was always the plan up and so it's really beautiful for him to remind me to temporary nature of this both to wait the pain of what it's like to live somewhere with things constantly going away and do things are not coming but also beauty of just letting something be the time that it is and not trying to turn it into something else is sometimes just as important as as the effort you need to make to create systemic change and we also need the ephemeral and to just enjoy the present. I have to ask. Did the police ever show up. The police did shop. We showed up a few times. And even you ask the question. My heart stops second. Say to police. The police showed up again. This is early. Sunday mornings like a small group of people painting. The only house left on a block right and so the police know that like what is going on and it turns out to be like curiosity right because this doesn't make any sense so they roll up and they say what you doing and i a panic husband says painting paint the house. I go inside the house. Nope i going to steal the copper. Nope what are you doing this for in our project. Okay and then came back like two hours later. Cec gave a thumbs up on caller essay. Like great job. Looks good. i'm here. It's like totally crazy. You know these heralds chicken shack rent house and police are like that. That's herald used color. Spot on they recognize it they. It was accessible conceptual. Art was completely accessible to them and they were then invested enough to at least come back end like comment that they thought that we'd nailed the the color. It's great you know as an artist. It's often hard to translate art. That is not representational. It's hard for people that don't have art backgrounds to understand and so to know that people can understand after you kind of explain and also more through your actions that you're doing something that makes no sense to them so it calls attention and makes them really think. About why on earth would you be up at six. Am on a sunday one hundred degrees putting your money into property. That's going to go away. And then the question is. Why would i do that. And why you right. We have the power. I didn't have any anything anybody else did. It wasn't a million dollar project. But i was doing right. Admit that much to me. That's visual artist. Amando williams you can see her. Full talk at ted dot com and see some of amanda colored project homes at ted dot. Npr dot org on the show today ideas about revitalizing and rebuilding. And what if all we need to revitalize parts of our bodies is the right tool. Could we think about biology kind of like hardware. could i take the pieces. i'm interested and sort of rewire them and put them together physically in different ways. This is andrew pelling. He's a biophysicist at the university of ottawa. And i run a research lab that creates augmented living biological systems. Okay augmented living biological systems. What the heck is that. explain please. so we're really kind of interested in creating living tissues that might not normally be found in nature we've also discovered ways to heal and regenerate living tissues in the human body and what might love has become very well known for is creating an apple ear and essentially an apple that we carved into the shape of human ear. We processed at the cellular pulled out a plant cells and then repopulated with human cells. Okay wait a minute hold up just want you to say that one more time you made an ear. That has human cells out of an apple can back up and explain to me. It's a long story but a lot of us have heard of approaches to buy medicine right now that might involve something called crisper or dna. Technologies that you might engineer change our dna and that's all really fascinating and very hard work but my response to that type of effort has always been like well. Can we control our cells and tissues without even touching the dna. So what we needed was a sort of scaffold. Sort of three dimensional architecture could grow ourselves into and We have found a way to take plant tissues. We find in the grocery store. We can strip out all the plant cells. And all you're left with. Is this fibrous material. The stuff that gets stuck in your teeth when you're eating a salad or whatever and that material cellulose was the three dimensional scaffolding we were looking for and it was really cheap. We could get it in the grocery store and ourselves could grow inside of it. Okay wait though so you get an apple but then how do you make an ear out of it. So what we did. We have been doing a lot of work with apples. And if you've ever cut an apple in half looked at it it does kind of look like two years side by side with these to me and the only person in our orbit that we knew who could carve anything was actually my wife. She's a violin maker. And so i asked her you know. Could you carve ear from this piece of apple. And i have a very loving impatient and it used to be at this point so to it. I was modeling and she carved us several years. And i. I took them back to the lab. And now i've got this tupperware container full of these pieces of apple that look like human years and what we do with them is we. We essentially put them into a large beaker and inside of the beakers to solution that we use to pull out all the plant cells. it's us soper detergent. and it's slowly sort of shakes and spins over several days It's a slow process to remove all of the of the cells but at the end what you get is almost completely white and it still holds. Its shape it. Looks like an ear and in this the scaffold this implant. We can then put in petri dish we can. We can put cells onto it and we let them grow and over overtime. They'll start to invade inside of the scaffold. Fill it up with as they replicate. And what you end up with a really nice proof of concept of a can't based human implant kind of cells. Do you put into the scaffolding. So we can actually put all sorts of cells. We've done work with muscle cells and vascular cells and you name it over the years. It's it's become fairly straightforward. You can cro- almost anything in there That's how generalizable it is. So you said it's a proof of concept so tell me what you learned from being able to grow sells like this and why. It's not being used to help people yet. Well i hope it will be helping people soon. And that's what we're working on now That year was the first proof of concept. Really convinced me and the whole team a what we had wasn't just some goofy funny discovery but was something that could actually be quite impactful in terms of human health. Well being and so what has happened since that time is now translating these materials into the clinical space and We've we've actually since that year being able to demonstrate that not only can we make three dimensional structural objects boat At least in the case of spinal cord actually prepare spinal cords in small animals and this really really exciting and potentially revolutionary. And that brings us to what you're working on right now right to repair spinal cord tissue using not an apple but another. Yeah we it's funny. I was In the early days literally we would go to the grocery store just by everything you could see. The lab would look like a farmer's market like just bags and bags of produce and we just decided rising everything and throwing cells on them and in the midst of elvis. One day. I was at home and i was cooking asparagus for dinner. I cut the ends of these often. Sort of looking at the stock and noticing all of those long capillaries little tubes inside the stock. I started to wonder you know. Could we actually use those conduits as a way to guy. Neurons back together In in the case of spinal cord injury in a minute more from andrew pelling on the extraordinary possibilities of rebuilding the body with produce on the show today ideas about revitalization. I'm a nuisance marotta. And you're listening to the ted radio hour from npr this message comes from npr sponsor. Three m committed to protecting healthcare workers. Globally three am employee. Chris knows that healthcare workers like his daughter may need to get up close to provide patient care. He is working hard to direct high performing personal protective equipment to hospitals and hotspots so she and nurses like her can be protected while caring for their patients. Hear their story at three m dot com slash improving lives. Three science applied to life. This message comes from. Npr sponsor discover- discover matches. All the cash back you earn on your credit card at the end of your first year automatically with no limit on how much you can earn. It's amazing because of all the places where discover is accepted ninety nine percent of places in the us that take credit cards so when it comes to discover get used to hearing yes more often learn more at discover dot com slash match twenty twenty one nelson report limitations. Apply support for this podcast and the following message comes from mcdonalds. Mcdonalds is giving away free meals to educators each morning breakfast monday october. Eleven through friday. October fifteenth. If you know an educator. Tell them to head to mcdonald's for breakfast this week. And if you are an educator go get an egg. Mcmuffin a bacon egg and cheese or a sausage biscuit with hash browns and a coffee free participating mcdonald's valid. Id required limit one per person per day. Menu options may vary by restaurant no substitutions. It's the ted radio hour from npr. I'm a new shows. Emirati on the show today ideas about revitalization and before the break we were talking to andrew pelling about his mind boggling experiments including a new idea to rebuild. Human spinal cords with asparagus. And this wasn't a totally original idea or anything. There's been plenty of work and synthetic materials with tunnels and conduits. And all that sort of thing but again i was wondering you know could it be simple. I just go to the grocery store and find my scaffolding there and the interesting thing about plant-based based biomaterials is. They don't break down there actually. Quite stable long-lasting So he's against stripped out all the cells and spiritus scaffolds. And then i thought well i gotta get talk to an expert at this point. Because i'm so far out of my sort of comfort zone of this at the stage. So i looked around and one of the top neurosurgeons in canada. Happened to be right here in my own city in ottawa and we brought her some scaffolds and she spent time thinking but this looking at them her first question to me was. Can i take these today and use them in a patient. You neuro people are crazier the me man like wow. Yeah one of the problems that she had seen an experienced was that scaffolding that she had used previously had always broken down. And this is. What really excited sure about what we were proposing was scaffold that was long lasting and stable and so thankfully She was willing to collaborate and help us serve design some preliminary Animal studies to i look at the efficacy of the scaffold in repairing a severe spinal cord injury and so you basically started a study where you put this asparagus implant in some animals with spinal cord injuries right and what happened one of the most fascinating things i've ever witnessed in my life started to happen a few weeks after this two weeks be animals that received the implants they started. They looked like they were having sort of a pins and needles in their legs. They're sort of scratching at their rear legs and biting at them was like regaining. Some feeling back and over the course of the next over the course of twelve weeks we watch these animals go from being paralyzed from the waist down to starting to move their legs so left right left right and then starting to lift themselves up on their back. Legs lift their their bellies off the ground. This is a a really important step in recovery and and this is also showing that Those core muscles are getting activated. The legs getting activated healthy cells migrate inside of the scaffold in it really just becomes a living tissue within the body becomes something that's kept alive by the heart and by no means where the animals perfectly walking or anything like that but this for us was an incredible moment because what seemed like such a far fetched idea appeared to actually have likes to it potentially could impact tens of thousands if not millions of lives on the planet and i've never never expected as a scientist to be involved in something that important and late last year. We announced that this technology was just designated a breakthrough medical device by the fda. This is gonna dramatically speed up the time line between when you know from going from the bench to eventually to the patient. So how do you get to the point where asparagus can actually be potentially viable therapy for someone who is a spinal cord injury like what walk like what does that look like is are we talking five years fifty years cushion. It's it's interesting as as i've met and spoken with many people who live with sponsored injury. A walking of course is sort of held out at holy grail but there are these really just these things that we take for granted that you lose you know the ability to control your bladder. You know sexual function scratching an inch feeling an inch you know. They're these dramatic these things that that seems small but can have dramatic impacts on human life. Now the timeline. It's i think it's difficult for me to to give you an answer on that. I mean we've we've heard timelines before and been disappointed so i think we need to be realistic here. But those human trials are Two years down the road from now But we've got we still have to meet certain milestones and proved to the fda that we're ready for that and that's part of what we're working on every single day now and it's it's what keeps me up pretty much all the time. That's biophysicist andrew. Pelling you can check out. His talks at ted dot com on the show. Today we are talking about how we revitalize our neighborhoods our bodies our spirits and even entire populations legos. I could actually talk a lot about like goes As a fellow parent and how much pain they've inflicted on the bottom of my feet. Oh yeah you don't you don't have calluses analysis like whatever you could stab me with lego. This is writer. Watch a hot ali. I think most people know me as a writer and a guy who build lego sets with his kids How old are yours right now. Brima six New cbo's four and the tyrant is about to wake up. But she's so sweet. She's one. I love it okay. So you're a father of three but that is not what you gave your. Ted talk about you. Actually you started your talk saying that. In some of the world's biggest economies people are having fewer and fewer kids and that that could be a big problem. Why there was just this topic though I had read about it almost every year for the past three years. That every year the birth rate in the united states was falling and specifically over the past fifty years the birth rate around the world has halved right and i was like why are people not having as many kids especially in the united states in japan and china in eastern europe. Bright people aren't having kids. And so i was just really curious about this digging a little bit. Deeper into y y jihad me continues on the ted stage. Why is the birth rate declining in these countries in some cases it's because women are more literate more educated. They have more economic opportunities all things. Yes all the things. Women also have more access to birth control more control over their reproductive lives all good things in united states in particular. A lot of young people are opting out of having kids largely site. The same reason financial concerns united states is the most expensive country in the world to give birth and guess what the united states is the only industrialized country in the world that does not require employers to offer paid parental leave. Many of you are sitting there right now saying watch. There's also overpopulation. There's also orphan kids who still need parents. And by the way we have a normal carbon footprint that is destroying this planet and yet despite all this chaos. I still think we should have babies now. I just want acknowledge that choosing to have. Babies is a deeply profoundly personal choice and there are many who are unable but just for today. Let's examine the flip side of the coin at how not having enough new people is going to be a major problem. Moving forward so i wanted to make sure that we have it very concise and clear about what the downside is of fertility rates. Going down for country. Why do we need to maintain a certain level of population. What happens to a society if you don't have enough people sure so. The data shows that the global total fertility rate needs to be at least two point one children per woman today so that one generation has enough people to replace the other right. So the question is what happens. When the total fertility rate decreases below that level. And we don't have enough people specifically what we're seeing in the united states. Japan china in the eu. Is that a plummeting. Population leads to rising labor. Shortages in the world's biggest economies less workers means less tax revenue less tax revenue means less money in safety net programs that provide valuable benefits like pensions and healthcare. So there's going to be this huge drain. Numerous imbalance between young people old people right. It means that the consequences that will affect everyone the elderly young generation right that will have to now take care of the elderly. Yep then putting more burn on a younger population already. Burdened challenged with climate change and income inequality and racism and so is your thesis that actually to revitalize world economies to revitalize actually entire nations. We need to have more kids. So the talk is it's talking about okay. So we have this problem. Where the global fertility rate has halved. But what we've seen is that if we actually invest in communities if we actually promote women's health promote progressive prenatal policies such as giving families affordable healthcare giving paid parentally subsidized childcare. Then what we've seen. In countries like sweden the birth rate actually picked up. And you see that people say oh. We actually do want to have kids. Okay but hold up. I do have to point out that some people listening might be thinking like watch a hot your man and you are essentially telling women that they should choose to have children. No first of all. You're absolutely right at you know. Obviously this is a woman's choice. I'm a man who am i to say you have kids. Don't have kids. But i wanted to point out the problem that we have in certain countries right. It is absolutely every couple of every individual's choice whether or not they should have kids or not have kids. What disturbed me was why we as a society are punishing women for one and a half kids. Another thing. I wanted to touch on his. Everyone says oh. I'm gonna make my decision. And i'm gonna live in my silo and i'll be okay It doesn't work that way. We're all connected. And so should we have responsibility to take care of each other so you are an american. You live in a country. Which as you've pointed out does not support parents in much in much of anyway. So why did you and your wife decide to have kids. I'll admit growing up. I'm like there should be no reason. Why procreate but when we had abrahim it sounds like a cliche but what happens is your capacity for love and sacrifice increases. You don't even know you had the ability to process these types of motions and you know i. it's selfish. The act of having children has given us tremendous joy. But we're also is. I think it's audacious hill. Mary of hope right and what i mean by that is. There's a part of me that empathizes with all the concerns. Are you gonna fourth child while you bring the child into a world where there's a rise of white nationalism and he's brown skinned muslim name. Why are you bring into a child that will increase the carbon but then other part of me says children literally represent what hope a renewal and so investing in having children family is my investment literally inhumanity than maybe this next generation can push things forward. I can only imagine that. Your sense of that is even more heightened than any other parents because of what you Shared in your talk. Because i believe just before. You're about to give your ted talk. You got some horrific news can. Can you explain what happened. Yes this was the irony Almost two years ago to the day. I'm in vancouver in the hotel. I'm about to go on the Stage in my talk I left my wife. And my two children at the time it brahima sabre and i get a call in the morning and my wife calls me sobbing. I'm calling from the hospital. We had to take my baby daughter. Nusseibeh was named after a warrior princess to the hospital because she found a bump in the stomach got back the results and there were bumps all around her liver. We found out that she has stage. Four liggins move. it has been a challenging week. that's been a challenging as a parent. You immediately do bar whether or not you believe. In god you do a barter prayer with the universe and say you say okay. Got my life for the kit fair trick and you do the barter prayer knowing full will you won't receive an answer but there seems to be a profound injustice that this two year old girl somehow magically overnight has stage for cancer which means only liver transplant to survive and chile just aggressive punishing chemo. And so i'm sitting there thinking god after now. Go give a talk talk. Do i have to give the case for having kids. How can i make the case for having kids when one of my kids and now has cancer. And we're going to be immersed in just chaos and pain and so i thought it would be disingenuous to step on that stage and not make it personal. So how is your daughter now. So new cba is four. Years old is going to turn five in the summer All of her hair is not comeback. So she's like halle berry With amazing cruel of hair and she. We just got results Tests all the time in this yesterday. All her levels came back. she's doing fantastic. And you know every day my wife. And i we just look to save a twirling around dancing being goofy playing with her brother and we just sit there and just saved my god. This is look at this miracle. I think it's interesting because we started off our conversation. And actually you started off your talk in a very macro way. But i think what you've gone is the sort of micro which is that. Your children have really revitalized you in that. You see the world in as a place for change. Absolutely i have to say speaking for myself. I was pretty jaded gen. Xer and having kids for me is like seeing the world new again yet. Literally as an adult. It's wonderful because you've now have become the teacher you become the mentor. You see life through a different lens right through a childlike lens. Where there's joy this curiosity and there's conflicting emotions and you see the beauty of lego sets again. I mean in this pandemic as i'm locked down with my three children and my wife you know i feel connected to this in this laughter in our home and there is something about revitalizing your spirit and refining purpose. Especially this time writer. Watch a hot ali. You can see his full talk at dot com. Thank you so much for listening to our show this week. Revitalize to learn more about the people who were on it to ted dot. Npr dot org to see hundreds more. Ted talks checkout. Ted dot com more the ted talk radio production staff. Npr includes jeff. Rodgers saunas mishkin. Poor rachel faulkner. Diba mohtashami james delahoussaye. Jc howard katie. Monteleone maria paz gutierrez christina kala and matthew clue ta with help from daniel shchukin. Our intern is janet lee special thanks to listeners. James daly kaja. Lucy sue check and locked me. Sarah for sharing their thoughts to our theme music was written by rahm teen arab louis. Our partners at ted chris anderson colin helms in a phelan and michelle quint. I'm a new summer odi and you've been listening to ted radio hour from npr this message from npr sponsor. American express business future proofing. Your business has never been more important. That's why the annex corporate program is here to give you the customer support and solutions to thrive empower your workforce with a suite of solutions designed to help tackle your changing needs today and to help fortify your business tomorrow with powerful backing entrusted customer service. The annex corporate program is here to help drive your business forward. 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npr amanda williams andrew pelling ted apple Revital Npr chicago obesity Amanda amanda newsom roti Buds dave newsom rhody npr Novo nordisk Amando williams john templeton foundation
Bang Bang Trailer Breakdown | Reviews and Roasting | with Ajit

UNPLUG & RAW

15:35 min | 10 months ago

Bang Bang Trailer Breakdown | Reviews and Roasting | with Ajit

"You know guys gives you. I hope to engage a welcome to the podcast of unplugged so today we are going to break down the thriller of bang bang. He took on. Cd scar jogi biology. Bit anyway here. So we don't further ado. Let's not hey big theater. I hope you're enjoying Team did the app and Three again they will record an eddie. Your forecast and boost your podcast audio content and then in could be distributed your podcasts or contained. Ten forty five apple podcasts and other platforms and into free and you can also on money with no minimum charges. So it's everything you need in one place. So i owe started my journey. Which anchors what are you eating. Go get your first post. Goss gonna meet anger or anger. Fm that mimic was ordered by the virus got enough new or balloting porn end up the panic copier been some of the. The allopathic is big. Little mediatory you or midday healthy. Thank you know we're gonna do this. Athletes have a helicopter. he writes alot more campaign aa. 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I'd be those either near by biotic lately into our jello hits. Pk tool or review colorado. What ty at that. And that's it for today guys. I hope you enjoyed his breakdown of Jelly hamilton Can send me a message through the even button or many male opposition. he'd subdue.

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