20 Burst results for "Nord House"

"nord house" Discussed on Stansberry Investor Hour

Stansberry Investor Hour

03:47 min | 4 months ago

"nord house" Discussed on Stansberry Investor Hour

"Growth of the chinese economy for the last twenty years has been about twelve percent a year and time prices almost twice as fast as even the chinese government letters claimed that china's communist don't have any idea of the real of vibrance say of their entrepreneurial economy that are now attempting to suppress and our economy as well as as has not grown is about a third or fourth as fast as china. But still it's been gone a lot faster than rcpi's cpi's investigated and william nord house of yale who won the nobel prize a couple years ago for his worst idea of which was taxing carbon of but But he actually showed how the all these efforts to measure. Economic growth. Grossed are just vastly misconceived when a studied the real price of light and time prices the time a worker asked to spend to light a wrong from the time of the fires and caves of the caveman through the candles. Advair size through whale oil lamps. Cara saying on Fluorescent ballgames so now ellie days. The progress of light increased hundreds of thousands of times faster than any and economist calculated. They're just while they wrote about dark satanic mills and does mall up projections of malthus in exhaustion. A technology advanced just huge faster than anybody. Estimated in the amazing thing is that that continues today. So we have. I have a upside storybook where governments are really pressing the envelope. Today's there provoking. Needless wars there Finding and punishing leading tech companies for illusory privacy invasion and and other We're just abusing. Both china and the us are now abusing their technology sector wantonly of because of their Because their political power is what is their prime motivation beyond rather than the welfare and prosperity of the world right pure power-mongering. Do you think there is though a legitimate. There's legitimate backlash in what you might call a term from from life after television. Dome unedic if there's a legitimate backlash isn't there not against this technology. You made the point in that book. Even we got all this wonderful technology and look what the hell we're doing with i..

rcpi william nord house of yale china Cara ellie us
"nord house" Discussed on Science Salon

Science Salon

05:48 min | 6 months ago

"nord house" Discussed on Science Salon

"My guest today is william nord. House in his new book is the spirit of green the economics of collisions and contains in a crowded world Bill is the winner of the twenty eighteen nobel prize in economics. He's the sterling professor of economics and professor in the school of environment at your university is many books include the climate casino risk uncertainty and economics for a warming world and a question of balance weighing the options on global warming policies. He lives in new haven connecticut. this is the man. He won the nobel prize for good reason because of his work and environmental economics is nudging people to do things That are good for the environment for clean air water and so forth in when it's in their own best interests to do so economically. We already do this in many many areas of life so We cover all these different examples of how this works in in different areas And then at the end. I ask him to make the case for Why conservatives republicans and so forth should be on board with this. And he. I think he i think he nails really economically. This is really the right thing to do. selfishly greedily Not to mention of course as a collective action problem. It's better to have clean air and water in a sustainable environment and So we go through all the different steps that need to happen not that many. Not that difficult. We can get there so With that lease joy. William nord.

william nord William nord today twenty eighteen Bill republicans nobel prize new haven connecticut
"nord house" Discussed on The Pest Posse Stampede Podcast

The Pest Posse Stampede Podcast

05:22 min | 1 year ago

"nord house" Discussed on The Pest Posse Stampede Podcast

"And they'll up with somebody who's qualified to help you with that. And they're essentially a coach and i would recommend bats as a way before i would recommend going for a specific book or video to watch Also along those same lines the executive lucia program if you want to apply for through. Npa i did that. I was class number two and it was wonderful for me if nothing else i got. Great plethora of resources to refer back to you on the subject of leadership and some great networking opportunities. Where i could go in and get more mentors for myself as i progressed and actually two of the people i hope for that program In a mentorship astill still mentor me today. And it's been a couple of years since. I graduated event as far as things that you can do on your own. Go ahead and do your own research on leadership go. Google put in leadership than put and then put in what you want to know about. And i promise you will find some results. That are going to pertain to what you're looking for you'll probably lead you down. A rabbit hole was going to say. I say you need to go find pierre nord house richard clawson or even One of one of the great self help people like john c. maxwell or any of those looking bookshelves remember but he's names it. It may not be worth it to you because none of what they say may resonate with you and then you. You can't really live it if it doesn't resonate with you. Go ahead and go come down the rabbit hole and be alice and and get stuck in in wonderland learn all things that are relevant to you and then take all that and make it your own. I think that's good. I really appreciate that and really appreciate your insights insights on this. I think this has been some good stuff on leadership Collie sound like you were going to say something. I agree with what mark was getting at. I don't think you'll like avid john maxwell fan but i don't think that you're helping yourself by locking into one person Just you need perspective. I mean if you pay attention to maxwell he. He listens to all kinds of people from various authors. He don't want self into one thing no and I think that's the same as what we should be doing. I think that's super important. If you want to develop a leadership mindset. You need to be doing that. Daily yup fifteen to twenty minutes reading. Podcasts whatever it is you need to be exposing your brain to that positive leadership mentality every single day. Chen is what changes us. Whatever we associate with. That's what we're going to be like baked the decision to every day. Expose yourself to whatever it is. You wanna be like you know because if you don't you're we just human nature is to fall apart. The love entropy folks it is brunei. yeah so excellent. well great. well this has been. It's been some great stuff margaret. Certainly do appreciate you coming on here and coming on this show. Today with as agony lasts. Rake our nation..

john c. maxwell executive Google richard clawson Chen alice brunei. mark
"nord house" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

08:37 min | 1 year ago

"nord house" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"The price tag this time almost a half trillion dollars the majority of that more than three hundred twenty billion is for the paycheck protection program well our next guest is head of an organization that lobbies on behalf of businesses many of which are waiting for this money Suzanne Clarke is president of the U. S. chamber of commerce which represents the interests of more than three million businesses she joins me now she's in Cork welcome thank you are you happy with today's deal as we noted the first round of this program ran out of money in less than two weeks will this be enough we welcome news of the deal were eager to see it enacted we know that there is just desperate need out there we hear from CEOs everyday small businesses in real pain and it makes us think that yes we will have to act swiftly for even more funding which is an open question what what is the number one concern on the minds of business leaders that you're talking to I think employers are worried about two things one is getting through this emergency both the public health emergency but also the economic emergency and the other is how do you prepare to open one public affairs health officials say they're ready you get that green light how are you ready to serve your customers and your employees yeah and they're so many components to that admin I wonder for example how are you were thinking about the push and pull between wanting to do this responsibly wanted sequence this into some business sectors maybe reopen first so it's done in a gradual way on the other hand so much is interlinked and your parents of course can't return to their jobs until the schools are open until day cares open it all needs to happen it together it really is complex you're right and I think is the chamber looks at a path forward to re opening it will be gradual it will be phased in we know that different communities have been hit in a different way different industries have different requirements but it's really four things one what are the essential services you need such as child care in transit to what is the equipment and training an employer needs to have in place three what are the regulatory roadblocks or litigation risk they need to be thinking about and for it is going to be faces because we know their industries that rely on high density it'll take longer to get back to normal let me ask you to stick to number three for a moment because that's something we've heard less about this challenge for businesses if they want employees to come back they need those employees to be screened to make sure they're healthy but that risks running afoul of medical privacy rules of anti discrimination rules there all kinds of liability line land mines here up on top of everything else the companies are grappling with that's right and if you think about this completely unprecedented situation there's no playbook to take off the shelf and just an act and it will all be acting with imperfect information so it's going to take unprecedented collaboration and communication and trust as we try to do this together and ensure that every American has access to their paycheck as someone who represents the business community are you a confident the federal government can turn this around with all the mixed messages on on testing and and other things I think it's a multi layered approach right you need the federal government for guidelines you eat state and local government for local implementation based on different conditions on the ground and you need business leaders to talk about what's feasible it's going to take that kind of collaboration to deal with this magnitude of the crisis eight I have a big picture question for you which is understanding none of us has a crystal ball what does the landscape for American business and commerce look like five years from now well I'm an optimist and I believe in the American entrepreneur so I think we're hopeful we're hopeful that while this V. has been terribly painful for American families looking like a depression or a recession we know it ends and we don't answer leave our house and so watch for that innovators watch for business to reopen quickly and we hope that the sharp incline on the other side comes quickly is there a realistic scenario though in which small businesses survive comeback even are thriving in five years we hope so we do worry about entrepreneurs who want to take risks going forward right but we believe that the health of an individual and a family go hand in hand with their job prospects so we want to make sure that there's a path forward to re opening the economy that we can get to the real pain that's out there but we believe we can figure this out together and we have to that is Suzanne Clark she's president of the U. S. chamber of commerce which represents three million businesses here in the United States at thank you so much for your time thank you its Holocaust Remembrance Day and seventy five years ago this month American soldiers liberated the Nord housing concentration camp in Germany for survivors Saul green glass that day April eleventh has always been special and his grandson NPR's Sam green glass tells us that the coronavirus is casting this year's anniversary in a new light Sagarin glass was born in August but every year on April eleventh I drop by his house or call me on the phone in Michigan to wish him a Happy Birthday this year on facetime I have a gun okay it's your second birthday his second birthday it was April eleventh nineteen forty five when he says his life started over again it's the day he was liberated from the **** April eleventh do you know what day that is because of the coronavirus assisted living communities like where my grandpa lives are closed to visitors so my dad is standing on the line holding up the phone one nurse brings my grandpa out on the balcony to wave we try to keep you healthy that's why I can't comment Saul was born in Australia it's Poland he arrived at Auschwitz in nineteen forty three I sell locus of kitsch troops composed pulled the month which describe also let that night he struggles to tell the story now he's a hundred so these tapes from an oral history he recorded a few years ago when it's all got to Auschwitz prisoners told him what to expect and not by chip shop that's the end I said I lost my family I don't care about me after eight days there he was selected to go to your house in a labor camp we spent two years taking rock for **** factory by nineteen forty five Saul's brother had also been transferred into north house and they were reunited the **** had killed their parents and four other siblings that spring ally started bombing north house and they didn't know it was a labor camp and Saul was injured by shrapnel finally on April eleventh the Americans liberated Nordhausen his brother delivered the news theocracy Dominic instead that was seventy five years ago this year the anniversary fell in the middle of Passover the holiday that tells the story of the Jews escape from slavery in Egypt with nursing home visitors prohibited for the foreseeable future I wonder if I'll get another chance to sit at the Passover seder table with him my grandpa doesn't really understand why no one can visit anymore sometimes he's been asking to come home but amid a pandemic keeping much of the country on lockdown April is still a symbol of liberation a reminder that life can start a new despite all the darkness Sam Greene glass NPR news this is NPR news Afghans who worked with US troops were resettled near New York City they left a war zone and now they face a different fight with this situation you don't know from where Danny's coming some are working in hospitals others are making face masks will save lives so that students happiness that me and I was on the news and refugees fight a pandemic tomorrow on morning edition from NPR news and you can join us for morning edition tomorrow morning on ninety point three K. AZ you streaming A. K. A. Z. U. dot org hose still in music will have updates on weather traffic in the.

"nord house" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:53 min | 1 year ago

"nord house" Discussed on KCRW

"The price tag this time almost a half trillion dollars the majority of that more than three hundred twenty billion is for the paycheck protection program well our next guest is head of an organization that lobbies on behalf of businesses many of which are waiting for this money Suzan Clarke is president of the U. S. chamber of commerce which represents the interests of more than three million businesses she joins me now Suzanne Clark welcome thank you are you happy with today's deal as we noted the first round of this program ran out of money in less than two weeks will this be enough we welcome news of the deal were eager to see it enacted we know that there is just desperate need out there we hear from CEOs everyday small businesses in real pain and it makes us think that yes we will have to act swiftly for even more funding which is an open question what what is the number one concern on the minds of business leaders that you're talking to I think employers are worried about two things one is getting through this emergency both the public health emergency but also the economic emergency and the other is how do you prepare to open one public affairs health officials say they're ready you get that green light how are you ready to serve your customers and your employees yeah and they're so many components to that admin I wonder for example how you were thinking about the push and pull between wanting to do this responsibly wanted sequence this into some business sectors maybe reopen first so it's done in a gradual way on the other hand so much is interlinked and your parents of course can't return to their jobs until the schools are open until daycares open it all needs to happen it together it really is complex you're right and I think is the chamber looks at a path forward to re opening it will be gradual it will be phased in we know that different communities have been hit in a different way different industries have different requirements but it's really four things one what are the essential services you need such as child care in transit to what is the equipment and training and employer needs to have in place three what are the regulatory roadblocks or litigation risk they need to be thinking about in four is going to be faces because we know their industries that rely on high density it'll take longer to get back to normal let me ask you to stick to number three for a moment because that's something we've heard less about this challenge for businesses if they want employees to come back they need those employees to be screened to make sure they're healthy but that risks running afoul of medical privacy rules of anti discrimination rules there all kinds of liability line land mines here up on top of everything else the companies are grappling with that's right and if you think about this completely unprecedented situation there's no playbook to take off the shelf and just an act and it will all be acting with imperfect information so it's going to take unprecedented collaboration and communication and trust as we try to do this together and ensure that every American has access to their paycheck as someone who represents the business community are you a confident the federal government can turn this around with all the mixed messages on on testing and and other things I think it's a multi layered approach right you need the federal government for guidelines you eat state and local government for local implementation based on different conditions on the ground and you need business leaders to talk about what's feasible I was going to take that kind of collaboration to deal with this magnitude of the crisis I have a big picture question for you which is understanding none of us has a crystal ball what does the landscape for American business and commerce look like five years from now well I'm an optimist and I believe in the American entrepreneur so I think we're hopeful we're hopeful that while this V. has been terribly painful for American families looking like a depression or a recession we know it ends and we do it and so we leave our house and so watch for the innovators watch for business to reopen quickly and we hope that the sharp incline on the other side comes quickly is there a realistic scenario though in which small businesses survive comeback even are thriving in five years we hope so we do worry about entrepreneurs who want to take risks going forward right but we believe that the health of an individual and a family go hand in hand with their job prospects so we want to make sure that there's a path forward to re opening the economy that we can get to the real pain that's out there but we believe we can figure this out together and we have to that is Suzanne Clark she's president of the U. S. chamber of commerce which represents three million businesses here in the United States at thank you so much for your time thank you its Holocaust Remembrance Day and seventy five years ago this month American soldiers liberated the Nord housing concentration camp in Germany for survivors small green glass that day April eleventh has always been special and his grandson NPR's Sam green glass tells us that the coronavirus is casting this year's anniversary in a new light Sagarin glass was born in August but every year on April eleventh I drop by his house or call me on the phone in Michigan to wish him a Happy Birthday this year on facetime as a gun okay it's your second birthday his second birthday it was April eleventh nineteen forty five when he says his life started over again it's the day he was liberated from the **** April eleventh do you know what day that is because of the corona virus assisted living communities like where my grandpa lives are closed to visitors so my dad is standing on the line holding up the phone one nurse brings my grandpa out on the balcony to wave we try to keep you healthy that's why I can't comment Saul was born in Australia to Poland he arrived at Auschwitz in nineteen forty three I sell locus of kitsch troops post cold months describe that at night he struggles to tell the story now he's a hundred so these tapes from an oral history he recorded a few years ago when it's all got to Auschwitz prisoners told him what to expect and not by voice sets up that's the end I ship I lost my family I don't care about me after eight days there he was selected to go to nor house in a labor camp we spent two years taking rock for **** factory by nineteen forty five Saul's brother had also been transferred into north house and they were reunited the **** had killed their parents and four other siblings that spring ally started bombing north house and they didn't know it was a labor camp and Saul was injured by shrapnel finally on April eleventh the Americans liberated Nordhausen his brother delivered the news the Americans today that was seventy five years ago this year the anniversary fell in the middle of Passover the holiday that tells the story of the Jews escape from slavery in Egypt with nursing home visitors prohibited for the foreseeable future I wonder if I'll get another chance to sit at the Passover seder table with him my grandpa doesn't really understand why no one can visit anymore sometimes he's been asking to come home but amid a pandemic keeping much of the country on lockdown April is still a symbol of liberation a reminder that life can start a new despite all the darkness sampling glass NPR.

"nord house" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

06:05 min | 1 year ago

"nord house" Discussed on KGO 810

"We gotta be careful this is astounding down here what's happening now in comic would've been one of the leaders of that movement what's the state department or is the state department now I I they embarrassed that you've uncovered this we haven't had any official reaction from the US government but you know there is one thing I I I can't let you go are I can't I can't leave without without mentioning and that's our our yeah describing to get all these documents are two documents in particular we were not able to get one dates to nineteen sixty nine we made if we request of the U. S. government department of justice for documents on homes com or they say they're two documents we can give you one nineteen sixty nine thirty five pages one nineteen eighty seven which is eighty seven pages so over a hundred pages of documents created decades after the war on Tom's collar that the government wouldn't produce throw for a request we make an appeal of that request and they denied the request they will usually give you extradited redacted versions of documents they would give us nothing not even pages with everything blacked out just nothing and then when we renew the request years later they said well we don't even have these documents anymore we don't know what so why would they be creating a document on com or as late as nineteen eighty seven is it possible he was still alive well he was he was born in nineteen oh one so in nineteen the seventy with an eighty six years old so it you know completely possible he could have been a life and the most benign explanation I can think of for for for creating documents that many years later about somebody whose dad was a subsequent trial of **** I know I mention nineteen sixty nine during that year there were some Nord house and officials going on trial these were **** who worked at that second rocket facility I mentioned in central Germany they were going on trial in nineteen sixty nine so it's possible there's a thirty five page document all about com or there but no again why would that exist if calmer we're just being mentioned in the footnotes and why couldn't it be produced to us and in nineteen eighty seven there could have been something else going on that that you know that the war ended in nineteen forty five but the ramifications of the war obviously continued for decades later but I'm I'm very troubled by the idea that there are documents still being held and and how you view this as a as an American that thinks your government made this deal with the devil as he'd be describing the subtitle of the book I mean do you do you think is yes is it is that it could be justified again the enemy of the my enemy is my friend yeah and that that's a key question in the book and I talk about this at some length it is troubling deal but I have to think that it's a good deal well made and well intended you know the I don't I don't like to second guess people that were making you know decisions like this on the ground in the minute in the moment and I can say with some confidence that if we hadn't made this deal we would have gotten the Rocketeer if we didn't have the rock a teens I think the outcome of the Cold War would be the question mark the geopolitical landscape might be vastly different today than it than it otherwise would have been than otherwise is in other words if the Americans hadn't taken hold of calmer and von Braun and Dornberger than the Soviets would happen and I mean they were they were close behind the U. S. in developing a bomb so yeah hi John they have the delivery system we got most of the German nuclear scientists but the reason the that the Soviets had a successful nuclear weapons tests in nineteen fifty three as early as they did is because their lead scientist was an Aussie a former **** so yeah it's it's it's a troubling deal but I probably would have done the same thing if I were faced with the same circumstances and of course I'm glad we won the Cold War obviously but I'm I'm wondering what would this have done any or hasn't done any damage to US Israel relations the idea that the American save these horrible monsters from the hangman's noose it remember you know I don't know the answer to that question that's a good question I don't think this this incident has I don't think it's a widely known enough yet to this book came out in October it's being well received people that read it love it but and we we haven't really gotten official reaction from government yeah so it's too soon to tell maybe have a from the Holocaust museum in Washington of the Holocaust museum in Washington was extremely helpful in research they have a great library there and there had arc of this Ron Coleman I became friendly with him that they were just fantastic and providing information I haven't gotten runs reaction to the book so so all right reaction from merry gene stay put on the other side will open up the phone lines take questions and comments here are I can Tina Turner hockey talk woman taking isn't a break on coast to coast AM we've got all the news right here I'm.

"nord house" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

06:27 min | 2 years ago

"nord house" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Why is it easier to over spend this time of the year is it because you get caught up in the shopping craziness or does it have to do with the stars joining us in studio to explain just that is astrologer and Nord house bike it's good to see you white thank you thank you for coming is it really the stars or is it just because people get caught up in the craziness the craziness is in part related to the stars there's actually an astrological explanation for why we overspend over eight over do over everything this time of year absolutely you don't know why yes I want to know why okay so the sun goes into a new sign every year around the twenty second of November okay and every year there's no way that Black Friday can be any time except after that date the sun in Sagittarius that's a fire sign it's big it's balled it once the biggest the best it's the planet is Jupiter it's the biggest planet in the solar system it wants everything in a big way it wants to spend the traveling west over eat oh my goodness I don't really understand this but I know we just got out of mercury retrograde everything was backwards rant yeah ends frustrating can get stuck so people what mercury retrograde is yeah mercury is the littlest planet in our solar system it's the closest to the sun and three times a year approximately it looks like it's gone backwards in the sky it's not moving backwards but it looks like it from earth but actually has a measurable effect on things on earth they've actually correlated this for thousands of years astrologers have what happens is everything related with mercury kind of goes haywire it goes underground we have to sort of pull inward stop and it's everything that has three read to review recycled right everything can sometimes it can't be a bad thing sometimes it's good sometimes it's great because it stops stuff that maybe you shouldn't do and you get to rethink it and thank goodness I didn't do that or if you were trying to get a job in a did you happen before Merck mercury retrograde you get a second chance and it could work yeah if it's people you've worked with before if it's a new job it's better to wait to sign the contract and go for it until after but it's stuff you worked with before that's a great time it's like old home week I'm here yeah I signed a contract during mercury retrograde during a for a new job dead over you know it's okay it was terrible now I work it was horrible what typically happens is a job not what you expect it was bad it was and then when it ends and it's like oops this isn't what I got a great story about mercury retrograde is Sylvester Stallone he tried to sell the screen play rocky for ever in his mother is a psychic yeah he said sell it during mercury retrograde and it sold right away yeah became movie of the year that you yeah isn't that wild card doesn't believe in and he's just shaking his all listening right now by the way and they don't believe it yeah don't put it on me hi I'm I'm slightly skeptical but I'm also open to that and might just save my life right now well what would you say to the non believers well first of all if you set aside the word belief just look at it as a practical tool because Estrella Jesus math geometry all the stuff we use math and numbers all the time look at it that way okay it's a tool if it you works great if it doesn't set it aside but I will say if you apply it you might actually find well there's something to this it's great for timing for business and how to run your life right yeah I'd like to start something new during mercury retrograde wait till afterwards so you're gonna do some readings so be having call answer what do you need to know their name yet when they calling give us your first name tell us your sign in and then when you come and just basically say what is it you want information about like what's so what's this top of mind job love exactly yeah yeah hi Nadine money yeah three one two nine eight one seventy two hundred what's the difference between an astrologer and psychic excellent question yes the thing is when people call in a very early on they often asked me to guess their sign well I'm an astrologer not a psychic a psychic might be able to guess at and we all have some psychic ability but I gotta have data astrologers like okay give me isn't it we we want their date time and place of birth we cast a charge I don't actually show you what that looks like right I read this all this information a circular deal that used to see in the newspaper no yeah see online exactly really understand what it means that looks like a pie chart exactly as symbols yeah okay yeah just like mad people can read all those wild equations they are a very similar sign I think by the way every single line is full a lot of people want readings you bet Carmen I are both the same sign well this what can you tell both we were both well my goodness mark Leo career love he finance Mariel had Morrow can you tell me something about that I did yeah okay three of us I'm I'm I'm I'm and what did they call it the cost I'm on the last day of Leo be going into Virgo you're probably definitely although young checked if you're on the edge I am definitely well okay yeah okay where you go you go to my website actually can get a free birth chart based on your date time place of birth intellectually show you are you actually for gore you Leo give your website what is it astrologer and dot com a and an E. gonna run together astrologer and dot com it'll say on the homepage you scroll down a little bit say free birth chart just click that link okay about love for him love for you all my goodness well Armand not for me now I'm already married time to get married in the statutory is time another fire sign that's why we picked it it's like this is a time for party said areas loves to party have a wonderful time tonight and I'm glad that you're getting another pair shoes I did here and and and I got to have it all right and they usually have a fashion plate too yes you have nice clothes for today look it is wearing a hoodie sweatshirt shower today I hope it lasts rhinestones on it or something I have shower within the last twenty four hours and I showered this morning just for the record and many of you hold on a second I'm a come back I want I want you to tell me about work for me Sir sh one Dave what do you want to know what do I want to know yeah walking about love love my it could be a soap opera for me but that you want to know about love going into the beginning the first of the year and you know just overall what what life may hold for us okay all right well.

Nord house twenty four hours twenty second
"nord house" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

12:07 min | 2 years ago

"nord house" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Overnight low in San Jose may reach thirty nine Oakland expected to go as low as forty six San Francisco forty nine and the Sacramento low overnight thirty four degrees predicted Sonny's guys on Thursday with highs expected in the seventies and for the bay area Thursday will be a spare the air day now one a with Joshua Johnson KQED public radio this is one day I'm Joshua Johnson in Washington a year ago we spoke to the mayor of paradise California just days after a wild fire broke out there at least ninety percent of the homes I just started to the foundation there's nothing last our business district fares a little better I would say maybe fifty percent our hospital our library our post office our town hall our police department the Kmart still there in the Starbucks is still there it's not like everything is gone but the vast majority of homes are the paradise fire and another blaze that devastated parts of wine country are very much on the minds of Californians today as more fires burn up and down the state one country is threatened again this time by a blaze near a power line that reportedly failed minutes before the fire started those lines belong to PGA any a company that has faced investigations and lawsuits over negligent maintenance what's the latest with these fires and what might they tell us about the threats the rest of the nation's power grids face joining us from Austin Texas is Russell gold a senior energy reporter for the Wall Street journal and the author of super power one man's quest to transform American energy Russell walking back to one day thank you so much for having me joining us from Oakland is Ted Nord house the founder and executive director of the breakthrough institute a California based think tank that focuses on tech solutions to environmental challenges Ted welcome thanks and in San Jose we're joined by its mayor Sam look Pardo Mister mayor glad to have you with us we'll be with you again Joshua the card to let me start with you how are things in the South Bay and in San Jose right now well we've got a few hundred residents were without power but it's far worse to the north of us did you go to Kate fire now its blazing over seventy six thousand acres and we've got many people obviously have been displaced and who lost their homes to the north of us and of course the air quality throughout the bay area is going to continue to worsen for the next day or two at that spoke trips out and what about you you live in the Berkeley foot hills how have you been affected either by the fires of the blackouts thankfully we haven't been directly affected by the fires although a Sam mentions the air quality is pretty bad and it's going to get worse but we have definitely been affected by the shot the powershot office we were we lost power for about two days over the weekend we were supposed to lose power last night but we haven't lost it so far and you know I live in in a part of the Berkeley hills that you know if a fire like the ones that have swept through the line country in paradise came through there you know our our house certainly would probably be pretty indefensible we would have to get out of there fast and and I think it's a big fire came through you know we will lose our house just sort of pretty pretty straight forward yeah we should right now yeah we and when we mention these power outages we should clarify that just little bit here's the CEO of PGA any bill Johnson speaking at an update last night with a were updating the public about these outrageous says the start of these appears to be the best those are players in the field repeatedly the targets of misguided attacks verbal abuse threats is ago salts even weapons today one of our major employees drive MPG vehicle was intentionally run off the road by their owners can we get the repeat this the men and women of P. G. C. in your community are there for a single reason that has been held these are people you know they live in your community they're your neighbors they're they're here to help that's the CEO of P. Jeannie bill Johnson speaking at an update last night Ted running workers off the road I mean I understand if people are upset about these blackouts but it seems like it's kind of skip some levels yeah I mean there it's a pretty simple equation right now which is that now I understand why people are angry and it's a huge inconvenience but but it's a pretty simple question right now which is the the last power you shut off the more narrowly targeted the shops are the the higher the fire risk as and I think our people are really sort of failing to appreciate that and it's gonna take a long time and a lot of money to fix that problem Russell gold could you give us a little bit more just for the background of what this year was talking about these P. S. P. S. events these are kind of blackouts that aren't power outages in the typical sense right no exactly PS PS stands for public safety power shut off and what it is is that when there are the fire conditions weather conditions are high winds low humidity P. Jeannie and and frankly the other utilities in California have the ability to shut off parts of their grit and that the purpose the reason that they do it is that if the wind causes a problem causes are a power line to fall it won't be energized and it won't start a fire it's it's pretty simple so at this point they're sort of saying you know the best defense we have is just to shut off the power grid it's it's really a stunning situation to find ourselves in at the beginning of the twenty first century especially in a place like other the bay area of California you know which is been known for you for thinking in sort of bringing us the future with the internet and all these you know the the the companies that are you know the the the well anyway they the internet companies and and yet here we are not able to keep the power on and they're sort of intentionally shutting it off and even in times when they do intense I shot off about power on the the twenty third about a week ago when they shut off the power to a large portion of the wine country one of the lines that was still on appears to have faulted and is to serve the prime suspect in starting the John Kincaid fire right now we should also note Russell that P. Jeannie has had a bad reputation in terms of maintenance for gosh going on a decade now back in two thousand ten there was a fire in a neighborhood south of San Francisco called San Bruno where transmission line a gas transmission line exploded blew up a neighborhood and killed thirty eight people SO P. genies been kind of under scrutiny for a long time with regards to its safety record right are you no question I think that thirty eight people that is is a little on the high side is a little closer to ten people I'm not mistaken but but your point is is accurate and we ran about this a number of times this year at the Wall Street journal this is a company that has had a series of safety violations they're currently on federal probation for for safety violations from that gas transmission line explosion that you mentioned and then we reported that you know the the the big twenty eighteen campfire hi which which burn rate through paradise killed eighty five people on that was caused by transmission line that was you know that they had designated and said that they needed to do and maintenance on they were concerned about the age you can do Asian of it and they didn't get around to it in time so yeah this is this is a company that has had a lot of problems and and a lot of a maintenance art related issues for for many years yeah and your roughly actually quite was about thirty some odd homes that were destroyed but eight people were killed in the sand broadcasts are so thank you for that we are speaking Russell gold of Wall Street journal San Jose mayor Sam Ricardo and Ted Nord house of the breakthrough institute the card you have suggested that P. Jeannie should basically be taken over publicly that it should be forced to become a non profit cooperative if I'm understanding correctly can I have that right and and why do you think that that's what should happen we have it mostly right actually we're not looking to have the government take over the utility but rather have the customers supplant the courage shareholders as the owner of the company in early two basic reasons one is to align the company's financial interest with the public interest as was mentioned by Russell yeah there's a company that's under invested in maintaining its infrastructure and rating its plans for the last twenty years or so and we have all been victims of that in various ways and so as you're not high they've also paid you know with a two year period of time and one point nine billion dollars dividend to shareholders dictate at the valley the dollar if this is too exactly there's no it's not the behavior of a company that focuses scarce dollars on getting out of bankruptcy paying off claim it and obviously of great the projector the other reason why I think a customer model is the better one is it really enables this company get access to capital markets because the capital much lower for nonprofit cooperatives in able to to for example not have to pay federal taxes not have to pay dividends to shareholders so that money that could be focused work needs to be focused and and we have a lot of precedent for cultural complicate till the industry insurance credit union auto buying if that works I know I'm gonna let you go in just a second we do have some listeners who are agree that the profit motive is an issue but P. Jeannie has said that it's not for sale not surprisingly I also wonder why have it changed business models as opposed to for example encouraging everyone in California to buy one share of P. Jeannie so they become shareholders and they get a vote and they can force the company to change from the inside well we have to a Chris Brown model is right I mean that if we all have a stake in that then we decided on the board in the board ultimately drive policy the company but I I should say that I think you do need a stake in what they say they're not for sale in fact there is bankruptcy court that's a bankruptcy his six the assets are re organized and if this is the opportunity for us really re imagine this companies into one that could better serve our red me a sample card of San Jose California Mister mayor I appreciate you making time for us hope that you all the South Bay stay safe and thank you very much for talking to us great to be with you Jack certainly some of you have expressed a similar concern about the profit motive of power utilities Angela tweeted we live in Michigan and lost power for a week in a wind storm and early twenty sixteen the winds took out the power lines DTP utility had failed to do unprofitable maintenance on the nationally owned power grid just over the border in Canada suffered no damage as they do regular maintenance we'll talk about the broader issues of power grids when we continue with Russell gold of the Wall Street journal and Ted nor house of the breakthrough institute I'm Joshua Johnson and you're listening to one a from W. A. M. you and NPR support for KQ EDT comes from disorder there a.

"nord house" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

03:05 min | 2 years ago

"nord house" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Well what these girls are doing is just spectacular in terms of raising awareness and putting some focus on the fact that we still have inequities in our system that according to Jessica Nord house of change the story for getting that none of these girls frankly none of the boys either are getting paid for anything of what they're doing here the high school team told WPTZ they were inspired by efforts from soccer star Megan Rapinoe enter teammates on the U. S. soccer women's national team to close that wage gap between men and women in professional soccer okay turn off the music so the position is is well intentioned it's not necessarily true as the basis of facts that they are using to promote their position but here's here's the thing I don't think this was explained to these players and anyone who's talking about equal pay between the men and women soccer teams I don't think they would continue to take their position if they realize what it is that they're saying I'm gonna say something controversial when taken out of context by media matters since I've got this national audience right now listening to me so pay attention here's the controversial statement I do not want pay equality neither should the male or female players I want pay fairness and they should too because of men lose on the national stage but the women when the women make more money for U. S. soccer should they get paid more than the men why would we want them to be paid equally the team that brings in the most amount of dollars into the organization I want them to be rewarded with higher pay regardless of their gender no swimming it's all negotiated but whether it's male or female or inevitably that the gender non binary U. S. men's national they were US men's Zeze team that team that makes the most for US soccer should get paid the most progressives can sometimes purposefully confuse topics they confuse equal access with equal outcome which is the same basic argument here the teams right now have the same access to a contract that they can agree to and sign and live up to but they don't want the same access to make those contracts they were the same outcome in negotiations which is exactly how to go she should do not work most of the work that way they want the same I don't I want the team that brings in the most money to make the most in their paychecks that seems that seems reasonable to me that seems to be in a world in which women would get paid more than the men if they're actually bringing in more than the men bring in regardless of how well they're doing meanwhile I'm I'm near Chicago claims gender discrimination after she says that she was fired as the coach of our son's youth football team for quote being too emotional and not manly enough that's a direct quote that's weird I hope they have it in writing somewhere here's NBC Chicago Stephanie Kirkland six year old son asked her to coach his youth football.

"nord house" Discussed on a16z

a16z

11:43 min | 2 years ago

"nord house" Discussed on a16z

"Phase I in their first phase of figuring out how to user resources like I guess my question is. Why couldn't they leapfrog this extractive phase phase and just go right to a more practical phase when it comes to acceleration of technology? Do you think that extractive phase as a happen. It's pretty clear to me that America and the UK and I think most other super rich countries are past peak stuff. If you weighed our economy year after year it would weigh less year after year. India and China and Bangladesh are not yet at peak stuff but they will get to that point much earlier on in their GDP per capita trajectory because Nigeria is not. I'm not GonNa lay an extensive copper telephone network across the country. They're not going to build as many coal plants per capita as we did because that's just economically inefficient to do. I'll be surprised as if the Chinese have as many private cars per capita as we did earlier in our history because it's really impractical to have that heavy expensive asset sit idle ninety five percent of the time time so I do think that this technologically very sophisticated economy is going to get countries through this resource transition much earlier than we went through it so one of the things that's so striking carbon emissions in the US or falling and you told me they're starting to fall in certain parts of Europe as well the EU in general has been on a shallow downward trend Yep. There's lots of advances made in energy efficient technologies all kinds of when this will continue. Let's take the strong advocates for dramatic action at their word that we're going to run into real trouble globally nobly. How do you not progress from there to believe in. We have to take a very different approach from a foreign policy standpoint in particular as China and India up potentially up to and including if chorus of actions because if you look at the graph of global emissions growth. It's very clearly to like gigantic examples so we're going to invade them to make them reduce their carbon emissions like that. I don't I don't see how that plays out. Let me give you a couple software waste because I think there are a couple important. Ones one is they gave the Nobel oh bell price to build Nord House last year for his work about how to deal with global warming and the notion of a carbon dividend when Nord House proposed carbon tax and I liked the phrase carbon dividend better because it's not a tax with government keeps the money you pass through the government directly to people and give them a carbon dividend hopefully skewed a little bit toward lower income people as part of that you also do what's called a border adjustment where you look at all the imports into the country and if they come from high carbon sources you you tax them just like you would if they were made in this country with high carbon sources. I think that's really strong incentive for our main trading partners in China's probably exhibit exhibit a here to start literally cleaning up their act in this regard the other thing. Is You know we have one source of power. We have one way to generate power that is scalable clean somewhat economical and not intermittent and it's called nuclear and there are a couple of countries like France and Sweden that have cheap electricity and the cleanest power in Europe and were running away from the rest of the world. I find this completely perverse why not put together a an international coalition and along with that and International Patent Bank so that it's cheaper to produce the new generation of nuclear reactor. I'm pretty sure that will get the cost down to the point where it becomes an economic no brainer even for low income countries to start transitioning into a a clean energy environment. I would do both of those things way before or I would try to coerce other countries into changing their energy profile or doing it in a way that would that would slow down their growth or impoverished their people so I'm glad you brought brought up. I'm glad you brought up nuclear housing. I was GonNa ask you that so many times just like flatly ruled out nuclear an option so what what's going on there and like what what what's the way through that Ah. I honestly don't know the answer. Why are they so stridently anti nuclear there's probably a bundle of things going on one is because of everything from Hiroshima and Nagasaki to Godzilla two three Mile Island and Fukushima and Chernobyl I mean I just finished watching their noble miniseries on Hbo so I have this kind of visceral visceral reaction to the idea of super widespread nuclear power but I think our homework is always not to trust that initial hick and to go look at the evidence evidence and when you actually look at the evidence and look at the issues I don't know how you come away anything except a nuclear advocate and we worry about things like nuclear waist and we should worry about nuclear waste but we don't then say well how much harm is caused by the pollution from other kinds of power generation worldwide why there are clearly hundreds of thousands of deaths a year from people breathing coal dust and people breathing the emissions from coal plants so the death toll. It's not even even close and this is backed up by very good research published in the Lancet and elsewhere. There's a nice article in our world and data about relative safety levels in death rates from different kinds of power. You walk away from that nuclear's biggest cheerleader so I don't quite know why the reaction is is so strident and visceral and negative all I can say it is not not based on evidence and I'm I'm starting to see a coalition forming that pushes back against that to say we're getting this deeply wrong on an important issue so okay so you were talking about cap and trade what made that so successful compared to other temps. Obviously there's a market based mechanisms but give me more details cap and trade. The basic I dea is make pollution expensive attach a cost to it in other words. Put it inside the market. Pollution doesn't naturally have a price and when that's the case no matter what the press release says businesses have a strong incentive to go pollute. If it's free okay put a price on it and then here's the brilliance of cap and trade allow companies to buy and sell that pollution or more specifically that right to pollute with each other so if I'm super dirty and I can't clean clean up quickly. I gotta buy the right to pollute but I'm willing to buy that right. If it's cheaper than the cost of me cleaning myself up right some somebody will sell me that right and make some cash rush because they're already really clean and they don't need that right. So this was a line of economics research. They've got started with them. Legendary Nobel Prize winning economist Ronald Ronald Coast and descendants of his ideas got put into practice early in the Reagan administration with the help of the Environmental Defense Fund so this beautiful Allianz Forum to say hey. Let's try this market based thing for dealing with pollution they overcame whatever reluctance was there from the from the incumbents again and they did it right and then the the research is pretty clear that we can just look at what happened to particular emission from these kinds of plants. America's skies are just ninety plus percent cleaner dinner than they were when when that when that legislation was passed and the cost of doing it is a fraction of the original estimate of that so there's a reason for these kind of crazy easy fans of markets for getting things done they work and when you can put things like pollution in a market and you do this with cap and trade and carbon dividends and things like that these are the these are the most efficient ways to deal with the problem. Don't China and India have to sign up for the same thing. One of the problems with carbon is at the harms from it are not local and they're not immediate so maybe the the fast growing high carbon countries right now will choose to ignore it for a while longer. We have a couple mechanisms to get them to not do that and like I said if you do a border adjustment for the high carbon products that we import that's a really strong incentive to do things better if we can make it cheaper for them to be green and I personally I think nuclear and a patent banker cheap technologies around nuclear is the path to do that. We clearly have to help the currently low income world get rich on lower carbon trajectory than there on right now. That's different than saying that they can't can't use more energy year after year. I'm not going to deny them that right to prosperity exactly but we really want them to get cleaner quicker. I think we have tools to do that and and I don't think that the Chinese and the Indians are indifferent to the longer term health of the planet. I really don't believe that I mean they're living with it. In a physical way everyone there is facing an experiencing erasing it in a very real way and we had this podcast a few years ago with Evan Osnos at the New Yorker. We were talking about China. One of my favorite things that he talked about is how because because of the growth of the middle class in China that there is now a huge cohort people demanding a better environment precisely because of the market deny met no not just that getting a better involvement so I found this great research that I put in more from less a very good economist looked at what happened when China finally got serious about urban air pollution and the reason they got serious about about it was people were leaving the city's even if they didn't have government permission to do it. People were leaving because their kids were just clearly getting sick. I'M GONNA GONNA have stunted lives so China took action and they brought down there countrywide particulate pollution by thirty percent in four years and they did it with these draconian Indian means but they did it and they took us in the United States twelve years to get that same thirty percent reduction so even one of the points I make in the book is democracies are are probably more receptive to the will of their people but there are interesting exceptions in both directions and China was clearly receptive to the will of its people not to choke off their children dron with pollution right right. I read a ton of Chinese sci-fi and it's literally the recurring theme is basically about the end of the world and like environment but Andy was route. That's cool yeah. It's a really big theme. Ah Yet to read a lot of different Chinese science fiction author see this but that's basically my genre this year one thing I wanna ask you I understand from the market dynamics point of view why cap and trade with successful swale idea an example and it's been proven out but why couldn't a government have simply mandated like we will simply put a limit on this draconian measures like China I did. Why would that not be as effective. Sometimes we did. That's how we actually brought down. CFC emissions so drastically we just mandated that they be reduced by x percent over time until they got down to close to zero the reason that works is that there's a relatively small number of industries a relatively small number of companies in a relatively small number of products that used chlorofluorocarbons and to be a little bit more cynical. The other reason that ban worked was somebody eventually whispered to the incumbent. I've been companies the CFC's. You're making right now. They're off patent the new generation of cooling propellants and whatnot those can be underpaid and that's going to be a big revenue source for you and so they finally got industry on their side. I feel hot can work for example. It is just flat illegal to dump waste at sea in America. We just did that via via. We didn't put a price on it. You cannot hunt animals in national parks. You cannot hunt deer or duck out there seasons so sometimes you want to do things by Fiat but I think if you can put it in a market mechanism and it's appropriate to do that. I think you'll get better better solutions quicker. Maybe that's not right but I've got this deep faith in markets once you put things in them in price them to deal with that price in a in a very fast way. If you change a businesses cost structure quickly man businesses will run from that increased cost like gazelle run when they smell a lion. It's just amazing how quickly it'll happen. I will tease tease tertia randy that little bit in that a as you're probably well aware support for market based systems like cap and trade of collapse. One of the points that I bring up in the book is that sometimes the the crazy side of the argument wins and I think the craziest winning on nuclear these days. I think the crazy is winning on GMO's..

China India America Europe United States UK Nord House Hiroshima Lancet International Patent Bank Evan Osnos Nigeria CFC
"nord house" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"nord house" Discussed on EconTalk

"We have lots of other things that people die from right now that are really we could do something about, and yet, we tend to focus overwhelmingly on climate change as the single most important environmental issue. It may not be. No. You're, you're exactly right. And I, I share with you. The idea that cost benefit analysis by no means perfect. It, it doesn't capture the everything. But again, I think of it more as a menu society. So basically, you know, we put on the prices and sizes what are you gonna get if you order this item on the menu, how much will it cost? What are the calories, what's the salt content? And, you know, the kind of guys who then you know, take a look over the menu and say, oh, you know what spinach is really cheap and it's good for you. You should eat that and you might not like spinach, and that's fine. But at least it's a good way to give you an indication of what works what is important? And certainly when you're orders of magnitude out, I think the numbers can definitely help you just to give you sense the Nord houses. I mentioned earlier, the, the guy who got the Nobel prize for climate economics. He's actually done a cost benefit analysis and climate again. You can disagree with you can say, maybe he hasn't included. Everything. Certainly, tried to include also these far tails and everything he finds that what we should do is put a higher tax on Siu to them. We have today we should do that globally. If we manage to do this globally, efficiently that is coordinate a single carbon tax across all countries from China, and the US, and the EU Latin American African everybody else across the.

Nobel prize Siu EU US China
"nord house" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

02:45 min | 2 years ago

"nord house" Discussed on EconTalk

"June joining essentially putting sunshine on the planet if you will, it's hard officially manipulating the temperature of the planet so that it cools down. We know you we can do that, because volcanoes do it back in nineteen Ninety-one Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines, emitted so much selfish oxide from one volcano that reduced temperatures about one degree Fahrenheit for about three years so you can these global temperature. So you can definitely do this kind of thing that is your only real way of avoiding dramatic battle comes the other part of the conversation. And the other thing you need to remember, if you really worry about bad outcomes, surely, you don't just worry about bad outcomes from global warming. You worry about bad outcomes, from a wide range of other. Issues. And I would still argue if you worry about battle comes from club warming, you should worry about a lot of other bad outcomes like terrorism, like, bioterrorism, certainly, the issue of, of a, an asteroid killing off large parts of the planet, which we know can happen and many, many other things, and Richard Nord house, which will probably talk about later. Sorry. Bill Nord house, a professor at Yale University and got the Nobel prize in climate economics. The only economist to get that he's actually written on this, and one of his points was, we actually do have a reasonably good estimate of how much is worth for most people to secure the planet because back in the early two thousands Naza was looking at should we protect the planet from asteroids, shoot. We look for near earth objects might hit the planet. These. Are basically extinction events in these real extension of wins. We know that they've happened before probably have about a risk of one hundred million years, so not a high risk by any means, but certainly terrible outcome. They could track either ninety percent or ninety nine percent of these earth. Objects and the extra cost of tracking. The nine percent was not very high yet, congress decided not to spend that it was a couple of billion dollars safe enough of that very. Well, it very clearly tells you that we actually put a price on human survival. And when north house dosa calculation it shows that we care somewhat but not all that much about the planet. So in that sense if you worry about extinction events, which I think very, very unlikely in, in, in climate, you should certainly also worried about it.

Mount Pinatubo Richard Nord Bill Nord Philippines Nobel prize Naza Yale University congress professor one hundred million years ninety nine percent billion dollars ninety percent nine percent three years one degree
"nord house" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

03:31 min | 2 years ago

"nord house" Discussed on 790 KABC

"Change? Is there a danger to climate change? And how much of it is man caused. Yeah. There's not a danger. Yes. That human activity is certainly contributing to climate change in a warming planet, but even the mainstream science doesn't say that we're headed towards imminent climate catastrophe. This is constantly cited that is saying that we only have twelve years to act. That's not what they said by any means. So what happened is essentially became a game of telephone where you know, somebody says one thing and then another person twists and say something else. And then, you know, a few people down the road. You get to the world is on fire, and we only have twelve years to act when in reality. Yes, we're experiencing some warming. But by no means are we headed towards a serious climate catastrophe where the statue of liberty is up to her hips and water. So one of the things that we keep hearing when it comes to climate change that over the course of the next century climate change is going to create water level increases around the globe. Thanks to the melting of the polar. Ice caps. How much of that is Israel. How much can we expect? What is the range expectation, and what are the methods that we can take to protect for Jampel major coastal cities. I mean, we've been in a warming period ever since the end of so it's been going on for one hundred and sixty years or so now, and there's been a current steady level see writes about twelve to thirteen inches per century. And those trends continue they're going to be slow and steady, and we're going to be able to protect against that with policies like building better infrastructure and building sea level walls that combat that slow rise in increasing water levels. These are practical commonsense policies that won't cost much, but we'll do a lot to protect against a changing climate. And Teaneck sea level rises what the left is interested in doing is simply trying to re engineer the entire energy economy for not just the United States, but for the rest of the world. These policies wouldn't make any difference in terms of mitigating global temperatures or sea level rise. You're talking about abating, maybe a few hundred degrees celsius in the earth's temperature by the turn of the century and maybe two millimeters to centimeters of global sea level rise by the turn of the century. So all of these costly policies, whether it's a carbon tax cap and trade or something as radical as the green new deal are going to absolutely destroy the economy for a change in the earth's temperature. That's barely measurable. Well, at what point where Nick Laura's felon entering environmental policy at the Heritage Foundation at what point Nick does climate change actually become a dangerous there any point at which climate change does become a grave crisis that we have to consider these sort of complete revisions to the way that that humanity does business or is it just that? It's lighting scale will note when we see it. William Nord house, for example, the Nobel prize-winning economists suggested that we shouldn't even begin to worry about this effective. Wli until we have a three degree celsius climate change that we are for seeing at what point do we start to worry, and and what sort of measures? Should we take other than shoring up infrastructure, for example? Is there anything that? We should be doing. Yeah. I think one is just getting a better grapple on the science for starters. So there's a lot of literature impure reviewed climate journals that say that there's a lot of disagreement as to what the equilibrium climate sensitivity is for greenhouse gas emissions. And that's just a fancy way.

Jampel Teaneck Nick Laura Israel Heritage Foundation William Nord United States engineer twelve years hundred degrees celsius thirteen inches three degree sixty years
"nord house" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

03:22 min | 2 years ago

"nord house" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"The actual danger of climate change is they're dangerous to climate change? And how much of it is caused yet? They're not a danger that human activity is certainly contributing to climate change in warming planet, but even the mainstream science doesn't say that we're headed towards imminent climate catastrophe. This is constantly cited that the I BCC saying that we only have twelve years to act. That's not what they said by any means. So what happened is essentially became a game of telephone where you know, somebody says one thing and another person twisted and say something else, and then you know, up you people down the road. You get to the world is on fire, and we only have twelve years at twin reality. Yes, responses warming. But by no means are we headed towards a serious climate catastrophe where the statue of liberty is up to her hips and water. So one of the things that we keep hearing when it comes to climate change that over the course of the next century climate change is going to create water level increases rela globe. Thanks to the melting of the polar ice caps. How much of that is real how much can we expect? What is the range expectation, and what are the methods that we can take to protect for gentle major coastal cities. We've been in a warming period ever since the end of a little that's been going on for you know, hundred sixty years or so now, and there's been a current steady level see rise about twelve to thirteen inches per century. And if those trends continue they're going to be slow and steady, and we're going to be able to protect against that with policies, like building better infrastructure and building sea level walls that combat that flow rise in increasing water levels are practical common policies that won't cost much. But we'll do a lot to protect against a changing climate and level rises what the left it. Interested in doing is simply trying to re engineer the entire energy economy for not just the United States. But for the rest of the world these policies wouldn't make any difference in terms of mitigating global temperatures or sea level rise. You're talking about abating, maybe a few hundreds of degrees celsius in the earth temperature. By the turn of the century and maybe two millimeters to centimeters of global sea level rise by the turn of the century. So all of these costly policies, whether it's a carbon tax cap and trade or something as radical as agree. New deal are going to absolutely destroy the economy for change in the earth's temperature. That's barely measurable at. What point was Nick, Laura, fellow engine environmental policy at the heritage founation? What point Nick does climate change actually become dangerous there any point which climate change does become a grave crisis that we have to consider these sort of complete revisions to the way that humanity does business or is it just that? It's just lighting scale will note when we see it's William Nord house, for example, the Nobel prize many comments suggested that we shouldn't even worry about this actively until we have a three degree celsius climate change that we are for seeing and what we start to worry and what sort of measures. Should we take other than showing up infrastructure, for example? Is there anything that? We should be doing. Yeah. I think one is just getting a better grab on the science of for starters. A lot of literature impure reviewed climate journals that say that there's a lot of disagreement as to what the equilibrium climate sensitivity is for greenhouse gas emissions. And that's just a way.

Nick Nobel prize United States William Nord house engineer Laura twelve years hundred sixty years thirteen inches three degree
"nord house" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

05:45 min | 2 years ago

"nord house" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Gather together to make someone's day little more fruitful and a little bit sweeter to give someone a fresher outlook and make someone smile from ear to ear dish out. The love to nourish our city and his people one day one meal and one we operated time help us NYC donate at city harvest dot org. ABC explain photosynthesis even didn't episode which you discussed biological sex, which apparently is no longer appropriate. He did an episode of another show last year, which he said that sex doesn't exist which is a weird take from a supposed science will. Now, he has taken his talents to south beach is on John Oliver, and he's telling hit the audience for John over the world's on fire. His demonstrating this by lighting globe on fire, which apparently is very convincing. Folks. I watched this. And I thought, you know, I've some serious questions about cap and trade policy. But now the globe on fire. I am totally convinced Bill Nye the science guy. Here's Bill Nye the science guy and his bowtie telling you about global warming here. I've got an experiment for you safety glasses on by the end of the century emissions. Keep rising the average temperature on earth. Could go up another four to eight degrees. What I'm saying is the planets on fire. A lot of things we could do to put it out are any of them free. No. Of course, not nothing's for you idiots, grow the GOP. You're not sure mind explaining photosynthesis to you when you were twelve but you're doubts now. And this is an actual crisis got safety glasses off. Scream crisis over and over and over again, obviously, it's a crisis Bill Nye the science guy says so joining us online, Nick Laura's, he's a fellow and energy environmental policy at the Heritage Foundation. He's also economist and his deputy director of the Thomas row institute for economic policy. Studies Nick, thanks for joining the Ben Shapiro show. Really? Appreciate it. Traveling. So let's start with this with his narrative L gore. People AO see the planet is on fire all gonna die. If we don't solve this within twelve years. What is the actual danger of climate change? Is there ginger to climate change in how much of it is man caused yet? There's not a danger that human activity is certainly contributing to climate change and warming planet, but even the mainstream science doesn't say that we're headed towards imminent climate catastrophe. This is constantly cited that IPC saying that we only have twelve years to act. That's not what they said by any means. So what happens is essentially became a game of telephone where you know, somebody says one thing and then another person twists and say something else. And then, you know, a pew people down the road. You get to the world is on fire, and we only have twelve years when in reality. Yes, we're experiencing some warming. But by no means are we headed towards a serious. Climate catastrophe where the statue of liberty is up to her hips and water. So one of the things that we keep hearing when it comes to climate change that over the course of the next century climate change is going to create water level increases rela globe. Thanks to the melting of the polar ice caps. How much of that is Israel. How much can we expect? What is the range expectation, and what are the methods that we can take to protect for example, major coastal cities. We've been in period ever since the end of a little that's been going on one hundred sixty years or so now, and there's been a current steady level see rise about twelve to thirteen inches per century. And those trends continue they're going to be slow and steady, and we're going to be able to protect against that with policies like building better infrastructure and building sea level walls that combat that slow rise in increasing water levels. These are practical common policies that won't cost much. But we'll do a lot to protect against a changing climate. And Teaneck sea level rises what the left is interested in doing is simply trying to re engineer the entire energy economy for not just the United States. But for the rest of the world these policies wouldn't make any difference in terms of mitigating global temperatures or sea level rise. You're talking about abating, maybe a few. Hundred degree celsius in the earth temperature by the turn of the century and maybe two millimeters to centimeters of global sea level rise by the turn of century. So all of these costs policies, whether it's a carbon tax cap and trade or something as radical as the green new deal are going to absolutely destroy the economy for a change in the earth's temperature. That's barely measurable. Well, what point the Nick Laura felon engine environmental policy at the Heritage Foundation at what point Nick does climate change actually become a dangerous there any point at which climate change does become a grave enough crisis that we have to consider these sort of complete revisions to the way that humanity does business or is it just that? It's a sliding scale will note when we see it. William Nord house, for example, the Nobel prize winning economist suggested that we shouldn't even begin to worry about this effectively until we have a a three degree celsius climate change that we are seeing at what point we starts worrying what sort of measures. Should we take other than showing up infrastructure? For example, is there? Anything that we should be doing? Yeah. I think one is just getting a better grab on the science of for starters. There's a lot of literature impure reviewed climate journals that say that there's a lot of disagreement as to what the equilibrium climate sensitivity is for greenhouse gas emissions. And that's just the way of saying. You know, what increases are we going to expect from a doubling of.

Bill Nye Nick Laura Heritage Foundation NYC John Oliver ABC IPC Ben Shapiro GOP deputy director Teaneck Nobel prize Thomas row institute Israel
Nobelist Says System of Science Offers Life Lessons

60-Second Science

03:13 min | 2 years ago

Nobelist Says System of Science Offers Life Lessons

"This is Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Steve Mirsky the benefits from science as they show up in our daily lives are just enormous, but I want to transfer you that right now science can do something for us. Give us a kind of hope that goes beyond just those benefits Paul Romer. He showed the two thousand eighteen Nobil will Morial prize in economic sciences. Romer spoke April night that the National Academy of sciences in Washington DC at an event honoring tenuous Nobel and Calveley prize laureates. Now, there's nobody who's got benefits as direct and his immediate as Jim Jim Ellison who was also there and who shared the two thousand eighteen Nobel physiology or medicine for his work that led to new drugs against cancer when you can show there are people alive now because of the discovering you've made that just you know, that trumps everything most of us create benefits in an indirect way. And they come. All steps. So they're harder to perceive warmer than cited. William Nord house with whom he shared the two thousand eighteen economics prize Bill has this beautiful paper that measures a particular type of benefit which is asking how much light and luminaires can somebody get from an hour's worth of work. And roughly speaking from say, the beginning of the Neolithic revolution up to say, the time of the founding of the National Academy. That's about twelve thousand five hundred years ago to eighteen sixty three that went up by a factor of twenty people just bump into things they discover things so twenty times more light. But from the time of the founding of the kademi until now it's gone up by factor twenty thousand so one hour of work translates into twenty thousand more luminaires of light than it did. The time this this institution was founded, so those benefits are just huge. And we need the by the way, it's it's the system of science that made those very rapid ones possible. Not just curiosity not just random search. So they're huge benefits. But right now, I think there's more anxiety about how we're going to interact with each other as people than there is about just can we keep having more material of benefits, and here thing science is maybe even more important because it's very unusual community of people draws on people from all backgrounds from all over the world and unites kind of common purpose, and we get things done because we insist on things like truth and honesty, and we can trust each other because of that instead insistence, and we welcome people in to that community. If you're willing to live by those those norms, and we ask you to leave. We don't pay any attention to if you don't live by those norms. And the goal is really one of offering benefits that can be shared by everybody. So if you think about kind of like the hope for humanity scientists model of what we can accomplish. But who we can be and how we can be with each other for scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Steve Mirsky.

Paul Romer Steve Mirsky Jim Jim Ellison National Academy Of Sciences National Academy Washington Calveley William Nord Sixty Seconds Twelve Thousand Five Hundred Y One Hour
"nord house" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"nord house" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Elliot Abrams special US Representative for Venezuela is urging the world to put pressure on nNcholas Maduro to step down. United States urges all nations to step up economic pressure on material and his corrupt associates as well as restrict visas for his inner circle now is the time to act in support of democracy, and in response to the desperate needs. The venezuelan. People Abram says the Trump administration is discussing proposals to grant Venezuelans temporary protective status. Now that President Trump is back on US soil. The parents have Otto warmbier have a lot to say about Trump's defense have Korean leader Kim Jong correspondent, Linda Kenyon has the latest warmbier is the American college student who died in two thousand seventeen shortly after his detention in North Korea with the president back from his summit with Kim Fred and Cindy, warmbier have released a statement that says we have been respectful during this summit process. Now, we must speak out. The statement goes on to say Kim and his evil regime are responsible for the death of our son Otto, Kim and his evil regime are responsible for unimaginable. Cruelty and inhumanity, no excuses or lavish praise can change that to time. Washington state. Governor Jay Inslee is running for president on one issue. First generation to feel the sting of climate change the last that can do something about it instantly intends to make combating climate change the focus of his campaign White House economic adviser Kevin Hassett was put on this. This morning think climate change is a threat to economic growth. Yes, or no. Yes. I think I think the Nord houses work is food for thought about what could happen. And it's something that people should take seriously. And think about all Wall Street, the Dow is up seventy one point tests and peopple Levin. I'm.

President Trump United States Otto warmbier president Kim Jong Kim Venezuela Elliot Abrams Kim Fred Governor Jay Inslee nNcholas Maduro economic adviser peopple Levin Kevin Hassett Abram Representative North Korea warmbier Washington state
"nord house" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"nord house" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Parents speak out. I'm Mike moss. Elliot Abrams, those special US Representative for Venezuela is urging the world to put pressure on nNcholas Maduro to step down. United States urges all nations to step up economic pressure on Maduro and his corrupt associates as well as restrict visas for his inner circle now is the time to act in support of democracy. And in response to the desperate needs of the Venezuelan. People Abram says the Trump administration is discussing proposals to grant Venezuelans temporary protective status. President Trump is back on US soil. The parents have Otto warmbier have a lot to say about Trump's defense Korean leader, Kim Jong correspondent, Linda Kenyon has the latest warmbier is the American college student who died in two thousand seventeen shortly after his detention in North Korea with the president back from his summit with Kim Fred and Cindy, warmbier have released a statement that says we have been respectful during this summit process. Now, we must speak out. The statement goes on to say Kim and his evil regime are responsible for the death of our son Otto, Kim and his evil regime are responsible for unimaginable. Cruelty and inhumanity, no excuses or lavish praise can change that time Washington state. Governor Jay Inslee is running for president on one issue first generation to feel the sting of climate change. They were the last they can do something about it. Inslee intense to make combating climate change the focus of his campaign White House economic adviser. Kevin Hassett was put on this. This morning think climate change is a threat to economic growth. Yes, sir. Yes. I think the I think the Nord houses work, you know, is food for thought about what could happen. And it's something that people should take seriously. And think about on Wall Street, the Dow is up seventy one points SNP up eleven I'm Mike moss. Here's Mitch Kelly from the one zero one five FM seven twenty AM traffic.

President Trump Mike moss Otto warmbier Governor Jay Inslee United States president Venezuela Kim Kim Jong nNcholas Maduro Elliot Abrams Maduro Kim Fred Kevin Hassett economic adviser Mitch Kelly Abram Representative North Korea
2 Americans win Nobel for working climate, tech into economic analysis

WBZ Morning News

00:21 sec | 3 years ago

2 Americans win Nobel for working climate, tech into economic analysis

"The Nobel economics prize has been awarded to to academics with ties to MIT Yale. Professor William Nord house and NYU's Paul Romer work knowledge for their respective work at integrating climate change and tech innovations into macroeconomic analysis. Both of them did their graduate work at MIT secretary. General Gordon Hanson of the Royal

Professor William Nord General Gordon Hanson Paul Romer MIT NYU Secretary
2 Americans win Nobel for working climate, tech into economic analysis

WBZ Morning News

00:30 sec | 3 years ago

2 Americans win Nobel for working climate, tech into economic analysis

"Today to Americans have been awarded the Nobel economics prize. William Nord house of. Jail Paul Romer of NYU or acknowledged for their respective work in integrating climate change and tech innovations into macro economic analysis secretary general Goran Hanson of the Royal Swedish Academy of sciences making the announcement today. This year's price is about innovation climate at economic growth, both will share and a one million

Royal Swedish Academy Of Scien Paul Romer Goran Hanson William Nord NYU