6 Burst results for "Norah O'donnell"

"norah odonnell" Discussed on Skimm'd from The Couch

Skimm'd from The Couch

02:14 min | 6 d ago

"norah odonnell" Discussed on Skimm'd from The Couch

"Operate <Speech_Telephony_Female> our, <Speech_Female> because we <Speech_Female> are considering central <Speech_Female> for food <Speech_Music_Female> products. We've been able to operate <Speech_Female> and maintain <Speech_Female> our e commerce <Speech_Female> website <Speech_Female> in Amazon. However, <Speech_Music_Female> once <Speech_Music_Female> this hit we <Speech_Music_Female> went and cheer <Speech_Female> preservation mode. Even <Speech_Female> before Kovic hit, <Speech_Female> we had a we had a goal <Speech_Female> towards profitability <Speech_Female> this year, <Speech_Female> and that Kobe <Speech_Female> rated that need <Speech_Female> just because we <Speech_Female> knew that our <Speech_Female> grocery retail <Speech_Female> channels that we were gonNA launch <Speech_Female> this. This year. Greenwich <Speech_Female> suffer a lot, <Speech_Female> so we immediately <Speech_Female> reduce our headcount. <Speech_Female> We <Speech_Female> all took collective collective <Speech_Music_Female> salary cuts across <Speech_Music_Female> the team. We <Speech_Music_Female> did away with operating <Speech_Music_Female> expenses that we <Speech_Female> get easily slash <Speech_Female> like an <Speech_Female> office lease <Speech_Female> and travel <Speech_Female> trade shows things <Speech_Female> easy to cut <Speech_Female> out were able to reduce <Speech_Female> our overall budget <Speech_Female> pretty significantly <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> make the hard decisions <Silence> early on so <Speech_Female> that we <Speech_Female> can band together <Speech_Female> know that this <Speech_Female> was a stormy. <Speech_Female> We're gonNA weather together <Speech_Music_Female> as a team, you <Speech_Female> know, I don't think as a as <Speech_Music_Female> a business owner <Speech_Female> or founder <Speech_Female> leader. You have <Speech_Female> to have all the answers, <Speech_Female> and so I think just being very <Speech_Female> transparent. <Silence> Just had a meeting yesterday. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> What do you guys think about <Speech_Female> going back to an <Speech_Female> office eventually? <Speech_Female> How does that feel <Speech_Female> <hes> and just having <Speech_Female> really honest? Transparent <Speech_Female> discussions <Speech_Music_Female> early on <Speech_Female> I, feel has been the most effective <Speech_Female> for me <Speech_Telephony_Female> now more than ever <Speech_Female> we need <Speech_Female> this idea <Speech_Female> of <Speech_Music_Female> of community <Speech_Female> connection to one <Speech_Female> another and <Speech_Female> the reason I started <Speech_Female> drops because I saw <Speech_Music_Female> T as <Speech_Music_Female> vehicle inform <Speech_Female> for an <Speech_Female> integrate ritual <Speech_Female> for connection to others, <Speech_Female> and even <Speech_Female> if we are all social <Speech_Female> distancing. Distancing I think <Speech_Female> now more than ever. We <Speech_Female> can think about <Speech_Female> community <Speech_Female> in a different way, <Speech_Female> and we have the luxury <Speech_Female> of time to reach out <Speech_Female> to another and <Speech_Music_Female> support one another, <Speech_Music_Female> and so I <Speech_Female> would invite the Kim community <Speech_Female> to to <Speech_Female> take a look at <Speech_Female> the jobs community, <Speech_Music_Female> and also <Speech_Female> as <Speech_Female> use this as a reminder <Speech_Female> to connect with your <Speech_Female> loved ones connect with people. <Speech_Female> You haven't talked to <Speech_Female> in a long time <Speech_Music_Female> and form that connection. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> Thanks for hanging <Speech_Female> out with us. Join US <Speech_Female> next week for another <Speech_Music_Female> episode of skin <Speech_Music_Female> from the couch, and <Speech_Music_Female> if you can't wait until <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> then subscribe <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to our daily email newsletter <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> that gives you <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> all the important news <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and information. You <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> need to start your day. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Sign up at <Speech_Music_Female> the SKIN DOT <Speech_Music_Female> com. That's <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> the S. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> K. I M. <Speech_Music_Female> dot com. <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> M's <Speech_Music_Female> for a little something <Speech_Music_Male> extra.

"norah odonnell" Discussed on Skimm'd from The Couch

Skimm'd from The Couch

07:52 min | 6 d ago

"norah odonnell" Discussed on Skimm'd from The Couch

"In person, I thought this is the most powerful woman I've ever met. I mean physically so powerful, and I was dumbstruck I just didn't even I. Mean I've interviewed presidents and prime ministers and princes and I just really didn't even know what to say to her. I was so. I love the idea that we can not only have power in our academic work in whatever we do, but then also have power of body. Strength. and. She also to me, embodies that in a way that I think is really powerful. What are you like as a boss? That's a great question. I need a lot of research. So I, think the simplest way to explain. It is I like to know everything. I read a lot I read six newspapers a day I get now I. Get I used to when I was in New York, I used to get six or seven hard copies now I get three hard copies at home, and then I read the restaurant at work so I read. Read a lot so I really kind of I think most folks who work me know that I kind of my mantra sort of tell me something I don't know so i WanNa know that nugget that I've missed in my reading I have to say that my first job at college was delivering the newspapers in front of the offices and I remember your stack. There were a lot of our Dhabi's everyone had their exact like i. need this in this in this order and I. I remember when. Danielle with folded those nicer. They're all over my. All over my desk here, you know I would be a good question to ask other people but I mean I read a lot, so there's a lot of research notes. I like binders with tabs, but I think. The only other thing I think is a non speaking of those my assistant. Who Work with me? They know that I that I'm not good at remembering is but I wanna remember birthdays and things I always try and send birthday notes and baby gifts, so you know people who work with me know that I need constant reminders about stuff because I value that like not gonNA executing it, so they know I need help you know executing those kinds of things I wanNA. Talk a little bit more about obviously. There's the role that you play as as a journalist, and also there's the role that you play as a leader and a key figure at a news. News Division when you took over as the anchor of the Evening News, following a difficult time at CBS some people at the top were like go because of inappropriate conduct or sexual misconduct, including your former co Anchor Charlie rose whether you expected to or not you and your boss. Susan's are inskeep. You guys have represented. You know the future of a news division and really a different time in news. How did you think about setting the tone, not just for the viewers, but for the people that were working for you guys every single day because watching it from the outside. It seems like there would be a great deal of leadership needed in that difficult time. Yeah I did I thought very seriously about it. I think that what I said on the air that morning, and then I repeat it again when other instances happened at CBS News and there were there was also executive changes was that you know women cannot achieve full equality in the workplace until there's a reckoning and there has to be zero tolerance. And I. Mean I was Pretty Direct I. think is the way that I would put it on the air and I had friends look over exactly what I was GonNa say, because I wanted every word to be perfect and I wanted it to stand the test of time. I think people can do, but I think Oprah has commented about what I said. You know on the air that morning and I'm proud of what I said and I'm really proud, and I'm really proud of of CBS for making the changes that did and Susan Zaremski is like no other boss. I've ever had in my entire life. You know my mom, always Ramesh. She's like you are so lucky to work for that. Susan's too risky. And it's so true and what she does is that she not only is so involved in every detail, but she also leads with incredible heart. She sends emails. Saying that was a great piece. You know. She constantly calls and checks aunt. She after. You know any big night or something like that she'll concentrate on speakerphone, and then she'll take to the entire crew about what a great job everything was. So I think the interesting thing that I've learned just now is that? Those instances are really really hard, but the change and the growth that happens after is good. It's positive. It's right having Susan's Renske as as the president of CBS News is truly. It's the best moment in my career. We're not had great bosses that are men do, but I'm saying this. Is You know the reckoning that we went through? has led to what is the most a rewarding times ever in my career. That's really great and We know Susan while she's amazing and by the way when she when she was. Moving into that role, there was ridiculous criticism of a true and she's to me is is bulletproof i. mean she's really honestly. There's been a CBS for forty five years. She is universally beloved by everyone you know. We are going to move to our lightning round very difficult. You'RE GONNA, have serious bond very quickly to our rapid fire questions. You have worked on morning and evening TV. Are you a morning person or a night owl? Morning Person. What time do you get up? Now I get up at like six thirty. which is late. What's replaced your morning commute? Working out almost every day last TV show, you streamed or binge-watch. ozarks season three I had already watched the other to season. You are married to a chef. Do you ever cook? I do does he judge her food I? Don't think he hates it. I make banana bread and stuff like that. WHO's on your bucket list to interview? Kim Jong UN has always been on my bucket list and Justin Timberlake. Surprisingly is actually a very difficult interview. You get at long but online, and because I think he's incredibly talented. Well I have a lot of questions on that one Meteo. What is the worst professional mistake you've ever made? I don't know I think I've just forgotten it I. Mean I don't dwell on those things. My husband always says no regrets, so I can't remember it I'm sure I've made. Many I'm sure. When's the last time you negotiated for yourself? Every day every day. What is your shameless plug? To watch the CBS evening news which I do believe is the best curated thirty minutes of national. News in America are such a pleasure and honour to interview. Thank you. I love you guys! I need to interview year. This was so much fun. I everyone, we're trying something new. During this time of economic uncertainty, WE WANNA. Take a moment to spotlights new female powder companies. We've heard from many incredible skimmers who are leading small businesses, and we will be introducing them to you each week on skin from the couch. See the Lincoln are episode description for how to submit yourself or friends. Mining Musashi Chandran founder and CEO of key drops and t drops makes an assortment of bagless holy dissolve will tease. We are based in Los, Angeles California tea drops primarily e-commerce and a really lucky to have that channel, because that enables us to still.

Susan Zaremski CBS CBS News president Evening News Kim Jong UN Danielle Musashi Chandran New York founder and CEO Oprah Justin Timberlake Lincoln Los America executive Angeles California
"norah odonnell" Discussed on Skimm'd from The Couch

Skimm'd from The Couch

07:36 min | 6 d ago

"norah odonnell" Discussed on Skimm'd from The Couch

"Blower. What is it like to be criticized by the president publicly? You know because I covered president trump before he's done it to me just. In Person It's interesting. How much he closely follows everything that said about him, so I think that's part of his operating mode to criticize. Publicly, he pushes back very very strongly I. It doesn't bother me at all and I. Don't respond to it because the facts speak for themselves, and I'm from the School of journalism where you keep your nose to the Grindstone, and the story speaks for itself, and the journalism speaks for itself, and I'm not in the business of engaging with him I'm. That's not my role. My role is to report back and ask questions and make sure that people feel like they trust the product and. You know when I took this job. As anger. The CBS evening news I went back to look at a lot of what Walter Cronkite said, and one of the things he said is journalism what we need to make democracy work. Another way to say that as an informed electorate is what we need to make democracy work. And the electric has to trust the journalists who deliver that news and so I do take that responsibility very seriously i. do believe that journalism is in some ways of public service I think we're almost in a public health service role right now in covert nineteen and so i. don't engage you know when we get attacked. You know we. We let the facts speak for themselves. The News business is notoriously competitive. As we talk about in your intro, there have been very few women who have been able to host their own evening. News show who've gotten as far as you've got an an obviously has paved the way for people like degnan. I to look up to and I'm very curious. How you navigated such a competitive environment when you are coming up and at the same time built a support network like everybody needs somebody to go to to vent somebody to go to to fall apart to. What did that look like for you? You know I think it's a really important question and I think in many ways the sisterhood just get stronger when I got the job of the CBS. Evening News Barbara Walters sent me a lovely note. Diane Sawyer sent me a lovely note. Katie, couric and I are very good friends and you know she watches every night. In like a week ago, I winked at the end of the broad s that she said. Were you waking at me like I'm impressed Katie that you saved to the very end of the right, so I think I love that you know there's a deep appreciation for that Gail called me yesterday morning in Saint Paul my Gosh, the right interview, it was so good on sixty minutes and I you know we were just to kill I gotta go. I gotta work out. She was like what so I think. Sisterhood is strong I think women have a deep appreciation of what one another has gone through and so I, appreciate that cheerleading. I? The I've never felt like. I wasn't supported. I think the hardest thing is noticing how women are judged differently, and I do I. Hesitate to bring attention to it but I. do think it's important to talk about because I. think that women are judged quite differently. For some reason it is insatiable for the tabloid press to suggest that there is some fight between women you know I admit. I I believed it when they used to write about Barbara Walters and Diane Sawyer Oh. They must not like each other you know or what's been written about me. Some really petty awful stuff. And you know I don't the only thing I can think about is for some reason that is, it sells papers, but I think we have to make sure that as men and women that we. Read these things with a critical eye and realize they're meant to sell papers or term pages, and they may not be true, and the reason that's important is because. I believe that women don't want to run for office or don't want to be CEO's or being a C. Suite, because they are afraid of being criticized, you know I mean there's also a strong correlation between the rise of social media and less women, running for president of their student body class, even in high school and in college, because they are concerned about the criticism, because it can be painful, and so we have to get over that and have kind of that Rhinoceros skin that Eleanor Roosevelt talked about. I think fats. What you just said makes a lot of sense. Also hearing, you say it in the position that year and I'm like Yeah I. I get it, you know. I'm just not gonna read. I'm not going to go on twitter and read the stuff that people say about us in. Get upset, but it's hard, and it's hard to develop that I also think in some ways. We had an advantage where when you grow up in news, you're kind of tossed into this world, and it helps you develop that scan, or you're not going to work in the industry for very long looking at you now. It seems like just such a given that you have that confidence. But where does that come from? How did you develop it where you always like that kind of leading the criticism Roloff No I mean certainly criticism still stings no doubt I think confidence comes from a strong support system. You know my mother has always said. Make sure you build strong support system around you, so the simplest explanation would be like your friends. You Know I. Mean You Judge Your friends when you're feeling down or something's gone wrong, so we do that in a personal setting, we need to do it in a professional setting and build a strong network of people around you who support you. And, so you know I have a team I. Don't respond to that or you know really highlight all the positive stuff or say this is what should focus on today, and I think that helps build confidence, but the most the really the most important thing that helps me build offense is the quality of my work. You know in the quality of the interviews that we do and that people trust. Me Entrust CBS News. What's your most favorite interview that you've done? You know it's hard to pinpoint one. But I would say that Malala Yousafzai. Remember after nine eleven well first of all I remember Diane Sawyer, going to ASEAN before nine eleven and reading about women who wear burqas and thinking. I, read about it, and she did a special on in thinking cut. This is something I you nothing about how do I not know anything about this? And then nine eleven happened of course, and then I read about how many women in Pakistan and Afghanistan or literate much women men to in so Malala became even before she won the Nobel Prize became, but certainly after she was nearly assassinated, she became for me. Someone who was a symbol of how the world needs to change that. Empower girl you change. The world is the simple way that it has been putting energy educated girl. You change the world and you know for a sixteen year old. She had the most incredible presence and confidence and sense of herself and I thought. How does have someone have that at such a young age? And really. Spend your life promoting values. You know because then that's where that confidence came from I. Think with her was a value that girls should be educated like that makes you stand tall. Yes, girls should be educated should be treated equally so I think that is the most meaningful I look at her as someone into, said Gosh so glad I met her at an early age sixteen and I hope I get to know her in thirty years and I hope that someday she becomes. You know this historical figure she already, but I mean someone who can actually change the world, so maybe that is the other person, too. I just love Serena. Williams who we interviewed you know when CVS USTA air, the US Open the open members. Winners used to come on the next morning. And of course singer.

Diane Sawyer president Barbara Walters CBS School of journalism Katie Malala Yousafzai Walter Cronkite Gosh twitter USTA Eleanor Roosevelt US Nobel Prize ASEAN Saint Paul Williams Gail
"norah odonnell" Discussed on Skimm'd from The Couch

Skimm'd from The Couch

06:54 min | 6 d ago

"norah odonnell" Discussed on Skimm'd from The Couch

"Hey everyone is show might sound a bit different today because we're skimming from three different couches, the same is continuing to work from home for the time being because of covid nineteen today O'Donnell joins us on skin from the couch. She is the anchor and managing editor of the CBS Evening News, making her the third woman ever to so anger, a network evening broadcasts before taking the helm of the evening news. She was the CO host of CBS this morning for seven years norad. Thank you for joining us welcome skin from the couch. Thank you for having me, so we're GONNA. Start off with Skim your resume for us. Will I went to Georgetown University I was Law Sophy Major? I was interested in a lot of different things in college so I had internships at always worked and worked at a law firm I. worked at the World Bank, and and then I injured ABC News and I think you know journalism really was what was the right fit for me? Just a deep curiosity about the news, deep curiosity about world events and people have to graduating from college I got a job at National Journal on a publication, a called the hotline, which was the original kind of aggregate her of news before the Huffington. Post and others got into the business of aggregating news. Even like you guys in some way, remember it well, and that also was like a crash course in politics, too, because we would. Sum Up every Senate and House race across the country, all the polling who all the key consultants were, so that really was a great crash course in politics, and then I got hired at NBC and MSNBC when I was twenty five years old to be you know it was one of the youngest correspondents at NBC history, and had a great career at NBC and had three kids, and then we all work on intelligent news underwear like personal services contracts. All of us have anywhere from two to five year contracts. In, so you know in each of those contracts, come up! You have an opportunity to reevaluate your next step and CBS came to me with an incredible offer to be. The chief White House correspondent for Obama's last term, and to be the substitute anchor for face, the nation, and I had always been ambitious about wanting to anchor a Sunday broadcast I love politics, and so to be able to substitute for the legendary Bob Schieffer at thought. This is really an an excellent opportunity, so. and. CBS. News and then Kinda. The rest is history should I keep going? No, that was perfect so something you definitely don't know I. and turned at MVP when I was nineteen in the specials unit, and I was like my first week on the internships. Let's say day two or three in you opt into the office. And you're the first professional famous news anchor I ever seen in person and I literally I stopped breathing I was so excited all I wanted to do is to be a news anchor at the time, and I was so nervous, and when you walked out of the room I asked one of the producers. What is she liked you work with her I will never. Never forget their like she's the best of the best, and I was like what makes her so good. And they said that she always does her homework and I think about that a lot and I'm curious. What is something that you your fans and people like us your big fans? What does the thing that we don't know about you that we can't Google? What I wasn't as good about doing my homework in college. And I did just fine at Georgetown. But I do I think certainly a professional that is dry. Always did know my homework because I do believe that preparation builds confidence and confidence build success, and so for me, you know certainly early on my career as a young correspondent with so many famous people at NBC legendary careers. My confidence wasn't a tie, and so I thought how can I be the smartest person in the room and no more than anybody else and. You know I just really did my homework. I really worked really hard to make sure I knew everything. The thing that people may not know about me. You Know I. Guess would be that I'm from a military family. You know I mean that certainly is my resume, but it's the one thing I mentioned because you know I remember in covering certainly the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq after nine eleven, a lot of people would say on television and Mike Barnicle on morning. Joe would say this a lot that Oh, no less than one percent of people have someone in the military who didn't understand these wars, but I grew up in the military. My father was drafted during the Vietnam War. State for thirty years I lived overseas and so I really do have a deep appreciation for those who serve my sister-in-law surgeon in the army and so I do have a really keen sense of the sacrifice that many people go through, and I do in some ways I almost wish that it was mandatory almost like in Israel that we had to sir because. I think you know certainly the discipline that they have is unlike anything I've seen those who sir. Let's actually start with that because I think it's fascinating talking about how you grew up and living overseas. How did this love of news and growing up with that military background kind of come together for you? You know I think one of the. First crystallized for me in some ways when Elena, Nachman Ost, who is still the vice president of talent at NBC? News said to me when I met her. When I was twenty five years old, and she said you know we like hiring correspondents who have from a military background, because they're very flexible and adaptable. They don't complain about being sent to different cities or states or around. Around the world they can talk to anybody because they've sort of been put in that situation where they have to be totally adaptable. Moment's notice and that was the first time someone can really validated kind of my experience and I thought. Wow, I didn't realize that that's something you know a gift that my parents gave me because it wasn't always easy moving around with different friends and. Was An easy on my my mom's certainly picking up and moving around, and even though we were very lucky, didn't move that much, so I think that's one of the things I hope that I'm flexible and adaptable. In many ways I'm I can talk to a lot of different people understand where they're coming from. I think that's a key component of being you know a journalist, and then the other thing is I really appreciate public servants, and I mean those who serve in in office as Representatives at senators as those who work in government so I, don't come to. Any administration with a cynical attitude, I say these people have given up a lot to have the name in the press to be criticized to be judged. Testify before Congress I think having come from a military background I do try approach each of those people who serves in government the appreciation that they're. They're coming to this to actually help their country whether they do that well or not. The press will hold them accountable, but I think that's why most people trust needed to help. Tell their story like Rick Bright. The whistle blower who he just did for sixty minutes. I want to talk about the whistle.

NBC CBS Evening News CBS Georgetown University O'Donnell ABC News managing editor National Journal chief White House corresponden Bob Schieffer Google World Bank Obama MVP Georgetown Huffington Rick Bright Mike Barnicle
"norah odonnell" Discussed on Skimm'd from The Couch

Skimm'd from The Couch

05:26 min | 6 d ago

"norah odonnell" Discussed on Skimm'd from The Couch

"Today O'Donnell joins us on skin from the couch. She is the anchor and managing editor of the CBS Evening News, making her the third woman ever to so anger, a network evening broadcasts before taking the helm of the evening news. She was the CO host of CBS this morning for seven years norad. Thank you for joining us welcome skin from the couch. Thank you for having me, so we're GONNA. Start off with Skim your resume for us. Will I went to Georgetown University I was Law Sophy Major? I was interested in a lot of different things in college so I had internships at always worked and worked at a law firm I. worked at the World Bank, and and then I injured ABC News and I think you know journalism really was what was the right fit for me? Just a deep curiosity about the news, deep curiosity about world events and people have to graduating from college I got a job at National Journal on a publication, a called the hotline, which was the original kind of aggregate her of news before the Huffington. Post and others got into the business of aggregating news. Even like you guys in some way, remember it well, and that also was like a crash course in politics, too, because we would. Sum Up every Senate and House race across the country, all the polling who all the key consultants were, so that really was a great crash course in politics, and then I got hired at NBC and MSNBC when I was twenty five years old to be you know it was one of the youngest correspondents at NBC history, and had a great career at NBC and had three kids, and then we all work on intelligent news underwear like personal services contracts. All of us have anywhere from two to five year contracts. In, so you know in each of those contracts, come up! You have an opportunity to reevaluate your next step and CBS came to me with an incredible offer to be. The chief White House correspondent for Obama's last term, and to be the substitute anchor for face, the nation, and I had always been ambitious about wanting to anchor a Sunday broadcast I love politics, and so to be able to substitute for the legendary Bob Schieffer at thought. This is really an an excellent opportunity, so. and. CBS. News and then Kinda. The rest is history should I keep going? No, that was perfect so something you definitely don't know I. and turned at MVP when I was nineteen in the specials unit, and I was like my first week on the internships. Let's say day two or three in you opt into the office. And you're the first professional famous news anchor I ever seen in person and I literally I stopped breathing I was so excited all I wanted to do is to be a news anchor at the time, and I was so nervous, and when you walked out of the room I asked one of the producers. What is she liked you work with her I will never. Never forget their like she's the best of the best, and I was like what makes her so good. And they said that she always does her homework and I think about that a lot and I'm curious. What is something that you your fans and people like us your big fans? What does the thing that we don't know about you that we can't Google? What I wasn't as good about doing my homework in college. And I did just fine at Georgetown. But I do I think certainly a professional that is dry. Always did know my homework because I do believe that preparation builds confidence and confidence build success, and so for me, you know certainly early on my career as a young correspondent with so many famous people at NBC legendary careers. My confidence wasn't a tie, and so I thought how can I be the smartest person in the room and no more than anybody else and. You know I just really did my homework. I really worked really hard to make sure I knew everything. The thing that people may not know about me. You Know I. Guess would be that I'm from a military family. You know I mean that certainly is my resume, but it's the one thing I mentioned because you know I remember in covering certainly the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq after nine eleven, a lot of people would say on television and Mike Barnicle on morning. Joe would say this a lot that Oh, no less than one percent of people have someone in the military who didn't understand these wars, but I grew up in the military. My father was drafted during the Vietnam War. State for thirty years I lived overseas and so I really do have a deep appreciation for those who serve my sister-in-law surgeon in the army and so I do have a really keen sense of the sacrifice that many people go through, and I do in some ways I almost wish that it was mandatory almost like in Israel that we had to sir because. I think you know certainly the discipline that they have is unlike anything I've seen those who sir. Let's actually start with that because I think it's fascinating talking about how you grew up and living overseas. How did this love of news and growing up with that military background kind of come together for you? You know I think one of the. First crystallized for me in some ways when Elena, Nachman Ost, who is still the vice president of talent at NBC? News said to me when I met her. When I was twenty five years old, and she said you know we like hiring correspondents who have from a military background, because they're very flexible and adaptable. They don't complain about being sent to different cities or states or around. Around the world they can talk to anybody because they've sort of been put in that situation where they have to be totally adaptable. Moment's notice

NBC CBS Evening News CBS Georgetown University O'Donnell ABC News managing editor National Journal chief White House corresponden Bob Schieffer Google World Bank Obama MVP Georgetown Huffington Rick Bright Mike Barnicle
Norah ODonnell, anchor of the CBS Evening News

Skimm'd from The Couch

05:26 min | 6 d ago

Norah ODonnell, anchor of the CBS Evening News

"Today O'Donnell joins us on skin from the couch. She is the anchor and managing editor of the CBS Evening News, making her the third woman ever to so anger, a network evening broadcasts before taking the helm of the evening news. She was the CO host of CBS this morning for seven years norad. Thank you for joining us welcome skin from the couch. Thank you for having me, so we're GONNA. Start off with Skim your resume for us. Will I went to Georgetown University I was Law Sophy Major? I was interested in a lot of different things in college so I had internships at always worked and worked at a law firm I. worked at the World Bank, and and then I injured ABC News and I think you know journalism really was what was the right fit for me? Just a deep curiosity about the news, deep curiosity about world events and people have to graduating from college I got a job at National Journal on a publication, a called the hotline, which was the original kind of aggregate her of news before the Huffington. Post and others got into the business of aggregating news. Even like you guys in some way, remember it well, and that also was like a crash course in politics, too, because we would. Sum Up every Senate and House race across the country, all the polling who all the key consultants were, so that really was a great crash course in politics, and then I got hired at NBC and MSNBC when I was twenty five years old to be you know it was one of the youngest correspondents at NBC history, and had a great career at NBC and had three kids, and then we all work on intelligent news underwear like personal services contracts. All of us have anywhere from two to five year contracts. In, so you know in each of those contracts, come up! You have an opportunity to reevaluate your next step and CBS came to me with an incredible offer to be. The chief White House correspondent for Obama's last term, and to be the substitute anchor for face, the nation, and I had always been ambitious about wanting to anchor a Sunday broadcast I love politics, and so to be able to substitute for the legendary Bob Schieffer at thought. This is really an an excellent opportunity, so. and. CBS. News and then Kinda. The rest is history should I keep going? No, that was perfect so something you definitely don't know I. and turned at MVP when I was nineteen in the specials unit, and I was like my first week on the internships. Let's say day two or three in you opt into the office. And you're the first professional famous news anchor I ever seen in person and I literally I stopped breathing I was so excited all I wanted to do is to be a news anchor at the time, and I was so nervous, and when you walked out of the room I asked one of the producers. What is she liked you work with her I will never. Never forget their like she's the best of the best, and I was like what makes her so good. And they said that she always does her homework and I think about that a lot and I'm curious. What is something that you your fans and people like us your big fans? What does the thing that we don't know about you that we can't Google? What I wasn't as good about doing my homework in college. And I did just fine at Georgetown. But I do I think certainly a professional that is dry. Always did know my homework because I do believe that preparation builds confidence and confidence build success, and so for me, you know certainly early on my career as a young correspondent with so many famous people at NBC legendary careers. My confidence wasn't a tie, and so I thought how can I be the smartest person in the room and no more than anybody else and. You know I just really did my homework. I really worked really hard to make sure I knew everything. The thing that people may not know about me. You Know I. Guess would be that I'm from a military family. You know I mean that certainly is my resume, but it's the one thing I mentioned because you know I remember in covering certainly the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq after nine eleven, a lot of people would say on television and Mike Barnicle on morning. Joe would say this a lot that Oh, no less than one percent of people have someone in the military who didn't understand these wars, but I grew up in the military. My father was drafted during the Vietnam War. State for thirty years I lived overseas and so I really do have a deep appreciation for those who serve my sister-in-law surgeon in the army and so I do have a really keen sense of the sacrifice that many people go through, and I do in some ways I almost wish that it was mandatory almost like in Israel that we had to sir because. I think you know certainly the discipline that they have is unlike anything I've seen those who sir. Let's actually start with that because I think it's fascinating talking about how you grew up and living overseas. How did this love of news and growing up with that military background kind of come together for you? You know I think one of the. First crystallized for me in some ways when Elena, Nachman Ost, who is still the vice president of talent at NBC? News said to me when I met her. When I was twenty five years old, and she said you know we like hiring correspondents who have from a military background, because they're very flexible and adaptable. They don't complain about being sent to different cities or states or around. Around the world they can talk to anybody because they've sort of been put in that situation where they have to be totally adaptable. Moment's notice

NBC Cbs Evening News CBS Abc News Georgetown University O'donnell Managing Editor Chief White House Corresponden National Journal Bob Schieffer World Bank Google Barack Obama Georgetown MVP Huffington Mike Barnicle