35 Burst results for "Noor"

The 4 Most Annoying Interview Mistakes

Work Matters With Ken Coleman

03:30 min | 2 months ago

The 4 Most Annoying Interview Mistakes

"Zooms head of hiring has got some really good insight on video interviews. So zoom exploded during the pandemic you know as this hey, this is a great tool to do meetings when you have to be at home and working remote and as a result certain companies kept hiring and so they were having to do interviews via zoom or just video interviews and so this is an article from CNBC's got some really good stuff in this I want to go through this because the video interview is not necessarily going away. Here's some things you want to be aware of these are big mistakes that the zoom head of hiring has noticed and they're spot on number one too much fidgeting and peaking at your phone. With an in person interview. This is Phil. Haynes who's head of global talent acquisition presume with an in person interview never sneak a look at your phone. I hope not. Can you imagine face to face have an interview and you do one of these numbers? Yeah Yeah. Sorry. I got a text from the wife. Could you imagine? and. Yet because the video interview and it's buzzing, people are looking down and they're looking at their phone or something else and they're fidgeting around and moving around and this is bad bad bet. It's a distraction for you and the person interview number to watch the up and down I move across the screen. I never thought about this until reading this article this really true when you're on a screen. and. You're doing a conversation with somebody you tend to your eyes are darting all around screen time. Is it here? I'm looking down here to get a couple of emails o a chat just came or whatever, and you're not looking at the person here's the deal just because it's a video interview, you need to have the same rules as an in person interview. We all know those people you meet them at an event and you're talking to them and they're scanning over your shoulder to see if there's somebody more interesting to look at Voi-. Number three. Don't be visibly worried and distracted by things. You can't control the home environment mishaps as Hell hanes refers to this has never this is key to here. Folks has never botched a really good interview. So the interviews going great and let's say a dog and this is what he says. I've Seen Dogs Butts Behind People's heads I've seen ups, guys at the door I've seen people do interviews with two year old, Noor Lap. The more natural. You are the better and this is an interesting statement hanes all these. Home. Environment mishaps in the middle of the interview have actually enhanced our ability to judge the real person. So here's the deal. If the two year old walks in and throws a dirty diaper and hitch in the side of the ear while you're doing your video interview, you gotTa Roll with it. Right? You gotta go. Well, that's my two year old Leon who just hit me in the head with a dirty diaper. We'll get to that a little bit later but the you know and have fun comment with you know. But this is just like a customer coming out of nowhere with a with a rant and I got to handle it. They see your humanness and they see how you handle it. Oh, it's it actually becomes an attractive thing and finally number four boring unenthusiastic answers. Again, this is not a video element is just the kind of put this on this one on here, and this is why I do the interview guide. Free resources that can come dot com how to win the interview and Hanes says, consider in advance. What questions you'll be asked You keep the person engaged make sure that you keep people engaged you do that by preparing ahead of time so you've got a really good answer

Hanes Cnbc Haynes Noor Lap Phil Leon
My Biggest Lessons From 4 Million Podcast Downloads

Side Hustle Pro

05:14 min | 4 months ago

My Biggest Lessons From 4 Million Podcast Downloads

"Tae Guys, it is Michaela here and I'm back with another solo episode I. Hope You guys are doing well protecting your energy and protecting your piece. It's so so important especially right now you guys this is the Mossel episodes I have done in a while and maybe doing for a while because we're going to get back to our interviews with side. Hustler's turn entrepreneurs however however. I definitely wanted to jump back in and share my experience giving birth during a pandemic have been doing juggling up getting back to being a mom for Noor and just how I'm easing back into a podcast life, my work life and I'm glad I've been able to catch you guys up and also catch all of you new listeners. Shout you guys for joining the journey as well. the last episode I shared how I did it turning a podcast into a full time business and this episode I want to share the lessons I have learn overall journey podcasting. So four years and four million downloads. Later, this is going to be my breakdown of what I really think contributes to my success. When I was starting out on this journey I, didn't know where it would lead. Of course I had dreams and everyone who starts something you want it to be well received you wanted to be big you want it to be so successful. So of course, I had those thoughts but I also thought that I was hoping to gain inspiration from my guests and figure out what to use my talent. What kind. Of Business to start with talents that have the skills that I have, I did not think that I would focus on the podcast itself and ended up leaving my job two podcasts full-time. So that was a surprising life turn. I tested things out empty always work and in a lot of trial and error I also learned through spending time researching my ideas researching my industry and investing my own money into training conferences. And classes to learn more and then put what I learned into practice immediately and emphasis emphasis emphasis on the word practice because there was no one who had a specific blueprint for what I went to do like once I figured out that I wanted to scale my podcast with certain level. There was no class that I could take that taught me that exactly that's why I teach what I know now podcast Mongols. Because here, I have the blueprint I've done it and I'm doing it and I wanna make it easier for everyone else rather than trying to piecemeal information from all different sources So the practice was essential and now as I reflect, I can identify some of the key factors that have allowed me to have a successful podcast. So here goes, I, have divided it into lessons for y'all already. So lesson number one. Don't be afraid to be known for something for Steinhaeuser pro podcast is about black women entrepreneurs who scaled from side-hustle two fulltime entrepreneur myself included. I'm not afraid to be known for that nor do I shy away from focus on black women because it may make someone else uncomfortable the people who need this show the people who listen to this show span, all races and genders. Okay but but but sir. The reason I focus in on black women and the reason I focused on that specific specific topic is because I want people to understand what this show is about you will have. No. Problem sharing this with somebody else because I. Make It crystal clear what we talk about. So often when my podcast moguls members joined the program, one of the first questions I asked him is what is your podcast about and often they tell me two or three different things Oh i WanNa talk about leadership in corporate America also WanNa talk about you know dating with my girlfriend bring her on as a guest and then i WanNa talk about I don't know travel. And always have to say we weightless. Let's roll it on back in the stroller back because. You are doing this as a catchall because you're afraid to be known for something. This is when we have to work together to refine their podcast topic. What's often behind their answer and their topic being so broad so vague and Goose for a better word. Is there fear of being pigeonholed? But when you are known for something, you're just floating around in the podcast categories not really fitting in nut grabbing anyone's attention because they have no idea how your show will help them how your show entertain them and you're just making your life harder. What is the use of having a show? If no one knows what it's about then they? Can't recommend it. One of the keys to the growth of sidelines Appro is that it was specific and specific things are sharable and sharable things are scalable. So do not be afraid to dig deep and be known for something because if someone can't walk away from listening to your podcast and tell someone else in one sentence, what is about then it's going to be very hard for you. So own your topic.

Michaela Hustler Noor Steinhaeuser America
Katie Adamson on how the YMCA is like an Iceburg

HIT Like a Girl

06:51 min | 8 months ago

Katie Adamson on how the YMCA is like an Iceburg

"My Name Is Katie. Adamson and I am Vice President of Health Partnerships in policy at the YMCA The USA. I have been at the Y. For fifteen years that I've been in the space for thirty so old I am about prevention and at the Y. We're about community health and so a bit different from the conference. I think I'm a bit of an outlier in terms of that. But that's kind of exciting. So I started my career out working for elected officials and so the first one was Pat Schroeder from Colorado and she stealth helped start the congressional women's caucus and children's caucus and she was one of the first graduates of Harvard law school too. She was a super big innovator in women's rights and I also got to work for a member of parliament and Ireland row when I was yeah when I was there. He brought the whole government down for itchy rights again so it was kind of neat to see the parliament go down because he felt like everyone should get access to HIV care and treatment. Ap Don't mind my asking. When is this like right out of college? He was right out of college. Okay now. They're probably more progressive in the United States. Went back then. They weren't that guy that I worked for a very desmond. He introduced contraception into Ireland around the pope. While that kind of tells you he was a real meek guy I was lucky to work for him and then came back and went back to pat. Schroeder's Office. I had been an intern for her. And I said I still want to work on the hill. Can you help me find a job in so Bernie? Sanders had just been elected so when I worked for him. Nobody who was now. Everybody knows who he is. And Bernie's known a lot more. His super super liberal left issues but he was a huge and continues to be a huge advocate for prevention and that the system is skewed and needs to be right-sized towards bigger investment in prevention. So that really influenced me a lot and for him. I worked on those issues primarily and we introduced legislation to establish national cancer registry in this country so that we you know we have more baseball statistics about guys in the world series than we do about women who got breast cancer and so the idea was if you could really kind of capture when people were diagnosed how they were diagnosed that public health could intervene catch it earlier do better screening referral. Things like that so we were able to pass. That legislation helped him get reelected helped him work with Republicans which he had to do in order to get reelected so I was doing a lot of work at the time for him to increase funding for prevention and so the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said. You know we're the only federal agency outside of Washington and we don't have anyone to help us. Educate the hill about what we do. Would you come work for us so took us about me about a year to get that job? But then I gotta go down to the Centers for Disease Control and help them come up and educate members of Congress about what the problems were and how big of an issue diabetes and cancer arthritis and all these issues were for the nation and how we needed to be doing more and building more programs in communities and that was an incredible experience for me. I came back and I work for some law firms as I was A nonprofit lobbyists basically so it was a law firm for profit. But I I worked for twenty nonprofits and I had to get all of them federal money. Wow so it's very hard. That's a huge responsibility was back in the earmark days and those are really good earmarks. I worked for Christopher and Dana. Reeve when they were alive. Superman and Dino's goal was that no one would ever have to make more than one phone call after a family member had become paralyzed because she was in a privileged position. She had all the access to anything. You could need in in terms of getting help for Chris. It took her like twenty six phone calls to get just a few things answered and so we built this entire center to help people living with paralysis. Get ACCESS TO CARE and information. Our Son had an issue so I've actually reached out to the Christopher Dana Reeve's foundation in having left the hospital after six months day with something that turned their lives upside down there just tremendous. Aren't they incredible? They really are and ours was not an interest spinal cord injury issue. It was non interested central nervous system but the people over there are just a pleasure to work with. I'm so glad to hear that because I was a long time ago so I'm so glad there's still doing three. Oh yes I was lucky enough to also work for Queen Noor of Jordan. Tell us more cues one of our clients and she and her husband when he was alive did so much to get rid of landmines in Jordan. And she helped takeover after. Diana died so she took over and ran the landmines survivor network and they'd won the Nobel Peace Prize with a group of others. Trying to get land mines out of the ground but they also started a landmine survivor. Peer Support Network around the world and so when they start this peer support network around the world. They helped landmines fibers. Get jobs and be able to survive as a lot of people few lose a lamb in another country. You're completely ostracized because you're not value to your family anymore. So long story short one of my clients was Ymca. When I was working at the law firm for just six months and I was about ready to get married and have a family and I needed to slow down because it was a really busy work so I came to the YMCA. And I've been there for fifteen years and so when I came to the YMCA. It was a really good time because the why was looking at trying to take the network of twenty seven hundred wise in the country and ten thousand communities we reach and drive the ship in the direction of prevention and control of chronic disease. And we've done this a few times in our history before during World War One and World War Two. We won the Nobel Peace Prize for our work during wartime a lot of people. Don't know that you know that. Yeah we were on the ground helping prisoners of war sadly were giving him some cigarettes and some donuts but back then we didn't have the science and that was part of what we did but we did a lot of social support the why was also on the Japanese internment camps providing health and well being in recreation so really got a lot of history in this country for things we've done and collectively tried to respond to community crisis a needs later when women were going back to work and we had latchkey kid problems. Why became one of the leading provider childcare? So the why was looking at it. It's makeup and saying we have challenge here. We are hello being organization we wake up everyday thing about spirit mind and body for all and we're losing the war here and if we're not part of the solution part of the problem so how do we get everybody moving in the same direction so that was kind of when I got to be hired and so it was Super Fun. Time to start helping our wise be connected to the innovators and so we worked with Folks like the Institute for Healthcare Improvement and we taught wise. How do plan do study? Act Really How to evaluate your work how to change the building so people felt welcome when they came in so they didn't see this gym equipment Or get a tour of the why they saw coffee and people sitting down and talking

Christopher Dana Reeve Centers For Disease Control An Pat Schroeder Ireland Parliament Bernie Vice President Of Health Partn Harvard Law School Colorado Adamson Breast Cancer United States Queen Noor Washington Intern Sanders Institute For Healthcare Impro
How to Become "Data Rich" and 10x Your Business with Data with AJ Yager & Meaghan Connell

Entrepreneur on FIRE

02:58 min | 9 months ago

How to Become "Data Rich" and 10x Your Business with Data with AJ Yager & Meaghan Connell

"I have always been data person of always been a numbers person I love analytics and these to rock the world when it comes to this stuff as I share with you in the intro. Today's mass classes all about you. Fire nation becoming data rich and taxing your business with data. So let's just dive in because we got a lot to cover today. I don't want to leave anything out. So let's start just by sharing. What specifically is data? And of course why should we be data driven? Yeah so I'm going to before we get too deep into this. I'M GONNA hope that most people didn't already to now when they heard data 'cause I'm sorry what'd you say I told you down Because data is simply information. I mean too. Many people will see it as ones and zeroes earn some sort of technology or math based thing that you know a lot of entrepreneurs or business owners just they they. WanNa touch with a ten foot pole and yet every single business owner when we ask them. Do you want to be more informed or less informed the very very simple answer that you need more information? Because there's a it's a competitive landscape right and everybody's fighting for their prospects attention and if somebody knows where those prospects are or who. Those prospects are how to find them. What's the best way to attract them? Obviously they're going to win every single time so data is simply information and the more you have the better suited you will be and it will give you the competitive advantage. Because nowadays there's data everywhere and so those those businesses that are using that to make decisions are always going to have that leg-up that's right and we're here to two companies. No like you have. Not every single business knows it but you are a data business no matter what and those logo like to say is the companies that used data will have the the competitive advantage over everybody else. Because it's it's it's literally just an edge up. You know if you know more. Data turns into Information Ryan. We're here to make it fun. We WanNa make it sexy like even if you're somebody who fail math class it can be fun and easy. Don't have to be complicated. You don't have to. It doesn't have to be complicated from the analysts. And all the stuff you see on Social Web's and all the and all the predictive stuff like don't worry about that we're going to are now. Yeah now am I saying data wrongs. It's like a niche Inisia-. Nobody knows type thing. Is this like data. Data like are they interchangeable or am I stupid? They're totally entertainment. It's more like aller allure. I actually. I'm a big believer though. The people should say Jeff just because when you say Gif I honestly always. I'm thinking about Christmas gifts and I just don't know you're talking about emojis. Wow the Internet would slay you right now. But it's well the Internet's hearing me right now and I stand by that Jeff Jeff all day long and fire nation. Most of you listening right now are small businesses. Your solar preneurs. Your Cyber Noor's your entrepreneurs you make things happen with a small team.

Jeff Jeff Business Owner
Q&A: How can I sell flash cards to pharmacy students?

Side Hustle School

03:30 min | 10 months ago

Q&A: How can I sell flash cards to pharmacy students?

"Hi Chris my name is Noor. I've been watching side hustles. Cool since late two thousand seventeen my side. Hustle is farm accused which is a set of flash cards that use the monarchs picture pictures to make it easier to memorize Generic drug names. I have them up on. Se for now just to test the waters. My question for you is how do I find market to a very specific and small audience. My products really only is perform seen pharmacy technician students. And it's a lot harder than I thought it would be defined interested people. Do you have any advice. Thank you so so much by all right thank you so much. I'm so glad you're out there. I actually think this is a really interesting project with with some real potential. I really like the targeted focus. In other words it reminds me of a story we did long ago. This was episode one thirty seven one three seven about a guy named Mike Bank think of it. He's actually one of our writers now but he wasn't at the time and in one of his other projects he created a course on learning anatomy for Pre Med students and it turned into a long-term passive of income source where for years he would earn anywhere between seven hundred thousand dollars a month without doing a lot. Now if I recall correctly that project also featured a lot of new monarchs pictures just like Norris Project now of course in her story. She's not finding initial success. So what we have here is an interesting in presumably helpful product in search of its market. So let's look at each of those things. First of all. I would get some feedback on the cards themselves. Like let's assume that nor has some background field. That was my sense from listening to the question or at least she knows some people in this field so I would make sure that this study aid really is helpful to them going. Get some real feedback from the pharmacy and Pharmacy Tech Students. You make any changes or tweaks wchs and once you feel confident in its value. Then you focus your time on finding where the target audience might look for study aids and on that topic. My sense is that she's not looking in the right place ace because where do pharmacy and pharmacy tech students hanging out online. Well I don't know for sure but I'm guessing it's not and nothing wrong with using Z or any other platform to test. The waters was just like she said. But if you really want to find these students I would imagine that there are two sources to places where students might be attracted to this particular resource the first first one is specific forums or resource sites four pharmacists or pharmacy students. Exactly what those are but in just about every field there is some sort forum some sort of message board. There's usually multiple ones they might be facebook groups or slack groups or independent forums. Up there has to be something out there. That's the first source. The second second one is just through general web browsing because again I don't think people go to SC and look for something like this. But I would imagine that somebody who's in pharmacy school might search on Google for pharmacy study eight or generic drug memorization guide. which is exactly what Nora selling? Now what comes up when you search for those terms. That's the kind of research I would do. It is possible to go and look at tools where you see how many people are searching for this particular search phrase and then of course you look at the results and see okay what are the other sites ranking for that. I think that's that's the path to go down and nor needs to be ranking for these terms in search engine results or at least let's say would help a lot if she did because over time it could bring her free targeted traffic. Bring your free traffic. That is exactly the kind of person that she's trying to reach and it would be much better for her website to be ranking rather than just an page or something else on another platform so so those are my suggestions. I let's make sure the product is solid as judged by the intended audience. And then look at getting away from other platforms into a more direct source of reaching this audience. It's

Pharmacy Tech Students Mike Bank Chris Technician Norris Project Facebook Google SC Nora
Own a Business, Not a Hobby with Jason Khalipa

The EntreLeadership Podcast

09:16 min | 11 months ago

Own a Business, Not a Hobby with Jason Khalipa

"Guest is someone who knows the value and the struggle of the grind mini no Jason Khalifa. As the champion of the two thousand eight cross gains gains. But since then he's dreamed up started in scaled a thriving business. It's called NC fit which in addition to having over twenty gyms around the world old it's pioneering widespread corporate wellness programs reinventing fitness in the hospitality sector. And even changing the way people think about fitness. This but this growth journey all started in two thousand twelve when he was forced to confront the fact that he actually did not own a business at all he simply owned a hobby. I had a mentor of mine. One day we were walking down the hall of this one Jim that we owned as they. Hey Man I'm just letting you know that all this can go away tomorrow and that what you have here is a hobby not a business because if you get hit by a bus this thing's going away and he said that to me and it really resonated and after that day I started putting things in place. Get to the point where it's bigger than me. It's not just me. It's it's an organization and and you might be a figurehead of it but it's just still be able to have people in place that could lead it on the future and that was really important. Took a long time to get to that point but after a year or two weirdly developed a team that which actually worked out really well my favorite because I started developing the teen because I WANNA have business not hobby but then my daughter got sick and it ended up working out really well because I stepped away from the company for a while and it just kept running on sale and kept running so you had prepared for that moment without even realizing it worked out really well my goodness so two thousand eight you're pretty scrappy at that point was it literally soper. Noor you were starting on your own or yeah okay. Yes so from a business perspective. We opened up fifteen hundred square feet. Fifteen hundred dollars a month six month lease and we opened it with ten thousand ars in so in a way we opened the business. What did you know about starting a business at that point? Well that's really interesting so at that point I knew I love to coach. I knew I wanted to make an impact on people but I also didn't realize at the time but I had backed it up with a lot of confidence because because I've been working at the health club for so long. They Health Club was all about the business. It was all about sales. Were working at just a regular gym regular health club. Yeah and cross all about anti sale anti title business like you know. Let's go coach. Let's let's really help these people and there were just totally different ideologies. He's in in which was really good for me because I had so much exposure to the business side and then I had a lot of exposure to the coaching side. And try to marry those two with when we started the business and so you probably brought a little bit of your sales experience because I mean we believe around here that if you are truly selling your serving someone Oh yeah if you're selling to the right person I'm extremely grateful for my lessons that I learned working at a desk selling gym memberships because we had a lot of different diversity in the area I was in law. Different cultures came in. And so you learned how to adapt and grow your business based on talking to somebody and he started to learn how to listen in here. What are they looking for out of this gym membership in how ultimately going to get them to sign up was question but I learned a law about people and talking to people and so that played huge? Dividends ends early on the business. Because you get people to come in and there's nothing to sell them on except yourself in your service and that was an important thing that I learned throughout college. Was this selling my passion right. More sharing my passion say a read something not long ago that it said the millennial generation and the generation following following it more than any generation in recent history in the United States is interested in the topic of entrepreneurship and starting a business but then it also said more than any generation in the history of the United States. They're less likely to step out of actually start a business so they love the idea of it but it seems like they're terrified and I say we right. It's my generation. We are terrified. Actually step up and do something. So what are the prerequisites. What are the things people need to have from your perspective looking back back in order to start a business? I think at the time if I can go back and advise myself I probably would have advised myself not to open a business and the reason why I would've widow of is because I don't think I had the background to feel credible enough to go do it now at the time. No eight the economy's in the tank cross is not even well known at all all and I decided to go to business and looking back on it. I don't know if I would have advised myself but I also think that I had things lined up to do you. Were right meaning. I didn't have any external pressure I didn't have any children. Timing was really good. I just won the game so I had this kind of notoriety and and I had had a background in the health clubs so I don't know of back then I I had as much as I wanted to have now but I'd ask anybody who wants to start a business. Do they have that confidence. So they have that background to know when they sign at least they're going to be successful because one Sali's begins you start acting irrationally. If you're in the tank too quickly you'd have things lined up for you. You know it's one thing to say that I wanNA star Weirdest Tomo Coffee. I've talked about this before I love coffee. Yeah we we were talking about the fact. That Jay's shop is probably way better than Arkle Luge Coffee Station copying personally zone it teaches own but I don't know the first thing about sourcing it roasting in selling it. I don't know anything about the health laws in my area area. If we want to open it meaning I know a little bit about business but I will need to go learn from people glide densify mentors go work at a coffee shop. That's doing the best in the world. Go take things I like in build them into my business. Take the things I don't I can leave them behind. I shouldn't have for longer right and I think that anybody who wants to start a business go to school for as long as you can before you actually signed the lease because once you sign you gotTa know your playing in. You're playing to win. The clock started at that point. You're already in the game. I love that though. Because what you're saying is just being passionate about. Coffee is not enough. No I mean the restaurant. Business is a great example. I love food but I. I don't know the first thing about sourcing these products. How long we keep them for? I would need to learn those skills for a long time and then identify key people that have have unique sets of skills there and then bring them on board. Because you've got to understand about starting a business like what makes you different. What makes you uniquely better than your competitor? And how are you GonNa win is just what we think about. If I can't answer that we probably shouldn't be pursuing it and you said go to school earlier. I assume that's not necessarily just formal education right so it's connecting acting the right people learning from them putting yourself in positions where you anyway surprised if you connect the people in the right way in authentic way people want to help you. They do and they WANNA share their information but you need to go identify that and you need the work and you need to back that up with action. I cannot tell you how many people on a regular basis so last sure did this thing where I talked to four hundred Jim Owners in the span of six months on the phone just to check in. Hey how's the industry. What are you seeing? What are we see? The how can I help you to really want to understand. Is Our business on the right path and for all these people I talked to you and all these people I meet in person you can you can give them the world you give them anything you want you can give them. The answers are looking for. But they're gonNA fall in depth ear nine times out of ten. I'll look at these people back. Dude all you gotTa do is go do this. Is this your call them in six months and they haven't done any of it is because it doesn't mean anything unless you put action behind it You know when I talk about going to school I talked about. I would go to school in the morning morning. I work at night and I go ride the elliptical till super late at night with the owner of this gym almost every day for years picking his brain. I wouldn't just say hey. Can we meet on. I don't have time. Oh well what are you doing later on. Do you mind if I go jumping elliptical like being assertive you know what I mean. Ask Ask ask until I tell you to stop asking. We talk all the time here. One of our kind of mantras is you gotta live like no one else so later you can live like no one else and it seems so often and we see the picture of the entrepreneur that is scaled a business bigger than themselves traveling to the Bahamas and is making money while they're they're not checking their phone and that's just not an accurate picture. It sounds like no. It's not and I think it's actually a really sad thing because people want instant gratification and in entrepreneurship and business it doesn't happen and overnight you have some anomalies of course right where you'll have a startup that startup gets you know goes for an IPO twenty four months later and all of a sudden get paid out hundreds of millions leads dollars. But for the most part I didn't see what that person went through before the IPO D- and that's just the exception to the rule in general more times than not it's in the trenches working for long periods of time and then eventually start building up some momentum and then it snowballs into something

Jim Owners United States Jason Khalifa Arkle Luge Coffee Station Bahamas Noor Sali JAY
Designing Anticancer Drugs with Reinforcement Learning

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

10:24 min | 11 months ago

Designing Anticancer Drugs with Reinforcement Learning

"Having a background in cognitive science and computational neuroscience and so I've been like focusing focusing on brain research for my pastor five years of education and now recently I've been doing more work on computational tation assistance biology and specifically on cancer and cancer trying to understand mechanisms of how cancer work and how we can find new treatments against cancer specifically quickly and in this work. I've been using mostly deep learning techniques and this will be part of like my presentation here at this conference. It's also and so yeah. So how do those things go together. So I think like many people think it's in a way weird if you come from brain scientists and then you go into machine running right and this is something I would say. It's like it's a very obvious thing to do in a way because if you look back into the history of machine she learning where it all came from like McCulloch and Pitts the first artificial neuron and then a few years later Frank Rosen ballot the perception. And so these were all computational neuroscientists and they were in the end really trying to understand how the brain works and they basically develop the The fundamental of the field of machine learning and so at some point this community and in a way it split up into groups and one group was more trying to and actually understanding the brain works and the other group was more interested in solving the problems. Right right and from this from this community. The machine learning learning community evolved into but whereas computation neuroscience right. Now it's it. It's still a field. It's still out there. It's has been separating more and more from the machine community what's there and originally it has been one like one big community. Yeah and so therefore I think it's quite natural to to have the process. Yeah Yeah you know I think Particularly here at Noor ups I have opportunity to speak with many folks that are kind of working on on that edge of cognitive sciences brain sciences and both using that to inform the way we think about machine learning using machine learning to validate you know some of the biological theories it was maybe more novel is coming from Cognitive Science and brain science and applying machine gene learning to developing cancer pharmaceuticals out in that. Come about yeah. How did that come about a good question? So like if you look at brain scientists this really this problem of seeing the brain which is arguably the most complex thing we have in the universe and and seeing like observing this brain and trying to understand his brain from at different scales at different spatial scales so to speak. So you can think about about the brain in the very abstract and cognitive ways thinking about cognitive phenomena like language and memory those things and you can think about it more from from neural perspective like how do act like what is the most fundamental unit of information processing. How do these units interact? How does information arise? And so like these two fundamentally different approaches and so I like in the first three years of my studies focused on cognitive science which has more top down approach unlike thinking from the big concepts and then down towards the implementation level whereas competition neuro science. They have more like the spot. Him Perspective They in the end and they're trying to solve the same problems but they start first with the basic building blocks like having a biologically plausible neural network model will that imitates basic behavior of neurons. And then they try to scale it up in order to understand more complex cognitive phenomenon and so like these field they really deep. They help each other and they need to work together in order to better understand how the brain works and so after after Android area defeating. Okay I need something a more solid and I really wanted to have this bottom up perspective from competition neuroscience which then I got my masters and so afterwards I I I mean I have to say that I was keen to explore and applications of machine learning because while studying the brain I got really interested more and more into the whole field of data signs and machine learning but and I wanted to apply those techniques but at the same time I wanted to I wanted to still somehow how work with the human body and with humans in general so this is how you how I came about him doing cancer Consume drunk modeling and so the poster is titled Pacman. Tell us about yeah Eh. So pacman is a frame. I mean it's an acronym so spelled with a double double and so it's an acronym. We came up during in my like about a year ago. During my master's thesis for prediction of anticancer compound sensitivity with multimodal attention based neural networks. And and so like when my supervisor came about with this acronym one of very long nights we spend in the lab. We like okay. There's no discussion. This is GonNa be the name for the project. Ah So quite funny how this came about so and we what we're doing in this work at that was the first step step off of the project and presenting at the conference. We were trying to basically forecast the effect the inhibitory effect of emol against a specific type of cancer and so we are treating this problem of predicting cancer drug sensitivity. Not really as the property of a pair and the pair is con- like composed of Itself the chemical the drug that you give to the patient and then the particular to more sell that you want to target because cancer is really like A. It's a family of diseases and the SORTA verse I. I mean there has probably never been two types of cancer that have been exactly alike because the Medicaid of mutations you have they vary like hillbilly inbetween of every individual patients. So it's really unfeasible to try to investigate whether molecule has some onto cancer effects in general. So you really need to treat this problem as the property of pair. So is this drug like hesitant. inhibitory effect against this specific type of cancer patient individually one of the questions. That comes up I is one of the techniques. You're applying here reinforcement learning. How does that play into Into achieving that goal so it comes about in the second step first that was really just trying to predict the sensitivity so the efficacy of Audrey and so what we what we did in consecutive step after we had built this model what we asked ourselves was like. Wow wouldn't it be amazing to have a model that can generate rate new drugs at can like come up and propose new anti-cancer candidate rex. Because in the old pharmaceutical industry there's a huge uh-huh productivity decline in the last few decades and the estimated costs that you have pulled new truck there Estimated to be two three billion Indian USD and most of these drugs that are like FDA approved and approved on the market. So they're really specific only for like very few types of diseases sort of even one disease only so the cost in our indeed that go are like spent in this business. It's just huge and and so we I mean we came up with this framework reinforcement. Learning is really core component. Where we're trying to design anti-cancer cancer drugs specifically for individual patients or groups of patients so we tried to envision the precision medicine perspective here where we're really We're not trying to generically. Come up with new cat. anti-cancer candidate drugs. But we try to like in the design process itself. Both we try to tailor the Monaco the drug specifically to the need of the patient himself or herself and so forth for this framework we use. We're using reinforcement Okay you also mentioned in the title of the poster transcript domain data. What is transcript Tomac data? You're right so you can think about transplant. Tomic data as basically The the expression of every single gene that you have in your body like you do you know about the human genome and so part of the human genome and code for specific proteins and these expression of these proteins. You can measure in the cell. That's different techniques techniques to do that so the most commonly used technique and the technique that was used to measure the data we work with is called are on a sequencing thing. Data we are you measure basically the M. A. Snippets in the cell. And so from this. You can infer basically which genes are expressed to what extent so so you end up if you if you do the sequencing step you end up with a vector of about twenty thousand genes and for each gene you would have an expression value view. This is usually just an integer. Like how many times did you find these Slip it in the sample. And then so this this vector Tori you can really think of it as like a fingerprint of the cell. So it's like it's a proper characterization of the cell there's different types of of comics data. So this is true. Tomic's data right. There's like also genomics data which directly directly measuring gene data and there's also also appropriate mix data actively measuring the the proteins

Cancer Cognitive Science Frank Rosen Mcculloch Supervisor Tomic FDA Pitts Audrey
Winter is a time to "smell the roses"

Your Gardening Questions

02:38 min | 11 months ago

Winter is a time to "smell the roses"

"Of the neighborhood get growing with stokes. Now how today's question when you start off program you said Time to smell the roses. Yes and of course the roses are long gone. But that's not exactly what it was a metaphor. It was a metaphor. We get it so tell us what you meant. Well mark this time of year. Gardeners can let the cracks in their fingers. He'll they can probably get nails cleaned. Leaned underneath they should have and hopefully will Take the Well let's just say the water and then dry the tool a great big old course look tool but it still needs to be washed off. Get the soil off of it so it doesn't continue to hold moisture in against the steel. Or what have have you Get those tools done and then it is indeed time to see the fire up if you have a fireplace or sit at the table or by all means studied literally studied these seed catalogs. That are becoming your way Like I said the the opening it up this morning first thing i. I became immediately Unsafe shaded from having ninety since last night and all of these beautiful colors sizes shapes and the breeders which which which floyd boarders on being have adjusted our lives by reaching out crossing. That is the science of it. Crossing Mama and Papa and kids and like Floyd City took cuttings from Florida. So he wasn't dealing with the big thorny dudes They they got roots on them. They're now making a crop so to speak all of these things. Play into this beautiful catalog where Science and the people that understand it and work in those areas are bringing us Noor better things probably more disease resistant probably better tasting maybe even more or vitamins and then one of the things. is you kicking back and smell the roses. That aren't existing right now. Is You those who are interested in. Organic can stay stay as organic as they want to be in terms of starting their own seeds

Floyd City Noor Papa Florida
Social Intelligence with Blaise Aguera y Arcas

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

09:18 min | 11 months ago

Social Intelligence with Blaise Aguera y Arcas

"All right everyone still here in in Vancouver at Noor ups continuing our coverage of this incredible conference and I've got the pleasure of being seated with bless Aguado. yuccas blesses is a distinguished scientist with Google. Ai Bless welcome to the Tomo podcast. Thank you so much. Thanks for having me absolutely so you are doing an invited. Talk here at the conference tomorrow morning on Social Intelligence and we're going to dig into what exactly that means for you but before we do love to get a bit of your background sure sure so It's a little motley. I started off in physics undergraduate at Princeton and I studied physics and applied math. There I I took a year off between my third and fourth years because I was not a very good student and I really started to get into into biophysics this X.. Pretty heavily so you're euro for after during during a or a little bit a little bit before and then during I worked for for a little while while in there he was working on bacterial Metaxas. That actually gonNA figure a little bit into mytalk tomorrow morning. So it's the behaviors years of of the intelligent behaviors of bacteria. And how does that. They that they find food. There obviously a really small simple system but maybe not quite as simple as people think okay and end and then from there My my next adviser Bill Bialik is somebody with a physics background. As well but also computational neuroscientist. He ran this course in woods. Hole at the marine. Biological lab called methods and computational neuroscientists it methods and computational science I don't I don't know if you're familiar or how many of your listeners are with with with them deal with marine biological laboratory but it's this place where a lot of Princeton notes on Cape Cod. Okay and so. It's right on the elbow of Kit. Kat across from Martha's vineyard okay this this little tiny town. It's very cute. And there's this kind of ramshackle lab that's been there since the nineteenth century tree that That a lot of a lot of visiting Sort of neuroscientists and biologists have been going for many many years A lot of really basic basic discoveries in science where made their. Oh so it's kind of this cool place. And and at this. Course at nothing computational neuroscience I I met my now wife Adrian Hill. Oh so she also came up in physics and Studied originally chaos and turbulence and fluid dynamics comics and things like this and was making the switch to puck additional science so we met there and and then she ended up getting a faculty job at University of Washington which is how we ended up moving to Seattle and around that time I started a company And was no longer really sleep. Part of academia at that point and the company got acquired by Microsoft couple of years later and they come into doing computer vision type of work or a it's a somewhat somewhat doing sort of multi resolution representations of of documents of of various kinds. It was okay. It was a combination of wave. Latouche kind of tricks six and and you X.. If I think wave letters like Kryptonite for me that was the hardest thing that I studied in Grad School. For whatever reason it was very difficult to rock it was it was hard. Yeah my my advisor. In Grad School in applied math was ingrid do bitchy who was one of the inventors intercept wavelength. Yeah she was she was absolutely wonderful very very smart very kind and I think I think one of the greatest living mathematicians if I. I don't know maybe unbiased. But Anyway Yeah Microsoft acquired it and I did immediately turn the team toward more four kind of computer vision e things right after that so photosynthesis which started off the photo tourism project by University of Washington professor and Microsoft research scientists together. With with their Grad student snively was in three D. reconstructions environments from the images and that was really my introduction to computer vision Asian. That was pretty classical. Wasn't like deep nuts or anything like this geometric computer vision but I kind of fell in love with that with that field and ended up at Microsoft Echo soft. You know sort of doing a lot of leading teams doing that kind of work so Microsoft's OCR team and they're kind of photographic treat type teams the teams that ended up doing a lot of work for a hollow Lens tracking The head using our facing cameras. All that kind of stuff was okay was part of my team at the time so I was at Microsoft for seven years I also was the CTO of bing maps which also had some kind of computer vision? The are photographic tree kind of stuff going on and being mobile and then I am I went to Google. That was six years ago. I come across so many people that are in this field that have some connection to bang. Yeah I shouldn't I shouldn't Bad I mean it was it was it was creative and scrappy at the time You know whether whether Microsoft was really committed to running these things I guess it. It's anybody's guess right but but yeah. I mean one of the most one of the reasons that I ended up leaving Microsoft was because about six years ago they had just Kind of lost the phone phone war and it became clear that they were going to be moving away from being a consumer focused company. We're GONNA start working on just enterprise stuff and I wasn't that interesting to me and that was around the same time. I'm also that did the whole deep learning revolution was really getting into full. Swing and I was very excited about about some of machine learning and computational neuroscience verging and Google is the obvious place. where the kind of hotbed of of a lot of that so nice? So what do you research. Google well at Google I started a team. UNCALLED CEREBRAL. With is not a name that we've generally used in public but that's not at all heading. Thank you it's the plural of brain. So there was a brain team already that you know Jeff. Jeff Teens started years before and I went to Google to start a team that would take how much more decentralized approach so rather than one brain. It'd be many brains. Everybody would have a little brain and I had a very augmentation focused point of view. You know the rather than having one giant running in a data center these things would have to shrink to democratize. There would have to go into devices. Run locally I had a lot of reasons for wanting to push in that direction including privacy Which I will talk about a bit tomorrow so mobile nets and a lot of these kind of efficient ways of running neural nets locally came from From our team again. I'm running. The you know the the the groups At Google the two things like oh CR and face recognition and a bunch of other sort of image understanding Primitives but we also power a lot of a lot of a or features chores or whatever you WANNA call them in android and also on other kinds of devices include including these little coral boards which are sort of an Iot kit for doing taking local I think those are just well. I guess it's maybe half a year ago at the developer conference drink. I have one. That's that's right that's right so yeah we're very excited about those cool he you mentioned OCR and Of all the things that we've talked about I think of that or it's probably easy easy to think of that as a solved problem the problem. But there's probably a lot of Even saying it. There's probably like this last mile problem. Where in order to get to usable or better levels of Accuracy and performance kind of that those last few percentage points are are really hard to get to. So you say I mean it solves problem and yeah I mean. It's good enough for practical use engines. That are good enough for practical use but a of of course. Extra percentage points are always useful. A little bit more is always better but also a team that I run at Microsoft was still using a lot of these classical techniques that would I you know they'll have a whole pipeline of different stages first segmenting out letters and then you know doing template matching and then using language modeling all kinds of like this and the direction that that that I think in the end that the you know the people in the team believe are really the most fruitful now are much more and much more neural so imagine smoke scanner that scans the entire line maybe by directionally and emits a string of characters. Kind of like a speech engine. Might if you you do it that way then you know. Join join letters and ligature is. Don't matter right cursive doesn't matter handwriting. And you don't print could be the same Arabic and other languages. That don't have good distinctions between letters. I ain't going but rather that don't that don't distinguish clearly between letters in the more cursive sort of approach. All of those things work and that sort of general and also just weird funds. There are a lot of things that are easy for us to read that a classic engine right so thinking about it more like a real vision problem some of the brain behind it as opposed to just a classical kind of letter clustering problem with the language model talked on

Microsoft Google Grad School Jeff Teens Princeton University Of Washington Microsoft Research Cape Cod Adrian Hill Vancouver Bill Bialik Scientist Aguado. Seattle Advisor Bing KAT Ingrid
Super Rabbit

A Moment of Science

02:00 min | 1 year ago

Super Rabbit

"It's a bird. It's a plane. It's able to leap tall buildings in a single bound. It's it's neurologist. Rex five-million-year-old rabbit fossils found on the island of minorca weren't from a rabbit large enough to jump over buildings but they were six times the size of today's rabbits at over a foot and a half in height and twenty six pounds. The super rabbit outweighed not only modern modern rabbits but other rabbit relatives like hairs and pike as well scientists say neurologic is a good example of how species trapped on islands can evolve in unusual directions. Sometimes large species become smaller over time dwarf elephant fossils have been found on mediterranean islands. It's and dwarf mammoths on the channel islands in other cases small species like rabbits may become supersized on minorca scientists is also found a larger than normal land tortoise and door mouse scientists believe the minorca rabbits might have evolved into such a large species because because there were no mammal predators on the island without predatory pressure to keep them ready for speedy escapes. Neurologic rabbits grew larger unless agile. They're there's short stiff. Spines suggests they were basically a couch potato species walking instead of hopping noor logs was also different from modern rabbits in in that it had a small brain compared to its body size and skimpy is it probably didn't even have long bunny ears but neurologist did have pause adapted adapted for digging at twenty six pounds. It needed a lot of food but scientists have yet to discover giant carrot fossils. This moment of science comes from indiana university with production support from the office of the provost. I'm ya'll cassandra.

Provost Indiana University Twenty Six Pounds Five-Million-Year
Mohammed, Noor And Minneapolis discussed on AP 24 Hour News

AP 24 Hour News

00:17 sec | 1 year ago

Mohammed, Noor And Minneapolis discussed on AP 24 Hour News

"A former Minneapolis police officer convicted of shooting an unarmed woman did the investigated her nine one one call will be sentenced today Mohammed, Noor is asking for no prison time. But instead says he would report to jail each year on the women's birthday and the anniversary of her

Mohammed Noor Minneapolis Officer
Minneapolis paying $20 million to woman's family over police shooting

Sean Hannity

00:40 sec | 1 year ago

Minneapolis paying $20 million to woman's family over police shooting

"Days after former Minneapolis police officers convicted in the killing of an unarmed woman the city announced a settlement with the victim's family. The city of Minneapolis is paying twenty million dollars to the family of Justin Reuss, check Damon, the unarmed woman who called nine one one in twenty seventeen to report a possible assault near her home as she went out to meet with police. She was shot and killed leading this week to a murder and manslaughter conviction for former officer Mohammad Noor newer argued that he and his partner were startled by Daymond. He faces sentencing next month, Minneapolis mayor. Jacob fry. Calling the settlement away for the city to move

Minneapolis Mohammad Noor Justin Reuss Jacob Fry Assault Damon Murder Officer Partner Twenty Million Dollars
Cop fired deadly shot before he could analyze threat, partner testifies

Rush Limbaugh

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

Cop fired deadly shot before he could analyze threat, partner testifies

"The murder trial of former Minneapolis police officer Mohammad newer is on a three-day break on Thursday, Noor sponsor partner, Matthew heritage testified for around five hours about the July twenty seventeen night when newer shot. And killed Justin Daymond heritage said he feared for his life. When a silhouette suddenly appeared outside the squad vehicle, but he didn't know whether deadly force was needed. Heritage said he pulled the hood off of his gun holster in Casey needed to dry and one question. Why said he considers every call threat until it's not nor says he shot Daymond in self

Matthew Heritage Mohammad Casey Noor Minneapolis Murder Officer Partner Daymond Five Hours Three-Day
Man arrested for attempted murder in Ft. Scott

Chad Hartman

00:19 sec | 1 year ago

Man arrested for attempted murder in Ft. Scott

"Jury selection getting underway this morning in the trial of former officer Muhammad Noor who fatally shot an unarmed. Australian woman after she called nine one one to report a possible sexual assault behind her home. In south Minneapolis, nor is charged with murder in the death of Justin Rose, check Damon a case that has drawn international.

Muhammad Noor Justin Rose Assault Officer Minneapolis Damon Murder
Finally we can complain about the Apple event

Latest In Tech News

09:07 min | 1 year ago

Finally we can complain about the Apple event

"Top content there is while supporting the rest of the newsroom, they'll just cherry pick. What they want via news. Plus an apple shave off a few cents over to the publisher. While owning all the data customer relationship and power. Why subscribe to the publisher I already pay for apple news. Plus should. Be the question haunting journalists nightmares for readers ten dollars per month. All you can eat buffet from three hundred plus publishers sounds like a juicy deal will end it is. But it could accelerate the demise of someone outlets leaving society with fewer watchdogs, the storytellers if publishers agreed to shake hands with the devil. The dark or it will just garner more followers flip over a few pennies laugh maniacally runoff into the evening, making ruin a sponsor that much more tempting, but they won't know it. It'd be running off maniacally laughing. There's so many horrifying aspects of apple news. Plus for publishers best to just list each one and break them down number one. No relationship with reader to succeed, publishers need attention data and revenue an apple news, plus Kitson away of all three readers. Visit Apple's app not the outlet site. They give it free rein to promote conference tickets merge. Research reports in other moneymakers publishers don't get their apple news plus readers, Email addresses for follow up marketing cookies for ad targeting. Content personalization or there. Credit card info to speed up future purchases at the bottom of articles further. This is annoying. Apple news, plus recommends post by an outlets competitors readers end up without a publisher's bookmark in their browser. Toolbar amp on your phone or even acts easy access to them from news pluses default tab, they won't see the outlets creation at highlights. It's most important content or develop a connection with its home screen layout. They'll miss call outs. The follow individual reporters chances to interact with innovative new interactive formats, but perhaps worst of all publishers will be thrown right back into calcium of attention. They'll need to debased voice. Amp up the sensationalism of hotter. Headlines. Look or risk. Noor users strain an inch over to someone else because it's literally tap away. And they tell you to go to somebody else at the end of the article, anyways, it's literally click bait two point all over again have no control of how to surface number two. They're at the mercy of the algorithm, which outlets earn money, apple news. Plus will be largely determined by. What apple decides to show a no first few curatorial? Slats on screen anytime apple could decide it wants more visual photo based content or less serious world news because it keeps users even if they're less informed. It could suddenly preference shorter takes because they keep people from pouncing and. Yep. Or more generic shallow dives that won't scare off casual readers who don't seem even care about that outlet. Anyways. What if apple signs up a publisher's biggest competitor in all the pension decimating? The first discovery while still exposing its top pay world content for cheap access and buy cheap. I mean pennies remember when Facebook wanted to build the world's personalized newspaper and delivered tons of referral traffic than abruptly decided to favor, friends and family content. All even publishers starve, well now the outlets are giving apple news plus two same iron grip on her businesses. They might Harry you're a ton of talent to give apple what it wants only for the strategy to change. The Wall Street Journal says it's hiring fifty staffers to make content specifically for apple news. Plus those sound like some of the most precarious. Jobs in a business right now. Now, remember when Facebook out the Wall Street Journal guardian and more to build social reader apps in one day just shut it off and then shutdown whole Pat form while news plus revenue will be a drop in the bucket of phone sales. Apple could at any time decide it's not thirsty anymore. Let news plus rat that eventual realization of platform risk and loss of relationship with the reader, led the majority of Facebook's instant article launch partners like the New York Times, the Washington Post and vox to drop the format entirely publishers would be why succumb to that. Same conclusion now before they drive anymore eyeballs to news. Plus, so. Yeah. That along with the fact that okay? So for the nine ninety nine a month that you'd be paying to have access to three hundred outlets end the articles in all that stuff. Apparently apple taking a fifty percent cut. The remaining fifty percent gets divvied up to whoever happened to have the most eyeballs clicks taps links. Anything interested through that? But. Realization apple news. Plus really isn't built for news the third and final point at least in terms of the article that'll be reading fused far. If you wanna read the article in share your thoughts. Some you can certainly do that let us know on Twitter Facebook or YouTube in comment section what you think apparently apple acquired that make Zine industry's self distribution app. Texture a year ago now is trying to cram in traditional text based news with minimal work to adapt. The product that means, National Geographic and Sports Illustrated gets featured billing with animated magazine covers N ways to browse the latest issue. News outlets get demoted far below with no intuitive or productive way to skin between articles beyond swiping through a chronological stack. I only see Wall Street Journal's content below my Megan's a massive at home feature from architectural digest a random gadgets and gear section of magazine articles, another huge call out

Apple Publisher Facebook The Wall Street Journal Sports Illustrated Twitter Architectural Digest Kitson Harry Youtube Megan New York Times Washington Post Fifty Percent Ten Dollars One Day
'New Zealand is unbreakable' in Friday prayers

Chad Benson

00:22 sec | 1 year ago

'New Zealand is unbreakable' in Friday prayers

"Muslim called the prayer broadcast. Nationwide is citizens of all face reflected on last Friday's massacres. Gamal Fuda imam of the Al Noor mosque where most of the slaughter occurred. We have shown that New Zealand. And that's the wall. Us an example of love and

Al Noor Mosque Gamal Fuda New Zealand
Mass shooting suspect charged with murder in New Zealand

NutriMost Weight Loss with Dr. Ray Wisniewski

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

Mass shooting suspect charged with murder in New Zealand

"The suspect in the horrific New Zealand mosque shootings has been charged with murder accused of killing dozens in a shooting rampage fueled by white nationalism and anti immigration ideology, forty nine deaths made it to the country's deadliest shooting since nineteen ninety Ben Tracy reports from Christchurch New Zealand the suspected gunman. Renton Tarrant made his first appearance in New Zealand courtroom, Saturday Tarrant, you are remanded without plea with his hands in Coffs. He flashed what's believed to be a. White nationalist hand gesture as the judge charged him with murder two other suspects are also in custody. My father was even one and the thing is you leapt over somebody to save the life outside the court, Omar Nabi more than the loss of his father who died during the gunman's attack on the all Noor

Renton Tarrant New Zealand Mosque Christchurch New Zealand New Zealand Murder Omar Nabi Ben Tracy Coffs Noor
U.S. youth rally in Washington protests climate inaction

Science Friday

03:59 min | 1 year ago

U.S. youth rally in Washington protests climate inaction

"It all started with sixteen year old environmental activists, Greta thune Berg last August Thornburgh started skipping school in Friday's to protest outside Sweden's parliament, insisting her country get behind the Paris climate agreement. Her protests have inspired thousands of young people around the world to join Fridays for future. That's a hashtag Fridays for future movement skipping school Fridays to demand that their governments take action against climate change. And today those young people are taking steps. Well, a step further joining together across more than ninety countries twelve hundred cities for a global youth climate strike, it's happening in cities across the world as we speak, including here in New York where we have our guests. Eric Kaplan science reporter for the Washington Post on the scene in Manhattan's Columbus circle. Hi, sarah. Hey, IRA, tell us what the scene is like where you are. How many students are there? What's going on? We could probably hear in the background noise. It had pretty busy. I guess there are about a thousand if not more. You didn't hear lots of them have posters. They're chanting. You know, we are the youths. We are the future we want climate change action on climate change now. And yeah, they're they've been sort of pouring in from all over New York. There were ten protests around the city this morning. Noor kind of coalescing at this rally here at Columbus circle headed how did he get organized? There was it all online and people know to come yet. So a lot of it is online here in New York. The protests really started with a young thirteen year old named Alexandria of in your she has been protesting in front of the United Nations headquarters every Friday inspired by Lindberg, and she is part of one of the national leaders of the US climate strike movement. And so, you know, they offend organizing online. But also a lot of inhabit organically people find out about it because they thought on Reddit or Twitter or they read a newspaper article, and they're like, well, I want to organize a strike in front of my school or in front of Brooklyn borough hall. Do you have any students there? We might speak with. Yeah. I see so Simone is right here. I'm gonna get the phone to her. Hi. Hi there. Welcome to science Friday. Tell us about why. You're there. I'm here because climate change is an issue. That's real very real and our elected officials and. Aren't doing anything about it? And. We may not at this age has a chance to put in a ballot vote. But we still have a voice, and this is how we're going to use it at get across. Message that changes coming whether they like it or not like Greta fed, and we're ready to take action and do whatever it takes. The letter voice be heard and make a difference on the world. Do you? Do you have the support of your teachers or parents and doing this because I understand you're thirteen? Yeah. So my parents are in full support of best. And some of my teachers are at one of my teachers my humanities teacher. Actually, here's the one who inspired us to start striking school because he got us into this and was teaching us about Greta and how out santeria strikes every Friday, and he's been folks affordable. Do you think that you can have any real influence on the future of climate change? I think so because every person can make a difference every price invoice matters at if you think that your voice doesn't matter. Then no one's ever gonna make a difference. And no one's ever gonna change. Because as everyone thinks that nothing's ever going to happen. And. Everything adds up. Everything makes a difference in the ad that I think that's why it has already grown so much. If you look at how many people are even here today and across the world, it's really inspiring.

Greta Thune Berg New York Columbus Circle Sarah Eric Kaplan Washington Post Paris Manhattan Simone Reporter Brooklyn Borough Hall Sweden United Nations Reddit United States Twitter Lindberg Thirteen Year
"noor" Discussed on Focus On the Family Daily Broadcast

Focus On the Family Daily Broadcast

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"noor" Discussed on Focus On the Family Daily Broadcast

"We have real guy came up after that very same program, and he came up to me. And remember I cannot stand to be lied to. He came up to me. And he said, my wife, and I have never had an art. And I was getting mad. I'm getting lied to. Then he said, we've never even had a bad thought toward one another and I could not hold back in the longer. I've said you are married to a carrot. You are not married to a human being give me a break. I see a lot of young people here. A lot of young men and women. Let me tell you something a good marriage is not the absence of conflict, a good marriage. Marriages to people who love each other and have committed themselves to each other who have determined to live through the tough times and conflict together. That's a good, man. That's a good merit humanity. People first time Noor coming to a speed bump in life. They jump out of the boat. That was stupid. Boats. Don't have speed. Speed. Why did they put that there?.

Noor
"noor" Discussed on The Brutal Truth About Sales and Selling

The Brutal Truth About Sales and Selling

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"noor" Discussed on The Brutal Truth About Sales and Selling

"Thinking of yourself as the asset asset sales per Noor? Because if you don't do this, no one else is going to do for you. You know, we used to have companies that gave you pensions, and you had a plan in some civil servants jobs. Still have that some government jobs have pensions. I still can't understand. Well, how that can even exist from an economic standpoint. But we as individuals have to do it for ourselves. We have to think long term we have. To think about building our career. And if you're not doing this, you just going to sink because somebody else will that I think the sales jobs are going to the divide is going to be huge. It's going to be very few great fantastic sales jobs, and then there's going to be a lot of crummy ones. I think even the be jobs may be disappearing meaning that companies are going to get bought out or most companies go out of a couple of companies went out of business last year companies that I had been talking to that. I thought had pretty good products and services, but the only reason a company goes out of business is because not enough money coming it doesn't mean it's a bad idea. No. It means that they can't get enough customers to exchange money for what they do. Maybe it's too early. Maybe the wrong sales people, but I've also seen these companies get sold and they get sold because they. Can't capture enough market fast enough. So the the sales people that can build and understand model that can crash it of the ones that are going to succeed. And that's why I share all these things with you. You know, and it's not just my course. Oh, I got to tell you the prices go up February first. So if you wanna get in and you want to save some money sign up now is going to be I've extended to six months..

Noor six months
"noor" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

Newsradio 950 WWJ

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"noor" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

"Noor joy road when suddenly notice car swerving out of. The way he, thought there was an accident taking place up ahead Tilly saw black SUV driving southbound straight atom in. The center lane Redmond says he was able? To, swerve out. Of the way everything happened? So fast you only have time to react as quick as? Its second that. All this is happening so you don't really think it all through but as That moment is happening my very next thought was worried for the people behind me like what was going to. Happen Detroit police say the SUV driver hit one of their patrol cars at a. Gas station and fled southbound on the northbound service drive he then jumped onto the freeway. No arrests were made WWE news time five, thirty three This This just in developing news this hour from Wayne County where a fourteen year old boy is fallen off a railroad bridge in Plymouth. Township www NewsRadio nine. Fifty Sandra McNeill is live and local with the, story Sandra their. Reports the boy was playing with several other children on the train tracks off Edward, Hines drive near. Wilcox he reportedly tumbled off the bridge into the water below firefighters rescued the boy from the water now officials here on valley ambulance confirmed to me that they transported the boy to Saint Mary's. Hospital he is in critical condition reporting, live Sandra, McNeill w w j NewsRadio nine fifty after over two days of, searching Oakland County sheriff's divers have recovered the body of a fifty five year old manor drowned Sunday in white, lake Oakland County. Sheriff Mike Bouchard, says an autopsy will be conducted on the victim to determine whether he had any sort of medical emergency. Underwater it was obviously a very hot. Day he was hot said he was, overheating so he's gonna jump in the water to cool off And one in the water and. She didn't see him. Surface she tried to number times herself to locate, him and could. Not wish says investigators do not suspect any foul play Blue Cross Blue shield of, Michigan.

Sheriff Mike Bouchard Sandra McNeill Redmond Sandra their Oakland County Tilly Wayne County WWE Detroit Sandra Michigan Edward Wilcox Plymouth Saint Mary fifty five year fourteen year two days
"noor" Discussed on On the Schmooze with Robbie Samuels

On the Schmooze with Robbie Samuels

04:17 min | 2 years ago

"noor" Discussed on On the Schmooze with Robbie Samuels

"I've been meisner dot com if you go back to september two thousand seven you'll see a connection that somebody was a solo for noor coach that asked me for a favor that led to another contact that lead to a contact the lead to a contact the finally led to an invitation to a week on necker island with richard branson wow and that all started with a spill low cra noor business coach yeah and so i tell people don't don't look your nose down on on good connections the only thing you should be saying no to in terms of connections are people who don't don't fit your values as a person or they're not good at what they do otherwise if they're good at what they do and they have the kind of values that are congruent with yours and you should be building relationships with with everyone yeah yeah many people have different love it i actually you're having me i'm having a flashback again to high school i started recycling program because there wasn't one and you know who helped me the most it was two people the superintendent who at the time when i meant he was the assistant superintendent and i'm pressed him by pouring him a cup of coffee and offer him a bagel on a on a lobby day trip as i got to meet him at five in the morning and the other one was they heads the head janitorial staff member come because clearly if you don't have them on your side you're not going to change this whole program i got letters recommendation from both of them for college and i thought nobody else is probably asking these people probably right especially the janitor which right actually brilliant because it shows the diversity of the connections you have i never really thought about it man i it's so great to see the origin stories sometimes that like the beliefs that you have in house sort of grows around you i i love to know kind of were your vision is for the next year i mean you know we are chance to connect again i want to reach out to year now i want to be celebrating all of your successes and what are we gonna be toasting at that time well i think an entrepreneur's either working in their flame or working in their wax when they're in their flame there on fire they're excited they love what they're doing and they're passionate about it you can see it in the way they act you can hear it in their voice when they're working in their wax takes older energy away can hear it in the way they talk you can see it in the way they behave so for me my my flame is this robbie it's it's having a chance to do interviews it's talking about networking in it's talking about how how someone can be successful in business and in life that's my flame writing speaking and so i have i'm in the midst ren pretty much made the transition now in where that's my entire role i'm now basically the colonel sanders of being so i'm the face and brand advocate of an eye and a business networking and and so i if a year from now i don't tell you it's been the best year of my professional career i will be disappointed yeah because you got it's great that you've been able to position this and be working in the ways you want to be working because there is a point where entrepeneurship will often are really driven to try new things and you're that's part of being an entrepreneur and the actual data day can be maybe not their best bowl my wags the daytoday my wax if i need to keep warrior ever again for the rest of my life i quit it's just great because if you can find the people you know that that's their passion is to be the the people who make it run that's wonderful i think visionary sometimes don't step out of the way soon enough to allow that to happen and we were really trying to build a team around you as you were expanding you know you've done your work now you get to really enjoy the parts of it that are yours this is so exciting i know that everyone listening is going to want to know how to find you and how to follow your work what.

noor
"noor" Discussed on Pursuit With Purpose

Pursuit With Purpose

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"noor" Discussed on Pursuit With Purpose

"We also impact everyone around us and i'll tell you now that whenever my grid gets the better of me because there are those weeks where i'm like back in that mindset yeah the biggest reminder to me to come back and do the practices in like live in this way is my family because i have very vivid realization of just how much they are thriving because i am because i'm also kind to myself so it's a great point in it is as you say not something we talk about because it's always like the snow the sloan entrepreneur you know hustle and but like there are people around them that if they're suffering those people are suffering too i couldn't agree more i like just your overall message of if there's anything that you wanna chievo or have in your life whether it's relationship or business comeback to that place of inner working in our compassion i it's probably not that you need another tactical strategy on how to do something for your business it's really something that needs to happen inside and that in what shifting for me to and love that you say such a beautiful way to say that because it's absolutely true you know it's like i and i write about this in the book i cannot tell you how much i feel my ability as onto for noor but also like just the quality of my work and the quality of my relationships have dramatically improved not because like i have different communication strategies or because like i found some like cool thing i didn't know about marketing tactic right it's because i show up as my full self my true self now and i did.

noor
"noor" Discussed on College Info Geek

College Info Geek

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"noor" Discussed on College Info Geek

"I a goes shelling you're all right chella noor's they got violent moore's viola noor's kidding nobody plays the viola oh no and it's really cool everybody says the middle child people should go check that out yeah i remember watching some online sketch oh it was like it was like how to be a band kid and it was like he's on first day with a girl and he was like so you play violin and she's like no no no no i played viola and he's like oh i i gotta go i'm sorry i had something marcham up i don't know what it was the that's my music recommendation for the day i think most of my musical taste making influence is is kind of relegated to the area of study music since i have that soviet listen listen to the celeste soundtrack bam now martin's news ninety playlist wreck i did i put you know what i actually need to put a celeste song album so i've got a study playlist on spotify called sunday study and there is a song from celeste on that so if you want to go subscribe to a spotify one you can find that one but i do need to put one on my youtube playlist i haven't done that yet so i will remind myself later to do that but it didn't notice that member that guy who reached out to us yeah the song that i put on the play this i think has like seventeen thousand views now so a lot of people use it playlist i bought that album did you it's a good album so yeah talk to you in an email if you're washington maybe he is.

chella noor moore martin spotify celeste washington
"noor" Discussed on Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill

Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"noor" Discussed on Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill

"Free the f b i arrested her january of twenty seventeen and they claim that she had admitted to helping case the pulse nightclub with her husband fbi agent spent seventeen hours interrogating her with no video recording and they used her supposed confession to ask the court to hold noor salman without bond and as a result she was denied bail and they charged her with providing material support to terrorism and obstruction of justice and last month she went on trial and here's what was extrordinary noor salman was acquitted by a jury of twelve acquitted of all charges that almost never happens where people charged with terrorism related crimes in the us are found not guilty just doesn't happen in fact it has only happened to other times since nine eleven two times out of more than eight hundred fifty cases the last time this happened with tw twelve years ago in two thousand and six it became clear during noor salman's trial and her defense that so much of what the public was told about this case was not true my colleague glenn greenwald has done some really important work on this case and he joins me now glenn welcome back to intercepted that you're having jeremy now a lot of information came to public light that calls into question almost every aspect of the pulse nightclub shooting accept the fact that these people are dead and omar mateen was the shooter number one that omar mateen had previously been to the pulse nightclub number two that he intended to shoot up the pulse nightclub because of his hatred of gay people your reporting and then the evidence that was presented or as come out as a result of this prosecution calls those key assertions which continue to this moment to.

noor salman glenn greenwald omar mateen fbi jeremy seventeen hours twelve years
"noor" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

02:43 min | 3 years ago

"noor" Discussed on RobinLynne

"The as a pillow on dji dan in laura noor lenovo sure.

lenovo laura noor
"noor" Discussed on 103.5 KISS FM

103.5 KISS FM

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"noor" Discussed on 103.5 KISS FM

"Noor tony well now i am seeing blue ribbons two no no gene in may and june hello to the five it's seven forty five a little bit late today but we will get there kiss fm friend nancy jews the view more ranking a theme song for paulina let wow lina producers year you all polish by lena she is looking for love this valentine's day and so we give you guys opportunity to win a daily court of all with paulina on valentine's day no we received barely thousands of submissions i was gonna go with dan's we got thousands though which is great to date her we picked five pure talked to all five quickly right now and then you must head visit already opposite ready the voting yes or lima said radha ganji dot com at poland cash you've over the first you like.

nancy paulina dan lima Noor tony valentine poland
"noor" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

VIBES-LIVE

03:31 min | 3 years ago

"noor" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

"Noor two the man i and in the wrong the earth sure chris boucher.

chris boucher Noor
"noor" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

03:31 min | 3 years ago

"noor" Discussed on RobinLynne

"Noor two the man i and in the wrong the earth sure chris boucher.

chris boucher Noor
"noor" Discussed on The IGN Movies Show

The IGN Movies Show

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"noor" Discussed on The IGN Movies Show

"But you know it's it's to me i think it's very interesting that they they do sort of just say look we're gonna they're making almost a political statement noor saying like anybody can rise up and be a hero it's not just the special people people born into it so yeah i think that's interesting now i because halloren i mean he's born into this famous family you know and look what happened to him um so i think that's kind of an interesting commentary there um what did we think of their sort of how that relationship played out between them because i mean you got a lotta people shipping them uh they have been since the first movie baylau rail but i think that i liked that she initially just cannot stand this guy doesn't want to deal with them and then she is kind of like i do see a glimmer of hope in him and she still does even by the end you know did you like that i thought that was the most fascinating daring and a controversial part of the movie of because yes she does seem as a monster and he killed hud solo ray yet she by the end of the movie seat she just see good in him she had her own get shooter force vision and saw that he was going to turn but against i think she was a little naive and just excited to uh to to to like rude rushed to him and try and turn him even though i think he was was ready for that right so but yeah the fact that there was clearly so you can read it in two ways it's too like the know damaged people who sort of have just a in emotional bond looking they touch especially uh or is or is there or is there with a romance there you're the romance expert.

noor
"noor" Discussed on The Chief Customer Officer Human Duct Tape Show

The Chief Customer Officer Human Duct Tape Show

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"noor" Discussed on The Chief Customer Officer Human Duct Tape Show

"I mean it's what we've seen time and time again is people are pretty forgiving and at the end of the day they just want to be put back together again you know what i'd love to know is over the course of these many years walk us through some of the highs and lows if you don't mind from inoperational standpoint because you've got a very empathetical listening crowd out here who are also kind of pushing the rock up the hill on a regular basis yeah i mean for me it was it could be a long time to realize even might be willing to call my thump an entrepreneur i mean people at me you know to the day if i would start another business an i my answer is always now eight is really really hard as hard in many ways some of the darkest periods of the of the business where the early days i mean there is nothing lonelier than starting a business and you know your your successes are those mall right i i used to measure by you know my consumer sales in one right who's like i pulled one a day you know and i was like that was a great day i mean it was a sad day when i thought none uh you know and it's just hard to get up day in and day out and kinda keep trudging that process but uh you know but what i you know what i did discover was you know one one trait that i do have a lot of its perseverance and and you know kind of it we knew all we're hindsight is always 2020 and looking back on that you know that perseverance is probably the skills that the aid to find me is not for noor and be got through during those times you know it was just one of those i'd made a commitment that i was going to do this you know first it was like i was going to do this for at least a year and then you know and then i was like i'm gonna do this for this period of time it was that commitment to.

noor
"noor" Discussed on The Chief Customer Officer Human Duct Tape Show

The Chief Customer Officer Human Duct Tape Show

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"noor" Discussed on The Chief Customer Officer Human Duct Tape Show

"I mean it's what we've seen time and time again is people are pretty forgiving and at the end of the day they just want to be put back together again you know what i'd love to know is over the course of these many years walk us through some of the highs and lows if you don't mind from inoperational standpoint because you've got a very empathetical listening crowd out here who are also kind of pushing the rock up the hill on a regular basis yeah i mean for me it was it could be a long time to realize even might be willing to call my thump an entrepreneur i mean people at me you know to the day if i would start another business an i my answer is always now eight is really really hard as hard in many ways some of the darkest periods of the of the business where the early days i mean there is nothing lonelier than starting a business and you know your your successes are those mall right i i used to measure by you know my consumer sales in one right who's like i pulled one a day you know and i was like that was a great day i mean it was a sad day when i thought none uh you know and it's just hard to get up day in and day out and kinda keep trudging that process but uh you know but what i you know what i did discover was you know one one trait that i do have a lot of its perseverance and and you know kind of it we knew all we're hindsight is always 2020 and looking back on that you know that perseverance is probably the skills that the aid to find me is not for noor and be got through during those times you know it was just one of those i'd made a commitment that i was going to do this you know first it was like i was going to do this for at least a year and then you know and then i was like i'm gonna do this for this period of time it was that commitment to.

noor
"noor" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"noor" Discussed on WGN Radio

"It's thursday we're thrilled that you're listening please enjoy yourself learn something then call us and tell us what it is because we we like and say that we would love to learn to are you a fan of sarcasm bulich sarcasm love it i do too this morning what what i consider to be a hall of fame sarcastic moment i was witness to take the train in most days and today there was some serious problems on the train evidently a train and a passenger collided some were down the line so what this does is it creates a domino effect because they they have to close the train station off wherever the incident took place and trains don't come in change they'll come out and people are waiting and waiting at it just gets nutty thatta standstill it aids so by the time i got to the train station noor already a couple of trains that had not come through so passengers are it's building and building the volume is building and that another train just whizzes by doesn't stop for us and then when you do get on its triple the capacity out at you'd normally have so it's like a cattle car and it's uncomfortable and people are angry and everyone knows are going to be late for work and even though whoever got struck by the true that should be the big concern learn is he made that person may not live but everybody's you know kind of thinking about themselves at the moment gone wold this is going to screw my whole day up i had a meeting scheduled i got a slide that over i just kinda take it in stride i say to myself there's nothing i can do right tell you did tax me though and say you may be late now that air loving your iphone still not love learning to coexist with it learning my best to.

noor
"noor" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"noor" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"The tools is for taking action because even if you take the wrong action even if you're going the wrong way as long as you keep moving forward and keep taking action you eventually will get to where you want to go but it's when people are paralysed and don't do anything that's the only real problem in business and if i could tell you the only regret that i actually have in in the five and a half years i've been in business literally only regret i could think of is that i haven't made decisions more quickly haven't taken action more quickly i love with access to exactly when i look back i can see that that really is the only thing that's holding me up over time i love i love so much that you said you know people that usually are not as successful as they want they're not where they want to be in life and a business is 'cause they've been paralyze and crippled and therefore for having taken the action must be one of my favorite quotes from my friend you'll polish and he says successful people are moving scared unsuccessful people are frozen stiff and it reminds us of that i was that i feel like for the you know person who's out there and they're afraid through uncertain and they're fearful of what will happen if i cut the courts from my job and go all illness business and the uncertainty and the fear i flexible hold people back and that's why i love that quote because it's to be fearful successful people are afraid they have this year's struggles and frustrations there's humans but they're moving in the direction they want regardless and so i love so much that you brought that up because it's such a powerful thing what is still occur three things freetrade every success watch for noor either must adopt or take action on when they're getting started okay so my version of success is having a business that she loves to wake up to and work on in in every day and also having the profitability that you need.

noor
"noor" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"noor" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"Noor milk kusel bad joys are forecast sponsored by air comfort service seen cooling and unfortunately into here that for the remainder of the week right steve yep all the way through saturday excessive heap warning is in effect now through saturday our heat index soviet up to 105 to one thirteen so that's what it feels like with the humidity the next several days as an into saturday given line to that heat index that's based on the shade in the full senate actually can feel ten to fifteen degrees hotter believe you're not it is getting hotter four tomorrow a wakeup temperatures in the upper 70s route seventy nine degrees clear skies and then we had up to one o3 wednesday afternoon heat index one o8 mostly sunny light winds so not much of a break there are no breeze to help you out on thursday one of three heat index went 11 as it's a little bit more humid on thursday still mostly sunny skies we'll go 104 on friday 105 on saturday which will be the worst of this heatwave before it breaks down a little sunday in a that'll break down monday tuesday especially right now they're mostly sunny 96 in st charles 95 in mm belleville 97 downtown at the arch enemies for chief meteorologist steve doubled and for the voice of st louis newsradio eleven twenty kmox love my hotel but it might seem a little odd to talk about a hot spring spa from baker pool and spa right now at 100 degrees or 100 and five degrees but this is a great time to get an awesome deal from baker us by put that order in this week at bake you're pool that hot tub will be delivered in time for you enjoy the entire fall and winter and spring i use mind pretty much ninety ten months out of the year gave up only about ten days ago and now i'm just street new with some the chemicals until i can use it again prochains water out come the end of august her beginning september our right now you can get a midsize tub for two fifty nine per month for sixty months zero interest in just twenty percent.

senate st charles Noor chief meteorologist steve doubled seventy nine degrees ninety ten months fifteen degrees twenty percent five degrees sixty months 100 degrees ten days milk