18 Burst results for "Noelle King"

"noelle king" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:33 min | 6 months ago

"noelle king" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The app Spirits not available in Virginia or North Carolina It's morning edition from NPR news I'm Noelle king Martinez nationwide some 28 million kids between the ages of 5 to 11 are now eligible to be immunized against COVID-19 The federal government estimates that about a million have so far And while some states are aggressively promoting the new shots for kids Montana is not Here's Aaron Bolton of Montana public radio in Columbia falls Days before the Pfizer COVID vaccine was approved for kids 5 to 11 years old Montana's Republican governor Greg Jean forte said his administration was evaluating whether to promote the new lower dose shot for kids We will have to see what guidance we get from the companies the approval and we'll make decisions based on that Too few people surprise Montana isn't promoting the shots for younger children just like it didn't when vaccinations were okayed for 12 to 18 year olds Jim Murphy says that's despite the state health department recommending a vaccination campaign for children The words that our team got was that those scripts were being revised and we wouldn't be directly promoting team vaccination for COVID from the state level Murphy was the health department's top epidemiologist at the time He retired soon after he says the scripts were rejected The governor's office disputes Murphy's version of events saying he wasn't involved in creating vaccine promotional materials for kids and never sent them any But another former state health department Stanford that worked on vaccine campaigns who declined to be identified for fear of retribution at work corroborates Murphy's version of events Governor gene forte declined to be interviewed for this story as office points out that the state is running ants like this one on radio TV and online The COVID-19 vaccine is the best way to protect yourself your loved ones and your community Sign up today to get your free COVID-19 vaccine visit COVID vaccine dot MT dot gov But Sheena bowl a professor at the Colorado school of public health who studies vaccine campaigns says ads work better when they're aimed at a specific audience Sometimes state level campaigns may miss the mark because they're trying to reach too many people that are too diverse Bull points to campaigns like Utah's as good examples Here's an ad that state is running You do so many things to protect your child Now you can protect them from the pandemic Doctor John Cole president.

Montana NPR news Noelle king Martinez COVID Aaron Bolton Greg Jean forte Murphy Jim Murphy Pfizer state health department North Carolina federal government Virginia Governor gene forte Columbia Sheena bowl Colorado school of public heal Utah John Cole
"noelle king" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:35 min | 6 months ago

"noelle king" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Frost overnight That means protect the outdoor vegetation otherwise the low around 36 overnight and then tomorrow mostly sunny in 54 and in mostly sunny and 64 on Thursday Coming up on 7 46 It's morning edition from NPR news I'm Noelle king Anime Martinez the U.S. men's national soccer team plays its next World Cup qualifying match later today But last Friday's win over Mexico is still resonating as it was a signature victory for the U.S. team over its arch rivals But players and coaches say there are laser focused on the game against Jamaica today NPR's Tom Goldman reports Within an hour of last Friday's win over Mexico U.S. forward Christian Pulisic already was thinking about Today Jamaica is going to be a tough match We know what they're about We're going to get the scouting report We're going to prepare as best we can Professional athletes are very skilled at returning to earth while the rest of us stay in orbit And so it was as pulisic calmly addressed the media gathered in Cincinnati Many of the still orbiting crowd of 26,000 kept replaying the moment when pulisic's goal broke a scoreless tie and swung the match America's way He sat out several World Cup qualifiers with a badly sprained ankle for crystal Lambert who traveled to cincy from West Virginia Performance confirmed his exalted status He doesn't matter how much he's injured What has happened to pass He's mister.

NPR news Noelle king Anime Martinez America Tom Goldman pulisic Christian Pulisic Jamaica Mexico World Cup soccer NPR crystal Lambert Cincinnati West Virginia
"noelle king" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"noelle king" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"News. I'm Noelle King and I'm David Green. When George Floyd was killed by police earlier this year, it's sparked both massive protests and Conversations about the many ways racial inequality plays out in this country. One of those ways is health. Black people are twice as likely to die of heart disease and covert 19 as white people. Those differences are visible in one of Minneapolis is most diverse neighborhoods. It's just three miles from where George Floyd was killed. But there's a clinic there that has decades of experience, grappling with race and health, and it's now being held up as a model. NPR's Yuki Noguchi has been reporting in North Minneapolis and joins me how Yuki! Hi, David. So take us there. What got you interested in this neighborhood? Yeah, What Interested me in north Minneapolis is it's incredible racial diversity within a state that's mostly white 90% of residents. There are racial minority. It's about half black, about a third Latino and about 1/10 Asian, mostly Southeast Asian, and the area reflects what we know Nationally that communities of color have more health problems, especially now, with the pandemic cases of Cove it in north Minneapolis run 5 to 6 times higher than the state. So safe to say this is a place that's been grappling with questions about race and health and that relationship for a very long time. Absolutely. North Minneapolis is like a poster child for race and its effect on health. And that's been the case for decades. When we're going to talk about this one clinic I mentioned, But you know you mentioned the case for decades. I mean to tell us more about that history. You know, George Floyd's death struck a really cord here, and the protests afterward felt like a real echo from the past and explain why let me take you back 53 years ago, there were similar protests there. Back. Then there was unrest over discrimination, including in access to health care, among other things. And that led to similar sort of rioting and protests on the streets of North Minneapolis Violence. Northside.

Minneapolis George Floyd David Green Yuki Noguchi Noelle King NPR
"noelle king" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:37 min | 1 year ago

"noelle king" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Noelle King and I'm David Green. Russia is stepping in to try and stop a war between two former Soviet Republics near its southern border. For the past month, Armenia and Azerbaijan have been fighting over a tiny mountains region called Nagorno Kara Bach. It's within the borders of Azerbaijan, but the population is predominantly Armenian. The implications of this fight. Reach far beyond those two small countries and let's bring in NPR's Lucien Kim from Moscow losing Good morning. Good morning, So we have seen three cease fire's over the past month or so. They almost they all failed almost immediately. What is this agreement that's being brokered by the Russians here? Well, this agreement calls for the immediate cessation of hostilities. And unlike those previous ceasefires you mentioned it looks like it's sticking. The main reason for that is that Azerbaijan has taken a key town in Nagorno Car box that cuts the region's main supply line to Armenia, so Armenia really was in no position to resist this agreement. Russian President Vladimir Putin went on TV in the wee hours of this morning to make this announcement. It isn't about justice public. So he said that the leaders of Azerbaijan and Armenia had agreed to the cease fire that all forces would remain in their current positions and that refugees would be allowed to return to their homes. The agreement will be good for five years and involved 2000 Russian peacekeepers. This could be seen as a victory for Azerbaijan. The Azerbaijani is we're making territorial gains on the ground, and they also had Turkey backing them. This agreement is also a success for Putin because those Russian peacekeepers will now make Russia the critical go to country in resolving the conflict in the future. Which is something that Russia often tries to do in conflicts at its neighborhood. Lucian, Let me just ask you. I mean, I know we've been covering this for a while now, but I think it's worth reminding our listeners just how this this fight began. Short well. The conflict between Armenians and Azerbaijan ease is an old one. But the fighting we're talking about now flared up six weeks ago. It's really the continuation of a war that started 30 years ago when the Soviet Union was breaking apart at that time, ethnic Armenians living in the garden car, Bach fought and won a war of secession. And that really was a status quo until this fall. But in the meantime, Azerbaijan, which has a lot of oil money, built up its military and appears to have been successful in its operations this fall. Another significant factor, as I mentioned before is that Turkey has become involved. Well, why are both Turkey and Russia so deeply involved here? And we've talked about the global implications of this what is driving each of their interest here? Russia and Turkey have been competing in this region historically, so this is not a new development. What's new is that after two centuries of Russian domination in the region, Turkey has begun to make inroads. The deal today was also no go negotiated between Putin and Turkish President Egypt, type Erdogan. The two leaders have a difficult relationship, but they've also found a way to reach compromises. Even in places where there supporting opposite sides such a Syria, so in some sense, Turkey can also be seen as a winner here because it now has an important voice in a region where has long been absent. From Armenia's point of view, the loss of the status quo and the new roll of its historic faux turkey can only be seen as a defeat and really a dangerous development. There are ready protests in Armenia over this deal. All right. NPR's Lucien.

Azerbaijan Armenia Russia Vladimir Putin Turkey Nagorno Kara Bach NPR Soviet Republics President Soviet Union Noelle King Nagorno Car Lucien Kim Syria Moscow Lucian David Green Bach Egypt
"noelle king" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:12 min | 1 year ago

"noelle king" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"From NPR news. I'm Noelle King and I'm Audie Cornish. This week of suspense isn't over. Yet. The electoral score has stalled with Joe Biden at 264 electoral votes versus President Trump's 214. But Biden's edges growing. He's more than 20,000 votes ahead of Trump in Pennsylvania, roughly 4000 ahead in Georgia and is still leading in Arizona and Nevada. President. Trump, meanwhile, is watching and tweeting. He's complained about seeing his early lead quote miraculously disappear. He continues without evidence to cast doubt on just about every step of the voting process. And some in his party. You're doing the same like Republican National Committee chair Rana McDaniel. If the shoe was on the other foot and President Trump was in the lead in all these states, the media would be screaming that the race is not over and we need more time to count and make sure it is right. Atlanta Mayor Qi Sha Lance Bottoms acknowledged today that the numbers in her state are extremely close, but expressed faith in the count. I don't think there's anything wrong with there being a recount, but I'm also confident that the numbers will stay in Domenico Montanaro, NPR senior political editor and correspondent has been looking at all the numbers. Good evening, Domenico. I have been and just looking at what's coming in Arizona as well, which Cuts Joe Biden's lead down by about 7000 votes there to just under 30,000 now, But he's just missing his mark. President Trump me needed about 58% of all remaining ballots, and he only got I missed that by about 2000. Total votes s O, You know, if that continues, Joe Biden winds up with a narrow win. But boy that could be close. Okay, So as you point out, it's coming down to counties in Pennsylvania in Georgia in Nevada and Arizona, where things headed on the path to 2 70. What is your eye firmly fixed upon at this point? Things are headed in Joe Biden's direction. You know, right now, Biden, according to the Associated Press is count has 264 electoral votes he would need just one more state. To get over the top. Even if you took Arizona out of the picture and made it 253 electoral votes, then everybody's looking right at Pennsylvania because that those 20 electoral votes would get Biden over the threshold. 2 273 Biden there has now expanded his lead to about 22,000 votes, and there's still about 100,000 votes in the state to be counted. If he gets to. The number I'm looking at is a margin of 71,000 that will likely put him outside of the margin of outside of the margin for required automatic recount that would be triggered if he was outside of that has to be 0.5% points that separate the two candidates If it's within that. I'd be an automatic recount. If it's on my estimate about 35 36,000 margin, and it looks like Biden is on his way to that. Do you have any sense of when we will know about Pennsylvania? Well, we're continuing to know it's drip by drip by drip vote by vote. I'm glad that they are being meticulous and doing a good job with it. But the thing is these votes that are that they're counting now are the slowest votes. That you have to be able to count. You know, they're thes air mail in votes, sometimes their votes that you know. In Allegheny County, for example, they had share that we're jammed in a scanner or weren't accepted for one reason or another. And they have to count those by hand. So in a close election, these things take time. I think we'll have a better sense by the end of tonight. Whether Biden gets over that 35,000 threshold it looks like he will. If he continues on his pace, he should, you know be about 110,000 net votes, either by the end of tonight or tomorrow morning. Domenico Montanaro, NPR senior editor and political correspondent. Thanks so much, Domenico. Hey, you're welcome. Moving on now to Wilmington, Delaware. That's where NPR political correspondent Scott de Tro is the hometown of Joe Biden on the lookout for the Democratic nominee. We've got a little bit of a delay on the line, but Scott if you could start by telling us what's going on with the campaign. You know, it's just a strange holding pattern right now in Wilmington. I'm standing right by the stage where Joe Biden was very much face come out and a player in the president elect of the United States. There are spotlights on it. There are decorations, flags, bunting. There have been supporter streaming into to sit and watch outside the security perimeter. And yet in this whole pattern, as those numbers that Domenico talked about continued to move at a very slow pace. So we are going to hear from the former vice president tonight, but it is going to be much more of an update similar to the brief message we've heard from him the last few days. Pointing to the progress that is being made, but making it very clear that unlike President Trump, he is not going to say he has already won this race. We can expect to hear that similar message. We have heard the last few days have patients to count the boats. But Biden declaring yet again that he feels like he is on a very clear path to the presidency of the United States. Putting aside the potential for Biden to speak tonight. Can you talk about how they spent most of today? Waiting. You know, as a reporter, I keep thinking about that moment, right? When Biden started to surpass Trump in Pennsylvania this morning, I was with asthma. Holland and I turned around and I sprinted back to make sure I'd be in place in case the race was called and and the campaign reacted in a similar way. The gear started to go into motion, They signaled. Biden will speak tonight. Expect him to speak in prime time clearly expecting the race to be called, and to be able to move on toward toward, you know, starting to talk about governing openly and that just hasn't happened. So you're really seeing a holding pattern? But Biden has made a point to come out and speak publicly every day since Tuesday night, which is something that President Trump has not done at all..

Joe Biden President Trump President Trump Domenico Montanaro Pennsylvania Arizona NPR United States Scott de Tro Wilmington vice president Audie Cornish Republican National Committee Mayor Qi Sha Lance Bottoms Georgia Noelle King
"noelle king" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:31 min | 1 year ago

"noelle king" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"NPR News. I'm Noelle King. I'm Rachel Martin. And I'm Steve Inskeep. Bruce Springsteen write songs about people who lost something a job, a family hope. On his latest album, The Person Who's Lost Something Is Springsteen himself. Fed Pictures in an old strip faded pictures that somebody When you were hard and against the wall running roll. I had a friend who was in my very first band who passed away two summers ago. He and I were the last living members of my very first rock band, and the death of his friend George Thes sent Springsteen the songwriters spinning back to his youth and New Jersey. Springsteen talked about this while sitting in the home studio, where he recorded the album Letter to you. The Making of That album with his E Street band is also the subject of a film. Both projects lead Springsteen to recall when he was a teenager in the 19 sixties and the guitar player for a group called The Casteels. We played. Bowling alleys, pizza parlors. Fireman's fares, Elks clubs, nyssa Columbus C. Y O Dance is high school dances, weddings, bar mitzvahs We played. In front of virtually every audience. You can imagine. It was his school of music, and Springsteen was not the lead singer, not the frontman, his late friend George Wass. Do you feel? You understand why it is that you became famous and he didn't George was married. Very, very young became a father, Very young. So he had a lot of responsibilities. I was a one track mind. You know, before anything else before work, girls, I was always just music. Music music music 24 hours a day, seven days a week, and that have a lot to do with his friend became a carpenter. Springsteen became a songwriter. And for this new album, the Older Springsteen Now 71 Records, three songs written by the Young Springsteen of almost 50 years ago that.

Bruce Springsteen George Wass Steve Inskeep Rachel Martin NPR News Noelle King Bowling George Thes Fireman New Jersey Columbus C. Y O Dance George
Senate Judiciary Committee sends Amy Coney Barrett's Supreme Court nomination to full Senate as Democrats boycott vote

Morning Edition

05:38 min | 1 year ago

Senate Judiciary Committee sends Amy Coney Barrett's Supreme Court nomination to full Senate as Democrats boycott vote

"And I'm Noelle King. Good morning, the Senate Judiciary Committee has advanced the Supreme Court nomination of Judge Amy Cockney Barrett. Mr Chairman, the votes for 12 years and 10 not present motion is passed. Thank you. All 12 Republican senators voted for her nomination. The committee's 10 Democrats did not show up. They were boycotting the proceedings. NPR congressional reporter Claudia Gonzales has been following this story and the proceedings. Good morning, Claudia. Good morning. No. Well so fairly short today. This morning. What happened? Yes, it all went by very quickly, all said, and done and under 12 minutes. This is a very traumatic Shift from what we saw last week with hours and hours of testimony at least 20 hours of questioning Barrett by the members on the panel, both Republicans and Democrats, But today Democrats boycotted they did not show up. Republican senators on the Judiciary Committee sidestepped that no show to move barrettes nomination forward to the full Senate. Democrats said they were boycotting because they wanted to highlight the damage that bear it would do to healthcare, reproductive and voting rights and the fact that the vote took place amid a presidential election. And this is one battle. Democrats say perhaps the lose, but they're looking to win a bigger war. Graham alluded to that when he talked about the next vote on the Senate floor. Let's take a listen They started this On May For up to May that be a 60 vote requirement in the Senate today, and he's referring to the Senate filibuster there. This is a requirement of 60 votes that was once needed to approve a nomination like barrettes. But the filibuster was eliminated in 2013 as Democrats struggled to move their judges forward when they control the chamber with the tight margin, So that's what Graham is referencing, and he added later that perhaps this will be addressed again in the future. However, now that the Senate is controlled by Republicans with tight margins, they're able to push through barrettes nomination with just 51 votes. It's a preview of the battles to calm that this will go on after barrettes nomination this conversation even as far as she goes to the floor to be considered by the full Senate, and we see if Democrats ultimately changed the dynamics of power in the Senate or the presidency through the upcoming election day. How did Democrat to respond today? They didn't just say nothing right? Yes, there had been rumors for days that Democrats could boycott these hearings. They were facing a lot of pressure from outside groups to even skip out on the hearings last week questioning their it. But they decided not to do that last week. Instead, they did it to Dae. So later yesterday, they confirmed that they would all not show today they're empty seats were filled instead with images of Americans who have used the affordable care act. This is a case that could become it could be considered before the court next month. And so this is one critical issue They've been highlighting all along. They also held a news conference after the vote. This was led by Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer on the steps of the Capitol is take a listen. The nomination of Amy Cockney Barrel. Is the most illegitimate process I have ever witnessed in the Senate, and her potential confirmation will have dire, dire consequences. For the Senate. With his Supreme Court and our entire country for generations to come. So this was the theme they've been driving through this entire process. Barrett will shift the court to a 63 conservative majority, and they say she's a foe to the affordable care act. The landmark abortion rights case, Roe v. Wade, and she could play a role. If there's a dispute in the election. This is activated activated opposition as well. There were protesters outside the capital. Speaking against this nomination, this resulted in about a half a dozen arrests so far today I spoke to Judiciary Committee Democrat Richard Blumenthal of Connecticut yesterday, said the watchword for them is no more business. As usual. He and the other members have been driving home this point that this is a sham process. It's not normal. It's not writing Americans should see it for what it is and probably see more of this in the coming days, because there is so much acrimony over this nomination. Yes, exactly So many reasons. We're in the midst of a pandemic. We're rushing this through in 30 days, one of the fastest, we've seen the fight over health care. And, of course, you know the division between Republicans and Democrats. Really. Exemplified by President Trump pushing this forward and so there's a long history as well of these fights over the Supreme Court in the controversy surrounding these nominations if we go back to 2016, Democrats try to move forward. President Obama's nominee at the time. This is Judge Merrick. Garland and Republicans refused because they said they were so close to an election months away. But here we are now people are early voting and they're pushing this through. So this is set into motion a series of debates to calm and we're even hearing about it from the Democratic nominee Joe Biden this morning. We understand he told 60 minutes that he's going to create A study a commission to bipartisan commission to study whether they should add more seats to the courts a lot more to come here, including next week, right what happens then? So tomorrow, the nomination for Barrett actually will reach the full Senate floor. It's going to be followed by some procedural votes on Friday, as well as on Sunday. In between, we're going to see a lot of debate an argument back and forth. But the rial final moment for this will come Monday when the full Senate will submit their votes for bear to confirm or vote against her nomination to the Supreme Court. NPR congressional reporter Claudio Gonzalez. Thanks, Claudia. Thanks for having me

Senate Judge Amy Cockney Barrett Senate Judiciary Committee Supreme Court Claudia Gonzales Judiciary Committee NPR Reporter Graham Noelle King Mr Chairman Joe Biden Chuck Schumer Judge Merrick Richard Blumenthal
"noelle king" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:50 min | 1 year ago

"noelle king" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Noelle King and I'm Steve Inskeep. The old saying holds the vice president is a heartbeat away from the presidency in this election cycle. Both presidential candidates are in their seventies and one just got out of the hospital with Corona virus that added some interest to last night's vice presidential debate. In Salt Lake City, Mike Pence and Kamala Harris discussed the response to the Corona virus, the economy taxes, thie environment and the Supreme Court. Among other things. Here's how one voters saw Harris. Comma. Harris was very professional. She was very calm despite his interruptions, despite his long winded answers, and not allowing the moderator to moderate Fatima Berry and immigrant from Sierra Leone, who lives in Maryland, says she can identify with Harris. People are very much connected with her. They see themselves in her, especially for those of us who had immigrant parents who taught us the values that She missed houses in reference to her mother, the fight to make it in this country. But Sharon News back of Stevensville, Maryland, had a different view. Just like Hillary Clinton. I guess I don't know. Because you're not making faces, And I don't get that while she kept doing that you could make it all these weird. Strange. I don't know. Maybe she didn't realize she was doing at News back is an immigrant from Venezuela. She didn't trust Harris's answers, she said, particularly on race and protests. And she told us she cannot imagine herself voting for these Democratic candidates. Even if something happened. I probably wouldn't any work is nowhere. I would build a Democrat for them two because they're like socialists don't have socialist. Two of many views were hearing on last night's vice presidential debate. Let's hear now from a representative for the Biden Harriscampaign will be hearing from the Trump Pence campaign. Later in the show, representative Hakeem Jeffries chairs the House Democratic Caucus. Good morning, sir. Last night was a more issues oriented, debate them the first presidential debate, so we'll talk about the issues specific policy issues in just a SEC. Let me start by asking you whether you think Senator Harris made an air tight case. That the death toll from Corona virus and the economic catastrophe this pandemic has caused are the fault of the Trump Administration. Without question Senator Harris made clear That the Trump Administration's response to the Corona virus pandemic has been an unmitigated disaster. She laid out the statistics. Which illustrate the pain, suffering and death that the American people have experience, which is extraordinary. More than 210,000 Americans today over 100,000 small businesses permanently closed and the Trump administration at the moment has walked away from negotiations. And early on. Failed to reveal to the American people the severity of the illness, even though they knew it in late January. When asked what abiding Harris administration would do to combat Covic, should they win, Senator Harris said. Contact tracing testing administering a vaccine. Vice president Pence points out. That's pretty much the Trump administration's strategy. Does he have a point there? There wasn't much new in that answer. No. The Trump administration on Donald Trump has failed to be able to even contain the virus at 1600, Pennsylvania Avenue. They're testing isn't even reliable. Including what is being administered to high level officials. Of the government. And so Senator Harris is exactly correct when she talks about testing, tracing treatment, social distancing protocols as well as the administration. That is Of the vaccine in a safe and effective fashion. Those are things that may sound basic. But Donald Trump and his administration have failed to execute upon what the public health professionals have indicated, would be necessary in order to permanently flat in the curve. That is why I think what she's basically saying is that the bind administration led by Joe Biden. And Kamila Harris or going to proceed in a competent and comprehensive fashion. We haven't gotten that from Donald Trump and his administration. At one point in the debate moderator Susan Page as Senator Harris if she would take a vaccine. Let's listen to her response if the public health professionals if Dr Douchey if the doctors Tell us that we should take it. I'll be the first in line to take it. Absolutely. But if Donald Trump tells us that we should take it, I'm not taking it. We know that many Americans are suspicious of a vaccine and that that may be a problem in the future. Was this statement a problem If Donald Trump tells us to take it, I'm not taking it. But it was not a problem because on some has told more than 20,000 lives during the course of his presidency. And he cannot be trusted at this particular point in time, Donald Trump said. There were 15 cases it would go down to zero. Donald Trump said that one day one day it would all disappear. Donald Trump also suggested to the American people that perhaps Are they consider injecting themselves with life soul? And so there's no reason to trust Donald Trump at this particular point time, But Senator Harris was correct if the public health professionals Have made clear to the American people that the vaccine is safe and effective. We all should be taking it as part of the effort to crush the virus. Let's move on to some issues that we're not about the pandemic vice president Pence accused Joe Biden and Kamila Harris of supporting the Green New Deal. Senator Harris denied this as Joe Biden has denied this, but there's actually a Biden Web page with this sentence. Biden believes the green new deal is a crucial framework for meeting the climate challenges we face. What is the truth here? Isn't it correct that Biden wants to make a lot of a lot of changes to how we generate energy and that a lot of his plans to resemble the green new deal? Well, Joe Biden has put forth a comprehensive plan of his own. To tackle the climate change crisis which existentially threatens our planet and our existence as we know it. We're seeing that as a result of the extreme weather events, whether that is the Hurricanes. That have repeatedly battered the southern part of the United States and or the golf course or the wildfires that are ravaging through the west coast of the United States of America. That said What job on has indicated through his website is that some of the ideas within the green new deal provide a framework for tackling the climate crisis..

Senator Harris Donald Trump Trump Administration Joe Biden vice president Mike Pence Corona Salt Lake City Hillary Clinton Steve Inskeep Maryland Noelle King House Democratic Caucus Hakeem Jeffries Supreme Court United States representative
"noelle king" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:01 min | 1 year ago

"noelle king" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"From NPR News. I'm Noelle King, and I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning, One of our colleagues walked into an Airbnb apartment the other day and discovered a magazine, a magazine from January, which offered suggestions for a better commute or packing lunch. It was a dispatch from a pre pandemic world, a tiny reminder of how immensely life has changed, saying the enormous number of debt now more than 200,000 just begins to hint at the experience of this year. And in this week is we've reached that point. We've called three reporters who've been covering the pandemic since the start. Martha be finger is on the line from member Station W. O. R in Boston as his Blake farmer at W. P Ln in Nashville and NPR's Will. Stone is in Seattle. Good morning to all of you. Good morning. Good morning. Well, let's start with you. What were the early moments of this pandemic like in Seattle? It can be hard to remember now. Well, it was terrifying because we were completely unsure of how widespread the virus Wass and all of a sudden the country was watching the Seattle area and that did bring a lot of urgency to the response. I mean, if you remember some of the very first deaths were residents of a nursing home outside Seattle. And the rate of people dying. Getting seriously ill was shocking. And I remember there was this creeping sense that it could be anywhere in the area. So this made the medical community and the public. Take it pretty seriously. There was a lock down in this painful waiting period racing to have ice use. Fill up that never came to pass. Hospitals were not completely overwhelmed, but Washington did have its biggest spike in deaths during the spring. And as we watched Seattle the rest of us from a distance. It was the first major metro to be this affected. Other people were watching with creeping anxiety as the virus spread toward them. And Martha what was happening in New York as we headed a little later into the spring. Well, the first case Steve, you might remember was on March 1st. In that first week, cases doubled, sometimes overnight. The first death was less than two weeks away. And then in early April, the death toll peaked at more than 801 day, overwhelming hospitals and funeral homes. So many states in the Northeast shutdown to try to control the spread. States around New York were scrambling to prepare competing for mass purchases and demanding that the federal government released ventilators. Once the surge hit Massachusetts in mid April. Hospitals knew what was coming, but But save patients and healthcare workers were still really slammed. Dave MacDonald is a nurse anaesthetist who worked long shifts in an I C U putting patients on ventilators. You know, I know when I put that breathing tube in that Paige is probably not going to make it. So come in each day. Then looking at that list, See those those patient than making it hurts. I'm still just in awe of the doctors. The physician assistance all the hospital maintenance folks who slept in their basements or their attics to avoid infecting their families. They took on new jobs in hospitals or they became the family for patients because visitors were banned. There were just so many people who went above and beyond during the pandemic. I'm recalling the period in late March, when most of the country did shut down, But President Trump almost immediately began pushing for reopening and in early April. That didn't happen, but parts of the South began to re open late. In April. A Georgia especially Blake, Farmer, What was that? Like? Well, you know, people were just itching to get back to a life. There were pockets of the south where the corona virus had been, you know, is bad his folks fears like New Orleans. But most places the curve pretty well flattened out after businesses closed as they were required to do, and depending on how you look at it, the restrictions either staved off the worst of the pandemic. It just wasn't as bad as predicted. So states across the South were really all opening up just after Georgia in May. I was in South Carolina at the time and stopping at a gas station or the grocery story. You wouldn't necessarily know there was a pandemic. Thiss was before many jurisdictions in the region were mandating masks and now you look back. This is when the pandemic really took off in the south. And of course, the surge of deaths was right behind. How did things evolve in the Western United States will stone let's go back to you? Well. The death toll in Washington state just crossed 2000, which is terrible, but much lower than other places, But it was a really hard summer in the West, especially California, Arizona and Texas. Those three states alone make up nearly one in every five deaths in the country as a whole. Washington had a second wave, nothing as dramatic as other places and by then around the country. The demographics were also shifting. So it was younger people driving the spread, and that did lead to fewer hospitalizations and deaths. And on the West Coast outbreaks also began to hit some rural areas, much harder, so these air places with agriculture and farm workers and that tended to disproportionately affect Hispanic communities. And in general, the impact on communities of color is striking. Take Washington more than 40% of deaths were among the Hispanic population, even though that's only 13% of the state's population. In this kind of disparities True in California, and it's true all over the country. Yeah, well, that's definitely true on the East Coast, So infection rates are often highest in low income and minority communities where residents live in crowded housing and are essential workers may be in the food industry in hospitals. But overall, the mandatory mask orders the limits on public gatherings working from home school and business closures. Those steps have all slowed transmission. Re opening has been slower in the Northeast. Though you might recall restaurants in New York City are just scheduled to resume limited indoor dining next week. The mask orders strict crowd limits Those air still in place and many offices. Air still remote Blake Farmer want to recall the deaths in New York state nursing homes were extreme in the beginning an enormous percentage of deaths. We're in those nursing homes has that pattern repeated itself in other parts of the country? Well, it certainly did. In those early weeks of the pandemic. One facility outside Nashville here had 23 deaths from an initial outbreak, and there were many other facilities. That was same way. One of those residents who died was a mother of Stacy Thomas, who had talked to in early April. Her mom had survived a lot already. You know, when they told me that she was positive for the cove, it 19. I was scared that she wouldn't pull through this one. So this nursing home was fully evacuated in late March after more than 100 cases were discovered, many of them without symptoms At the same time, a TTE that time they didn't know the best way to manage nursing home outbreaks..

Seattle New York City Steve Inskeep Blake Farmer Martha Nashville Washington NPR News Northeast Georgia Airbnb California Noelle King NPR Stone United States Boston Dave MacDonald South Carolina New Orleans
"noelle king" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:13 min | 1 year ago

"noelle king" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Noelle King. And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning, this Labour Day weekend did not unfold just the way that some people in California had hoped. They were out. Camping seemed like a good thing to do in a pandemic. You're outdoors. You're away from other people, and then they heard word of approaching wildfires. One such person was V. Chat Kim in Central California. We were there yesterday. It was fine, and we were like, okay, it's gonna be okay. But they want to drive back. It was fiery red skies was pretty crazy. What made this worse for some people was the moment when they realize that fires had blocked their route of escape. Some campers needed a desperate airlift to safety reporter Alex Hall of Cake Ideas in Fresno in California's Central Valley and covering this story. Good morning. Good morning. Okay. The fire that trapped people is called the creek Fire. How big is this? So this fire a zit now is over 70,000 acres in 0% contained. It started on Friday in an area of this year in Nevada Mountains near near Fresno. Here in Central California, and in an area where you know a lot of people recreate there's a lot of camping backpacking. People have cabins there. Some people live there. It's very dry. A lot of forested area and this fire grew very quickly from several 1000 acres, Teo, like I said over 70,000 anchors and the list of areas where people are being ordered to evacuate, keeps changing and growing every day. So you have people who are Repairing toe leave. Some people are even doing what they can to protect their homes. And this is an area also with a lot of ranches, and people are trying to figure out what to do with their horses and other livestock. Plus, it's Labor Day. Weekend is a lot of people out. Just, you know, being outside. So you know how people coming down from the mountains either because they've already been evacuated or they're getting ready for when they have to be. Well, what happened with these people who are trapped? So over the weekend, there was this rescue of people who were in an area affected by the fire called Mammoth Pool Reservoir, and they were there camping like a lot of people were this weekend and there were 1000 or so people, according to the Fresno Bee, who were there and found themselves trapped. The roads out are blocked, and it wasn't safe to drive out and 200 or so had to be airlifted out by California National Guard Steve Anybody hearing me some of them were injured and taken to the president of 70 airport in the hospitals nearby in this area. Now it's being reported that some people are still there. And it's unclear exactly when they will be rescued. Well, we'll continue covering that story now. Alex. I understand you yourself were out camping over the weekend. What was that? Like? Yeah, Like many other people. I went out with a group of friends and actually drove through Yosemite Park Very close to a lot of the areas that are now you know, up in flames. We can't near Mammoth Lakes, which is on the eastern side of the Sierra and you know, Yes. It was very smoky on Saturday. We did hear about About the fire starting your near Shaver Lake and, you know, we know a lot of people who lived there. Go there often. So you know it was sad. We talked about it. But the smoke got really bad. Att. Night. The moon was red. And then in the morning, the smoke was so bad that we had heard that where we were might be evacuated and because we really didn't know what was going on and how quickly things would change. We just had to get out of there as soon as possible. I'm glad you're safe. Alex. Thank you very much. Thank you. That's Alex Hall joining us by Skype. She is with our member station and is currently in Fresno, California. Rex. It is still not finished four years after the UK voted to leave the European Union. The U in UK are negotiating new trade rules at the moment, but British Prime Minister Boris Johnson is signaling that he will go ahead with no deal. Brexit if that's not done by October, and some people are getting a sense of what life will look like after here's Eliot Hammond. Surrounded.

creek Fire Central California Fresno Steve Inskeep Alex Noelle King Nevada Mountains Steve Anybody Alex Hall Mammoth Pool Reservoir California UK Fresno Bee Shaver Lake Mammoth Lakes European Union reporter Eliot Hammond
"noelle king" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:25 min | 1 year ago

"noelle king" Discussed on KCRW

"From NPR News. I'm Noelle King and I'm Steve Inskeep. Not for the first time, The Trump administration is rolling back and Obama era environmental regulation. This one is aimed to cut climate warming methane emissions from oil and gas operations. By getting rid of that rule. The administration says it wants to help drillers. But NPR's Jeff Brady reports that some big oil companies argued against changing the rules. The announcement was delivered in Pittsburgh in the heart of Pennsylvania's gas drilling region. In 2016 the state voted for President Trump, but polls show it leaning Democratic this year. Thes rules or promise is kept by the Trump administration and president Trump himself to the energy industry. EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler says Thie Obama era methane rules were illegal and re sending them fix is a mistake. Methane is a concern because when it escapes unburned, it's a greenhouse gas that is more than 80 times as potent as carbon dioxide. At least for the 1st 20 years. It's in the atmosphere. The EPA says the oil industry is the largest source of methane leaks. But Wheeler says the old rules were duplicative and burdensome because some states and the industry already have programmes to reduce methane emissions industry already has more than enough incentive to capture methane without reporting requirements and other obligations. This is because methane is the key constituent of natural gas in a valuable commodity and announcing the proposed rules last year, the agency said the changes would save the industry up to $19 million a year in compliance costs. A significant concern for smaller drillers is that down the road, the Obama era regulations also would have applied toe older wells drilled before 2015. With this change. That requirement goes away. Oil industry trade groups praised the new EPA regulations. Environmental groups are critical. Peter's Al's Alice with Environmental Defense Fund, there's no scientific basis for the actions of the administration is taking The action's opposed by a wide range of stakeholders, among them big oil companies like Exxon Mobil, BP and Shell. They worry that if methane leaks continued to be a problem that could undermine their arguments that natural gas is a cleaner burning fossil fuel than coal. The president of Shell in the US called the rollback, frustrating and disappointing and said her company will continue its program to reduce methane emissions. While the EPA says the new regulations will not increase methane emissions Environmental Defense fund disputes that we estimate that the administration's action will increase methane pollution by about 4.5 1,000,000 tonnes per year. Zazzle says that's equivalent to the greenhouse gas emissions from 100 coal fired power plants. His group plans to sue the Trump administration over these changes that could lead to years of legal battles. Even a scientist say time is running out to avoid the worst effects of climate change. There's one way this rollback could be short lived, though. If Joe Biden wins in November, and Democrats gained control of the Senate, this change and others the Trump administration finalized recently could be reversed..

Trump administration President Trump EPA Thie Obama Environmental Defense Fund Administrator Andrew Wheeler NPR News president Steve Inskeep NPR Noelle King Jeff Brady Joe Biden
"noelle king" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:17 min | 1 year ago

"noelle king" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"From NPR News. I'm Noelle King and I'm Steve Inskeep. How far must you go to prove an absentee ballot? Israel, The question is important in every election. Tens of millions of people, for example, voted absentee or by mail in 2016. But because of the pandemic, more people hope to vote that way in 2020 Rhode Island wants to make it easier. It dropped a rule that required a voter tohave to witnesses or a notary of firm and absentee ballot. A federal court allowed this change, but the National Republican Party would like the Supreme Court to intervene. And stop it. Nellie Gharbia is on the line. She's a Democrat and the secretary of state of Rhode Island, So she's a big voice in the States. Elections Secretary Gharbia Good morning. Good morning, Steve. What makes the witness requirement unnecessary? Well, the witness this requirement is unnecessary because the real security of the mail ballot is the signature itself and the verification process of the signature on that application process. So when you apply for a mail ballot in Rhode Island, your signature on that application is verified at the local level. Once you're approved for a mail ballot it sent to you. You do an oath envelope when you include your mail ballot, mailing it back, and I'm sorry. The envelope. Can you just tell me what an oath envelope is? It's it's It's an envelope that you put your ballot in that includes an oath that you swear that your the voter, you know, upon penalty of perjury and all sorts of fines. And you sign that oath and that signature on the oath. Envelope is also verified by a separate group of election officials at the state level at the board of Elections. So that is the real security of the mail ballot system. It is not who the witnesses are, who we don't actually know who they are, or even the notary public. So you are pointing out as other people have on this program. There are many ways to verify absentee ballots and mail in ballots. It's a much more secure system than some people have suggested. And yet there was this requirement and the Republican Party is saying, Come on. It's not that hard. You confined two witnesses. You have time. It could be your spouse. It could be a neighbor. It could be anybody they would like to keep this requirement. Why not? Well, no, because really, it's not necessary for the security of the ballot. And really, no one should have to choose between their health and the constitutional right to vote. You know, I'm going to always fight to make sure that Rhode Islanders Khun vote safely and securely were in the middle of a pandemic. We should be allowing people the options that make them comfortable and keep them safe and be able to vote. Do you believe that on the part of the Republican Party that this really is a debate over ballots, security I am concerned about the Republican Party's process through state after state after state where they are filing these lawsuits. That really question election process is That each state is comfortable with them. That has really security and safety of voters at heart. I don't I really have a problem with making it harder for people to vote using this pretense of voter fraud, which honestly has not been proven in any of the cases that they're alleging. And we should note just for the record. There been millions and millions of people have voted absentee or by mail with very, very limited cases of voter fraud, handfuls of ballots, Really, But let me ask about the practicalities of this if you and many other states have many more male inter absentee ballots. Does that mean that Rhode Island is going to be unlikely to call a presidential winner on election night? It might be possible and But let me focus on this. This election is unlike any other election we've ever had on DH. We're focused on making sure that Good island. Voters can trust the system and that they're able to vote safely and securely. So the accuracy in the end of the count is more important than the speed of the count in this particular election. Well, I'd I'd like to believe that and I know that in past generations, it sometimes took many days to learn a presidential winner. But we're now in this highly tense environment where the president is demanding a result on election night. Do you foresee a risk of some chaos? If days passed after November 3rd, and we're not sure whose one certain states I know that nationally. There's a lot of anxiety around the election results. I know that in Rhode Island, the board of Elections will be working, you know, day and night to make sure that they deliver those results safely and securely and accurately to Rhode Islanders. Jamelle Bouie, columnist for The New York Times, addressed various efforts to tamp down mail in balloting or question mail in balloting and he makes a suggestion in The New York Times yesterday says, Listen, if we really care about democracy We're just gonna have to show up in person in some way. The safest way we can figure out and vote Would you recommend that people consider just showing up in person? Now I really again and I really want to stress that meant voting from home is an absolutely safe and secure way to do it. People of options in our democracy they convert from home they convert early in person in many states, including Rhode Island, and they could vote on Election Day. It's up to the voter to choose what works for them. And in a couple of words here, absentee ballots are going up in your state. There will be going out very soon for the September 8th primary. Yes. Okay. Nellie Gharbia, Secretary of State of Rhode Island, saying Thanks so much. Thank you. A believer in the wild and debunked Cuban on conspiracy theory has won a Republican congressional primary in Georgia. Q and on claims, among other things that satanic pedophiles are trying to destroy President Trump. Here's Emma hurt from member station W. A. B E in Atlanta. Many first got to know Marjorie Taylor Greene when Politico dug up videos she'd posted about members of Congress. But I'm sorry, anyone that is a Muslim. The believes in Sharia law does not belong in our government. They don't She also called Democratic donor George Soros and Nazi Soros is Jewish and a Holocaust survivor. Some Republican leaders called her comments appalling and disgusting..

Rhode Island Republican Party National Republican Party Nellie Gharbia Steve Inskeep board of Elections NPR News Rhode Islanders Israel Good island George Soros Secretary Noelle King Supreme Court perjury
"noelle king" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:28 min | 2 years ago

"noelle king" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Org's And by the listeners and members of the public radio, now 7 46 It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Noelle King and I'm Steve Inskeep. Voting in Indian country is often problematic. If somebody had a voter registration cider polling place simply asks for a voter's address. They face the reality that many reservations do not have street addresses. Some officials in some states are now pushing for mail in balloting to prevent the spread of the Corona virus this fall, and his Laurel Morales of member station Kjeii Zizi reports that has made the election process for native Americans even more complicated. Tony Leah, on the Navajo Nation in northeastern Arizona, is the hometown of Darryl Marks. His mother and grandmother still lives there, and that's about five miles of exacting. Down a dirt road to get to their resident, Mark says. It's always been difficult for his family to get their mail. They rely on a P O box at the trading post. There was a time she only checked it once or twice a month. So Jai was very familiar as a child growing up seeing the you know past due notices and things like that, because my mom was in checking it regularly because there were other things that are a little bit more important. Things like hauling water, feeding the family and working a full time job. Mark says if they miss the mail in ballot deadline, the drop box is 100 miles away in Flagstaff, and in November, dirt roads can become muddy and impassable. We saw time and time again that there were just unreasonable distances that people have to travel in order to cast their vote. Jacqueline De Leon is an attorney at the Native American Rights Fund and a member of the Isleta Pueblo. The fund recently held field hearings all over Indian country to better understand the obstacles to voting that need of Americans face. People rely on peel boxes, and they shared P O boxes. I'm talking about like 10 to 15 people sharing appeal box in Alaska. It's not unusual for the mail to be delayed if weather prevents planes from landing in remote villages. In northern California. Many corrupt tribal members live in RVs, which are considered temporary housing by election authorities. And in the southwest, the Navajo nation has sued over the lack of translators. Navajo isn't traditionally a written language, so there's no translation on a mail in ballot. And alien says that's a major problem. Given the push to vote by mail this election because of the covert crisis, adoption of just mail in balloting would be devastating in Indian country. Another registration hurdle is Internet access. Or than 1/3 of Native Americans living on tribal land flack broadband, according to the Bureau of Indian Affairs on the Navajo Nation. It's 2/3 of the population as the tribe works to stop the spread of the Corona virus. No one is out trying to register people in person. Those events are not happening right now. Petty Ferguson Bonnie directs Arizona State University's Indian legal clinic. You know the tribes there not encouraging people to come onto the reservations right now, because of the pandemic, So you know what are the alternatives? Are there alternatives? Election officials have to get creative when it comes to registering and voting. Arizona Secretary of State Kiddie Hop says voting early will be key. She points to one county that plans to use a mobile voting booth. It was a food truck, and they converted it into a voting van. They can dio curbside voting where tool of the poll workers from different parties come out and help that voter vote at their car. The problem now is spreading the word. Those early voting options don't do any good If we're not telling voters that their their hubs, says the father, someone has to drive, especially if they don't have gas money. The less likely they are to vote for NPR news. I'm moral more Alice in Flagstaff. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm Noelle King and I'm Dave Frieman. Here's Joe McConnell on VD at 7 50 If you're going for a drive in the Hayward area, let's find out what's happening. Hayward, San Leandro South. Aditi has two problems one and Hayward wanted San Leandro. There's a crash it Winton off to the side of the road. It looks like that's clearing and then South bound it low welling, a brand new collision reported. They're just a couple of minutes ago, was already slow between those points. Affected the well.

Navajo Nation NPR News Steve Inskeep Noelle King Flagstaff Arizona Mark Hayward Native American Rights Fund Navajo Tony Leah Laurel Morales Bureau of Indian Affairs San Leandro Joe McConnell Alaska Jacqueline De Leon
"noelle king" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"noelle king" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Noelle King and I'm Steve Inskeep. During the 19 seventies and eighties, a string of murders terrorized California the suspect became known as the Golden State Killer. Yesterday in Sacramento, a 74 year old retired mechanic and former police officer admitted to being the serial rapist and murderer. His name is Joseph D'Angelo junior and he pleaded guilty to 13. Murders and rapes. NPR's Eric Westervelt has our story today, and we should warn you that this report, which lasts a bit more than three minutes, contains some graphic and disturbing details. Because of the pandemic. The plea agreement hearing was held in a university ballroom turned into a makeshift courtroom, D'Angelo appeared frail in an orange prison jumpsuit and wore a plastic face mask against the Corona virus. He didn't look at Victimsfamilies in detail. Prosecutors outlined his long spree of sadistic home invasion, rapes, kidnappings, robberies. And murders. After each case, DeAngelo would answer the charges read by Judge Michael Bowman, with only the words guilty and I admit murdered very Domingo, which occurred In the county of Santa Barbara. Violation. Penal code Section 27 Murder in the first degree. How do you plead? Sometimes he'd use a knife. Other times a gun in the case of Sherry Domingo and her boyfriend, Greg Sanchez. D'Angelo used a firewood log to bludgeon the couple to death after shooting them. Over and over. He'd use similar tactics. He'd often stalk his victims break into their homes late at night than tie up, taunt and terrorized them before raping the women. Often repeatedly he'd sometimes pile dishes or coins on victims backs. If I hear any noise, if you move, I'll kill you all he would threaten After decades of dead ends. Investigatorsfindings caught D'Angelo after connecting old DNA from a crime scene to a distant relative of his using a popular genealogy database. In addition to the murders as part of the plea deal, D'Angelo also admits to more than 60 other rapes where the statute of limitations has run out. In exchange, he'll get life in prison without the possibility of parole..

Joseph D'Angelo Sherry Domingo Steve Inskeep California Noelle King Sacramento NPR officer Eric Westervelt Judge Michael Bowman Murder DeAngelo Santa Barbara Greg Sanchez Victimsfamilies Investigatorsfindings
"noelle king" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:24 min | 2 years ago

"noelle king" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Noelle King and I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning, China did not even have to begin enforcing a new law to make changes in Hong Kong, the central government just passed the National Security Law in Beijing. And in Hong Kong, pro democracy leaders are already stepping away from politics. This new law criminalizes a lot of dissent and changes the way that the centers would be put on trial. All of this affects a coastal territory that is supposed to have some autonomy. Dating back to its time as a British possession. NPR's Emily Fang is following this from Beijing, either. Emily he Steve, is it understood exactly what's in the law? Yeah, that's the thing. Beijing passed this law about nine hours ago, but they still have not provided us a public draft of the law, meaning Hong Kong people are supposed to follow a lot that they haven't read yet. But broadly we know that this law would allow Beijing not Hong Kong to Judge case's deems relevant to national security and that Beijing will set up its own security body on Hong Kong soil to collect intelligence and investigate such cases. This was a highly secretive and accelerated process for passing what is a very significant piece of legislation. I talked to Wilson Lung earlier today, He's a council member of Hong Kong's Bar Association. That's just completely contrary to the notions of law that we had in Hong Kong, which is the law as a accessible You know, transparent process. Where? Before you in AC alof? You discuss it. You get the draft We debate it. Instead. What Beijing did was they bypassed? Hong Kong's legislative legislature Completely hen picked which representatives to consult and simply imposed the law. Hong Kong is to be supposed to follow. You mentioned that Beijing will have its own course courts for cases that are of interest to Beijing so people will not be getting into the independent courts they've had since the British Times. And that they thought they were promised. Until I believe 2040 2047 does this break the promise of some autonomy for Hong Kong? Of course, Beijing says that this upholds that principle of semi autonomy but in practice yes, it breaks that promise. This law shows that Beijing's legal dictates now supersede Hong Kong's own rule of law. Whenever Beijing decides that issue falls under the umbrella of national security. I also talked to Alan Long, he's former chair of Hong Kong's Legal Bar Association. He's now a pan democratic politician. He says that this national security law creates a parallel. Legal procedure in Hong Kong that's run by Beijing and Beijing. Only once you are a national security suspect. Then you will be put into that system, which would be mend by special branch within the Hong Kong police. Your case will be prosecuted by a special department within the Department of Justice. And you will be tried by some handpicked judges. The law is expected to be effective as of tomorrow July 1st, which not coincidentally, is the anniversary of Hong Kong's handover as a British possession to a Chinese territory. So we shall see if there are protests tomorrow have officials said how strictly they're going to enforce this new law. No, it is unlikely that Beijing would sweep up everyone deemed subversive in one go, but we have seen a massive chilling effect in Hong Kong civil society already within hours of the law being passed to opposition political parties said they were going to voluntarily disband because they thought operating under such conditions was too dangerous. You've seen people deactivate many of their online social media accounts because they fear their political post may be used against them. And sales of anti surveillance software to jump over Chinese Internet censors have gone way up. And I guess if people did protest tomorrow, they would risk being arrested. Under this new system right? They face much higher legal penalties. Now Hong Kong police have also been much more strict and enforcing anti protests. Techniques, the U. S. Britain. Other Western countries have spoken up in criticism of this national security law. The US has actually put sanctions visa restrictions on Chinese officials who curtail Hong Kong's freedoms. Beijing has hit right back and said it'll curtail visas for Americans who behave egregiously towards Hong Kong. NPR's Emily Fang in Beijing. Thanks. Thanks, Steve. When the White House and Congress passed Corona virus aid packages. They promise that sick people would not get stuck with the bills from Cove in 19 tests that has not turned out to be entirely true. Every month. We take a look at medical bills for our bill of the month. Siri's today a woman from Southern California who did everything she was supposed to do. Sarah Varney, a senior correspondent with Our partner, Kaiser Health News brought us this story. Follow your doctor's orders. That's exactly what Carmen Quintero did when she developed a racking cough on March 23rd and was sent home from work. I went to work and I was sick, so they sent me home. They told me I couldn't come back until I was tested until something said that I didn't have the virus. Cantero is 35 she and her girlfriend live in Corona, California, east of Los Angeles. In a house packed full of four generations. She's a supervisor at a warehouse that distributes and 95 masks and essential business during the pandemic. They called my primary doctor. She's even told me it seems like you have the covert 19 symptoms. So I need you to go to the nearest hospital because we do not carry this. The test here with us. So then I hang up and hanged up and I did what she told me. Cantero went to the Corona Regional Medical Center, a nurse tested her breathing and X rayed her chest. But the hospital didn't have any corona virus tests, and the nurse told her to go to the Riverside County Public Health Department. It was still early in the pandemic then, and tests were scarce. The earliest the county could. Tester was April 7th more than two weeks later. Then after that, I got to build from the hospital for for that day. 1840 just because I did not mean my deductible And I just didn't thought it was fair because I went in there to go get tested, and they started doing all this stuff. Congress passed a Siri's of federal aid packages meant to shield.

Hong Kong Beijing National Security Law Emily Fang Steve Inskeep NPR Siri Cantero Congress Corona Regional Medical Center Noelle King China Riverside County Public Health Bar Association US Department of Justice Corona
"noelle king" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:04 min | 2 years ago

"noelle king" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Noelle King. And I'm Steve Inskeep a few weeks ago to astronauts lifted off from U S soil three. But here tonight that got beat. Bob and Doug were on a space X rocket. It's the first time a private companies carried astronauts into full orbit. Colonel Doug Hurley and Colonel Bob Lincoln are now on the international space station, which is where we connected with him last week. How's the view? When we get a chance to look at the window, it's spectacular. I can't begin to describe some of the sites that you get to see the sun rises. The sun sets. If you sat in the couple of for 45 minutes, and you had a rough day, it would immediately washing all away. It's just a incredible view of our planet that we have from here. How is going into space now? Different than it was half a century ago. If you go back to the earlier missions, the Apollo timeframe the team on the ground did quite a bit of manual computation toe ensure that the subtle burns that needed to happen with the engines on board the vehicle to end up at the right landing site. We have the luxury of having much of that all on board our vehicle, and so it was ableto. Get all the way to space station pretty much by itself, and we monitor to make sure that that was happening safely. So you're in much more of a self driving car. Is that a fair analogy? We're in a self driving car with a lot of capability to make sure that we agree with what it's decided to do. What did it mean for you that you went up in a privately owned spacecraft? You know, From a personal standpoint, the opportunity to work on a brand new vehicle and fly on the first test flight of a brand new vehicle was just something that comes along once in a generation. So You know when we were offered the opportunity to participate? Obviously, we wouldn't say now. Do you talk among yourselves about what? The possibilities might be 10 or 20 years from now because of some of the work you're doing now. I think we talk amongst ourselves in terms of what the possibilities might even be next year or three years from now. Way look. Att tthe e re use that Space X is done with the First age rockets that they have. It's opened up the door for, you know missions to be launched. That would be prohibitively expensive. If you were to use another method for getting the vehicle into space. As the cost goes down, then really, those opportunities will open up for other folks. Tio fly on those vehicles. I think you'll still need somebody trained. To go with him and much like if you were to go scuba diving, you know you could be trained and go. But you want to go with somebody who's got some skills and some experience, Gentlemen. Final question. Do you get a chance to follow the news from home? And does it feel different from the distance that you're at to be following it? It's tough to see the world kind of in the state. It's in right now from here. It's difficult to see the challenge is that where we're facing with the with the strife in the cities and with the pandemic? And then just by virtue of being able to look out the window. You see the world with no borders up here, and that does resonate with you. And then hopefully that message. Khun, get back down to Earth that You know? We need to be able to work together for the common good and not work against each other and argue all the time over things that shouldn't be argued about Colonel Hurley in Colonel Banchan. Thank you very much, gentlemen. Thank you. This is NPR news Back down to Earth back to the V, A bridge. Here's Joma comma. Crashes reported on both the upper and lower decks. Now the one on the upper deck is a westbound passed the island instead to be a hit and run, but it's at least of rubberneckers value because it's back it through the tunnel. And the lower deck problem is eastbound before the island where there's a report of a crash that might be in the right lane. The toll plaza backup is out beyond the overpasses, but not the maze in the South, A Y 87 north bound north 87 before Almond Expressway, it's a report of a mattress. That might be partially in the left lane, Joe McConnell for captivity. Support comes from Comcast business offering Internet voice and video solutions designed to help businesses maximize performance. So the focus can remain on employees and customers learn more business dot Comcast dot com Area Today High sixties to the low eighties or so critical fire weather conditions persisting, especially in the North Bay Mountains today to so do Take caution. Take precautions. The time now is 6 51 Good morning. This is the California report. I'm Saul Gonzalez in Los.

Colonel Hurley Bob Lincoln NPR News Steve Inskeep Comcast Noelle King Joe McConnell Colonel Banchan Almond Expressway Saul Gonzalez North Bay Mountains Doug Khun California Los
"noelle king" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:42 min | 2 years ago

"noelle king" Discussed on KCRW

"W It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Noelle King and I'm Steve Inskeep. Mississippi plans to fly a new state flag a flag without the Confederate battle emblem by voters 37 14 to bill passes. The state Senate voted on Sunday to retire the current 126 year old flag. Mississippi's Republican governor, Tate Reeves, has said he will sign the measure that calls for a commission to design a new flag. Senate Minority Leader Derrick Simmons is among the lawmakers who voted for the changes on the line, Senator. Good Morning. Good morning to you. Thank you for having me. I just want to know what I'm doing. The math here is this is a flag from 18 94. I guess more than a generation after the Civil war. But it is a kind of combination of the two main Confederate flags from that war. Was there ever any doubt in your mind about what that flag stood for? It was never any doubt. In my mind. It was a very Hateful, oppressive and divisive symbol. And after 126 years of flying that flag in the state of Mississippi, Mississippi will soon have a new flag. I don't mean to recount the arguments. You must have had all your life about this flag. But what did you say when people would push back and say Oh, no, This is just a symbol of our heritage. I said it was a symbol of hate and not love, and it was a symbol of division in that unity, and I made it clear to people that It certainly was a flagged at that represented some Mississippians and not all And so I had my own personal experiences regarding discrimination and had my father and grandfather that shared Many of their experiences and how the flag was just a constant reminder. That community is a color or black Americans in Mississippi was just steel, not part ofthe ofthe Mississippi. What do you mean by a constant reminder? Would you be driving somewhere and see that flag and Well, what would go through your mind? Yes, I actually the flag was in the schools that I was educated in the flag was flying in the businesses that I were frequent. The flag was was actually flying in public spaces for the in terror. Eight years of my legislative career, had the walk to the capital and not on Ly see the flag outside of the capital. But every morning we would do invocation and would do a prayer. And behind us. We have the American flag. And unfortunately that Confederate flag Why do you think that this has changed now? There is a combination of issue Stevo. Certainly what is going on nationally? Um, is the impetus you have people wanting to address the inevitable the racial inequality in America. Are. These systems have basically being at the underlining conditions of a lot of the problems that we are seeing in Mississippi, of course. That while the flag was just a symbol The symbol is feel like a symptom of the overall racial inequality that exist specifically in Mississippi. And so I mean, I hope that that this moment, um continues in the state of Mississippi, and this is just the start of a new chapter in Mississippi. So that we could have a more bright, progressive and inclusive Mississippi. So let's take this flag down. But this also addressed all the other issues that we face in Mississippi. State Senator Derrick Simmons of.

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"noelle king" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:14 min | 2 years ago

"noelle king" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Noelle King and I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning. Why're Corona virus cases rising in much of this country? One likely factor is Memorial Day weekend. Just a few weeks ago, when some beaches and boardwalks were packed people acted in many ways in recent weeks, as if life was back to normal. Here's another question. What we do is July 4th approaches. NPR's Alison Aubrey is guided us through the practicalities of the pandemic for months and joins us once again, Alison Good morning. Good morning, Steve. How dire is the situation right now? Well, it's pretty bad dramatic increases in cases in many states, and I'd say there's been a topic of debate here, Steve about how to protect ourselves. And it's about masks. Bottom line here is get with the programme where one cover your face. We've seen how this issue has been politicized. Some people see masked mandates as an infringement of personal freedoms. But if you listen to scientists, there is no really debate here and yesterday, even though the president has not been a top supporter of masking his secretary of health and human services, Alex Caesar had this strongly worded warning on NBC. The window is closing. We have to act and people as individuals have to act responsibly. We need to social distance we need to wear for our face coverings if we're in settings where we can't social distance, particularly in these hot zones. So a strong statement here from a top administration official, and you know until now, it's been a bit of do as I say. Not as I do. But this weekend, we saw vice President Pence and Texas wearing a mask after months of not wearing one in public. The president, of course, still hasn't but now officials around him people he has appointed to top positions of responsibility, saying where a mask But given that there is this I don't want to say debate. But people have resisted the science here. Can we just lay out the science? What's the evidence that masks help? Sure. Well, let's just look at Illinois. There's been a significant decline in case is there a face mask ordinance took effect back in May I spoke to Emily landing about this. She's an infectious disease epidemiologist at the University of Chicago Medicine, she says, Look, many of the states that have not uniformly mandated masking have seen increases. The rates in Illinois came down tremendously. But if you look at face covering rules in other states, I would argue that that may be playing a role in the resurgence. Even though they have had similar phase three openings to Texas and Arizona, right. The lack of face covering order in place may be a bigger deal. So she says, If you care about protecting others on yourself, cover your face. Even if you're young and think you're not as vulnerable to serious illness, you could be protecting others. Oh, you just touched on another key factor here, Alison, we get the impression that maybe some younger people think that they're not as at risk and their keep getting told you might still carry it to somebody else. But Younger people might think differently. Is there any better information about what ages of people are at risk here? Well, age does play a role. I mean, risk goes up the older you are, but the CDC has a new analysis on the conditions linked to serious illness. Bottom line is people with chronic conditions, and this includes younger people diabetes, obesity, heart disease, lung disease there at higher risk, and how much higher is actually Steve Staggering. The latest analysis shows people with these conditions are six times more likely to be hospitalized, 12 more times likely to die from the virus. I spoke to Darius my safari, and he's a cardiologists and the dean of the nutrition school at Tufts University, and he put these numbers into perspective. You're 35 you have one or more of these conditions. You have the same risk of hospitalization as a 75 year old who doesn't have any of these things. So having these conditions adds 40 years of age, essentially to your Bodies covert risk. So young adults who have these conditions are at higher risk. Well, it sounds like if it sounds like it's important to know your own personal risk here. That's right and was afraid, says there are things you can do.

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