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25 Burst results for "Nodar"

Being a International Student During the Virus with Zeyi Yang

$6.99 Per Pound

06:29 min | 2 months ago

Being a International Student During the Virus with Zeyi Yang

"So did we miss anything? Is there anything else? The listeners should know blow introduction took. It's your fault because you made it long because you're involved in so many things So that's I mean it's so crazy. It's like a full circle because I think when we were researching on on what questions. We should ask her and everything when we first started the project by the way listeners. If you guys have been caught up check that episode out. You wrote that article and you know you interview these people who are from John who are getting ahead and thinking about. How do we rebuild this place? Could you tell us like the story behind that article how you pitched it Your involvement Sure I'll so I pitched it because of course I am. One always have a lot of connections. They're always looking at wore. My people are doing this and I know there are non loud but some will have people here in United States or vary warrior. Just like me and I try to do something for home. Even if we're just we're like miles away from so I connected to I v because I talk to a New York based organization. They're like comprised fully off Wuhan People Or It's a name. It's called Yellow Crank Club. I believe so. They were all like people from John or have connections to Wuhan der here. They're professionals and they tell me. Oh I these organizing this report project. It he she'll be the best person that you can talk to mark to know her. Howard to know her and also besides hurt because I went to school in John onto onto college so I have a lot of friends or like like school. Connections also here. I also talked to them of a hot. What they have done for the city and those are pretty much one made up Was in the article for self strain of morning. Post. That's crazy. So how long did it take for you to Pitch Shit and then for you to write the whole thing up where people really enthusiastic about helping you out? Yeah I think so. I pitched to the editor actually is through Nodar Hon. Journalists also here in New York also So that probably approved that a very soon like after one or two days because He saw veteran. And then I did an interview in like one week I think I can I can. I said I have a lot of school school friends from Wuhan. So it's really easy to connect to people from and there were I think was actually the last person I talked to. The article Easier to got to off today. I feel like okay. I got everything I use. Probably not a week to ride article and then shaky S. journalists to journalists. You know you have any questions for Zee on I mean I yeah so I think a quick question that I wanted to ask you know A little bit about South China Morning Post If you'RE A ASIAN-AMERICAN I'm not saying all Asian Americans speak Chinese but I mean especially if you are of Chinese American background south China morning poses kind of like the most relevant newspaper that covers Chinese American Chinese issues around the world can dumb. Can you kind of explain to the listeners? Like what is like a like. What is the American counterpart for like the South China Morning Post in like how relevant it is India and the Chinese community right? Well that's a big question I will say it is probably one of my most trusted publication that reports a lot about China though is English newspaper based in Hong Kong. So Iri but he really looks a lot of different regions like not just Hong Kong Bar. They have a lot of stuff in mainland China. They have a loan stuff in other Asian countries. They're looking at like the whole that. I guess Asian Pacific region so and also I feel like I do like to resuscitate him more money because they usually presented a very balanced views. A NAS saying they don't have like a Pro China China views. They do but then you kind of see a balance of all different. They're all diverse views injured. So that's why I usually have a US my go-to new sources for like English articles about China. I see I see so like I mean I think I think when when when lot of Americans when they think of Chinese media they have a sense of a skewed perception or I wouldn't set. Well maybe skewed isn't the right word but they have a preconceived notion that you know a mainstream media in China to be Control you know what I'm saying by the government to to to a massive degree I'm not agreeing or disagreeing with that point but Would you say like you know I just go off on what you just said earlier? Like you know if you are like a American of somebody who was not Chinese were living in China. Would you recommend like with south China morning? Post like the go-to newspaper that you would recommend for a Americans to Kinda get informed about Chinese issues. I think it's is a pretty hard question to answer. A first of all to is true. That most of the media based in China are heavily censored is that I didn't say a man I asked him to go back your hand. James Right yeah. Because it's true that Because Autumn Media Inge based in China are subject to kind of like the administration regulations about it slow either administering Goto Demonstrate Unique article. They have to comply with that sadly the truth but endure a lot of nuances in there is like it's not every single be censored in China

China South China Morning Post Pro China China Wuhan New York John United States Yellow Crank Club Hong Kong Bar James Right Hong Kong Nodar Hon Editor Howard Pacific India ZEE
Michaela Haas on Turning Bad Breaks into Breakthroughs

Untangle

09:45 min | 3 months ago

Michaela Haas on Turning Bad Breaks into Breakthroughs

"Michaela. It is so great to have you on untangle today. Thank you so much for being here. Thanks for having me. I've been looking forward to this awesome so I loved your book bouncing forward. Yeah and the subtitle of the book is transforming bad. Breaks into breakthroughs and this just stirred up so much for me because so much of your work is about resilience and forgiveness and use the term post traumatic growth verses post traumatic stress for example. And I really WANNA help our our listeners. Understand why resilience is so important and why some of US fall apart while others of US thrive based on your stories exactly. That's really the question. That has intrigued me for a very very long time. And I as a journalist I meet a lot of people who've been through traumatic experiences and I always wondered why some people were able to deal with it better or heal from it. And even thrive while others fell apart so this question became deeply personal when I got severely ill in my twenties and I was actually bedridden for about eight months and it was pretty scary because the doctors didn't know what was wrong with me and if I would ever get better and I was Nodar Cillian and I did fall apart. So this really sparked the personal part of the journey to see well other people have been through things much worse than what I've experienced. So are there things I can learn to become more resilient? Are there things that I can use to nourish myself when I'm down and the book bouncing forward is really the result of this because I got to speak to? People Admire like Maya Angelou who actually gave the book it's titled. She talks about bouncing forward going. Beyond what the Naysayer said or people like temple grandin the autistic pioneer or a paralyzed surfer called Jesse Bill. Our and I asked them all the same questions. What helped you. How did you make it through? And in the course of this research I came across this amazing new science of Post Traumatic Growth. And of course everybody has heard of post traumatic stress but much to my surprise. I learned today is really a lot of information about how we cannot only heal from traumatic experiences and challenges but even use them to grow and so this is what really fascinates me and this is why I wrote bouncing forward to share this research with anybody who experiences challenges in life and who doesn't right. Doesn't I think you have a statistic in your book that eighty nine percent of US experience at least one traumatic event in our life and with post traumatic growth. Is there sort of a depth of experience or negative experience that you have that makes it almost impossible to come back or in your research? Have you found any differences between how bad experience actually is in how easy or hard it is to come back thing one of the things? I've most surprising is that it is not what happened to us. That determines how severe trauma is I've interviewed a chapter about. My friend Coco Schumann. Who WAS AN AUSCHWITZ? Maya Angelou was abused and raped as an eight year old. So I've come to understand that there is nothing that we cannot heal from now. Of course it doesn't mean that it doesn't leave scars and actually what determines if can heal from a trauma isn't so much what happens to us that how much support we get. How much incharge feel how much control they can take situation? How safe we feel how much we lost in very very much. Our mindset. 'cause. I'm I've been a practicing Buddhist for more than twenty years now and what actually got me into Buddhism was mine counters with Tibetan refugees in Asia. And they had traumatic life stories. They've often witnessed family members being killed or tortured or they've been in prison or they've been tortured and even when some psychologists were surprised to find that only one of nine hundred refugees they interviewed was diagnosed with Ptsd and all the others had found ways through that practice of compassion and meditation and Mindfulness to work through their pain and work through their suffering. And this is where I think the idea of post traumatic growth is so helpful because as soon as we can find any purpose in while we go through then we actually have a much much better chance of healing from it and this is something that no matter what our specific traumas children set. The fundamental question is not if we encounter suffering because we all do but how we work with suffering so that leads to awakening the hard in going beyond the habitual views and actions to perpetuate suffering. So this is really the core. A founding forward. Yeah it's a really. It's a complicated idea. I mean it seems simple on the one hand and complicated on the other because looking back at your story so your bedridden with an undetectable illness at the time for eight months. And you're struggling with that. Is it because you didn't have the tools yet to become more resilient or to accept this as an opportunity I mean? Is there any way to wall? Were inside the opportunity to look at the gift of that without getting too sort of Wu about that because these experiences are horrible. I met a few people who were able to do it on the spot but I think there are rare. Most people need at least a few years or several years too with some distance to look back and see it as a growing experience and I think one of the worst things you can say to somebody who's in the midst of it things like. Oh it's GonNa get better or who knows what it's good for people. Hey these phrases and that's really not what poster medic growth means and actually the only way we can grow as to allow struggle but one thing I can say that helped me and that I think helps anybody who's going through a tough time is mindfulness meditation. Because I think that we have no choice but to learn to stay present and running away as tempting as it is or drinking. The pain away or taking painkillers or whatever particular styles of avoiding it. It just never works. None of these methods works. So mindfulness meditation is now you so widely in the army and businesses in trauma therapy and I founded crucial now. I head already started meditating before I became ill but I had to realize that I was more like a good weather meditators. I use it to make myself feel good and I had to learn to go deeper with that and to stay present even when the going gets tough even when there is physical pain even when there is emotional pain to stay present and rushy Bernie glassman because also In bouncing forward is well if you think about it. We're always in the present moment anyway. We can't be anywhere else. It's just a matter of allowing ourselves to actually be there and be present with whatever happens. Of course it's a practice at work on for the rest of my life. Yeah I think we all will and I think a lot of people who have experienced trauma. Let's say yet in their lies. Don't really understand that. These practices that you cultivate pre trauma are going to be important for anything that you deal with in life. And how do you inspire people to really understand that these practices will be your if you will forgetting through things? Yes obviously you want to practice meditation or other. Resources full resilience. Ideally practice them when the sun is shining so that we have them at our disposal when the going gets tough and one of the things. I find most encouraging. Is that actually in the mindfulness tradition that I trained in we can use happiness and pain to transform ourselves to open a hard to become more compassionate rather than closing down to sharing was really going on. We don't have to wait for trauma to start but it's useful to prepare ourselves because most of us not only experienced one trauma in life but five to six actually and it's not just the war in Iraq that can be traumatic but a divorce can be traumatic and illness can be traumatic surgery. A car crash thinks that happened to pretty much all of us and I think if it was up to me resilience would be taught in schools. Mindfulness Meditation would be taught in schools because kids learn about it if they applied. They grow up so much stronger because resilience is like a muscle if we work at it. If we train in it then we become strong and we become more resilient and the earlier we start or if we have daily practice the more useful it will be to us when we do encounter a severe challenge or

United States Maya Angelou Michaela. It Coco Schumann Scars Temple Grandin Nodar Cillian Iraq Ptsd Bernie Glassman Asia Painkillers Jesse Bill WU
Bullying Prevention with Katie Zeppieri

Babes and Babies

13:33 min | 8 months ago

Bullying Prevention with Katie Zeppieri

"Welcome back to you're listening because I have an an exciting episode for you guys today very informational and something that really needs to be talked about October is rolling prevention month and if you look at the statistics it is crazy the increase that is happening in it is so sad to see you see more in the media and in the news and I just wanted to share a few those statistics with you before we jump into this about one hundred and sixty dozen kids per day skip school for fear of being bullied when bystanders intervene bullying stops within ten seconds fifty seven percent of the time so there is something that you can definitely do to help prevent bullying and if you see it happening do step in there's a few things that few other statistics I wanted to share with you that it's really sad but it's so important to talk about and the in what's happening is suicide among youth has it used to be relatively rare and now it has increased so much in the last ten years so from two thousand seven to two thousand seventeen the number of suicide among people ages ten to twenty four increased fifty six percent from six point eight deaths per one hundred thousand people to ten point six and it's become the second most common cause of death among teenagers and young adults is aside in a lot of that is linked to bullying and there are so many again so many things that can be monitored or stopped or ways to convene like you hear these stories now about kids videotaping and it's like man that they are a part of the problem too and so I haven't using guests today WHO's GonNa talk to us about the work that she has been doing with young women starting in those in in that age nope and in middle schools and high schools and doing a girl talk empowerment Dan how just your words and being kind goes so far and it is so important especially with statistics like this in in there's just things with these days that are amplifying such a social media so kids don't just leave bowling at school they're going home and being cyber bullied too and so it's so important to monitor that I am not against being Kim business at all because you hear these stories where the parents don't know what was going on or you hear the stories where they made the issue the people in nothing was done about it and we can't allow that to continue to happen there are some amazing articles out there that I will share with you guys on my website and it also talks about what to do if your kid is a bully what to do if like signs to look for if your kid is a bully signs look for if your kid is being bullied just tons of different information on their group chats and things like that of how to deal with all these different issues but I'm so excited for I guess Katie's Pieri coming on and she is she she's so amazing she such an amazing speaker in the work that she is doing is awesome she started the largest girl talk empowerment movement throughout Canada and it's starting to spread to other countries and she just has such an important judge to share with us and so I'm going to bring her on all right everybody I'm so excited about today's Gusts Katie Zampieri on and she is just killing it she's such an amazing woman she is a speaker and entrepreneur and activist she's an author and she founded the girl talk empowerment which is an amazing amazing community that I'm going to let her talk about but I actually got introduced to her at a convention that I went to earlier this year she was a speaker there and she told this amazing story about an article that she wrote that just like always stuck in my mind and I've actually Katie I've retold that story so many times about that woman in Nepal that you wrote the article on so I'm just so excited that she agreed to come on and she's here today so thank you Katie thank you so much for that introduction and I'm so glad we connected yeah me too said she was a speaker at the Toronto Business Babes event that I went to and yeah I mean you spoke about what you're doing the work that you're doing into shared some of your heart and I was in that moment and oh my gosh I have to get this woman on the podcast so since October is bullying prevention month I was like Oh wow this is such a great opportunity for her come on and this is great and honestly the community that you're building Elizabeth and empowering women and MOMS is just so wonderful like I think that's really the message even with the work that I'm trying to do with my organization girl talk empowerment you know we're really trying to create this culture and change the culture of how girls and women treat each other because you know my own personal experiences in school particularly high school showed a very different side of girl world and it was not a positive one in oh I really I found myself wanting to be friends with males and trying to avoid female circles as much as possible and one of the reasons for that is because I found there to be just so much drama gossip rumors bullying and girls girls bullying of Berry insist easiest sort of way where it's not typically the physical bullying which has its own issues and is obviously very problematic but girls tend to bully in a way that each away someone's psyche and self esteem it has a lot to do with a name calling it has a lot to do with like talking bad about someone behind their back also even more cruel things like trying to isolate someone trying to make it so that they have no friends or so that they feel like nobody likes them I I see this I witnessed it I experienced it in school I see it now work that I'm doing speaking of traveling to schools around Canada the US it really is this culture of mean girls and were trying to change that we want to create this culture of kindness where girls actually look to empower each other and not see somebody else's beauty or you know intelligence as a threat instead sita something I can complement this person it's okay to that person can be pretty beautiful and that doesn't take away anything to do with WHO I am as a person so I think bullying bullying prevention month is so portent in general especially related to this topic of girls as I've seen it continue into into womanhood as well yeah the it's I remember reading or hearing somewhere that in boys bullying tends to be more physical but for girls it's social emotional bullying and so that is such a different mental battle it is and social media has made that way way way worse especially for girls because you know it was one thing to be isolated at school we'll which by the way was something that happened to me I remember having like a very specific group of girls actually targeting me and sort of going to anyone who would try to speak to me approaching them shortly after speaking to me and asking them why they were talking to me and why they would ever want to be friends with Katie eight and so like there was that kind of like isolation trying to happen and not that is how I was made to feel but now it's it's even worse in my opinion because not only will you be isolated at school but now you can go home online and you know you're checking with your friends or your on snapchat or whatever it is that you're doing and that label that you're given being the girl who has no friends are nobody likes you is just going to be reinforced again and again get with people blocking you with people putting terrible comments with people sending you a negative direct messages were just even that psychological game of who likes your photo and who doesn't like your photo like this is the kind of stuff that is affecting the minds of young girls today and my argument is that they are you know being being sold and bartered with these negative messages that it actually prevents them from worrying about anything that Nodar SM- it's hard to focus on wanting to chase a dream or you know better yourself in any way whether it's academic extracurriculars when you're just feeling like basic social inclusion is such a struggle for you ah wow I and that was one of the questions I was Gonna ask us about social media because you you hear about it so much now like even with the teen suicide rate in almost all of it now involves social media which is super sad but it's also preventable and I don't know it's so hard because you hear about bullying and it like makes you angry like when I hear even you saying like those girls targeted you I'm like wow what brats like you know like how do you like it is prevention so it's like okay how instead of just getting mad about it which I'm doing I'm like oh my gosh people suck you know but it's like how do you like take steps to change that it's that's something that we're we're trying to wrestle with unfortunately I think I have a very sort of a realistic perspective that we're there will always be people who try to bring you down in life like I don't know if we can ever fully combat I thought there will be some adversity that comes your way so I think what we've tried to do is focus on individual empowerment end that's that speaks to the girl who sitting there feeling like she doesn't belong feeling like she has no place that because she isn't the most popular girl in her school or she doesn't feel like she's the prettiest girl in her school she feels like she has no value so when we kind of come in and speak to her you know that's kind of who were looking for those audiences to say you have immense value and worth you don't need to heat with any of these other girls you don't need to change who you are to try and be more like somebody else like you just alive you doing your thing value and worse and remember to focus on bettering yourself every single day four you know focus on making time for self care focus on trying to get better at your academics focus on trying to get were involved in your community focus on your passions and your talents and you know if you could take that one hour of extra time that you're spending every single night on snapchat or scrolling through looking at other people's lives wishing your lives look like that if you could focus that time on bettering for self what would your life look like and that's really this message of empowerment and that's kind of why I chose that word to represent what we do because when you inspire somebody you know that's nice you're you're making that person feel a little bit better maybe they feel like they want to go take action but when you empower someone you're actually giving them the tools to better themselves and that's the beautiful thing is when you can realize for yourself what actually others in life and kind of decide that you're going to commit your focus your time your energy to being the best version of yourself and prince in the world so that really was the shift for me that hopping in high school when I found like the Human Rights Club at my school when I got a chance to speak I realized I really had a passion four speaking in public speaking that was when I kind of felt the shift where I stepped into my own and not to say that it doesn't hurt you when people put you down

Fifty Seven Percent Fifty Six Percent Ten Seconds Ten Years One Hour
"nodar" Discussed on Analog(ue)

Analog(ue)

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"nodar" Discussed on Analog(ue)

"And celebrate story thing, you know. So we try to make the time to to make that happen. And you know, we've married it's going to be twelve years in a few months. And so we still I mean, just this past January where when dating diversity was we recognized it. And I think we always will I do think our wedding anniversary becomes more and more and more important with each passing year. But I still personally I think Aaron feels the same way I still feel really strongly that are dating diversity is important. And there wouldn't have been a wedding anniversary without the dating aniversary. So we definitely recognize both. And I suspect you Indiana will probably do the same even if like you say like do you do you white than the same? And we'll how you celebrate. Like, do you go out Neil above them gifts? That's kind of one on. I think to your point. Yes, that we do wait the wedding one more. And like when when we did our most recent anniversary related trip that was for tenure wedding anniversary, Nodar tenure data nursery. So in that sense. Yeah. You're absolutely right. But I think I don't know a chip on my shoulder. So I waited phrases. But I I still personally leaving Aaron out of this entirely. I personally feel like the dating versity is pretty big deal not as much of the wedding. But still a pretty big deal. And I don't wanna lose sight of it. And I think the most married people that I know don't care about their university. And I personally I think that's kind of unfortunate because I think both are worth recognizing. And and again, maybe it's the particular circumstance with me because it is, you know, six months offset thereabouts. And so that makes it nice to have like, you know, twice a year on six months apart. Have a have a moment where I can make sure I'm really appreciating earn for all the wonderful things that she is does for for the family. But I don't know. I I don't wanna lose sight. Of it. And even if the wedding anniversary is more important, you'll even to me, I still view the data versus pretty darn important..

Aaron Indiana Neil Nodar six months twelve years
"nodar" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:19 min | 1 year ago

"nodar" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Or so is it there wasn't much discussion of crypto at the Kuban Eddie's world, and to some people that might be obvious like, oh, yeah. Coober netease. That's the thing. The enterprise is used to run their centralized infrastructure. And then, you know, the crypto world is this world of decentralized crypto anarchists and they're trying to build their own currency and these worlds have nothing to do with one another. But in fact, there are plenty of opportunities for these two burgeoning ecosystems to have applications built in each other's worlds. I'm sure we'll see it eventually. But why isn't there more collaboration between these two worlds today? Right. So. So my perspective on this is I see both the blockchain and the container world as that transition from one thing to another and what I mean by that is so containers are a transition from on Prem infrastructure to cloud infrastructure, and people want this transition people want to use containers for this transition is because there's no vendor. Lock in right? There's a from switching from traditional pram. Pram infrastructure to cloud in those quite quite scary and risky proposition. So it makes sense to put yourself into containers. And then distributed through different cloud providers. And hoping that there is no vendor. Lock in. And I think in terms of blockchain it's Nodar transition essentially from lung running services into several less world or function as a service because essentially theorem contract is a lot like a a Lambda function. Even though that the scale ability and performance Asia, they're still being addressed. I think this future will make you know, sulphur development easier, and we can definitely see some union among the two transitions as well. Because containers and orchestration tools are also being used quite heavily in setting up blockchain infrastructure, the for example, like a node and all that let's talk. About that in more detail. So the centralized distributed systems tooling things like coober netties or Kafka. How is this stuff useful for building crypto currency applications? So in terms of building crypto currency applications? That's not quite useful. However does infrastructure tooling. It's great for spinning up the base infrastructure for blushing applications, which blockchain applications doesn't even interact directly. Right. And that leads into this web three thing because they've essentially there's no more servers the client application, we'll talk directly to busy like a uniform set of servers that is that could be running on infrastructure tooling from the container generation. Well, let's start to talk a little bit more about web three because that's what you're working on at fort Matic your first company. Kite, matt. Matic was as you described around making Docker easier to use you got acquired by Docker and your new company fort.

fort Matic Coober netease Asia Kafka
"nodar" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

03:28 min | 1 year ago

"nodar" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"The news continues at three ten thank you for being with us live in the Mercedes Benz plano news center. I'm Chris summers. Sure. Check the closing numbers from Wall Street big day. Good afternoon. David johnson. Kissed by computer terminal. It's been so long. We had the best single day since March everything click today, and it's hard to start the day with a big rally, but we did. And then hold it all day long. And in fact, add to it the just about the best reading of the day was right at the close with the industrials average up five hundred forty eight points at the gate of better than two percent. The acid p average up by two point one percent up fifty nine the NASDAQ was up almost three percent two hundred fifteen points in this one was not just raw emotion. There was something behind this ain't what it was was earnings earnings out from three big Dow stocks today and all of them just knocked the ball out of the park. Goldman Sachs up six and a half dollars today after handily beating on the bottom and the top line. United health was up twelve dollars a share today that adds that alone adds about. Seventy points to the industrials average. And I it was a good and finally Johnson Johnson they dated on that one initially was kind of flat mic closed up two dollars and sixty two cents. So big winners there, and they came pouring back into FANG stocks Facebook up five dollars, Amazon that's three and a half percent. Amazon was fifty nine dollars. Apple was up two dollars twenty cents. Google was up Twenty-nine Microsoft at three forty. Tesla obsessed seventy dollars a share. And if you if you were following the FANG, you know, I left out the in net. Netflix. Well net was up thirteen dollars a share today, and I'm looking at it and after hours trading right now, and it's up almost another fifty dollars a share. That's because Netflix just reported. Just remarkable earnings eighty nine cents twenty one cents better than expected revenues a four billion dollars and they had big. Subscriber games gains. But they're looking recognized for Netflix. That's what it is. Maybe you're paying Nodar ten or twelve bucks a month. Whatever it is for their service. The more of you. There are the more money. They're gonna make well they're gaining a subscribers at a faster pace than expected straight was looking for seven point six million coming for this quarter. They're saying it's going to be more like nine point four million. So the earnings are going to be still better crudes up dime goals down two dollars and twenty cents ten year rates pretty much flat. Just above three point one five percent. But the Dow the Dow was up five hundred forty eight points today, earnings out from Dallas based Comerica and several other financial institutions, and we're going to check with Ralph Babb to CEO chairman of the board of Comerica on CEO spotlight tonight and see if he sees any kind of a slowdown in commercial activity. Evidently, there's a sub Sabado lex out in west, Texas, and we know that home. Prices looked to have rolled over CBS's. And he storm clouds tonight at six twenty five hundred forty.

Netflix Comerica Amazon Johnson Johnson David johnson Dow Goldman Sachs Chris summers Ralph Babb CEO Facebook Texas Apple Dallas Google Tesla CBS Nodar
Identity: Who Am I Anyway?

The Road Home To You

05:12 min | 1 year ago

Identity: Who Am I Anyway?

"Else. Hi, welcome to the road to you. I'm Brad to Gable joined by my husband. We'd like to invite you to join us is we have real conversations about truth, grace and living out our Christian faith. If you have a messy past struggle with the idea of being the perfect Christian or simply curious about just what Christianity is your the right place within, we don't claim to have all the answers, but we're excited to have real conversations that deal with topics that matter. So grab a drink buckle up, and let's head on down that long road home. Good morning. Brandy. Good morning, Matt. And how are you doing this morning? I'm over. Right. I didn't sleep. Great. Yeah, me neither. And as a result, I'm maybe doing less than great. You know, I dreamt about skunks. Oh, that's nice. It wasn't because I could actually smell them. Oh, well, it was weird. I don't know that I've ever had a drain where I could actually smell something in it. Right, but I was smelling skunks. Yes, I was talking to my brother awhile back and talking about how well now that marijuana is legal, it's hard to know if you're smelling a skunk or you're smelling somebody's recreational marijuana. It's possible that it was there was a little bit of real life intruding upon your dream. They hurt you. Wanna come on in and smelling like skunk it was. It was. It was a weird dream. Yeah, very gunky things to consider. Anyway, not why we're here. Right? So this morning we're gonna. We're gonna talk about identity, but I, I wanted to share some stuff with you because I mean, the name of our show kind of suggests that we dig road trips. We'd need a whole summer series on road trips from the bible. Right? I took a road trip this summer. Yeah, which we've already talked about, but we didn't talk about one of my favorite places that we stopped on this road trip. You hear about it, it's a place you've been to. Actually I haven't. We have driven past driven past it. I've gone. Wow. I'd like to stop their aunt, but I'd like to when we drop our daughter off, I've already decided this when we draw our Nodar off to watch him in a couple of years. That's a soothing. She wants to go to the base in Montana SME that right. We on our way back. We are going to stop and we're going to linger in Wallace, Idaho. That sounds good because this is a funny little town and I love it so so much. Okay. Well, as Idaho, that's we're gonna talk about really, really quick. We'll get onto a real subject. Okay. Wallace was founded in eighteen eighty four. It is according to Wikipedia, they principal town of the quarterlane silver mining district it produced more silver than any other mining district in the US. Wow, that's all it does. Is they mind for silver and there's. A lot of shops that would let you know that they mine for silver. Every single building in Wallis is on the national register, historic places. You're kidding? No, because it's I ninety kind of passes right? Right? And the way that they wanted to make the highway go. It was going to essentially decimate all of Wallace back in the seventies, they were able to get it on the national historic register, and so every building must be preserved, it's fabulous. I'm thinking what better way to salvage your town then? Say it's a historical place which it is. I mean, it's an all of these buildings are pretty much from the turn of the century in two thousand and four on September twenty. Fifth, there Mayor, Ron, Garrett, tone proclaimed Wallace to be the center of the universe. Precisely it is a sewer access cover on one of their streets that is the exact okay center of the universe. They've got like a manhole cover that says center of the universe

Wallace Idaho Matt Marijuana Brad Montana Gable United States Wallis Wikipedia RON Principal Garrett
Teva to hold Indivior generic drug launch pending U.S. ruling

Arizona's Morning News

01:09 min | 1 year ago

Teva to hold Indivior generic drug launch pending U.S. ruling

"The mayo clinic is joining a group of hospitals launching a nonprofit generic drug company. It's called civic prescription. And it'll directly manufacturer generic drugs in serious demand professor of surgery and vice dean of clinical practice at the mayo clinic in Arizona, Dr William stone explains why it's needed either. The medication has gotten to be. Prohibitively expensive. Or it may not actually be available. There may be drug that an individual patient needs. But the manufacturer has not produced enough of that. And they may not have it locally fourteen. Generic hospital drugs are the initial focus in are expected to hit the market as early as twenty nineteen hoping to potentially work alongside V as throughout the country Ali vetnar KTAR news on neurological institute in Phoenix now has a fifty million dollar grant to study deadly brain cancer, looking for a cure for the same cancer that claimed the life of Senator John McCain the grant itself is effectively supporting a new type of clinical trials program at the barrow, which is a combination of basic science research and drug development. That's Dr Nodar Sam Sinai with barrows doctors tonight says the gift will push barrows to a new level of personalized

Hurricane Florence North Carolina Phoenix Arizona Barrows ABC Jim Ryan Wilmington Mayo Clinic Captain Kenny Overton Hurricane Harvey Governor George Caliph Ktar Dot Raleigh Ali Vetnar Ktar CEO Kathy Klein Senator John Mccain Dr Nodar Sam Sinai
Fire Can Be Different Colors

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

03:09 min | 2 years ago

Fire Can Be Different Colors

Hiram Benjamin Ron Lee Nodar New Hampshire Utah
"nodar" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

Newsradio 950 WWJ

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"nodar" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

"Cadillac Buick business desk Joan Doniger has our Bloomberg business report being the boss doesn't mean you don't have a boss Better pizza Papa John's Papa John's founder, Gian Nodar had to step down as, chairman because of racist comments a net executive did to paramount fired it's, TV chief because of those kinds of allegations she denies them. In the tech world the CEO of Intel and Texas Instruments resigned within weeks. Of each other because of personal violations of company, policies zero tolerance among company directors. For anything smacking of sexism racism, but there are, other forms of bad behavior simply crossed the line loop ventures gene monster fired off a letter to Elon Musk telling him to. Tone things down even though loop has no money. Invested in tesla Mosk apologized for referring to a British diver who helped rescue that tie soccer team. Is a pedophile to point where it is I think jeopardizing some of the confidence in investors Munster says the letter was a step that needed taking the next step taking maybe sabbatical. From Twitter I'm Joan Doniger with the Bloomberg business report on w. w j NewsRadio nine fifty Tasty cake we're all about making happy happy. Even at the DMV can I yes we're here to make someone happy you sure you've got the. Right place may I offer you one of tasty cakes icon ick butterscotch crickets sucrose Band pretty God actually ma'am did I just see you. Smile And there you have it another.

Bloomberg Joan Doniger Elon Musk Papa John Gian Nodar Cadillac Intel Buick CEO tesla Mosk chairman founder executive soccer
"nodar" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

03:38 min | 2 years ago

"nodar" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"The evening and then overnight skies will clear will drop, to sixty tonight tomorrow it's going. To be probably are only completely dry day this week lots of sunshine and hotter tomorrow backup to ninety. Wednesday would drop back to around to around eighty with a. Chance of showers and storms that chance will continue Thursday Friday as well from CBS forum Ashton Altieri on KOA NewsRadio eight, fifty AM. And ninety four one FM now on Colorado's morning news seventy degrees in, nine fifty two a, tweet from President Trump warns Iran not. To threaten the United States the president last night tweeted quotes. Or you will suffer? Consequences the likes of which few throughout history have ever suffered before what? Does it mean and what does it. Mean for the future relationship of these two, countries we're joined now by director Of the center for Middle East studies? Professor Nodar Hashmi good morning Happy with, you never before we've seen anything like this foreign policy via Twitter but is it a block by. The president Well we don't know what I think what's clear is that, we are headed. For a major confrontation with you on the on the American, side and on inside has increasingly become belligerent Increasingly become deeply and there seems to be a zero sum game here the eatery relates to American or they will be one William perhaps attack militarily? They continue down this path so I think, these are very ominous times what is the foreign policy endgame professor with this move because it doesn't seem like at least initially this has to. Do with a nuclear agreement that they have in place the why the US seems to want to strip away and change that is this, more about what they perceive or is it just being. Antagonistic about the policies Iran has in the Middle East Pulpy and gimmes precisely what you just stated A deeply Actor in the, Middle East and there is a deep desire to. Change you on the case scenario for the, American administration Donald Trump is to change the behavior of the regime regionally walkable to try and squeeze it so that perhaps the regime collapses and bring about a more favorable American regime in. The aftermath ticket scenario is highly unlikely that's very much a view of the policy advisers that Trump. Is around it himself with bru- Hani, has said Trump war with Iran is the mother of. All wars how much further do we want to go down? This road before we pull back Well it? Remains to be seen I think there's several. Things to watch for in November the United, States is given the international community. A, deadline to stall on you Loyal you. On responded recently, that he can't sell. Its oil on the international market that no other country. In the region she'd be allowed exports in, other words he's threatening oil supplies You know For the global economy while you will, be. Dollar etc So I think these are very, dangerous Living in Unfold as director of center for Middle East studies professor Nodar hush EMMY the heaviest commercial communication satellite ever built is in orbit after a successful launch over the, weekend reporter Monica Nelson has more private firms SpaceX launched the Telstar eighteen vantage from Cape Canaveral on a, block, five, falcon. Nine rocket the, company's second the fifteen thousand six hundred pounds satellite will provide broadband connectivity for the. Western hemisphere the rocket landed successfully on an ocean platform after delivering. The payload it's designed to be used up to ten times. Before, refurbishment, Monica Nelson, NBC, News, Radio, nine fifty five..

Donald Trump Iran Middle East president United States center for Middle East director Professor Nodar Hashmi Monica Nelson Ashton Altieri CBS Cape Canaveral Colorado professor Nodar EMMY Twitter SpaceX professor
"nodar" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"nodar" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Sixty seven downtown now on Colorado's morning news a bold. Tweet by the president warns Iran not to threaten. The. US the president. Tweeted in all caps. Over the weekend quote or, you will suffer consequences the likes of which few throughout. History have ever. Suffered before what does it all mean and what's it mean. For the, future we're joined now by director of the. Center for. Middle East studies professor Nodar Hashmi thanks for coming on Happy with you? Never before we've seen anything like this foreign policy via Twitter but is it a bluff by the president Well we don't know, what I think what's clear is that are For a. Major confrontation with you all On the inside has increasingly become Increasingly become deeply And there seems to be a. Zero-sum game here the eatery relates to American demands Or they will be Perhaps attack militarily they. Continue down this path I think these are very ominous times what is the foreign policy endgame? Professor with this move because it doesn't seem, like at least initially this has to do with the nuclear agreement that they have. In place the wives see the US seems to want to strip. Away in change that is this more about what they perceive or is it just being tagged mystic about the policies on has in the Middle East Game is precisely what you just stated Deeply Actor and there is a deep desire to change you The best case scenario for the American administration is to change the behavior of the regime regionally to try and squeeze it so that perhaps the regime collapses and that would. Bring about a more favorable American regime in the aftermath second scenario is highly unlikely picked up very much. View of the foreign policy advisers that Trump is around it himself with Ruhani has said to. Trump war with Iran is the mother of all wars how? Much further do we want to go down this road before we pull back Well he? Remains to be seen I think there's. Several things watch for in November the United, States is. Given, the international community a deadline You responded we can't sell its oil on the international. Market that, no, other country, in the region should be allowed to export its. Which is threatening to disrupt oil supplies green, you know You know consequences for the global economy value be Donald etc these are very dangerous, I'm, living in Professor with a few moments we have left do you think the advisers the president has the, palm Pao's, and obviously, the bulletins are they very antagonistic, to the, Middle. East and in particular. Ron you think Wrong in terms of the Middle East they have allies, in France Number two Arabian United. Arab Emirates so they have a different view of how the Middle East political match Uh-huh The only an. Actor Explains their belligerent policy objective speaking while you. On a very destabilizing the only one that's creating instability in the Middle East. Largely ignored much beat I think analysis and rhetoric that we're hearing from. The Trump administration professor thank. You for, your perspective this. Morning we appreciate it From DU professor Nodar Hashmi at. Seven twenty six money news. Time PAT's, here how much Colorado more than you have this is assuming that you go with the rule. Of thumb idea that you should spend less than. Thirty percent of your salary on housing there's a new list out from go banking rates it. Puts Colorado at number seven for how large a paycheck you..

Middle East Professor president Iran Colorado Nodar Hashmi Trump administration US Trump Twitter Arab Emirates director France Ruhani Ron Arabian United Donald
Majority of Americans think Trump mishandling Russia: Reuters/Ipsos poll

Kentuckiana's Morning News

03:21 min | 2 years ago

Majority of Americans think Trump mishandling Russia: Reuters/Ipsos poll

"H., a. s. I'm wwl Kyi need urologist Mamello savage with, a quiet midweek forecast this Wednesday were mostly, sunny humidity staying low with a high near eighty eight. Degrees lows down to sixty five tonight, we'll, hit, ninety tomorrow the, humidity comes back on. Friday with a high of eighty-seven will also watch for a good chance of showers and storms a few that could. Be on the strong. Side at your wwl Ky. forecast I'm meteorologist Mamello savage did sixty-nine at NewsRadio eight forty w. h. s. our top story developing. At this hour LAPD officers in these six thousand block of Janine drive that's near the. Intersection of shady Ville up there at that address after getting a call just before three this morning of shooting they arrived to find the body of a man who appeared to be a. Hispanic deceased outside of a home at that address with at least one gunshot wound unknown if that man lived at the address the homicide unit remains on the scene at this hour It's six thirty two at News Radio eight forty w. h. a. s. Papa. John's Nodar saying he regrets stepping down from the company that bears his name a letter Schneider wrote, over the weekend says he believes the. Company pushed him out over rumor and Indo Schneider also said in. The letter that he won't let the company that he founded be unfairly tainted his lawyer says the company can expect legal. Action if they push Nodar off the Papa John's board the company has already. Asked him to stop talking to people and. Affected him from his office space at headquarters Georgetown man accused of murdering a bus driver pleading guilty to having child pornography. Thirty four year old nNcholas Willinger allowed Kentucky state police to search his room while they. Were investigating the beating death of sue, Jones will endure is accused of murdering and robbing the woman at her Sadie Bill home in two thousand ten during their search police found images and videos of, child pornography eleven of those videos showing children, under the age of six after pleading guilty to receiving Child porn will enter was sentenced to more than fifteen years in prison followed by a lifetime of. Supervised release Healy Hanson NewsRadio eight forty w. h. a. s. more than half of Americans believing President. Trump is mishandling the nation's relations with Russia latest. Reuters Ipsos poll released yesterday finds fifty five percent, of registered voters don't approve of the president's handling of Russia while thirty seven percent do more broadly forty two, percent of, those surveyed approve of the president's performance Mexico is considering legalizing drugs, in its fight against. Violent crime the country's new president-elect Andres manual Lopez over door has given the upcoming interior. Minister the word to explore whatever it takes to bring peace back to Mexico the new government also wants to reform the Justice system with offers of amnesty and reduced sentences the country has. Seen more than two hundred thousand murders since two thousand six the job is to protect And serve the first two members of middle towns new, police department, sworn in. Last night former LAPD officer is now now chief Ed blazer and officer Robert Herman taking the, oath after the city started the department. May Ellen PD's eight division will continue to patrol and respond to the Middletown area however the addition of chief blazer and officer Herman..

Papa John Indo Schneider Lapd Mamello Savage Wwl Kyi President Trump Officer Robert Herman Nodar Ed Blazer Newsradio W. H. A. S. Papa Mexico Reuters Healy Hanson Russia Janine Ellen Pd Georgetown
"nodar" Discussed on The Wellness Business Podcast

The Wellness Business Podcast

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"nodar" Discussed on The Wellness Business Podcast

"Last we have an amazing guest today was going to keep to help us look at our mindset and how it dictates behavior as well as understand what needs to happen to reprogram the belief systems that don't serve you so you can be more successful our guest is robert nodar and he is founder of robert nodar coaching he supports health fitness and wellness professionals to take the mystery out of marketing so they know how to earn money and grow across profitable business doing what they love he has worked with and lectured for over eighty thousand people internationally he has taught at numerous organizations including the lincoln center new york open center the swedish institute maryland university of integrative health the job at center and beacon theater he also developed and led the business and marketing program for the institute for integrative nutrition robert nodar welcome to the podcast hi everybody i'm so excited to be here thank you wow this is great and i know for listeners a lot of them attended i am so they know robert nodar because his marketing strategies for you guys were amazing so i know robert nine has an touch milly last few months and we look on the phone awhile back and we've really hit off so i knew we needed to house him on the podcast and or but i know you've been studying mindset for a while and is this something that has always interested you or what prompted you to wanna learn more about the well you know things like you know there's certain things you have to know and learn and the universe always makes you see even when you don't want to.

robert nodar swedish institute maryland uni lincoln center new york open c milly
"nodar" Discussed on Aaron's World

Aaron's World

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"nodar" Discussed on Aaron's World

"Zone telling us that in me life on it wow aaron where do you think a planet right in the middle of the habitable zone that's four times as big as earth do you think you might have life on it yeah well it could now how do we know whether it does or not any thoughts about that no i don't know do you think will ever have a telescope that powerful non enough that we can look right at the planets around other stars and find out more about whether life might exist on those planets nate be will assess nodar see what he thinks here as we have to tell us go in the works one is called j debra use and the other one is koguashvili meter telescope which is supposed to come to us you hawaii and that we use his two telescopes monday when they are built to end when the operational it will give us the capability to look into the planet and actually get the the signatures of biological processes that maybe people not something look put a sentences or something lucky earthquakes something look mccain knows and also the signatures of palm trees and grass and then the night give may dip reflected the off to snow as in queen ben princeton instance looked the night that district both leg the above the surface of oceans so within the next ten to fifteen years we will have the capability as well while the duchess blows my mind so aaron where do you think he he say will actually have telescopes that will let us see a lot of information about these planets out there maybe even see evidence that life existed out there what do you think about that he added that's awesome we will continue this line of thought with our next scientists before right now i want to say thank you to dr nodar huzhou pour for spinning this time with us on born to do science book thank you so very much for the thanks aaron it was striking to you and i i'm glad that you get me this opportunity to explain the discovery.

aaron mccain ben princeton dr nodar huzhou fifteen years
"nodar" Discussed on Aaron's World

Aaron's World

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"nodar" Discussed on Aaron's World

"Might come from the planet one of the ways to explain it is for instance if you try to loot cat light candles next to a searchlight from about ten miles away and you you hearts they don't see that you're not going to see the candle you don't see the light at the candle right so when you are looking for planets around these other stars you can't just see them so you need to use some kind of a clever trick and there are a couple of different ways to do this but the one that you use is i like to call the wobble method and we'll talk about that is that it but first we need to understand the doppler affect aaron do you know what the doppler effect is have you heard that before no have you ever seen or heard a on tv a like a a car race where the cars are going around the track and he in the car sound like this need here well what you're hearing there is the doppler affect as a car comes toward you the sound the pitcher the sound gets higher than wallets going away from you the pitch gets lower no right well we get the same kind of thing with light and i'll let nodar explain that right we get the same thing with light but the except that you don't hear the light bud light has colors and so when it comes to towards hugh nukes defending caldere's than when he goes away from you but so in the stars moving away from us that looks more red and when it's moving towards us that looks more blue grey and that's the doppler effect and then we can use that so aaron think about this if uh if there is a star in it has planets going around it right in the.

aaron nodar caldere hugh
Here’s why China-bound Providence Day, Isaac Suffren, think this year will be different

On Air with Ryan Seacrest

01:53 min | 2 years ago

Here’s why China-bound Providence Day, Isaac Suffren, think this year will be different

"Tell me something good here so you calls of anything good munition goodness is our it is carry tell me something good china i i'll tell you something good but it is my core out of her career why boyer brand and even though we can't wait accord every but you're right now it doesn't make me feel happy that we made at the bar well it's so great you have love you have each other that's the best right yeah so right now but we both agree that we going to wait wait the fact that a bad what's his name greg craig see you responding to the moment that's right the best out of it is perfect darn leave tell me something good coworker are yesterday with my daughter birthday and i'm so excited to the doctor thank you would make it too far your coin character in a rare genetic disorder um do we so you know an alarm sprinklers you've been really brave through all of this and the other thing is hurt coin character actually remission right now go to break allow or what a blessing that she's there and you just you keep thing in good things in good things are going to continue to happen lutely oh my goodness supermarket love you guys by the way another you to sweden earning we love you you you have a good weekend thank you so much for coral hug that nodar new by here's a quite ready it might take a year it might take a day but what is meant to be will always find its way go to air with ryan here are the top coldly songs that you've done number three yes

Greg Craig Ryan Boyer Sweden
"nodar" Discussed on The Bone 102.5

The Bone 102.5

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"nodar" Discussed on The Bone 102.5

"You had to your body and you telling you tell you what what are the old butts singer at terrorists either thank you never did that surf i would i will dow what's up john yes sir my girlfriend make it back version of the nodar butter or named dan it called gay and not about his own your can by ready shows or a guy just go into these obviously never did he try on somebody else harm can we just have a mature conversation about candy i'm trying to walk you back through to see maybe we miss something just trying to put on a show here for for people to listen to demands better butter here's how can catch well you know the thing is got so excited over that skip skipped past like six other cross the take that why did the coaching council him here's here's how that could have gone freezer johnson you'll be playing played the part of a new garage door was about how excellent ali playing the part of dan's boyfriend if they're even as it here dan oh well i'll tell you the part of the ns fake wafer or rather a guy who has the and as a figure of okay ju rebel live hey what's up hey buddy dude i can't believe you guys are talking about candy i was he's we have a mutual friend and i was just talking to her about the special kind of kenya that she makes the ad oh yeah what sorta now you know our mutual friend ian wright she said she was just hanging out with yesterday bruylandts deanne the not or butter on your kid ha that's still is a yet now wasn't mayors is no way too good good good way to go about what he was trying to do i like the attempt hey i'll try again ring ring hello a cold six people are holed hurt the abuse a top in florida at he called bill it's weird.

dan kenya ian wright florida deanne
"nodar" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"nodar" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"About the implications with michael coined dean of the massachusetts school of law reprimanded case presents an interest will be factually the nfl could defend uh so this may not be the ila which the nfl because hernandez nodar sympathetic linked it is case who's not epic embiid a number of significant issues with what we would call cards aca because at the end of the day he did being decks and it not sure the medical science will he makes someone a murderer and so italy or the uh boston eighth in the bristol case is it open question of whether they'll be civil liability there to those victims and so i think the nfl and the patriots will see that the challenge that they will likely be able to fight uh to do a likely a satisfactory conclusion but what it does meaning that other plaintiffs who have suffered through whether injury may well have a much stronger hey you know what i first heard about this suda immediately thought of junior ceo because aaron hernandez's is an individual that authorities say committed suicide and now we hear about the cte and i understand what you're saying about him not being a sympathetic bigger he was a killer right but what about aaron hernandez the men who killed himself well and that's where the sympathy if anything why if he had known about uh extent uh perhaps of his injury that may have been some treatment available there may and other ways he would have dealt with depression in the light but the nfl's bigger kaubl as you know what did big no an how long have been known that the players who are exposed to such a fatal illnesses ep eat maskell of law dean michael coin well the senate race in alabama is ramping up between republicans roy more and senator luther strange president trump has endorsed strange in is set to campaign with him tonight but it's correspondent alex mark what tells us two of president trump's most loyal supporters are backing more with the race in the final stretch the candidates are bringing out the big guns got more and more and it's thought to be in the lead taking the stage alongside sarah palin and recently fired white house counterterror adviser sebastian gorka this is a very important election i don't know the other people realize that but every buddy.

massachusetts school of law sarah palin president senator luther roy senate dean michael coin bristol italy nfl sebastian gorka alex mark trump alabama aaron hernandez ceo suda patriots
"nodar" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"nodar" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"Of that criticism and he takes all of it instead as strikes me as a pretty good investment nodar i yet as my friend ryan resula said you know and and sky you know he's he's always telling me i'm wrong them spend a lot of money on this and get that done for fifteen million steady 44 it at some point you go yeah you you're probably what but up but i'm not gonna sit here and say he was overvalued at forty four million does a big servers for those owners as i said insert him and set of lien itis at the end of three hundred renault's eros or raining down vestment has roger goodell take a lot of arrows and he gets paid very well and if he has to settle for twenty or twentyfive mill hill still be okay vision of financial do that you're right they could pick up my his choice what what would you how would you assess very quickly well because we have to run lie how would you assess the chances that i don't know but by the time the next cba comes up that someone other than goodell as the commissioner low but existence i don't know 20 25 percent possibility high to me that dust yeah i think i famously misc mix is up offers take one time but what the the canary into coal mine means the canary died because of gases underneath a the minds he he's the first one to go and his air quality system like onto carried canaries did not get out of here they're so tremors there's some things going on here between roger goodell robert kraft each i mean jerry jones robert kraft that you might go hm everything's on the copacetic for roger goodell two things i think it's bear almost nil that he will be there i think it'll be him a nil during this almost almost nil and you brought up two white fables to savers who whatever i got more we're going to talk about hours longer area in the mine holy smokes we gotta rulon abbott will canada ho hear him out coast to coast hosting with ryan resell o one o'clock eastern here on espn radio my first take all the time and.

ryan resula renault roger goodell commissioner jerry jones robert kraft canada espn twentyfive mill 20 25 percent
"nodar" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

WBT Charlotte News Talk

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"nodar" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

"Well most of the answer flavor nodar say well i'm afraid to see what it's gonna say they don't wanna know which gets what creates there are known a gap ever hear the unknown in the fear of the unknown again that's victory will just talk buga last segment is gonna create a problem and the problem unita solution go other i can do it for you when you can look it takes a few minutes till the set up the account and without use your password which stole it for you i don't treat those who are going to see that because if you understand how many corners duty to work you have to search at how much benefit you're gonna get at sixty two sixty six with seventy and then guesswork also your spouse don't forget about him or her they are just as important this equation of when they're going to take social security are strong about the end in london last segment and linda l'industrie 62 a damn 67 are retired as extra exotics will security now and so even though he declined to mind for six years and so that's another world where stamp lab and see where you guys are with your income needs and we found out that boom no you can hold off of income coming in and your earned come from work and leisure roth ira income and so forth you could pull along it to 66 and reform retirement age and they looked really and then i put the numbers out that the holy cow thank you and guess what that extra four and a half years of deferring social security how much more money regan the long run astronomical so knowing your benefits not being afraid to look at your benefits how'd you benefits are created for you with your spouse so important because of social security is one of your biggest asset and it could take care of medical costs and take medical.

social security london linda l'industrie six years
"nodar" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:33 min | 3 years ago

"nodar" Discussed on KGO 810

"You know i remember german shirley lewis a whole lot going on jerry lewis right member he married his thirteen yearold cousin in that destroyed his career right it was a people i don't remember that happened in the early 60s but it was a big na it was a huge i obviously grown man marion a thirteen year old girl bought in utah today a 14yearold girl can get married if her parents consent nodar no it doesn't say if she can mary an adult maybe she can mary only somebody that's under eighteen i dunno right but in a weird that you would still have people who do this will be governor cuomo in your say just signed a bill that raise the marriage elgibility from fourteen to eighteen but almost a third of the state's let you get married at sixteen if your parents hey okay that's is weird and it's almost reminds you like if your parents what is your parents have to say about you getting married this arrest your wife i mean should a sixteen year old be able to get married i mean do you think what what's the magic age what's the magic number i dunno i know fortytwo here right burns our our favorite guided drag into these quagmire joins us here a former federal prosecutor and heard practicing attorney back in the uh the empire state if so that you heard about cuomo shining though legistlation right to you usga up eighteen aid the get married you know just on your own sixteen and seventeen any aramco consent and cortina in unit rental consent and the content of a court judge bad what governor cuomo did and i totally agree with this move uh are the very smart move that they're doing is eighteen to get married and they only the queen seventeen and eighteen and your new court approval amend those who or store thing going away maternity fawning everybody to like my grandmother got married when she was being you know you would hear that all the time but the point is times have changed a lot and there's a dark to a new hit on a ship which is that you know a lot of times the parents driving that bush in other words they wanted to force the marriage on the job and the job wilson exercising religion unlock started with milan showing that it was very good there um you know.

utah governor cuomo federal prosecutor attorney the queen bush shirley lewis jerry lewis mary milan thirteen year sixteen year
"nodar" Discussed on The West Wing Weekly

The West Wing Weekly

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"nodar" Discussed on The West Wing Weekly

"Margaret miller anzac macneice who also listen to the episode before it went out none of us are apparently that attentive but then amazingly we will get back an initial audio drafted the show and i listen to it in its entirety never occurred to me we never opportunities to cash what was a pretty moronic mistake were many and yet uh the guess so let me let me own that of course halfway through seven seasons would be midway through the fourth season not midway through the third season it's thinking third season xi episode like we've done three seasons and eleven episodes that of course is not true so i guess the positive away is there's so much more to do before this podcast is complete in twenty nineteen there you go okay well in this episode we're discussing season three episode eleven of the west wing the title is one hundred thousand airplanes half of that will be three at three hundred eleven airplanes that's right this episode first aired on january sixteen two thousand and to just one day before my thirty six th birthday i can after fact check back with you now a bureau bureau you've lost all credibility this right this episode was written by arendse work and it was directed by david nodar a you wear of his work yeah guys crazy he has directed tons and tons a fantastic tv sopranos lots of single episodes a single episode of the west wing this is it ten entourage is six game of thrones games of thrown its entouage very nice is just a terrific director and he does a good job with this one i think in this episode there are two timelines in the present president bartlett gives his state of the union address while sam's being shadowed by a vanity fair reporter who turns out to be his exfiancee and in flashbacks to a couple of weeks earlier the staff tries to accommodate the president's desire to announce a crusade to cure cancer.

david nodar director bartlett sam reporter president cure one day
"nodar" Discussed on The West Wing Weekly

The West Wing Weekly

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"nodar" Discussed on The West Wing Weekly

"Margaret miller anzac macneice who also listen to the episode before it went out none of us are apparently that attentive but then amazingly we will get back an initial audio drafted the show and i listen to it in its entirety never occurred to me we never opportunities to cash what was a pretty moronic mistake were many and yet uh the guess so let me let me own that of course halfway through seven seasons would be midway through the fourth season not midway through the third season it's thinking third season xi episode like we've done three seasons and eleven episodes that of course is not true so i guess the positive away is there's so much more to do before this podcast is complete in twenty nineteen there you go okay well in this episode we're discussing season three episode eleven of the west wing the title is one hundred thousand airplanes half of that will be three at three hundred eleven airplanes that's right this episode first aired on january sixteen two thousand and to just one day before my thirty six th birthday i can after fact check back with you now a bureau bureau you've lost all credibility this right this episode was written by arendse work and it was directed by david nodar a you wear of his work yeah guys crazy he has directed tons and tons a fantastic tv sopranos lots of single episodes a single episode of the west wing this is it ten entourage is six game of thrones games of thrown its entouage very nice is just a terrific director and he does a good job with this one i think in this episode there are two timelines in the present president bartlett gives his state of the union address while sam's being shadowed by a vanity fair reporter who turns out to be his exfiancee and in flashbacks to a couple of weeks earlier the staff tries to accommodate the president's desire to announce a crusade to cure cancer.

david nodar director bartlett sam reporter president cure one day
"nodar" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

TalkRadio 630 KHOW

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"nodar" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

"Shops in a shoe consoldiate older of buying power for repeat materials shooters asian and everything they do that the oath insurance companies were actually the smaller shop like cars used to and dislike that we use despite it all the time really after my small business seminar i made up my mind i that there's need and i don't know if i want to start this or nodar howard wanted but there's the need for what i like to call and if people are listening wanna start when i don't care meese not like it's big secret like something called business management systems okay now the before you think you know what i'm talking about i'm talking about literally taking over their employees their payroll their accounting their marketing literally leading people in business now this would only be small business small to medium taking over all of their daytoday operations and just letting them excel at what they do because the more and more i think about it a lot of these small businesses simply don't have the time nor is is there the efficiency of scale can you get back your out so that everything worked out i said judge takeoff you your back but what happened to the phones mr on a master of do not disturb ole miss shuts it all down somebody hit do not served woah could happen well okay so i was saying business management systems i think that would be called you imagine you basically takeover there they're nittygritty crap and just let then concentrate on what they do and with technology today you could do all know you probably do the relay disliked deal with chevrolet on a daily basis and everything the that they pump at it's i don't know how we keep up with you guys all of you here you all have to challenges you have the back and the front the back in the business then the marketing the the bs the accounting the payroll the state compliances then you have the front end were you have to do what you do well that's hard hey.

insurance companies meese nodar howard