20 Episode results for "Noda"

Trainer Talk with Orlando Noda

The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

56:21 min | 2 years ago

Trainer Talk with Orlando Noda

"Originating from Jimmy Johns of Lexington studios this is trainer tall presented by facing Tipton on the horse racing radio network but it was both but not in a game wins Donnay assault. WE'LL GET RID of Steve Atherton career win number six thousand it was all of another dugout nail spoiled trader look as a six win. Canals Rosie has gotTa Give Trade Greater Gary Contessa his two thousand career win on dialed in never got to them. It was animal kate guns Graham Option skied hobby with career victory number one thousand broad now. Here's his mic. Hello everyone good afternoon and welcome to trainer talk presented by Phasing Tipton on the Horse Racing Radio Network. This is of course the show trainers listen to and we are happy to have you listening on Sirius X._M.. Channel Two oh one in everyone tuning in worldwide on our website. You're doing that horse racing radio dot net looking forward to the next hour as we visit with another trainer who is just getting started with his career. We'll talk more about that in just a second but of course I am Mike Penna Berna the backstretch alongside my usual entry. Mate Jude fell the for the pick for coming to you from our Jimmy Johns of Lexington Broadcast Studios and J._T.. Here we go again. This show is so much fun when we get an opportunity. It's fun when we get to visit with the established trainers the pleasures the BAFFERT's the Asmussen's when you bring on somebody who's just getting started and you hear their story a story that many people don't know to me those are really fun. Show yeah absolutely it's this is great to be there right when somebody starts their career and then when they come back on the air five years from now we can say we knew you win right and that's happened a lot so it's really a a lot of fun to get people ascend off and get their name out there and put the put the face with the name of the program and maybe a perspective owner to shows up and says hey. I liked what you said on the radio. Here's a horse for you. Yeah don't forget if you miss any portion of this interview tonight. All you have to do head over to our website horse. Racing Radio Dot net will make a podcast of Al before you as soon as we finish up here shortly after seven o'clock eastern time and you can listen at your leisure all right well tonight's guest has just three winners but he only has sixteen starters so not a bad percentage all of those coming in two thousand nineteen in addition those numbers include two seconds and to third place finishers so nearly half of his sixteen starters have hit the board and and this past Sunday he recorded his first win at historic Saratoga when New York bread t loves a fight the five year old son of Girolamo scored in an allowance optional claiming race so congratulations he is trainer Orlando Noda any is with us now on trainer talk presented by facing Tipton Orlando. Welcome appreciate everything yeah. Thanks for taking the time to <hes> to be with us. I know this is all somewhat new to you. At least training on your own is a bit new to you but whatever you're doing. It seems to be working. My friend little by little is taking the time. Thank you all the details in this and treat every state every horse I backwards and didn't show up track. I feel go back to last Sunday. I mentioned that race t loves a fight winning the seventh race on the program at Saratoga that allowance optional claimer you didn't interview on the Fox program Graham with Maggie Wolfendale right afterwards and you were you were smiling from ear to ear your floating on cloud nine. Take us back to that moment. Oh yeah no began with that. Junior actually got hurt in prior race and the agent called <hes> Iraq days in called US put us up or like all right 'cause junior already knew the horse men we at least we ever saw we gotta top job on the worst and <hes> I mounted eradicated. Send him off the pace though the pay should be quick and <hes> if finish for you got plenty of Orson and it was a through I started Saratoga for a win just a dream. Come true like it's just a start. Is that the dream of yours for a long time to run horse at Saratoga Yeah. I actually me yeah <hes> well back in two thousand seventeen I was working on cassie and I was taking care of maim away. He was a two year old time. Come off of a maiden especially win and he went his first time as a steak and I was actually <hes> working with him and we take a picture in Saratoga with flame away and that one unreal even the I I was screaming like I was at that day and yet this always like oh just even you can call them down. This is not your first <hes> not our personal win lose. My first wing thrilled yeah especially when you can you know when you can finally see your dream become <hes> reality. T. loves a fight. You were telling us before we came on air actually has a a really special connotation to that name. Tell us about that yeah so actually the breeder of the Horse <music>. Her name is Teresa. Lisa and her husband actually got in contact with me in reference to act after playing them or we claim them. A woman came up and said Oh yeah I mean following this for. Have you ever needs to retired. I'd I'd be willing to take them well. The story came back from the husband was that she was <hes> actually fighting cancer at the time and they named the Horse team of the fight as she was fighting for life and she actually beat it at the time and it just like enlisted per spirits every time she sees the horse run and be that doors has won three bags and back is like helping her she wasn't they were to get to the to the race at Saratoga be checks reoccurrence of it and she actually hospitalized but it just when her husband came into the paddock. I was like no communication like all of us own family like this is for everyone that I had helped her spirit and <hes> being Tinos when when he's needed the most I noticed you you train that horse for your family. I and sometimes that's hard. When you're starting out you WANNA do one thing and somebody your family wants to do another thing? Has that created any problems for you or they leave you alone. I should be honest. <hes> everyone has their opinion on training. I hear them and to be honest. At the end of the day I'm going to undo what I feel is right for divorce. <hes> the the like for example my dad had was old time trainer of train them hard and and the run hard I'm more of a more conservative as long as they show up on the race why other in the morning yeah if they can do that then everything else kind take care of itself. We're talking with Orlando Noda who racked up his third career win and his first career win at historic Saratoga this past Sunday and just getting started with that training career after spending time with trainer Mark Cassie as you heard him mentioned Orlando go back to the beginning you grow up in Miami where did the love of course racing begin for you why my dad has always had for smooth just for himself one or two here and there ever since I seventy eight and <hes> we actually got into me and my brother Jonathan we actually got incident in twenty twelve when we went to New Jersey me and him took off and <hes> we bought where we saw was was a good that of course which are five thousand dollars horses in paying two thousand dollars a piece for for eight of them which is kind of <hes> a big money pit because being that I knew do they know much so my dad was helping us over the phone and then I went to training facility and Westhampton New Jersey started writing them starting training and from there now we're training under my dad's name and slowly journey. You just came along through a lot of issues of manage. It's really tough even when the racing to five thousand dollars level but we just think tune it in that year we ended up. I don't know if five racing and <hes> I believe it was four wins home by dissecting and a couple of words but it was just real awards racing when they crossed the line that that I just like it was an infant hook that adrenaline rush that you get when they when they crossed the line. I've I've said that quite often that if you could take that feeling and you could bottle it this would be the market in the world you agree. Oh yeah no the the that team in of racing and all that time and effort not insulin when crosses that finished I I it's there's a lot of work behind the scenes just for for one race well. You sent me a text after I I asked you to join us on the program here and you said thank you so much for the opportunity to express the effort that goes into winning races. So what does it take to get horse ready to win races. I feel you just have to treat every horse independently but actually in point what they need when they needed and in just even if they're a five thousand dollars claimer or steak or just treat them on like decor and they will show up good bed good foods and and just just hands on Hendra loving care I ill. They'll they'll give it back to you. When it comes to the race eight yeah? It's a it's always a balance to try to figure out you know what distance what class what exercise the horse needs how much how much to train them how little to train them and it can vary from day to day from month to month from year to year. Bobby Frankel Todd Horse might be one way one year in a totally really different horse the next year have found that to be true. Oh yeah no and that's the truth <hes> be that I did start in Ocala breaking babies with partying Renzo and groupies <hes> I I went to tyler to learn what the big outfits redoing out of powder start the babies because I actually read one of the horses that I initially had started with eyebrows heard in Florida and had the full and then that was breaking her myself and it was just ongoing process of learning all the aspects of horse racing from the beginning all the way to the ring strike that has gotten this bar in other experiences of all the other trainers and have crossed my past that that'd be open minded in this industry who actually absorb the information that other people are actually have known for many years but are just some people share some information and we are more like on though just finding out on your own so who who are crawling era with with forces Orlando who are some of those trainers that you've been able. I know you work the Marquess but outside of mark who are some of the other trainers that you've been around that you've been able to Kinda learn in watch and observe and pick up things from them say we we were trying <hes> we I was breaking babies under <hes> Johnny Sacco A- At <hes> <hes> newco pupil Newcastle just starting out with the babies and it's a different aspects of trying to get a horse ready for a two year old sale and actually taking them all the wait to the track <hes> and tomorrow presper speed and they hold up then you have the concept of Cassie. I WanNa have the classic runner where they have top dollar horses and then I also worked for <hes> it's a another company picks l._l._C. which she was the ones who actually bread my my man when I initi- hurts Ocala and he was more hometown team and his wife would joe and and coordinate breaking their own babies and take him to the sales but they were eighty. Five percent or ninety percent of their forces came out to be winners out of the sales so there's many aspects I learned earned in that part and then when I actually took my Philly to P._T.. Sonia to Nelson Jones I was working with the with the gentleman main Henry and even sales more. More so but then you started getting into the racetrack and and kind of me and him he was helping me out and now here now so it Kinda put our heads together like okay this was of course and that worked for that horse so <hes> and and also my dad had been day he he always has his opinion so I do take that into consideration but <hes> it's just an ongoing process I even when I came up not academic initially <hes> Michelson Ouzo was there by in my same barn and giving advice even though they were they're trying to do their best of teaching me at where where they they have gone wrong so I wouldn't take that same route like it was something that I still not necessarily wrong but in the fact of maybe president too fast too early got some chins fires your time together but it was still ongoing learning process and added worked for the biggest trainers but I feel like I have researched and and developed developed my my knowledge around people that have been in a long time yeah you know when when I started training it was a different game. I'm twice as old as you and I just <hes> was very fortunate to have trainers that were willing to take me under their wing or answer any questions I might had an and I asked a lot of question and I learned a lot of things and it's not like that as much anymore but I think for the most part trainers like to share with the young trainers coming up their their insights on things and and I think you'll learn every day and even you talk active trainers like Richard Mandela. He's always talking about you know. I learned this about this horse. I learned that in in you know he's in the hall of fame and he's learning everyday too so it's a game where <hes> you know the horses. <hes> speak to you but you gotTa uh learn the language and I think a lot of trainers <hes> we'll we'll help you so I I would recommend keep asking those questions because even if they shoot you down <hes> there's going to be plenty of them that answer you and it can really make a big difference in your life. Yeah and that's and that's one thing that I take into consideration is just the more you ask them where you're GONNA learn. It's not the fact of Oh what if I didn't do this or mentioned find out out and at and also an even I've gotten really good information from my ferrier my bed just from their experiences and and other people that have been in the industry like I have a philly billy that has yet to run and <hes> the breeze rider. He says men she looks back. Turn a foot. You can try on the terrorist why come to find out <hes> when when one of the guys here courageous cats are known for their turf forces. Maybe try for some chairs and it's just coincidence that the writer told me I'm GonNa Change US she. She has the turf stride. I was initially thinking Oh trier short. I'm dirt but I took take that into consideration in now trying on the Turkey. I doubt Yeah it's it's trial and error and we've had several trainers. Tell us that on this program you get a sense. I guess in correct me if I'm wrong Orlando but you get a sense of what is going to fit each horse best but but then you still don't know until they actually do it right exactly yeah. No the only thing you don't know is is the heart of worth has antenna intended races. That's when you'll find al bring so he has I feel so you can't train his heart. Yeah and you know you talk about breeding horses when you were in Florida and breaking horses the babies at Christie's new castle farm. You're only thirty years old so I'm kind of curious when you were very young as a kid growing up in that Miami area was this all you ever wanted to do or some where there's some other things that certain points you said well. Maybe I can make a go at this or that hat or whatever it might be yeah <hes> like I said my dad has always been into this so it has caught my attention but <hes> but before that I was actually a completely different field work I was I was a commercial fisherman. I was a had like forrest Gump bubble gum shrimp and I had a fleet of votes and one thing to another and it was going good and <hes> and we ended up going route and I have the business for about four years ended upsetting out and then got back into the worst 'cause I had my baby. Coming up has a two year old so and that's where I get my energy and and still today's you just gotTa keep fishing in whatever industry it is which is harder trained horses or catching fish <hes> I I can say it's a very <hes>. It's very very long hours on both jobs but one was a night job one was during during during all day job but most of them. I didn't enjoy <hes> I'm not one too shy away from any type of neighbor work and and that's that's where I come into play in in this industry like my brother is the one who actually means financially backed me up with this dream of mine of becoming an assessment trainer and bought a couple of baby got a doc lanes <hes> and if it wasn't for my brother as an owner I wouldn't be where I'm at today either so yeah so what's what is a bigger challenge though catching the fish or learning how to train these horses and getting them the wind. I think this is more of a challenge because each course's individuals fish and whatever they actually just migrate to certain spots certain times a year and you already hybrid charted out and it's just as Labor but I think <hes> training horses I I must say what kind of fish would you catch. What's that what kind of fish would you catch? <hes> out was actually a commercial live shrimp Russia livestream light for the bait stores that had the live shrimp yeah and for the New York seafood market that they would actually ship them from Miami in the airport seems to live people working here New York art while you know we didn't interview on the same show with David Fox years ago and David is a big fisherman. He likes to go out on his boat down there in south Florida and David the interview from his boat <hes> which I thought was it was the only time we've ever done an interview with anybody that was out on a boat and that was Kinda cool but as you're doing that you're building that business. We're you still able to follow the horse racing side of things or say even <hes> the the biggest <hes> follow of mine was <hes> California Chrome <hes> we actually I liked the worst ever since he won the Santa Anita Derby and <hes> I told my brother Hey we're going derby and <hes> we went to the Derby that year ear and when he won it was like crazy because <hes> how are you going to house anyway. I think every dream you have a so what mayor and with a not so great that you don't know what's going to happen. You get a superstar horse. That's thanks horsemeat streaming and that's what I always dreamed up and figured for even my Philly like she's Breeders Cup nominated Lord Italians nominated nominated this that the other and <hes> you always hope for the best and just do with with what you die but yeah I know we we followed into with all the California chrome to Kentucky when he won he actually prepaid my trip to the Belmont in and for the frequent put your money where your mouth is. Well you know that was interesting at the beginning of the interview. You said you know you treat them. All stay courses and I think that's a great philosophy started start with the stakes book and Work Your Way Back Right. I mean you gotta have some goals and aspirations for every horse even horses that you claim in and you know sometimes people say oh that's a it's a daydream or whatever ever but you you might claim a horse that you think improve on the grass and pretty soon you know he's he's winning graded stakes so <hes> that's how you get ahead is is <hes> you know dreaming big and working hard to to reach those goals falls in and I think that's a good philosophy have little by little yeah and it's coming together little by little details and he certainly does that. He is Orlando Noda our special guest on trainer talk presented by phasing tipped him. You heard him talk about starting out <hes> with a Shrimp Boat Company and now picking up winners at Saratoga so if you do have that dream as you'd mentioned and you willing to work hard to go get it it'll happen and it's happening thing for Orlando and don't forget if you mistake portion of this program just head over to our website horse racing radio dot net you can check out a podcast of this program and all of our shows at your leisure their their horse racing radio dot net Orlando when you were breaking babies with J._J.. CROPPIES Newcastle Farm J._J.. Of course passing away just recently back in May. Did you get a chance to spend much time round J._J.. Yeah he hears mostly <hes> just the other stormed and <hes> but yeah now he wasn't really really good Guy Kinda really strict but at the end of the day that has to be with with an operation so big like him and <hes> it was <hes> it was just another year experience of what they did in reference to the babies they did a different than hardly into Renzo or not interested and different than mark cast yet in Ocala farms. It's just the differences of opinion on on training babies. Do you remember he's. He's had some really big name babies that have come through that program. Did you get on any of those big time horses that I can't remember no off off off a hand as it was usually usually you just go from Barnes Barn and okay get on this and get on twenty six twenty known the mayor's name might really they weren't named at the time so if you really were to follow the mayor and and and then and see what the name was and maybe so but as a offhand no what's the key to breaking a youngster the right way patience nations is key when you rush them <hes> that I feel that the harder you press them so early on the the the shorter. They're they're. They're they're racing career will be yeah. It's it's very important <hes> to take your time because those early lessons carry with them their whole life so <hes> you not not only when you're training him but when somebody else's training him you can you can tell right away. If you get a <hes> horse in your stable that was <hes> ill broke as they say and and <hes> it makes a huge difference because sometimes you even have to start over because they're they're not easy to deal with right Orlando. Did you ever have any thoughts of becoming a jockey. Now my way sixty pounds six foot tall. That's a lot of reduction. No no the the one who who needs to be doc is my wife. Melanie ways a hundred one hundred four pounds five foot netting and cheese job question but eh she just rather he just riding walk and take care of Voices in and watch on the sidelines so get don't get me wrong. She did get on some of my horses when I was in in Ocala because every now demanding forget the urge out she wanted to ride like even here in the shed Joe Show Joe's emotions forty but <hes> but she just doesn't want her mind but was she there with you Sunday at Saratoga August yes sir yeah they had to be a special moment for the two of you Oh yeah now in and and realistically <hes> We actually got credit for Junior Alvarado because of her dad her dad added a really big <hes> trainer in Venezuela remain crews and he <hes> actually with his connections. We're able to mount junior up for onto teams because <hes> junior had asked me road for her his father in Venezuela world well. That's a great story and it's you know it just shows that oftentimes things come full circle and they're doing that for a special guest here tonight Orlando Noda Orlando stay with us. We're going. You get to a short commercial break. We'll come back continue this visit on the other side of the break. This is trainer talked presented by phase it tiffany nominations are now open to the basic tipped in November sale. The world's premier breeding stock event the sale annually produces the highest average in median of any nick sale in the world and in two thousand eighteen sold twenty two horses this for one million dollars or higher held the Monday after the Breeders Cup this one night sale offers leading racing broodmare prospects proven producers and selected yearlings in the most electric atmosphere. You will find at any thoroughbred auction. Nominate your best today. The Phasing Tipton November sale where stars China brightest bloom racing started by former jockey and thirty five year racing industry veteran Jeffrey bloom bloom racing offers racing partnerships bloodstock services pin hooking and private race management management pulling away from come dancing participant the others midnight. B.'s zoo leaves no doubt today she won the Phipps in hand experienced the fun excitement in exclusive access of racehorse ownership bloom racing forming racing partnerships now getting on the action at bloom racing dot com. This is trainer talk presented by facing Tipton on the horse racing radio network has to forty forty four point six nine half these three will turn for home together three and a half links back that T- let's fight who's next on the outside and starting to put an bid as they arrive at the gate poll pink stir in front sudden surprise tries to fight on Taylor's our fight fight continues to progress down the middle inkster to catch it the sixteen poll T let's fight ranging up alongside there's T- loves a fight right T- lots of pipe beats big stir on the wire sonic charged light furthered. Hey Jeremy Toto's forward Larry Komo's with the call that was T- loves a fight taking the seventh race at Saratoga this past Sunday the five year old son of Girolamo scoring in that allowance optional claiming event for trainer Orlando Noda who is our special guest on trainer talk presented by phasing dipped in Orlando just getting started with that training career at least training on his own as you heard him say in the first half of the program he's been aboard horses breaking babies for a very long time he has bred horses horses. He has spent time working with trademark cassie and now getting things started on the right foot with his training career having one three of his first sixteen starts and not too shabby percentage their Orlando. Let me ask you this question my friend. You've talked about the relationship with your wife. We talked about working with Mark Cassie. Are there things that mark has taught you or that. You picked up on being around him that you're still using with your operation. I would say so <hes> I think I learned a little bit from everyone and take what I feel as right <hes> and <hes> the the thing I would say when you have superstar four-star horses I- Kathy has a very different than when you're trying to claim something and just don't have that type of that type of crop but yeah no you just gotTa take care of them at at the end of the day that's that's pretty much. Take care of and <hes> and do and and I and at the end of the day that there's a lot of competition everywhere but you just have to compete with the best even if it is against Moore Cassie one day yeah. What's that like when you have to go up against them now I I <hes> I when I I've seen him at Saratoga? Always I go congratulations and everything so that's that's <hes> that's the plan. I'm I'm a small operation right now my own voices and just trying to get some <hes> some owners and slowly but surely I hope to get a good set of crops to so how about when you're on the other side added a fence and you're watching mark have success big races winning the preakness Belmont this year for example what what's that like for you watching somebody who met so much to your career have success in those big races know that and that and that's the boy that's what it comes down to that everyone dreams winning Derby winning a classic race and no and for him to be in this industry show long into finding be able to to win and it's early. It's really the dream come true for anyone so we all know aspired to to do to to do as that so it was a thrill of course my my my wife was working for cassidy for I took on a little bit more horses not four hours doing everything by myself and then she worked for Kathy here in New York and <hes> So of course we're rooted for for Kathy sources when when when when Sir Winston crossed the line we were all screaming for for cash because we're team cassie. I took a picture of Cassie. That's great. You mentioned your wife daughter of a trainer working for Cassie. How important is it to have <hes> your wife your your for life partner be interested in horse racing and and understand the hours and the the lifestyle involved we actually met in Ocala at a farm and <hes> she as I have a passion for horses and that passion is Kinda attracted us like we didn't know that both of our fathers were trainers but we just loved horses and then once led to another menu desert the training might is a trainer and yeah we put in a lot of ours but we do because we love the horses we love the sport and and that's the type of people that I want to have in my circle of of workers? I not just someone that's like willing to work for a paycheck and just do the bare minimum. I rather be like someone like that. Actually is here for the horses and that's the most important part to to to be successful in this. I feel Orlando in the first half of the show you talked about starting off and having your Shrimp Boat Company before you decided to make the transition in a training racehorses. I'm sure when you did that new you built that company. You had a business plan and you look ahead and you try to forecast where you were going to be three four five years up the road. How about with the training side of things where where do you see yourself or where? Would you like to be three or four or five years from today. Oh it's it's. It's just like <hes> really Rodriguez told me look I started the same way as you. I was on horses. I started out with two three horses and it's just a coincidence that yesterday I got my first owner. He gave me to horses. I like what you're doing. <hes> could you take on to worship Fisher. I just hired a groom two days prior to me go into Saratoga to help around and <hes> he says just keep doing what you're doing. Stick with it and and your Alpha will grow with would do time yeah it'll grow. There's no doubt about it. We're where do you WANNA be. Do you WANNA have like a Steve Asmussen type of operation where you have horses all over the country or do you want to be a little bit more boutique. I rather be more together rather have my my born so I can pay attention of course once you build a reputation like like those trainers of course then you put your trust into into your assistance and to everyone working under you but that's the type of team I wanNA build together and then have them branch off into the near into the future but mostly it's <hes> for for now hopefully the next two years ago. I wouldn't want to take on any more than thirty forty courses and another big influence of mine is <hes> Joseph Saffy from Gulfstream which is good friends with my brother. He's actually gave me a lot of tips and help me out with a lot of issues that I've come up with and he he's he's a young trainer is myself and he's he's the secret and it's industry. Is You just have to put the horses where they win. And when you're winning percentage in your you and your percentages high bleep believe me people are going to be approaching you and he said it was I went out to Saratoga and that's a big at the big step for you to win in Saratoga so to be prepared to take on some some clients. Thank God thank you so much and sure enough the following day they had my first client yeah it's good Saffi's good guy and he won the triple crown at a very young age and <hes> it's. It's taken him a few years to get a really good foothold in south Florida but I mean he's one of the kingpins now and he wins races in bunches and <hes> all his hard work because there's never a anybody work works as hard as he does. I mean every time you go out in the morning. He's out there on his golf cart going back and forth track and arguing with his dad. He's he's got a lot similar situation you his dad's always telling them. What do he's a little spats every morning? It's Kinda cool but but he's done such a great job and he's a wonderful person we he's a good friend of our show and he's done a lot for us and and we really like Saffy Joseph Yeah little by little little by little you chip away and then <hes> all those little things add up to big success you mentioned during the short commercial break their Orlando that you're getting ready to saddle horse coming up this weekend at Saratoga by the name of riot worthy a Horse that you claimed tells a little bit about this horse well man talk about black back class like this is a New York bread and she has just backlash for days. Just stay course all around and they gave her eighteen months off. I figured maybe they'd try to impregnator and something happened for first time back. They run it for twelve fives well. What do I do? A lot of people were really scared. Oh why are you going to claim a horse that you don't even know. I'm like hey for twelve five. I'll take the risk and <hes> and sure enough she she's a she's INRIA. She's GonNa be really good horse and and I've been to render backwards he could win. She finished third her last time out running back for twelve five and <hes> she should show up you know when you claim a horse <hes> he who hesitates lost as a rule go by. Everybody always wants to see one. If you could see one all the time it'd be a lot easier but you want to get a good one. You just got a fire away right right and <hes> not and it's kind of the reason the same same reason why we claimed <hes> number fight was because of his back class even though he was running for ten thousand twelve five show that he can run and I was another reason why we we shook on the horse I with <hes> five other people that same day and and when I ran for forty it was it was a little bit over his head right there the same guy who wrote them hockey he <hes> he breathes him and he worked at six nine in hand then that's a really getting worse. He's like yeah if he runs like this. We should win. We finish scores and <hes> I decided to Albro. That's when we Kinda Kinda got the contact with Doll Dorado and he says let's go and sure Enough Jeff. I put him in for twelve five. I voice is going to be done because if you figure for other people shook on what's another twenty five hundred to explain the horse but not knowing them when thinking for twenty five and no-one Tyson from forty so now how now we gotta stay pretty cool. How Important Orlando is that back class? When you're looking to claim a horse I feel that maybe they were at their prime at one point and sometimes difficult to get him toback were they were not every horse can do it but it just shows that that they have hard to be to be raised versus? Even though it might still be claiming verses they have apart to run. You mentioned the named Junior Alvarado several times throughout the program. I know that that's something that that relationship is something that seems to have worked for you guys <hes> Why is that the the horse fits him and it's just he has really good hands and and he and who's winning to give me a shot when when I haven't WanNA raise when I haven't then nothing huge in can to be honest with you even <hes> Mike Assistant when I called them before like her dad had contact in <hes> he went awry one of my horses he's I go no uh you can put the bug on like okay so I wrote the bug but so the sharing that relationship and <hes> and it kind of the same thing that happened with Iran Ortiz I read or teasers GonNa ride one of my other horses stretches. Stretch stone but he <hes> he had to call and everything and he ended up calling and we ended up having the horse scratch and whatnot but he was willing to give me a shot like it's at the end of the day you put everything into them as possible to win the race for a jockey just to guide into to the to the finish on when when the big jobs they're like oh no now. I don't have a jet under mainly like pretty hard to win racing yeah. It's difficult when you're young trainer just starting out to get some of the top riders to ride 'cause. They don't know you from third base. You know exactly it's not easy. I remember a highlight of mine was the second winner I had Bill Shoemaker Road at C._N._N.. Me then I remember calling the owner. His wife answered the phone and she says to we get in and I said Yeah we're in the first race on Friday and she who's writing. I said shoemaker and she started screaming. And how did you get shoemaker. I said I told his agent I bet one hundred four and that horse one and <hes> Sam Bells Lark was remain. It was like the biggest thing that ever happened to me at the time now is just unbelievable but it's hard to get some of those guys I had a call with a different jockey that that was just very mediocre the ochre and he took off. I didn't have a right so got a little lucky. Harry Silver took mercy on me Orlando. How many horses do you have in training now? Personal and I just got to okay well eight right now and total but <hes> it's it's a it's a small crop but it's very thin for where we do everything I like. I it just hired a grim like four days ago and he's working out good so far so little by trump should start growing and don't get me wrong. I've <hes> I've known about eight tickets in Saratoga having gotten one yeah and I couldn't shake. We're good enough to shake the team. Is it more difficult to claim horses at a meat like Saratoga as opposed to maybe the winter meet aqueduct for example. Oh yeah the top of the type of money in Saratoga. Every race is of course that were shooting for six. Seven people are shooting for so if you're route then that's what you do. This show obviously sponsored by Phasing Tipton. Do you ever see yourself getting to the point where you're going to say a facing Tipton yearling sale or a two year old and training sale and you're you're picking out young horses. This is for for different clients. I do see that because that's only possibility to get to the big races. You have to have new crop two year olds to be able to anyway. Don't get me wrong. You have to have an is for a baby to to to feel where we're but central growth is and whatnot and instead just little by little I of course we we that's that's where that's where your dream has to start as a two year old or even not so much as a yearling I wouldn't I wouldn't go that far. I'm not I <hes> I'm not show. I'm necessarily familiar with breaking a baby but now that I'm focused more on the race track I would rather to your training talking to trainer Orlando Noda here on trainer talk presented by facing Tipton just getting started with his training career. He settled sixteen horses. Three of those have one Orlando. How did you know that the time was right to make the move and go out on your own? Oh my my my Philly <hes> it was time for her to run in <hes> Ami wrong. Everyone told me Oh why be why be a little fish in the big pond when you could be shark in a little fish in the ocean when you could be a shark in in the bond everyone one night or ten oh and now in New York is so hard really hard to win. Mason WANNA try out against the big boise where I know needs to compare and and see what what what shows up and also it's a New York you your top dollar. She's running for for tags. That are well worth the money. If you could win one race Orlando. What would it be Derby Yeah? It's too easy. That was all right. How about this? If you could train one horse you get the opportunity train. One horse past present doesn't matter which horse you're GONNA pick yeah to go with the People Source California pros. I know that I guess I guess once you have a horse. Pay Your way to the preakness Belmont. It's easy it. Would you want those racist California chrome who knows but I know we wanNA share dried. When I went to the backstretch <hes> the day before they take the Debbie and <hes> and we went to go see chrome took pictures or the train the Guy Lipper and crowned himself and it was just a surreal experience just to be there to the hoping he he would win the Derby and sure enough? He goes and win yeah. He was a special horse. We developed a great relationship with Allen and Art Sherman throughout that entire run and Allen is now out training horses on his own to move to Kentucky got a place this year and he's starting to train horses on his own so eventually he's going to provide more competition for you my friend we're all open the competition that name of the game do trainers actually have rivals where you have say one trainer that man for whatever reason I just can't beat that guy or that girl when I saddle against them so far I haven't came up today. I haven't settled that many but <hes> I don't feel I don't feel rivalry. I feel we just have to put in the effort and at the end of the day luck has a lot to play with this in this game a lot of traders leave. Oh no you can't get ready but I feel like has lots the play with this one that goes your way. Just gotTa ride the run yeah. It's <hes> it's it's an up and down game and you can't get to low and get to high. You just have to have to go with the foil every day. As long as you keep showing up you gotta shot so right. Do you still do sufficient Orlando here in New York. I haven't gone fishing gets yet. My wife is desperate Theo fishy but <hes> but when I went down to Miami I did go out on my dad's bowed road and sandbars so I'm a I'm a have sought running through my veins Ville Yeah. Do you think you would be bored if you went out and tried fishing at say Lake George or Saratoga Lake with just not be exciting waiting for you then they they she is is fun wherever you go even if you don't even catch let the just on the time they the people around with it. Just that's that's fishing. Is this impasse time and and and enjoy it. If you pick horses out like you pick wives. You're going to be very successful who who ever heard of a wife that loves fishing love sports racing. I mean what a great the job you did their cheese cheese the names of them above that for sure great claim brother all right so what's the future hold here for Orlando. I asked you about four or five years up the road. Where you WanNa be what you want to do but immediate future what what are the plans for the rest of this year and moving into next year I plan to stay in New York and and <hes> openly girly operation but <hes> the reading like Anthony York is just academic the the amount of money in the short fields in academic is just they says I just I understand that the winters are cold holding everything it just tough it out but <hes> but I intend on doing all my efforts to <hes> the one two three now at aqueduct for retirement yours because I have what's next for T- loves a fight off well prior to him running we had nominated for the the more synergy J._V. Morrison or for the six and a half or may twenty third and and <hes> we told her stuff is the worst wins and comes out good again the horses <hes> running and a lot of people believe in a lot of time off between races? I feel if the worst does eating its food feeling good in the morning and doing everything good no heat no pressure. Everything's tight run. The horse run the horse and <hes> <hes> Mike letter out of of Rondos A._J.. Called me is also we having plans. I said you already know nominated him for the state because I told him about the state prior to a lounge like Oh allows allowance is going to be easier. I said okay so now those are you gonna run them back. As long as he shows up before entry day showing signs that were go go and it'd be it'd be ten or eleven days back but he's a he's been shown up every fifteen days back so gotta run them while they're hot will serve yeah you're. You're a big believer in that. I am especially with <hes> with sprinters. When there's sharp you you got to take advantage of it and instead of training them galloping him galloping galloping every day? Why not running yeah all right Orlando? Only a couple minutes left here in the program but we always liked to wrap up trainer talk by asking trainers owners to tell us a little bit about themselves that people might not know and I know we've talked about a lot of things over the course of the last hour the shrimp boat operation you're fishing passion <hes> and of course the passion for horses but what other things does Orlando don't know to enjoy doing or other hobbies that you might have I I'd say more than anything is courses and <hes> it's just looking into the future and helping and helping being like millennials I get into this for and that even though there's big times trainers like we can still do it like they're still on opportunity for everyone. Just just take the risks and that's what I am. I've always been a risk taker. I've had many businesses some failed some succeed right now. We're going to succeed and we're going to keep doing what we're doing and hopefully in will have one in the starting Gates Derby. That'll be a great day. I will go to that. There'd be no question about that'll be fun. Well Orlando look whatever you're doing. It seems to be working. You're focused you are having a lot of success already. We WanNa wish you all the best moving forward and hopefully get a chance to shake your hand when we make it up to Saratoga here in a couple of weeks I appreciate your bond all right. Listen all the best <hes> this weekend with riot worthy and all the best moving forward with T. loves a fight and the rest the stable. Go get it done all right Orlando note here on trainer talk presented by Phasing Tipton again in up and coming trainer just getting started with that career you heard him talk about learning from somebody like Mark Cassie and some of the other trainers that he it has observed while he's been in their shed row and how many trainers have told us that jude that one of the key factors is to pay attention to what these other trainers have to offer because so often they'll be very open about sharing their knowledge in their experience with you yeah yeah I mean <hes> it. It's <hes> the way everybody learns really on the racetrack the learned by doing method gotTa get a horse because you have to make your own mistakes along the way and then you know the the older trainers trainers you respect <hes> and even sometimes even a small trainer. That's only had you know a a modest barn in their lifetime can teach you some really important things <hes> and then the business aspect is this is so important. J. Robbins top meal a lot about that. I wish it would listen to him more. That's for sure you wouldn't be saying here next to me. You know we you told me that all the time. There are people that helped you and you you were very good at paying being attention to what was going on with these other trainers guys like Charlie Wittingham for example yeah I mean Charlie was great. Lazarus great has berea you know Bobby. Frankel helped me a lot. He sent me clients so everybody can help you. Don't forget if you missed any portion.

Saratoga Orlando Orlando New York Orlando Noda Mark Cassie Tipton Saratoga Yeah Saratoga Philly Bobby Frankel Todd Horse Miami Ocala Orlando Noda Orlando Gary Contessa Phasing Tipton south Florida Jude Florida Tipton Orlando
Coming To Know God

OG

12:46 min | 1 year ago

Coming To Know God

"Hello and thank you for joining us on the OGI K. Podcast truth about everything. I am your host leak. The topic today is knowing God asking the question. Who Do you know God to be? How do you come to know? God How did you come to? The knowledge of God of who got is understanding God to be a male by calling God by a specific Pronoun He Referring to as a guide as she like how do we know? God How do we get? The idea of the identity of guy was given to us by religion was given to us by our parents. Were we told that God was loving? God was kind and God was compassionate. The guy was a protector provider. Have we actually experienced it for ourselves? I feel that is the way to know guy you know God by experiencing God. You don't buy a car without checking it out without getting to know it taking it for a test drive looking under the hood seeing if it's a good fit for you and it's the same thing guide you don't get to know. God just by what other people tell you you get to know guy by the experiences that you have with God and from those experiences you develop a sense of who got. Is You know wealth when you are wealthy. You only know love when you are in love. And you only know poverty by experiencing power. There's something powerful about inexperienced that can give you. What just someone else sharing their own and beliefs which you can never do your own. Experience is goed so this is how knowing God place. The discovery of guy takes place through the experience of guy so when we experienced guy when we come to know guy we use words like great or powerful Almighty or provider Sustaining Nipah Tint. Just off these transcendent ideas and thoughts but the problem with that is that words. Do help because that's a form of communication that's how we communicate is humans but to stop it right. There would be a big problem to stop it to stop your knowing of God at the thought of God. Just being would be wrong to stop your understanding. The guy just being awesome or good would be wrong because in our truth. God is greater than what we conceive. Great to be got is more powerful than what we can ever conceive powerful to be and that is because the words that we use are related to human concepts and ideas. We use the same words for people or even pets or even situations you know. A great car is a great car into one day is not it? Wouldn't it will not always be a great car? Great Book is a great book until one day it is not It would never be eternally great. There will always be something else that comes along that may replace it or even stand close to what if not even replace it. Even with goodness now we relate goodness of people places and things Even the goodness in a person or the goodness in a in a material thing that we associate good to will never eternally be good. There is always a period in which that goodness so that greatness that powerfulness fades away or changes and when we apply these words like grade in and beautiful in good to God were actually also apply the opposite guy where where he's great. God is great but there's also a sense of deficiency deer or God is all powerful but there's also a sense of weakness there when we understand guide as when we limit God to just our concepts of these words because like I said our concepts of these words have the opposite attached to them. There's always an expectation or the possibility of the opposite of great to occur the opposite of good to occur the opposite of powerful to occur when we apply these words to God and leave it at that this is why wins and thinking of God is good when situations occur and you look for God in your inner seems like your faith is weathering or as weak is because that good that you have attached to guide also comes with the opposite of not being good. Maybe he maybe got not as trustworthy as I thought because our trust like I said comes with the opposite with an untrusted so in my mind. I'm thinking that what what needs to happen. Is to understand in to know God in a way that is beyond our words in our concepts on our ideas beyond all of that we need to separate guy from human concepts it there needs to be a mysterious about God like God is great but he is mysteriously great. He is good. He has mysteriously good. He has powerful. But God is mysteriously powerful data. That shows you that there there. Are these attributes that we attached a God? Are just a snippet just a small of view? Smartest perspective of just how great God is the mysterious nece leaves room for God to perform for things to come about that. You may not fully understand and to be able to accept those things says God being beyond your understanding of goodness greatness powerfulness awesome. You don't stop at that idea of those human qualities that we are have failed at. You know the person you love. It's also at times the person you hate the person that you admire can also become the person that you despise so God is beyond these words. Audience thoughts audience concepts. There always needs to be a degree of transcendence when speaking of God and when applying words the God knowing that what we see God as even what we experience God asks what we have known God to be what we have been told that God is. That's just the tip of the tip of the tip of the iceberg. That is not it. In its completeness who always have to remember that there is a mysterious quality to God and unknowing. This God is an able to be fully understood. We are always in a position of discovery. When you understand God to be mysterious. There's always room for discovery of God for surprise for an awakening for newness for enlightenment to be shocked to be awed to be mesmerized by the mysterious -ness of guy so annoying who God is not God is great but he's great beyond measure Noda. He is good but he is good. Beyond measure powerful beyond measure. Whatever idea phrase that you attribute to God note that it is that in beyond that in beyond bad there is no measure that we can hold got to. There was no concept that we can hold guy to. There is no thought that we can hold God to because these thoughts these ideas. These concepts are limiting. God is mysterious and that mystery goes beyond everything that we understand. Which is everything great. Which is everything powerful. Everything wonderful everything. Transcendent everything wise. Then at that moment from that understanding from that mystery from that ambiguous place from that unknowing this from that place there we are able to discover we are able to come into. We are able to truly know God now. I WANNA share some scriptures with you some sacred texts from a couple of different religious beliefs religious. Faiths the I is and they regards the guy that says he is the so supreme being of eternal manifestation creator immanent reality and we have another one from Hinduism says. He is the one God hidden in awe beans. All pervading the self within all beings watching over all works dwelling in our beans. The witness the perceiver the only one free from qualities that that right there just sums it up beyond all things mysterious of God the transcendence of God the separation of God from our concepts and ideas and the limitations we attempt to place on God by keeping God can locked into those ideas and not allowing our minds to be freeing to discover more on what God is

Noda one day
092 | Illumination

Aaron Mahnke's Cabinet of Curiosities

11:50 min | 2 years ago

092 | Illumination

"Our world is full of the unexplainable. And if history is in open book, all of these amazing tales right there on display just waiting for us to explore. Welcome to the cabinet of curiosities. Communication is key. It's the cornerstone of all successful relationships. Effective communication can bring people closer together. Help them understand each other better. And even stop certain problems before they start in the case of hero. Notre communication could have saved him. And the Japanese military a whole lot of headaches Noda had been stationed in the Philippines during World War Two an intelligence officer by trade, he Edmund given strict orders to do everything within his power to hinder all enemy attacks on the island, the airstrip and the peers at the harbour became his primary targets and should he be caught? He was to fight until death capture and suicide were not allowed. Once not arrived on the island. He fell in with a group of Japanese soldiers who had already been stationed there. He was of a lower rank than them and so had to follow their orders. Instead his mission had stopped before editor even started. And it wasn't long before the United States took over the island with the Philippine Commonwealth in February of nineteen forty five seven months before the official end of the war. The other soldiers had been given orders to fights which they did. But they were no match for the allied forces. It would have been much easier. Had they allowed Noda to carry out his original mission. But it was too late for that all but a handful fell leaving a note the acting commander he ordered the remaining men to retreat into the nearby hills where they would be safe. He and three other Japanese soldiers lived in the Philippine wilderness for months building huts out of bamboo and stealing food from local villages when they got desperate day slaughtered cows and eight their meet time in the mountains, though, change them in the man eventually grew paranoid of anyone who dared venture near their camp. Stray islanders were often mistaken for enemy guerrillas and killed without question. The soldiers managed to avoid all American and Filipino search parties for time until their position was compromised and shootout killed two of them a third surrendered to the authorities while Noda venture deeper into the mountains, and no one heard from him after that Lieutenant Onoda was declared dead by the Japanese government in nineteen fifty nine all search party efforts had failed to locate him then after the killing stopped they stopped looking. And then in nineteen seventy four a Japanese student named Norio Suzuki set out to find the missing soldier. Well, he set out to find three things. Really? In his words. Lieutenant Noda a panda and the abominable snowman and four days after his journey began. He found him alive. Suzuki tried to coax the soldier off the island to return to the modern world back home. But Onoda wouldn't listen he was still awaiting orders from his commanding officer. Unable to convince the soldier to leave with him. Suzuki took some pictures as proof and let the Japanese government handle the recovery of their missing asset. Those government officials asked notice superior officer major Yoshimi Taniguchi to fly out to the Philippines to deliver the orders as he had promised years earlier. And once those orders had been given a notice surrendered and handed over all the weapons he had amassed during his time on the island for over thirty years hero Noda believed World War Two was still being fought. All over the world. He had no idea that atom bombs had been dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki or that the allies had won the Japan. He came home to was like an alien planet with tall glass buildings all around him and cars clogging the streets. He became a celebrity of sorts back home and eventually released a book about his experiences on the island how he'd fought his own war on behalf of a country that had left him behind. But he found fitting into the new world difficult so much had changed while he was away unable to handle living in a modern Japan. He traveled to Brazil got married and established schools to help troubled kids, both at home and abroad hero Noda had been lost in time for most of his life. He'd missed so much and had come back to a world. He did not recognize yet despite his hesitation and wariness. He never forgot his primary mission survive at all costs, and thankfully, he succeeded. This episode of cabinet of curiosities was made possible by Robin Hood, Robin Hood is an investing app that lets you buy and sell stocks ET apps options and cryptos all commission free. While other brokerages charge up to ten dollars for every trade. Robinhood doesn't charge any commission fees. So you can trade stocks and keep all your profits. Plus there is no account minimum deposit needed to get started. So you can start investing at any level. The simple intuitive design of robinhood makes investing easy for newcomers and experts alike view, easy to understand charts and market data and place a trade in just four taps on your smartphone. You can also of you stock collections such as one hundred most popular with Robin Hood, you can learn how to invest in the market as you build your portfolio. Discover new stocks track your favorite companies and get custom notifications for price movements. So you never miss the right moment to invest Robin Hood is giving listeners of cabinet of curiosities of free stock like apple Ford or sprints to help you build your portfolio sign up. At curiosities dot Robin, Hood dot com. its name instills mystery and wonder in those who hear it it strikes. Fear in others. It's influence around the world is unmatched as evidenced by the symbols and signs on our own currency. It has influenced political elections and mcchord into some replaced popular celebrities with brainwashed. Clones. It's also been linked to the freemasons and a clandestine organization known as the new world order which seeks to take over the world, by way of global Thawra -tarian government. Of course, I'm referring to the illuminating its reputation has solidified it as one of the most influential and sinister organizations in history. I were while it might seem like the luminary is a far-reaching underground society with a deeply historical foundation. The truth is allow more ordinary. It all started when an eighteenth century German scholar named Adam vice hopped had an idea growing up vice hopped found a passion for reading and philosophy. But philosophers enjoyed studying went against the Catholic. Conservatism permeating Bavaria at the time. He started looking for others like him folks who also believed that religion and the monarchy were stifling, the growth of modern society. He thought about joining the freemasons for a while whose group was flourishing throughout Europe at the time, but vice hop couldn't get beyond some of their beliefs. Instead, he decided to create his own secret society one that didn't renounce religion, but gave its members freedom from the prejudices and limitations religion seemed to impose the goal was not to establish another theocracy vice hopped wanted members of this new organization to find happiness and liberty without all the political trickery that he linked to the church the aluminum first meeting was conducted one evening in nearby forest on may first seventeen seventy six five men gathered together and set the foundation for what would eventually become an association of three thousand members soon enough. Big names started joining the ranks, including baron, Adolf. Von nigga, a former freemason whose efforts within the alumina not only brought it publicity. But also heightened tensions inside the group. He fought often with vice. Thoughts about the direction of the organization encouraging him to behave. More like the freemasons by giving everyone secret names and organizing the members based on a hierarchy of thirteen complicated degrees eventually left the group, but it's work added to the mystery that would eventually elevate it to the public consciousness and inspire numerous books television shows and movies about its undercover operations. Except the illuminating as it was known during the seventeen hundreds never made it to the levels described by authors like Dan Brown or burn to echo an edict issued. By the Duke of Bavaria in seventeen eighty four. Put an end to all secret societies not previously sanctioned by lot. Anyone caught practicing as a member of an outlawed order was to be sentenced to death. Vice hopped lost his job as a professor at the local university. And so he fled to Saxony where he ended up teaching philosophy. And that was the end, but if the aluminum was forcibly disbanded over two hundred thirty years ago, why does its name still crop up? Whenever someone mentions the Kennedy assassination or the moon landing. Well for that we can thank one book series. No, not the one about secret messages in famous talion paintings. We have to go back even further to the nineteen seventies. When popular culture was defined by counterculture, like Robert crumb, and the national lampoon and Robert Anson Wilson, you might not have heard of him. But the work he did with his friend and partner, Robert Shaye cultivated much of the alumina de Laura that we're all familiar with today it started while the pair were working at playboy magazine as associate editors they and some of the other writers started mailing and fake letters to the magazine about a secret society called the illuminaries, then they'd write more letters to contradict the first batch, adding an air of mystique and intrigue around the organization. Wilson and shea turned their hijinks into a popular series of satirical, books called the alumina trilogy which fleshed out the conspiracies behind the assassination of JFK and the meaning of the eye of providence on the back of the one dollar Bill. The books eventually influence numerous films and stage at Titians only further spreading their misinformation to the masses these stories took on a life of their own and the fiction soon mutated into rumors and eventually full blown conspiracy theories. Thanks to the internet. Those theories have now grown more elaborate over time and thanks to a prank from to magazine editors a failed German secret society was reborn as one of the most powerful and far-reaching organizations in the world. Well, at least by reputation that is. I hope you've enjoyed today's guided tour of the cabinet of curiosities subscribe for free on apple podcasts or learn more about the show by visiting curiosities podcast dot com. The show was created by me, Erin minke in partnership with how stuff works I make another award winning show called Lor which is a podcast book series and television show, and you can learn all about it over at the world of Lor dot com. And until next time stay curious.

Lieutenant Noda Robin Hood Noda officer Japanese government Lieutenant Onoda Philippines Bavaria Suzuki apple Japan Norio Suzuki Robert Anson Wilson Robert crumb Adam vice Philippine Commonwealth United States Europe playboy magazine
Cmo colaborar con el podcast de Un gran viaje

Podcast RadioViajera

05:48 min | 3 months ago

Cmo colaborar con el podcast de Un gran viaje

"All after does many those manila's own behavior so he published through will alter the way. We are liberal comper. You're gonna they'll ask cornell got under his podcast compatible experience but in this case the hinted to engrave as the values messes or news in most food. Hit hit us kettle komo thais bruno Speakers in the us komo days you got. I'll podcast manila's gynecological associates located here. Kick obvious is march. Las personas qc manager tasteless programmers senior. Mr muto coastal town programmer. Returned to give your heart is is must complete do you wanna intimates porcari overload. Eisele ultra located rational. You've got his own ambience from record audio maturity tandel each. I don't know no programmer. Kara loonies. You're already obvious. There's no real podcasts. From guru gaining can pour kenton kentucky behaviors career as you have lower but he. npr's blow cw. no no ourselves sustainably. He's giving gunda seat but it was from our whole. No solo porculus reminded mark professional casey dot com promo divo- custodian tender on economic marilyn mckean. Mr mom interstates was platform is going on now. Kassian i feel gala programmer. Muto impossible our restock who test and the baby looks only reality. Theon aleppo's per luke soon collapsed. Komo see so. They were hawk moment or dollar allen data. You're say romney mandate does impose imposed at amazed at the impo baron. Danica make what steady. Nato comstock noda empathize part of a home. You owl would occur. Attica routine nadia. You can make it a bowl for those status heliport ascione economy allen pakistan. Met the podcast profanity able mrs kucharski. Athas possibly could gas monopoly. Radish the meat but in los in los angeles dr game l. program the other he got out the respirators cosima permitting and out of the nato but to get the name of todos no miss and being the standards programas gals. Who was will these things sitting threaten their poten. Thiab the appetite cartoon Modernist debris it'll get your into two yamile. I'm retired monitors all compared to continue on the delight. Indra saying ask the but allow manorama deal in. Alaska boise nada undergone amiga the mutual but it cannot be gone isto lavar but until up for those or three settlements wireless volunteer by the cafes and peradeniya when those more or less knows dental but okay stelvio. You see crazy boy this. He nami interstate gramma packets. He got atlanta. I'm meteorological plus belittle does monitor and theater federal lab ramirez parallel scooters e-books. See this not news mascara blocking our principal program shannon rotunda per year or eat. i wanna Get the alameda park. Nine deploymenta combat sociaux yemen. Alexander radulov kassian volleys. She met scooters replica. Theon calmer spotify apple podcast. The hierarchy say like sarah and make more sense to use them. Now they mcgrath. I'm a bathroom window com donating your own graham via podcast instead web. You summer museums colors. They continue. But i can also say. You are in of museums continuous exclusiva. So yes or no. I-i works number automatically theon menstrual anonymously over a few days and promotional jimbo mass canal seeking montenegro. Message mass poison was her own. No no euro. Thursday ten is indicative public- nokia's or participating another allow study for day respiratory to this issue but our country. We shall anti semitism mina in the dot. In russia continues analyst complementarity commodity yesterday republican nominee works another story platform to this on the products. That i got here. Spurs kucharski epo calcium on our holiday. Dr compare theater. Oppy nar roseburg. I must gavel iky centimeters number. Four thirty told us. This does not managed a louis. Guinea gabon theodore the gap program beginning silos.

Mr muto porcari Eisele manila Kara loonies gunda marilyn mckean Kassian Muto Theon aleppo Nato comstock noda mrs kucharski Athas cosima Thiab manorama cornell kenton bruno npr
Mini Meditation: The Physiology of Vulnerability

The Mindful Minute

13:19 min | 1 year ago

Mini Meditation: The Physiology of Vulnerability

"Thanks for listening to the mindful minute. I'm your host Mural Arnett these ten to fifteen minute. Meditations have been created for your use as part of a daily home practice for inspiration insight and a better understanding of what it actually means to meditate to sure to tune in to our Thursday full length episodes. And now let's begin. So let's practice if you've already had your legs crossed. Just take a minute to uncover legs crossing the other way. If you're at home you can be seated in a chair with your feet flat on the air and wherever you are we'll let our hands come onto our lap palms facing now. You might let your eyes drift close. And if that doesn't feel safe this evening or this afternoon you can just take a soft gaze towards their together as a group here nice deep in Helen Ex. Not a sigh and we'll do that again. Inhaling deeply exhaling by allowing your breath to fall to its own natural pace just easy inhales. An EX hails. You feel yourself settling into your practice today. You might start your practice simply by saying silently to yourself. Now is my time to meditate. Now is my time to meditate with that invitation. You feel yourself truly sit down any last parts of you. That are still tensed or held C can just drop into your seat sealing the hips and thighs relax subtle lifting and lengthening the spine so that you feel tall maybe lanes in the back of your neck list the crown of the head the muscles through the face relax the forehead broadens the skin around the eyes softens the muscles through the mouth relaxing the tongue the job perhaps today you noticed just the subtle hints of smile it doesn't have to show on the outside it does not mean you're happy but rather that little internal smile is the allowing the welcome of your present moment experience new might feel the next few breaths move out across your collar bones across your shoulder letting the shoulders relaxed by condado feeling breath is a moves through the chats maybe you can soften the muscles through the chess in that same way you might see if you can soften the muscles of your belly so that were not gripping or resisting let's simply softening and opening up to this moment aw find ourselves seated here with the back of our bodies strong in a way the front of our bodies saw receptive just here that we begin to feel the braff perhaps just inside the nose you notice the sensations as you breathe in feeling as you breathe out you don't have to worry about describing your breath or your experience you could just let yourself feel without any words feeling this inhale feel hey miss exhale and in a moment or two will settle into a period of silence and each of us will just do our gentle best to keep sealy each in how each exhale and absolutely we will each also sync thoughts feel feely get distracted each time this happens for us. We'll just gently Noda's noticing the thaw or the feeling you might feel that subtle smile as you acknowledge it then we'll just return to the breath no need to resist or push away anything that arises but rather we acknowledge we come back to the brass ceiling the Bra in this way and this practice rebuilding our ability to become struggle with whatever shows up Moment shared if she'll that brass deep if you drifted away or got lost in thought or feeling to see if you can notice where you were smiling a bit as you come right back here feeling your spine lift and lengthen if you slumped at all and we already palms come together in front of the heart like a prayer bow the chin slightly together as a group deep in Jalan Helen. Outta CY honoring yourself for carving out the time to be still to be with yourself and to work with the expectation of comfort. Thank you guys so much for. Being here nasty. Thanks for listening to the Mindful Minute. You can learn more about me by. Visiting Merrill are net dot COM for bonus meditations tips and a little bit of babies band. Follow me on instagram. At Merrill Arnett.

Mural Arnett Merrill Merrill Arnett Noda Helen Ex Jalan Helen sealy feely fifteen minute
Courageous Conversations that Get Results

Her Legal Global

28:23 min | 7 months ago

Courageous Conversations that Get Results

"Welcome to her legal global. I'm your host fe geld. Our podcast is dedicated to providing you with actionable skills to empower your legal career. Today were welcoming decade of coach carmen. Mason and i'm delighted to welcome carmen. She is a certified executive coach a leadership consultant and as a lawyer. She has fifteen years and over. Twenty years of combined experience. A lawyer post-secondary instructor senior manager and executive leader in both the not for profit sector and the justice system. And while i'm telling you all this is carmen brings a wealth of wisdom knowledge and experience. Today's topic and one. I'm very excited to be exploring all about craig's conversations and the key skills that can turn difficult conversations and into productive wine so welcome carmen. We're delighted to have you. Thank you faye. It's great to be here so carmen. Before we get started i feel that it's always a bit better if learn more deeply when we're familiar with the journey. How did it all begin. Well i think my my journey into law was somewhat of an interesting story growing up. I always thought there was two professions. That were on my mind. When was a teacher. The second one was a politician. And when i was when i was fifteen years old i i mentioned to my father that i was thinking about becoming a politician and he said you can't just go and be a politician. You need to be something. I maybe a doctor or a lawyer and well i took that advice and i jumped into law thinking that some of the skills that i had developed earlier in life like public speaking debating i i was interested in those things and i thought you know what law probably will be a good fit for me. And how did you find it when you started out. Well i think. I started out in private practice and this was in the late nineties. I started in a small rural practice. So i left the city that i have been living in because of job opportunity and i was very fortunate. I've found that. I was i was able to be exposed to very high level. Trial matters almost instantaneously. So i was kind of like trial by fire. I was learning a lot very rapidly. I was very busy. And i was also very consumed with my word so you felt of your love for it but also it sounds like it was beginning to take a lot of energy. So what happened next. Well i i learned that you know the the experience was definitely an asset and i ended up moving into different firms in private practice but i also started to see very early on that that kind of fit between work and the rest of the life rate from the beginning from the early stages was a challenge. For me i i. In retrospect i was not very aware and conscious of my ability to say no to things to keep a close eye on that fit between work and the rest of life. I i struggled with a. That's a that's a big observation. I find a lot of women are in that same boat. And what did you do in terms of your family. I understand that you ended up combining a number of different things at the same time. You're superwoman years. Can you tell us a bit about those. In my mid years still practicing law we had two children and when our children were both under the age of four. I was working fulltime in lawyer slash executive council position so very very high stress job chelayel also was heavily involved in the charitable world. I had started a charity. A number of years ago and had been working on that and was doing a lot of development work on that during my lunch breaks and after work and on weekends man i decided to have another add on to that and i started teaching law at a secondary in the evenings and on weekends so yes there was a lot going on and did you end up maintaining that. How did how did that develop a good question. You would think that at some point. Something's gotta give and in in my case. It was certainly true as much as there were years where i felt like i was in the flow and i was doing some amazing work and taking on some amazing challenges and really making a difference. I was getting tired. And i was noticing it. I call it peripherally in a sense. I was noticing things. Like i was so tired at night that i felt like i couldn't. I didn't even have the energy to plug in my phone to charge it. So you can only imagine how hardware yeah tired but also you know. I had a family. I had young children a husband other family other commitments. So i was pretty I was running pretty thin. And what did you. What did you choose to do about that. How did it all work. Well it took me a while fae. There's there's no doubt And i'm not shy about talking about the struggles. I i was probably. What's if somebody from a distance was looking at me. Would call an overachiever very type. A. was very connected to my job title status working my way up the proverbial ladder. Those were all things that were important to me and eventually later in my years and it was actually about the same time that i came into discover coaching that. I realized that. I had the ability to do really good work and have a great impact. But i didn't need to be all things to all people and i certainly wasn't superwoman. And i realized i had a choice. I just needed to have. Maybe some courageous conversations with myself began it. I'm sorry that when you began to develop your courageous conversation title in the theory and the working area around that so my my development and my work on courageous conversations in a sense began kind of mid career. Probably when i was about ten or twelve years into the legal profession as working as a lawyer and i was dealing in a very high pressure slash sensitive system and in positions that were dealing a lot with complaints and issues with the justice system. So that was kind of the beginnings of that. But it wasn't a formal sense that i was you know per se working on developing programs around courageous conversations. It was just what i would happen to be working on at the time. My work specifically on dealing with difficult conversations and being more courageous in our conversations has really began since i developed my coaching practice on my leadership consultancy in the last two and a half years. I just wanna take you back one step before we go forward with your courageous conversations. Because i understand. You did leave law for a time period and i just want to explore because i know some women want to look at that option they want to hear about it and explore whether it's a possibility also to give some hope that there is the possibility to return to law successfully. If you do in fact make the choice to leave at some point. So can you tell us a little bit about that choice in your return. Sure so i went in and out of law twice and so the first time i was exhausted i it goes back to that story. I was telling about juggling multiple roles. I've is exhausted. I said you know what it's time for a change and rather than being very aware and considerate of you know my own needs in my family's needs i quickly jumped into something else that was outside of law and it was you know in some ways the the work that i did and it was a three year period. I tried a few different things. I learned a lot but what happened for me at that time. Was i said you know what if i discontinue practicing. I'm running my own. Risk here of a couple of things and i'll put it on the table that the risk that i'm going to identify with my perception at the time of what i was putting at risk my perception at that time was that i was risking losing status and paying or better paying jobs. My was you know. I did no longer had the fancy titles and the offices associated with some of the lawyering roles that i had been in and so there was a struggle. They're like a bit of a shift. Or even a loss of identity that i was dealing with and there was also more practical component to it in terms of there comes a point when you go non practicing that in order to reinstate you would have to have jump a few hurdle so this is put it that way and so i knew that that time period was coming up and you know like i said earlier struggling with the loss of potential loss of identity. I jumped back into law and try it again. A few different things went back into private practice than a job in government came up and tried that and eventually. You've you've worked your way up to be an executive coach and just tell us a little bit about how you to that role. So that kind of coincides with my departure or my taking on non-practising status as a lawyer a second time so when i went back into government in a legal role i knew very quickly i. I wasn't in the right place. I was missing. Something and i wasn't exercised strengths and talents. That i knew i had and i i really felt separated from that and wanted more of what i was. Good at in my work. So i ended up taking on a job as an executive director. Overseeing two hundred and seventy-five court staff in a really wide geographic region and it was a fantastic opportunity. I work with wonderful people. But what i wasn't prepared for was the amount of change that was basically thrust upon us Do to really economic downturn. There was a number of structural changes may and along with that came literally dozens of difficult conversations in terms of restructuring and working with people to try to improve upon our justice system. Bad in some ways was very very flawed in some ways so coaching came along about. Then i and it wasn't a plan of mine. I just was offered the opportunity to learn some coaching skills. That were part of a leadership development programming and when i was introduced to coaching i learned very quickly that this approach was nothing like nothing i had heard of or been a part of in law before. That's he this is. This was the aha moment for me. When i realized that by exercising different skills than i was used to as a lawyer the impact that i have with individuals in helping them to get through really complex and really complicated issues and things that were on their plates. It was just such a world of difference using those those key skills those coaching skills. Which are very much what i use when i teach and when i talk about courageous conversations while i'd love to learn more about this courageous conversations because it sounds like a perfect word to use in so many different contexts. I find myself wanting to use it. Continually is courageous conversation. So tell me what makes a conversation. Courageous well fe. I like to almost paint a bit of a picture. And imagine that on your blank canvas start on one side of it and you have kind of zone and the first zone. I'm going to call it. Baby the caution zone as the comfort zone. The zone of this is the way we do things here. This is the custom the tradition. this is. yeah. This is that cautious type of zone or conversation is one that a lot of people in law fuel stuck in and i say that because i experienced it and i work with people that i coach that feel that they feel like they have to be a certain way that they're expected to act and say things in a certain way to please their clients their bosses the judges etcetera etcetera and head. Oh yeah ex to progress. Absolutely some of them. We'll say unless. I say yes to this or you know. I can't question this i you know i need to be confirmed conforming. I need to be cautious and each watch my step i was just gonna say i think that is exactly what a lot of women feel especially junior women learning the ropes in a firm. Yeah absolutely and it just in in my work. As a coach it comes up in so many different contexts for men and for women but with women. I see it quite quite a lot Especially around conversations of a new mother going back returning from maternity leave and really hesitating and being cautious about what they ask for what they say or how they respond to work. That is maybe going to take them out of their desirable zone there. And they're combining a whole new layer into that conversation at that point that i think we're all very busy presenting that okay. I've had this child. But i'm just you know quite capable of my job at at the same time by stating it that way. There's no recognition that there has been changes in those changes need to be part of the conversation. Yeah and so you know. There's kind of that internalization of the feelings and the difficult thoughts and emotions around this worry for a lot of people. I can't say anything if i do. I'm not gonna make my way up. I'm not going to be accepted. Etcetera etcetera and i you know it's so that being in that kind of side of this picture that we're painting around the cautions zone one that That's the beginning of the picture. And you know if we want to move into that you know. What is the courageous zone, the courage zone look like it's a different world and it's tough to move from that. So what is that about? What is this. How do we do this without feeling that we're putting ourselves massively at risk like i can see why we've just covered off a lot of why I think it's important and some of what gets in the way but what is it. Let's go further on that and talk a bit more. O kay, w here do we go from here. And what if i do this. Will i be at risk? Yeah it's such a good question so we almost have to step back before we get into this courage zone and we start thinking about. What can i say. So i don't put myself at risk. What can i say. what can't i say. People start running scripts through their minds. And i'm gonna really encourage people to step back and at least at the beginning and it's gonna take some patience but to start by thinking about their mindset before the even go into thinking about what they're going to say and that mindset that i'm going to suggest is one that a lot of folks who are trained as lawyers struggle with and myself included. Okay. I think that you know. We're we're trained as lawyers to problem solve, to be lifesavers, firefighters, in a sense to know the answer is to possess the knowledge and to be able like you do when you walk into a courtroom, y ou have to know your stuff at the snap of finger and if you don't you risk not knowing the answers to things and potentially jeopardizing a client's position so i think that pressure has to be acknowledged and i think shifting from this concept that we always need to know the answers and that we always have to state our case upfront. I encourage people to step back and say instead of going to that k ind of fixed mindset or even that judge mindset where yo u always need to be prepared and have the answer. Let's try something else. And i'm gonna call this o ne more of a growth mindset some people would refer to it as a learner's mindset. Yeah i'm sorry. Would you say it's like be curious? A bsolutely absolutely if you've got the key factor in that growth or learners mindset is curiosity and stepping back and thinking thinking we remembering you know when a child or when we were children w e wouldn't ask a ton of questions when we're thinking about creating something or making something it's like we would just do it. And if we struggled along the way yes we would ask for help which is awesome. But you know that curiousity that we're kind of born with. We seemed to to lose a little bit of touch with it and so going into a courageous conversation with a mindset that is open to, number one listening to t here's obviously another person or people in this conversation and getting to understand their challenges and their perspective. Even if we think we're right you never know what we can learn and the more that we can do that and just step back listen to learn and understand that can help us in number one building rapport with that person across the table and then number two actually developing a relationship where they're going to hear what we say rather than it being more of us being defensive or you know knowing taking a position and saying i want this change or i want that and making it kind of yes or no scenario. That's not what a growth our learners mindset would look like it would. It would be like you said they're very much about curiosity being opened to the possibilities and exploring. S o you'd say would be listening loudly like really putting your listening skills to work to be able to get your mind into how the other person is thinking about the situation. What is their perspective on this? Absolutely and you know what that is tough especially when we feel like we have a position that's really valid o r maybe we feel that. We're being disrespected. We want to clarify things but just stepping back and listening to learn and understand what other people's perceptions are. What other people's experiences are you know. And then acknowledging those things when we're listening loudly and actually confirming that we get and we understand. Okay so could you give me an example of how that would go in conversations. You know say. I'm a person that's coming into. I'm an associate and i am not getting the types of cases that i would actually like. Isp being passed over but my work is good. I'm now approaching a senior person in the firm. And i want to have this conversation and of course. I'm not really feeling confident about this. So how would we go through that process with doing a courageous conversation using that as an example so like i said i think the starting point is going in to that conversation with an open. Mind set where you're going to really try to listen and learn and understand what is going on across the table from you and i think setting the stage of even saying something. I wanted to talk to you about my case. Load what i'm noticing or what my perception is that i can take on more. I'm finding that you know i. I have a great interest in this area. I'd like to develop more in it. But i don't seem to be getting the work and that that might just be my perception and i'm curious about what your thoughts are on file distribution and the work i'm doing as well. You know Even even saying hey. I'm open to feedback on this file distribution or on the way that i'm handling things all of a sudden what we've done is opened it up. Would you say that going into that conversation. As part of having the creepy conversation you would want to be able to perhaps in through your mind some of the particular ways that they person could be feeling about it. So for example in that and listening going into that conversation saying to yourself there are other alternatives. Besides just this person not wanting give no different places like it's just easier because the other associate happens to have more expertise just because of worth article than they were easier to. Just keep the cases then think about having to reshuffle and rethink at an example. Yeah absolutely so sophie as you were saying that i was thinking perfect example of our ability to coach ourselves so to get curious with ourselves even before we go and have that conversation and we can ask ourselves what are meeting with some of my assumptions. Here what are some of the stories. And they're usually untested stories are running through my mind about why i'm not getting these files and just sit down and saying okay. You know it could be this could be that and then this is where the courage zone comes in is having the conversation around. This is my perception and i. I want to confirm whether the way i'm thinking about it is. I'm on or off for how you're thinking about it and you know what are what are the factors that you're taking into consideration. I really like. I'd like to learn. So that i know how i console. Best part of this process is asking powerful questions and seeking permission to offer another perspective and confirming at this happened or the neck. That is what you would say as part of developing key skill. Yeah absolutely. I think that those powerful questions are going to be ones and it is. It's very simple very powerful. These questions are going to be open ended so that we're really going back to that. Learners mindset we are being open to the possibilities and really listening to understand and learn what is the perception of the other person or you know. Might they might not be thinking about this at all. Who knows so those those powerful questions if they often begin with what or how and i my one of my recommendations to people is that they avoid questions because it can often in invoke a bit of defensiveness. So yeah that. I'll i want a different case load. Why aren't you providing it. Yes i can definitely see that. Shutting doors yeah. I think that you talked about it. Fe that progression of moving forward and not only confirming that we understand another person's position but then being curious again about okay. So if i'm understanding you correctly this is how you normally would distribute files on in this area. You know. i'm curious. What could i do to get more file. You know what. What in a process. Would you suggest that i go through. How could i express interest more often about. How can i make this easier for you to make this an easier process. Something along those lines and then after you get through that if you can get them to change their perspective or buy into the perspective that you have provided then you confirm the agreement with them. Yeah and you know what this is where it's not always one conversation. In fact a lot of the times it's going to take many conversations and i think you know i have to say if you get a no. I'm sorry but we can't do it that way. I like to tell people consider it a not yet because things can change our bosses. Our leaders our partners. Cannon will change perspectives. won't change. New considerations will come up. People will think about things overnight or over the course of weeks and months and yeah so that that word no or not now think of it as a not yet have have had hoped that if you do good work and you show up in your be your best you will be noticed but you also have to ask and keep asking the goods powerful questions that show you want to be respectful and interact in a productive way and move forward so that when there are maybe some next steps identified. You can confirm that and you can say okay. So i think i get it. You know maybe. I need to complete training and this or maybe i need to shadow with the more senior lawyer before i'm assigned to certain file is is that. How does that sound. And then in terms of exactly it sounds wonderful in terms of giving people the options about where to go. And i love that that you don't just accept go and take it as not yet because that keeps the door open and as we know careers go on for a number years and if you i made the mistake of expecting my work just to speak for itself and i think this is an amazing process of having these conversations to continually get yourself into a position of being noda's and also having the conversations that get you the work that you're going to enjoy doing so. It's a very proactive. Thing that you can be doing in your career to to make those changes and i just want to ask you. What have what are the results that you've been seeing in terms of minting courageous conversations with your coaching client. Well i think The ones that make me smile ear to ear often involve career change so i coach a lot of lawyers. They come to me and they say you know what i think. I need to leave Whether it's private practice or another sector and they're starting to already think about very specific options out either of law or maybe a different practice area. And what i've seen. Is that when people step back and we work on getting them in out of the cautious zone into the courage zone they start having conversations that express interest and are very honest and open about maybe the difficulties in the challenges that they're having and when they ha- their brave enough to be vulnerable and have those courageous conversations. What i've seen. And what. I love in. My work is some recreation of jobs. Some changing of whether it's duties and responsibilities or even titles like unexpected results where people. They're not having to leave but they need to have that conversation i do. Yeah that's just it as you can tell from my voice that gets me excited. It's wonderful and it's an amazing concept. I think that it's been a wonderful conversation to talk about courageous conversations. I want to thank you for coming on. Tribe talks and sharing your expertise with the community. I'm looking forward to taking what we've discussed today. And using it to create our tuesday challenge where we will take one thing from what you've discussed today and use it to change empower us in our lives and our careers because you've made it abundantly clear that having creatures conversations has the ability if it right away can start changing lives immediately so i thank you very much carmen. This invaluable information for legal global empowering and transforming us through skills and shared wisdom for other great episodes follow us and be sure to check out her legal global dot com for community informative skills-based articles and to work with me. Your host fake gelb.

carmen chelayel faye Mason craig tate sophie Cannon noda gelb
Geri Jewell -127

On Mic Podcast

28:45 min | 1 year ago

Geri Jewell -127

"Hello and welcome. It's on Mike with Jordan rich great to be with you in this brand new year as we record it's twenty twenty and conversation Asian is alive and well in the new decade I the contact information email address Jordan chart productions dot com. That's C. H. A. R. T. Chart Productions Dot com where we produce the program program twitter account is at Jordan. WBZ and on facebook. It's the Jordan rich though I guess today is the One and only Jerry Jewell Noda millions his cousin Jerry on the NBC Sitcom the facts of life. She was the first person with a disability to have a role a regular role on a primetime show. She began her career. Doing stand standup comedy. At the comedy store in the late seventies and soon after in nineteen eighty. She performed at the second annual media access awards where she was introduced to the one and only Norman and lear and her career took off. Jerry's appeared on a whole bunch of shows the young and the restless sesame street twenty one jump street the Emmy Award winning movie two of a kind and of course the HBO go hit series. deadwood Jerry Jewell is also sought after as a motivational speaker and trainer in the areas of disability diversity and Geo bt issues. She uses humor so so effectively to bring about attitudinal change creating hope and joy where there's pain so many projects and among them is her autobiography. I'm walking straight as Xichang received the two thousand twelve gold award by the independent publishers. Jerry Jones remarkable performer and an even more impressive human being. Oh and by the way. She has a furry friend friend with her name. Juliet who you might hear from during the interview. So now it's my pleasure to say Jerry Jewell. Let's go on Mike. Yeah well I started doing. Stand up comedy routine. Seventy eight and I was asked to perform at the second annual Media Access Award Award in nineteen eighty though nineteen seventy nine years later and Norman Lear N.. Charlotte lay. Were both in the audience that night and after I did my comedy routine Norman came up to me and said you really funny kid but you will you tell him as it so wait a couple months okay. And he actually. They waited three months. It was three months later that I got a call that he had written me into an episode of the facts of life which Eh crispy nineteen eighty. It was so cool and I also was watching. You do comedy prior to that and let's talk a little uh-huh yeah let's I because I am a big fan of stand up and I know that you worked in one of the most legendary places. The comedy store many many many many. I mean that's where everybody from prior to Robin Williams. They all started their Jerry. They all started. Yeah let's go back even further and chat with you a little bit about your childhood and about when you knew you wanted to perform and why it was so much a goal of yours. Take us back to the early early days when this all started. I born in Buffalo New York that was my disability and and My pants we located in California when I would eighteen months old because at that time the meeting and and shot in instant emergency kid has noses was he. La Pediatric and so Oh my mom and dad basically sacrificed everything and the whole family moved care all right to be diagnosed at UCLA. Hey when I was eighteen months ago so I was diagnosed having cerebral palsy. And then putting much. I title relatively normal hours grabbing. Sleepy I hear the categories with you. You're in so you're in. La Because of your parents yeah okay. It is the loudest cats that I've ever ever had my life. She knows I'm here in new pigs. So she asks why she's so loud saying wherefore Art Thou Romeo and cat speak or what I always wondered about every time and she wanted me off the phone I see I see. And what is that enough. She has a little longer count. And so I turned it off so there wouldn't be any into action and here we go. Well we can. We can certainly accommodate Juliet in the conversation. So you already county I I Graduated from High School in Nineteen seventy five Went to college and then dropped out of college and became a standup comic and to me. I I was mesmerized by television has a child because it was a form of escapism employees. I I was only by far away special schools so I never got to be got. Thanks ships in my own Nathan because nobody knew and I would rather cute in minutes allotted the neighborhood kids and so my safe haven was to run in the House and Watch TV and one of my idols. The goal of was killed Burnett and I started writing hill well and colder that I wanted to beat be locker when I grew up. Wanted to be a comedic actor Noviny do and by the way I have cerebral palsy. What do you think and and one of the letters that got some care on? I still have it to this day. said that there was no guarantees. She's that I would become professional. News no guarantees in life period. But the important thing is to put out the effort and decry getting their acting capacity. Nobody knows what they can do a mess. They try and letter caned my eyes I'm home nine to every would she ever without me. Isn't that cool. While Eddie takes takes people like like that in our lives to remind us of that and the fact that you reached out is really impressive them. too many people think that they're alone and that no one will. I answer their questions and many won't but she did good for her and good for you. Yes she did it it was. I'm very glad yeah and I even ordered ticket to the Carol Burnett show when I was sixteen seventeen. I can't even remove my sophomore atwill junior year but it just happened to be the episode where she was wearing the couldn't manage well about audience audience. That's a classic that's one of those cult. Classic episodes that we see Youtuber. Wow so jerry. Doing stand up is no easy task. Ask and they say that so many comics and I have friends in Boston. Who are so many comics are doing it because it's a chance to get people to laugh not at you but with you? What was the first standup like view? Because so many people do want to put it politely bomb early on. What was it like view when you get up there? I would. Hi Jeff the time and I and I'm looking out I mean 'cause the olive and Algebra for the second time I was raised lestrade and I I was sitting in a Disabled Services Department Mike when our Sunday has who happens to be blind. He realized how bummed out and he said. What is your problem you and I said well? I'm glad I really don't WanNa be. I WANNA be in show a business that want to be an ass. I WANNA be a comedian Achil- Burnett and he wanted to ask you. What do you do? I go to the Comedy Avenue Store every week and tell blind jokes and I said well that made will be but I can see just fine nine. He's now thinking as you go to the comedy store in plastic so I give 'em blame I'm out into this and interesting. Because he he and his friend John Houghton drove me up to la the weeks before. Walk to meet Daddy Moore. Who ran the original room at the comedy store and he wanted me to meet Danny to see the package do an amateur and when Danny met me said hey look there's never been a comedian quite like you before and I can guarantee that mature when approve of you or not and I don't want to get up on stage and have mid-east eh? Okay she's never going to perform the my top again and then you didn't know that she would tell you he didn't want to take that risk yes he said I want to be polished before the NFC hugh so the deal is you come to the comedy store every Monday. My midnight an amateur night. Eleven eleven thirty and not wanting to back door time that she tells Indiana and went missing leaves the room. I'll put you on Michi by the way pauly. Shore's mother I am not mistaken. Yeah and the food show that I ever did on that Monday night. And knock on the back door They informed Dani that was their Mitzi left Burma short time asking he ran did the MC okay into the J. Among county right out right now. We'll put the other Thomas on acid you and we think of Jay. Hey you think of a male you don't automatically think being So he introduced me as a heat and now people love warm. Welcome to J you. He drove away from on Townie. And I stayed hearing-impaired. I WANNA hearing aid. Can you could not do a thing. I thought I would death it that you could not hear one thing and I just just looked at at the audience and I could hear. It was so quiet and I could hear the mumbling in the plan. Well it was like like. Oh my God. That's a he oh he grover not exactly so the intro was helping already I guess. Yeah Yeah and I didn't ask anybody. I just went into my routine that I will probably two nights before her and my my mind was I don't know about you people but I looked up and coming out of the closet lately. Yan Dan Talent and said that what you haven't heard about The still the people that have been coming out of the closet like don't tell Anita Bryant now I don't want anybody now sequence. This is a state and then was that you can't keep it A. It could a moving all over the place you know after. Don't tell him need to plan especially because she'll go another Bam insured travel all over the country saying unless staff these people these. I'm teaching public schools. They will influence children. And before you know it all started will be moving like this. I so remember the Anita Bryant days. Yes I I have to hand and I got a standing. That's good no over the course of your stand up career. Did you ever though run into people who didn't have that wonderful sense of humor that most Americans have and said. Hey you know you're demeaning people with disabilities because today hey especially there are so many is since sensitive types out there who think everything is offensive. What what was there? Any case that habit come uh-huh yeah and the only is gone. When I was doing? Stand up I got repeated by the La Times with this huge review. Two page article. Aw Okay and dividing wrote and I read this in the La Times was that this is a retention new comics so oh self confidence that she acts like her hefner even there she just goes into the next pitt and ignored and matters. I didn't listen. You never heard the hecklers boy. What a great defense against hecklers? Just don't listen don't here that's so funny. Well you know there's is a book that you wrote and I want to plug it right now. It's called I'm walking as straight as I can and it's quite compelling got great reviews a lot of people have read it and should read it and you wrote that book and Talk Not only about cerebral palsy. which is something? That's quite obvious. I mean to those who know you but you also wrote about Other issues including your your sexual preference and stuff. You've had to battle through more than one block. K tell us a bit more about the book and and what you hope to achieve with it. Well Shell and I don't like to say nutshell but I had an autobiography published in nineteen eighty four coug Kyrie and I had green because that authors would you know just want my God. I was on every major talk. Go in the United States but the irony of that is that I hated my book and I didn't light it. I probably had very little. They do with it. And I made a pact with myself that one day I would like Jerry Story and it would be on my word I would write it and in two thousand and nine I did. It took me a year and a half to complete and it was published and in two thousand eleven. And I'm walking around with a play on woods. It was you know several power in and being gay combined Combo it is a play on words. But it's it's it's a very important part of your life to to say what you have to say your own words. I think that's that's so helpful to you right to get the story out there and to share it with the world it was it it was you know. Okay I'm calling and all out there I have nothing to lose. What am I worried about? You know I had been in the industry since nineteen seventy eight. deadwood ended in two thousand six to me at that time and as usual every time I did you have done on. TV and end. Sometimes I way is is not a decade work again. This is always been the pattern. I don't understand. Let let my Kinda my hands. I might as well look why came. Let me ask the question in that has to be asked. And it's and it's no the answer because I've interviewed other people who have broken through the barrier but the barriers still very very high. I'm talking about about entertainers particularly actors. Jerry in television and film roles who are passed over for showy say physically adept actors. Who Pretend to be disabled and it goes on all the time even now are you? Are you hopeful that more people with with different abilities. We'll have a chance to to get up there and act as you have. Why yes? There's there's been a lot of headway mbappe. I was at the media active poorly and media access award last week so it Hollywood is has come a long way in considering in people with disabilities belong hopefully lead in Costa an well and yes. It's gotten a a lot better absolutely but we have a long way to go. You know we have to train the casting directors to consider not just you now. Let's let's put it this way every made you own that I have ever gotten. Michael has not come from auditions I have had a total of me feet thirty nine forty additions in forty years. That's town much more Jack. Have you know we on my So I've been very black that that Norman Lear was in my audience in two thousand into I was standing in line at a pharmacy and David. Yeah that line to deadwood right arm they say who was it Who got Discovered in in a pharmacy in a Hollywood it was Lanta. Turn your Atlanta Turner read Redux. That's what you are. I know that's crazy Now you gotTa tell me some deadwood stories. I love the series. The fact that you did the movie with so many other of your cast mates so many later is amazing and beautiful. Glove the film. How did you use bench David Milch but talk about the role because for many people you were the most sympathetic of all characters getting wailed at by you know oh who Slightly whiplash there Ian Character. Tell us a little bit about dead. Wouldn't how you worked at role and so forth. Well I met David Nepal missing. He wrote his phone number on a prescription pad going anti depressant and he really did believe you and Dan he basically. He told me that at some point he wanted me to read about the eighteen. Hundred ended dead wood and I read several books to which he gave me Juliet. Wow I'm really pleased. That might be the best meowing cat. I've ever heard on a phone unbelievable. I know she's like I said she knows I'm hearing impaired and she doesn't intentionally. Well Okay so I actually wrote twenty pages of backstory for the character and I it can David and he called me back within the hour and told me that he loved when I wrote. He said when you're a great writer and I like about ninety seven percent of what you wrote and I said what does he like. He didn't like the name. I chose for my care but I like you said I don't name is jewel. And so he gave it the name jewel and of course I I would in fact of life so I got both of my name. You get your names in there. That's pretty good. That's pretty good. But what what's interesting about. deadwood is of course people reacted acted the language my goodness and it was so course. But it was almost shakespearean like it was so beautifully delivered and and Your characters right in the middle of of a lot of the action lot of stuff going on when you yes I you know what a lot of people don't realize that I was scared to David but as a cat in that would even be in shade and I think he knew that this show In needed some light. So as you said I was delight. Deadwood you know I kinda got the people this mile to feel to have empathy and that was that was the role of jewel. My my kids had the least follow language in the whole show Yeah and when when I David at diplomacy in two thousand and two I would still recovering from spinal code surgery from C.. One the seven so practically my whole. Nah I thought my career was over at that point and I ran into David Milch and then last summer I had had steiner surgery again my lower back and I it was a long and the Supian said had I would be back to my normal in about a month. Whatever and two months later I tune in half Clinton later I still is using a walker? I couldn't DR Congo Jays the climate page and I got my clipping flipping mail to me from deadwood now right at knowledge like there's no way I can't visit so I have to message with production about the two degree and that Please tell me that I can't do all That he has my blessing two cats and she said she could not message and I said yes because if the two he cobb The next day J I got your message in. Yeah and and there's only one tool will you and I don't care if I have to get a wheelchair accessible trailer. MAKEUP COMES DIS. Yeah I have to hire a driver if I have to make the changes you GonNa do and and tear just came to my eyes is that I said you believe in me that much as he said I believe in you in the top you had did a tip to you toes and so there were two pit bull. Don't times in my life were physically. I thought it was over. David comes in my path. I've got chills. Does a such great stories and we're all blessed in so many ways no matter what we all look like on the outside. There are so many things that happen to us on the inside and that's a great great example of kindness and and and also understanding quite frankly my dear that you have the talent to get it done. I mean. Hollywood doesn't waste time with people who can't do the job so well I thank. You didn't do it. I wasn't playing games. How how am I supposed to know? You look great unscreened to me well. What's interesting about that was is that once? I realized that I had to look back through and told them that I had to get out of the stupid bath plays. They didn't work back places in the eighteen hundred and he he wouldn't let me get out of it because he said if anything goes wrong and you added the brace insurance companies won't hey for any more seriously because you out of the brain so I went back to deadwood despondent despondent over that supposedly. I can't get out of the race. What are we gonNA do and Jeannie Brian who was kissed incredible class in the Danner? He made my dress businesses to well over the base and then prop bill an actual replica of a brace that they want in the eighteen hundred goods that will over the over the draft to I know I love deviled Sanath please. That was a blessing because Double Bass Act. Oh boy that's Hollywood magic Jerry Hollywood magic that is so cool well listen you. You are such a delight it and so does Juliet by the way but people can go to your website. which is your name Jerry? JEWEL DOT com. Is that correct. And I I should add that. You're very busy as a motivational speaker and an author and of course an actress and comedian. You have a great life Most importantly accordingly of all. Thank you for sharing your life with all of us. We really appreciate it. You're very welcome and I just got done doing a documentary for NBC Two hours on the best of life so I don't have a Nigga did that's coming up and we can keep up with you on your website for details on all the exciting things happening will listen can continue to do what you do. Feel great thank you again. For All the joy you brought viewers and listeners have told thank you thank you uh-huh thank you. Juliette a dynamic lady and find talent in a lovely person that's Jerry jewel with of course Juliet chiming chiming Hin. You've been listening to on Mike Jordan. Rich podcast available on all major podcast platforms. I certainly invite you to subscribe and download rate and review the PODCAST. We've gotten gotten some great reviews of late and that's it helps spread the word throughout the land with listeners checking in from just about every state and now dozens of countries conversation with interesting creative people. There's more ahead. Just keep on listening and thank you so much. I'm Jordan rich as always be well. So you can do good

Juliet Mike Jordan Jerry Hollywood Norman Lear David Jerry Jewell cerebral palsy NBC David Milch Jerry Jones Yan Dan Talent Jerry Jewell Noda Emmy Award facebook La Times Anita Bryant twitter Jordan rich Xichang
E117  LC25  Your Questions, Part 3

The TechSalesShow

26:43 min | 1 year ago

E117 LC25 Your Questions, Part 3

"Welcome to the tech sales show where we are dedicated to making you a better tech seller sharing tried and true sales strategies in answering your questions weekly. Hey Buddy. What'S UP BRIAN. We are on listeners. Choice partner three. This is all about your questions. So Bobby we've been collecting questions from listeners. Over the past several months and consolidated to a three part series. And we've got more but we'll save that for For a later time so this series is in no particular order. You can listen to it in any way you want to in Bobby you WanNa talk about. We're going to cover next week next week we're GONNA jump into a new series The title last series is creating opportunity. It's really about a creation mindset Maybe not so much of a of a finding mindset. Which a number of reps and people that I've been coaching lately have been more seem seeming to gravitate towards a finding mindset while it's great to find the next big Wale pretty unlikely in today's world and We got a bunch of tips and tricks will give over a two week period of time on how to go out and create opportunity in both net new accounts and then some of your existing accounts as well perfect looking forward to it all right so we've got several. We'll get through here and then we'll save the rest for the next time that we. Qna and Bobby. The first one is how do I keep a deal? Moving along when a prospect disappears and man if you're in if you're in like Actually it probably happens across many different business types. It's probably just because I'm in this but if you're in kind of big deal big hunt prospecting. This happens all the time to where you'll have a prospect who was seemingly hot and heavy. And you know they seemed interested and they you know maybe they really wanted to fill out their RFP. Maybe that's really what it was all about. And then all of a sudden they kind of start ghosts in the they stop stays slow the responses. Maybe they stop their responses altogether. That's never happened to you. Has It no you know my customer's always followed my reverse timelines gross you know? Of course it did and I know I know what I think about from a consumer perspective. When I've done this to sales people sure and then I think I've asked for feedback from customers. The reality is is. There's a myriad of reasons why this happens most commonly I think life just happens right other things become more important. The budget gets cut. People don't want to make other people mad and their ghosting. You intentionally right I I this week Got a quote to rearrange Muslim. Some walls structure in my office at the flight. School kind of open up my office so that I'd see more customers etc and it's literally adding a sliding door and putting up like almost the FO wall I was thinking somewhere in the tune of two four thousand dollars all in for the work to be completed and I got a quote. That was ten thousand dollars right. Yeah I am probably not calling them back. They're going to beginning ghosted and it's actually a friend of mine right. I mean I never thought it would be anywhere near that much and I read the description of the work. And it's like I gotTa Pay. I gotTA move. The furniture is is is not meeting expectations and we have plenty of time to talk about it. He didn't ask a lot of questions when he came out. So I so that very reason. I think when you are working a deal that you weren't engaged you really don't know lobbed over proposal. The proposals a huge miss. And you're just getting ghosted. It's happened for me. Recently to very similar I was. I was thinking I get some concrete done worked on the backyard. We're going to extend patio bid and reduce some of that. Come BACK IN. The quote was eleven thousand dollars. That's all right. I'M NOT GONNA. I'm not going to be kicking off this part of the project because it was just going to be kind of a phase one thing anyway so I've certainly well the reality. They're starting to reviewed but the reality there is. This was a piece of work. I mean we really need four five. Six seven pieces of work done all of it building all contractor all of it multiyear all of it adding up that. I know it's going to be hundreds of thousands of dollars but I I don't want him to do the work for free but is that really wasn't take in my first mindset when I opened up to quote on my phone and looked at the numbers. Because that's what I did and that's what everyone does. I did not read all of the goodness of the beginning of his proposal. It it's it's a big number and I thought well. Golly I could probably do that. Three weekends myself right. I gotTa do is put up some to I four and I. It's GonNa be hard work but I know me and my son getting there do some she rock and paying a couple doors right so I just and that's what customers are thinking especially in the tech world right. Is it worth four x what I thought it was gonna be to have someone else do it? Or do I just divert my team and have them work on this project and so I think the how do you? How do you remedy this? And there's not necessarily a perfect way to remedy it. I've seen a couple of things work reasonably well was the old. I'm going to be two buildings over on the states can get a cup of coffee with you. I've seen that work a lot. That's probably the most effective tactic scene work. I think the smartest thing to do though is to is to is to recognize that ghosting as part of the GIG and that you're going to have a lot of deals and you're GONNA have a lot of lines in the water and you've got to be ready and willing to move and learn from that experience by maybe learning opportunity. There is the there's obviously expectations were obviously not met like something fell through because if it was if he came back and I think it was nine hundred dollars. Your response back. What would be probably what like when when you start. It'd be so hundred dollars I would've said are you sure we're going to be able to accomplish everything we wanted like. It wouldn't have taken much. Maybe this is. I'm prospecting them in the front of the Horse here like when he first walked in and looked at all of these the gut on how much you think. It's GonNa Cost Bobby and I could've said two thousand and he was Wollo. That's not going to build this fake wall. And here's why and talked me through it. I mean I think that's a lot of what we don't do good as tech sellers. You know we don't. We don't even really understand the balance and imbalance of of where we both are at in the willing to talk about this project because if he would've said the fake wall was gonNA cost to grand. I was okay how much. How much is the door? Because I I know I can build the fake wall. The doors the big lift right Putting a door and a wall. That's already there. I don't think I've never done that. I don't think I can do that so I think that's the first piece Is figuring out. Where are we both working towards the same goal? Yeah Yeah so learn from it now understand. What the MRS may be more transparent that first meeting? I know some folks that will like the very first meeting. They'll say look. This project is in a cost you X. number of hundreds of thousands or millions of dollars are we even the right stratosphere right they're like super transparent about where things are gonNA land and I've seen it work really really well and I've seen I've seen some sellers do a good job of selling pure value to say. Look it's probably gonNA come in this range but we're going to be really prepared to help show you how X Y and Z can save your company to ex- that's over a three year time period so But I think I think for me and maybe this is the sales manager. Part of me speaking is that an average rep consistently depends on deals. They're getting ghosted on in waters. Plants is going back to an episode. We did a couple years ago and is not. S- is too dependent on deals that are out of their control. And is you gotta be ready and willing to move on. And if you're not so you're gonna be a perennial average. No doubt no doubt and close the book works. But you can't overuse it. We had an episode on that calling calling customers out on on ghosting. You a moving on I think the funnels is key here. You've got to have a bigger pipe and you can't have one deal. It's going to help you get your number. All right next question is how do I prospect when I'm burnt out and man? I can feel you hear bitten technology cells twenty now and there are not only that like there are many parts of this job and I'm sure it's every job I'm sure a hematologist saying them he's burt-out on things. I'll go back to that. I talked about a lot bobby. That's my Thursday rule which I exercised this week at a crazy travel week and I said I am. I am not taking an early eight o'clock meeting. I basically hold all meetings until ten. Am and I sleep in until seven am and it is. It is so refreshing to know that I don't have to wake up and immediately jump on a plane or jump on a call. Fridays are already relaxing giving the nature of the tech industry to add a Thursday to that. For whatever reason. Psychologically for me makes a huge deal. That's just a minor tactic that I always call out and I've talked to a ton of you there. That are doing this and I love to hear that it's working One thing I would suggest here in your thoughts on the two is Try to vary it. Maybe three of your your best partners or five of your best partners. Step a lunch with them. Have something for them. Of course you know you're not just in the looking for mood but ask the ask your partners like what's working for you guys is there. Certain event worked. Well like broaden your horizon a bit sometimes we can be so myopically focused on what it is. We do day to day today that we lose focus on what else is working out there. I think some of this book will bleed into the conversation over the next couple of weeks but it doesn't the prospecting piece doesn't always have to be about finding the whale. Rider doesn't always have to be about finding the next thousand seats for software millions of GIGABYTES for storage it. Just sometimes it's just meeting with your customer and checking in right. You'd be surprised how much stuff you'll find We talked about call ten probably thousand times podcast but just reaching out and talking to people. You'll be amazed at how much stuff you'll find that might not be current week or current month opportunity but could be could be something that's GonNa turn into an opportunity down the road. Yeah I'M NOT GONNA burn too much on this because we'll talk block say we're GonNa talk about this in the next series I would. I would say if you're burnt out on the means. Obviously the obvious thing is to vary to vary your approach but look outside of it. What's probably happening as less of a burnout on prospecting? More of a burn out on the job in things like diet exercise sleep. I would probably look to those things I because when I'm in a good spot there the rest of the job becomes exponentially more easy no doubt. Noda our rights. I feel like I'm earning a bad reputation at my company Some of the products have gone wrong and I tend to move quickly and isolate myself in summarizing. The email here okay. So let's take the first part I feel like I'm earning a bad reputation of the company. Sounds like they're saying the reason they're earning a bad reputation of the company is because maybe they're operating as a lone wolf moving quickly through customers opportunities because they're moving quickly. Some of the projects gone wrong. Probably reading a little bit into this into this question here but I think this is probably the real challenge. Bobby of the lone wolf approach is to Is to kind of Skim and in in do what you WANNA do. Take your approach cannot forget about the way the company operates who was typically and try to take things on yourself in obviously the challenge that causes the almost an immediate symptom of that is that people are having to clean up around you. So if you're skipping out on this or not doing that will then. People are having spin an extra thirty minutes here. Our there to To do the work that you were uninterested doing or unwilling to do Which FRUSTRATES PEOPLE PEOPLE? Don't WanNa work with that person It's it's a beating and I think they think well there's no impact it's just a is cost less approach that I'm taking. Obviously this person has started to gain some recognition of the impact. This is having you nailed it with the Lone Wolf Syndrome here and I've probably been privy to this or created this myself was a rep because I'm confident and I think I got it but one thing that I think I really learned that at. Emc More than anywhere else was. Don't don't win alone indefinitely. Don't lose alone you know. There was so much visibility on multimillion dollar deals that you would lose that you. I learned really quick that I didn't WanNa lose alone even deals that I thought I was GonNa Win for sure right in that hardware world. I think there's quite a bit of margin and someone would have to win the deal in their managed. Let them go the floor quickly and then we were out right and that's a multiyear problem like they migrate. You're done but that instance. I think it's it's important that executives be involved your manager being involved you. Everybody's Kinda got their eye on the ball so that it it doesn't come back to so poorly on you. Make it about the team. Make it about the joint effort. Make it about the group not that you want them to all look bad but you probably missed something if this is what. You're feeling right now if you feel like your credit getting a bad reputation there's things that people saw the weren't done and I think the typical one that I've seen over last year's overselling And making it impossible for the delivery team to deliver right. I mean that that's pretty much. What every engineer would say for every salesperson. You oversold that. We can't do it like that would never done like that. And you know maybe you lose the dealer to but that that definitely will change your brand for sure if you if you didn't undersell as an example and I think this underscores the importance of your brand and your brand equity I refer that way a lot internally certainly not my term but I think it's a really good way to describe it. We all have we all carry equity and There are people that have done a great job of building and growing their equity within the company which basically just their personal capital ability to get unique things done or to get a conversation with someone at a high level of the company. These things can be massively impactful for deals they can create liquidity. And your deals and get things done the Peop- The lone wolf burn those bridges and they burn that equity unnecessarily. They think they're saving time. They think they say saving effort. I think just getting things done the reality. Is that person that you think his kissing up to so and so or so and so is really building equity that they're using to close deals now. They're obviously people that will kiss up and they don't even know how to convert on. Capitol that they think they're earning so sophistication. Is Everything here but brand equity helps you get things done that contract exception that executive one on one that unique commission to ask that you have because a deal crosses over fiscal lines? There is a reason that the same people get that over and over as typically the people that are kind of hearing what's important to the company and focusing on that and also doing the really hard job that they're assigned to last thing. I'll add here is if you ever want to be a manager. This is one that you don't WanNa get trapped in either because managers managed teams. They don't mainly manage individual lone wolfs and they've got to incorporate a group of people to accomplish a goal. And if you are such a lone wolf that you always go at it alone you always break the glass to get the deal done etc. You're probably never going to be looked at for a manager. Position Men the VP's are directors or whoever that frontline manager is working for once solutions. Not Problems exactly that with my dad. My Dad used to always say I was my first sales lesson was. Don't leave the monkey in your your boss's office. Don't get this monkey on your shoulder your wrestling to get off. The the answer is not to drop it off at your your boss's office in your previous bosses will will say thank you for that. No doubt okay next one. How can you make a sales meeting or team meeting? The teammates want to join not something they have to join. It's a challenging one. I like I thought of a few things on this. I was just GonNa say impossible and we go the next question but impossible. We'll give the best tests we e contents everything. Don't feel free to cancel the meeting every once in a while like you don't have to have it seen meeting every week or every two weeks or whatever so just having it on. The calendar is not necessarily a valuable use for. Everyone's time so I guess. I think I don't have a meeting for meeting sake what I try to do. I don't know if this is a great or not what I try to do as I have. A one page surprise surprise that. I collect my thoughts over the course of the week in preparation for the next month team call and then I basically work off of that one notes for our team meetings. I got a policy that during the week unless it's super urgent. I don't touch the team with email between Tuesday and Friday occasionally on Friday. I'll break that because Friday's kind of an Admin Day so I store up things it will eventually discuss on Monday. So tends to be a media content. That's one thing I do have others contributes. So if there's something team is good adds that the rest of the team is wrestling with. I'll have them speak to it If you got a remote team going camera on can be helpful. It just makes a little bit more real otherwise you kind of get the impression that people are. Kinda doing handstands or push ups or whatever while the tea meeting is going on and kind of you always have this awkward. You finish a topic yet if there any questions in your in. You got crickets online. Having camera on tints to eliminate that. Yeah I've I've actually been with a few people that have played an entire nine holes of golf while on a conference call with their team meaning listening to their boss. It's pretty genius really. I don't know if I'd WanNa know that or not. I'm sure it's happened on. One of my team calls all right. Let's bobby hit the the final one here trying to determine what is next in my career. We've actually done a full series on the sole recommend check that out. S- I think the guiding principle I use with my own career is. I want to be a happier person I wanted to continually as I get fifty. Do think do more of the things I like doing and less of the things that I don't like doing in while that seems very obvious. I don't think it's the prevailing approach that people take. I think a lot of people think the manager is the next role from me and what they do. Is they get so headset and focused on becoming a manager. Typically of even just the organization or teammate. They are on that thing. Things like this is the next job like I'm gonNA crush it as a sales rep and or or not crush the seltzer up. And I'm going to be the next manager of this team that I'm managing and I think it's such a short sighted view on what your career could become in. You may not even like the job like it could be just terrible job and maybe the co pay versus being the top sales guy on the team. Yeah this is one that I'm not sure young people believe in. I'm still young at heart at at forty six. But the I wanted my career to move much faster than I should have wanted my creative and I will also say that I worked for a company in the mid two thousand two thousands five to two thousand ten where that Microsoft. Your job was to find your next job so it was all about. You know getting promoted moving onto the next thing and so it was induced some to me but I can remember. Just remember how well I felt when I went to spark them and I had a bigger. I had a big job but I didn't have a lot of responsibility. I was to sell the like. I was before Microsoft that I was relieved that I wasn't going to be looking for my next job. I didn't need to get promoted. I didn't need to try and promote myself. I didn't need to create my keep this debt. Going in impressive bunch of people possibly slit throats along the way because I needed to get ahead. I that was all pass me and it was very freeing. So if you're in that world where you're trying to move up quickly take a deep breath and think about what's the worst thing that can happen if you're in that job for four years like and blow it out for those four years and enabled ten people around you to be super successful and accomplished a lot of goals. And so when I took some time off and then went to Dell. Emc had no interest in being a manager. No No desire I just nailed my day job and I was getting hammered every day about getting a better job beginning promoted moving on doing things that would lead teams of people. Please participate in leadership development. All the things that I didn't necessarily really want to do but because I was doing my job and not trying to promote myself. The opportunities were boundless. So I'm not saying that's going to happen if you're twenty four and you had a good year one good year that did the doors are just gonNA come wide open but I do think that consistency over three four or five years while you're while you're participating in some leadership development programs building your mentor network partnering with Partners and doing great with those things. Though the the jobs will start to present where you're not having the seek out ask for them and it will also create a mindset where you're not losing opportunities Ryan. I think for all of us that were in the mode mode of getting promoted and moving on. We didn't get a few opportunities. Maybe we didn't fail an interview process but we thought we wanted to show job. We never even got the finals. Day that those those are painful and then you really start to question and you really start working harder and you get desperate. You know. I think if you just nail your day job be surprised at what opportunities present themselves because other as we say hitters wanted to be around hitters and and a good boss a good manager is going to seek you out and find you in a way to to start documenting. This is instead of it. Being specific about what role is next for you. Be more specific around what things you're good hats and what things you enjoy doing and that can be broad enough to where if an opportunity presents itself it could be something unexpected And like I said Bobby Twenty Four. It's not gonNA be as easy. But this tech world these companies were working for which is growing. They're outpacing the rest of the marketplace. So you have unique jobs. In management roles that come up and individual contributor roles that come up that are unusual and by pitching holding yourself pigeon holing yourself into a specific role specific team. Who you can't you can't control what's next. They'RE IN A. What if some top manager wants to go cross functionally in managed that team direct like you're GonNa get crushed in the interview right if they're a top performer? And I just want to go try out the line of business that you're managing and then how long are they gonna be in that role two or three years so now? The senior grand plan is just that powerpoint deck away so I would just say focus on what you enjoy doing what you're good at and then Speak to mentors. Go Cross organization in really broaden your horizons and I I think it'd be much happier in west disappointed if that most immediate thing does not come true. Well I've heard a lot of disappointing stories about managers want to be managers sitting at manager jobs. I've heard a lot more stories where a person had no idea that they were even looking for the the thing. They found that they love. That is their passion. That's chains there live Blah Blah Blah. I mean there's a lot more good ones out there than the few bad ones and it. It just just is a real deal that if you if you quit searching for that thing it might find you Without you searching for it right it. It really is It is a powerful tool. It's happened to me a couple of times and I've been very grateful forum and it might happen for you as well with that. Let's wrap it up Brian as always average is the enemy. Average sucks. Don't be average people. Thanks for listening to the textile show. Thanks everyone thanks for listening to the tech sale show subscribe to our email listed. Www DOT tech sales show dot com and follow us on twitter and facebook at tech sales show until next week average is the enemy.

bobby Bobby Emc Wale partner sales manager Qna wrestling Bobby Twenty Microsoft twitter Noda Brian engineer Wollo VP executive facebook
Yves Bergquist on the Forthcoming Explosion in Creativity Around Media

Mission Daily

56:59 min | 2 years ago

Yves Bergquist on the Forthcoming Explosion in Creativity Around Media

"Didn't see their don't mind me just typing on my quirky typewriter keyboard for anyone who doesn't know this is a keyboard that was inspired by typewriter so it has actual keys a return key spot to put your ipad type on and it's been so fun to play with and we have one quirky keyboard to give away in our giveaway this week emission dot org slash giveaway. You can enter for a chance to win or you can just listen to me type. We also have a second product to give away this week in our giveaway. It's the Muse to brain sensing headband. I really like catchphrase. Sitting down is just the beginning which really cool about this headband is if anyone has ever tried to meditate before and you're like man. I'm just anxious about this. I can't stop thinking about the day so many things going through my mind calm down Stephanie honey. It's time to meditate this headbands really nice because it actually has sensors that provide real time feedback on your brain activity your heart rate your breath and your body movements and it helps really guided meditation experience so we're giving away one of these one of the quirky keyboards good emission dot org slash giveaway for a chance to win and good luck. I'm Alec Baldwin and you are listening to mission daily selected as best of twenty eighteen by apple mission. Daily is the number one podcast for accelerated learning on today's episode we have used Bergquist an A._i.. Researcher and director answer of the A._I.. And Neuroscience Media Project at the entertainment technology center where he and his team are focused on researching and developing next generation applications drawn from a and neuroscience for the media and entertainment industry eaves is also the founder and C._E._o.. Of A startup corto which leverages deep neuroscience in research to surface what attributes of media content resonate with audiences and how those cognitive alignment are driving content performance in this episode Chad we need to discuss how the entertainment industry has traditionally evaluated new entertainment projects and how eases changing this with his deep neuroscience in A._I.. Research where are you based in Los Angeles and is your startup keeping you there or are you traveling all over the world. I try to to be very disciplined with my my travel because I have a family and I just WanNa be traveling all the time but yeah there's or going to Norway <hes> in two weeks for a conference this conferences all over the place I I try to be. It's always hard to to to say Noda to people 'cause I really loved the stuff that I really love talking about it. But you know that's the way it is for sure and defined a lot of emerging information or new memes in theories at these conferences. Obviously there are some but how much <hes> yeah basically how much new Intel and new discoveries are you encountering so conferences for me or mostly of tool to find new clients. I try not to rely on conferences for new information because otherwise you know I would be constantly gone and there's nothing more mind numbing than to attend conferences for for weeks and weeks on end so as a matter of fact. I have a principle that I don't i. I don't attend conferences. If I'm not speaking there Gotcha just because otherwise I would spend my life doing this hard already managing so many I have so many balls in the air between my lab and my <hes> my research in in in the stuff that I write and my startup. It's it's really difficult so I try to limit conference attendance and then you know the the really really interesting stuff you know I have a few people really trust that I follow on on twitter and I that if it's not bubbling up to their feet it's probably not worth my time very cool so that's I guess a good overview of how you view information curation and how you're going about getting your your Intel there. Are there any other sources <hes> that you prefer whether it's like scientific vic papers or databases or subscriptions where where you going there. I think the O'Reilly a newsletter Scher really outstanding I think I don't think they are covering anything thing. That is a waste of my time and I don't think that there's anything that's substantial. That's not covered <hes> I think between that and <hes> M._I._T.. Technology Review <hes> you're basically covered with serious serious things that are happening across the you know that are noteworthy because there's just so much going on that is really hard to to curate everything very cool and could you talk to us a little bit about your work at <hes> A._T._C. or the entertainment technology center and how that came to be sure <hes> so how that came to be as I walked into the Office of Ken Williams I knew about A._T._C. before but I walked into the office of now my boss Ken Williams. WHO's the Executive Director Had C._O._P._D.? The N._S._A. You're the temperature hosie center there's A._I.. and machine learning is this really big category of tack <hes> That is very relevant entertainment but at the same time very complex and there's a lot going on so do you want let me to create a track in your in your institution. That's solely dedicated to machine learning and you know you don't have to pay me. I'll get funded all flesh it out. Just give me a business card an email address in an office and I'll just take it from there and to his credit. He said Yes 'cause he's. That's is the kind of Guy <hes> but <hes> and so there are three years later <hes> you know we we've done some incredible work during breakthrough research <hes> we're are fully funded and which exciting stuff so it's really one of the things that actually have been probably the thing that I've been the proudest of <hes> it might be. My professional career is to take this thing from from zero to one hundred with <hes> with cans leadership. I think what's it's exciting to is that the <hes> backers and the people that are funding this are some of the biggest names in technology and media and entertainment <hes>. Could you talk a little bit about how you chose to put together that group of funders and what may be some of them bring to the table that <hes> is important for for your group Yes so I didn't put them together. These are members of the technology center that are funding the center in funding might work by way of by way of that <hes> the came to the center really by by chance <hes> I became aware of their activities and who was member in at the level of representation at the center is is insane so the more it is all the C._T._O.'s of all the Hollywood studios and you have very very senior executives from companies like Cisco and Microsoft and in Technicolor of Neo Nagra Kudelski <hes> ubiquity Gray Snow Nielsen et Cetera et Cetera and the most senior executives imaginable in the technical recall in the Technical Organization for all these organizations and the conversation is right there about you know what problems do they have and what a pretend these they would have to develop something that would solve these problems at a massive scale. If you look at his studio uh-huh studio will spend billions of dollars marketing movies right. If you make a ten percent improvement on that across five studios you can imagine how massive your impacted right so sure you have a one stop shop for the problem definition and then you go and prototype solutions and you have a one stop shop for applying these solutions to the industry as a whole was really amazing because he has one foot in academia and one foot of industry where you have the freedom of academia where we can turn things and push should limits and and draw on all the resources that are across U._S._c. now just at the school cinematic arts which is part of but also the Engineering School <hes> the neuroscience school etcetera etcetera that philosophy's cool <hes> and yes so when fund academia you have all the reason with all the all the freedom active and then you have all the accountability industry where if you develop some things are really interesting and disruptive for the Ansari that solve a real problem then you have the opportunity to implement them at the level of an industry which is really amazing and so it's a very special place. It's really the the highest level conversation about technology and media and and it's just it's just fun. It's like the most exciting sandbox in media as H._e._c. and I think what's so exciting about this space to is that the frontiers and the rules are being written right now so as a market. How do you view the total? It'll addressable market for maybe like we could call it like new or emerging forms of media <hes>. There's there's original content. There are all these different <hes> new mediums. I are there a couple of names or is there some language from the industry you can provide provide us to talk about this so I'll I'll push your argument a little further what the media industry is about the the the product of the media industry is stories and narratives. You're in marketing advertising news certainly entertainment telling stories and you're telling stories that you really hoping or going to resonate with audiences and what you really sending his brain states and so I like to tell people that media has neuroscience without neuroscientists because you're making and selling brain states without any kind of notion of neuroscience and so what we're doing is we're like hey we what happens if we try to really understand what is essentially neuroscience in terms of neuroscience artificial intelligence and that's disruptive. I think very disruptive way to think about it. Because you really going back to first Chris Principles of the media industry which is you know science and an storytelling and so when you do that then you sort of re completely factor the way you think about about storytelling and so the total addressable market of stories. What is this really interesting question I it's it's a cross media at attainment advertising marketing politics everything I've been relationships <hes> healthcare <hes> the the biggest thing in in human civilization? That's what the total addressable market is human civilization for me and that's kind of really deliberately how we think about it <hes> we we don't just optimize try to optimize stories for a teammate really try and figure hi what kind of narrative structures native domains emotional analogies get people to behave in specific ways so we can better understand the stories that we're telling the consequences of the stories that we telling shoe and really try to tell stories that help people in a better way so I'll give you an example conspiracy theories spread faster times further than the truth and it's because we'd see conspiracy theories or a much better story than reality L._A.. I WANNA find a way to tell the story of reality as exciting more exciting than conspiracy theories if you look at violent extremism for example also violent extremism as basically when some type of mental illness meets a really really good story and you see it across Isis Neo Nazis malicious like that it's really the reunion of mental illness meeting really really good and compelling story and so that's you know we look to to make an impact there as well so the way so obviously we're thinking a lot bro more broadly than than the auto industry is thinking because you know they're corporations and they need to <hes> you know they have shareholders and they need to have their own agendas but really putting this at a very very high level of Hey. How do we understand stories as a narrative from a purely cognitive standpoint and how do we understand what kind of stories resident inlet way with with kind of people and generate what kind of behavior that's really what we're trying to do? We're really getting close now. Yeah I think this is a great segue way to start talking about de risking <hes> media investments if we think about stories and what they do for us as humans they kind of de risk the <hes> the learning process right because we don't have to then venture out on the on our own and get a similar experience we could live through the experience of others so how how are you thinking about de risking the learning process or the process of creating new blockbusters. I can tell you what we're doing right. Now can take some very concrete examples. I can't name the studio so I can name the Property But oh sure yeah just an anonymous version. That would be awesome yeah so for a very long time. <hes> new entertainment projects were evaluated through. What's called a COMP system? The COMM system is a bunch of bunch of people reading the script and and getting to a meeting and say well this movie or TV show is life these four or five movies T._v.. Shows that we know of <hes> we're gonNA average the Nielsen Ratings or the or the box of us which of these five movies or T._v. shows that it's like and then we're just going to give us a target for our <hes> <hes> for how much money could make this project by you and I realize that this is not a very good thing right about things and I think with this really misunderstands is the fact that audiences this media audiences are any radically radically difference situation now than they were even fifteen twenty years ago because fifteen twenty years ago the entertainment industry you had a strong hold on people's entertainment type you had to handful studios heroes and a handful of of of cable channels network cable channels and there really wasn't any thing else than watching T._v.. or go to the movies with theater you could do with your time so it was all intensive. Purposes is an awfully fast forward to now where you have virtually just tens of thousands of options for how to entertain yourself at any point in time and most of them are free. It's a completely different market for the entertainment industry right so if you think about about us from an audience perspective you're really dealing with an audience of experts so you and I and everybody who's watched T._v.. or or gone to the movies or absolute experts in <hes> because our brain has been trained <unk> over thousands and thousands and tens of thousands of hours of watching contact about that includes advertising marketing content in trained to recognize the good stuff from the bounced off and so when that happens something interesting happens cognitive the what happens cognitively heavily is you have a very strong desire for novelty and so a lot of the risk models that are still applied today really worked very well. Fifteen twenty years ago really aren't working very well today and so what we're doing <hes> in in an environment where <hes> the key success factor Israeli how much novelty you're going to bring to a certain genre or sub aura or character type that would just measure that mathematically way we look at similar to like less per minute. I think is a metric in comedy where this would just be a different metric right. Yes so so hopefully it's a little bit more sophisticated again so so we extract all the attributes and those of character attributes relationship attributes emotional Tonelli's and we have database of about ten thousand scripts that we go out to and we look at intrinsically what are so it's metrolink which processing application that just goes out on his own so machine driven application he goes out and say hey. This script that you gave me is like these five or six scripts on these dimensions. It's like well. The characters are have sort of the the main characters have these similar emotional journeys overall descript has this tonality the care to relationships that matter most have this tonality so it's really measuring everything that the human mind and will not gravitate to give me an example we're working for a studio and their producers comped that spy movie with other spy movies which is very natural spy movie bonding Oakland Burnett and stuff like that the problem is it doesn't really that doesn't really capture what the story is that captures what the genre is. What type of film is and that's substantial? It's not meaningless nice but this was an enormous amount of attributes about that script. They have nothing to do with the spy genre that are have to do with the flavor of the script and whether it's like in the flavor of the characters that is very very important because it's going to draw an audience ends that isn't necessarily a core spy movie fan on Inspe- but is gonNA vibe with the characters if you're going to buy with the film about and so when you're doing comps without us you're kind of really limiting yourself instead of going to see every single spy movie out there because they're really big fans of the spy. They're really ignores a lot of audience segments that are going to gravitate towards certain movies based on extraneous <hes> attributes that have nothing to do with genre and so what we do is we then then so he have something machine representation of the cops and then go out to social media and we look at okay. What are the audiences for these? Cops it's very kind of three hundred sixty degree view of what is your addressable audience. What is the cops for this script? What is what are the audiences for the comps and we go to read it twitter facebook? Go everywhere we can to look at how many are there. How passionate are they about these kinds of attributes that are in your script and how do you talk to them in a way that convinces them to go? Watch your TV show or see you're moving right so we're really trying to be at scientific as possible. It's granular possible in really nailing down very granular audience segments and that includes by the way <hes> geographic audiences. We can give you a list of Zip codes where your movie movie or your TV. Show is <hes> predicted to do very very well and you can look at you can do out do a lot of modeling based on that okay. What is the size of my decibel audience? What is the size of the audience that we know have a ninety nine percents going versus? Does that have a sixty five inches of going and then you can do some financial modelling around now but as a whole the much better much more scientific way it's not perfect obviously but it's much better much more scientific way of looking at an addressable audience in copping project very cool and that's are we talking about Cordo your platform there or are we talking about a separate research. <hes> we talked about quarter okay very very cool and yet for for people who are just joining us or who are not familiar. <hes> CORDO is startup an early stage startup that is building a very comprehensive platform to help media makers understand the story that they're telling and predict how much the story is is going to resonate with different audiences segments and to essentially create a microscope into media audiences for anybody telling any story vehicle and obviously you don't build something like this unless you're deeply passionate about a space so where did your interest in in stories or technologies or really anything in the space <hes>. What are your earliest memories so I grew up on film sets my <hes>? I was raised by single mom that was doing wardrobe <hes> for films in France and so I grew up on film sets which as kid is there's no better environment to to grow up because it's just the most incredible the place film set as one of the most incredible places you can. You can go to still now. I go on Moody Lots. Movie lots are just magical. I mean it's a completely magical environment as really think that's what the film never left me. Although I did various things <hes> was always a film fan wanted to be an actor at some point to be a director at some points has always been very very immersed in that environment and and I also <hes> very early on gravitated a lot towards psychology and in cognitive science and so it's really a way for me to kind of bridge <hes> to bridge the two also did a lot of research on on terrorism back ten years ago and <hes> actually lived in Pakistan for a little bit and did some research on on militant networks and militant groups and it really struck me that a lot of the question asked myself. How do you get get someone to want to become a suicide bomber and in the course of doing research around that or unless I called you the ideology of is really interesting to kept coming up on on narrative just powerful Nervo compelling narrative meeting certain mental situation that is in search of a narrative structure and identity as I really got me thinking about about narrative and then <hes> you know if you if you start reading about stories and and especially stories in film you start realizing that there's a very authentic structure two stories a set of steps to solve the problem? If you look at every single story the Hero's journey in Hollywood is really is that a focused on <hes> solving a problem and sometimes there's a personal problem and then a collective problem. Sometimes there's just a collective problem. Sometimes there's just a personal problem but it really is very algorithm. Automatic is a set of steps to solve problems also how you define a mathematical. They're more software algorithm and so you know the two are very closely linked so that got me to really try to understand <hes> are there you know expressions. If a story <hes> that are equivalent to expressions in mathematical algorithms and sure enough there are and just yet question for my own selfish interests here but how big is the space in terms of researchers. How many any other researchers are there out there that are you know many researchers and practitioners where yeah who would you consider to be in space are very few that I know of <hes> there is less than five and and and less than five <hes> mostly less than ten <hes> some are still in the space <hes> some I know oh there's someone at the University of Vermont that stick about this <hes> Disney research has done a lot of Disney has a research center Zurich Sun a lot of work on this <hes> Josh Heisenberg give the University of Florida? Eh now is L._A.. has done as P._G.. Recently illness but really very very good. If you think about take it once they're further and think about the neuroscience of narrative. There's virtually no one yeah I feel like with some recent <hes> pop cultural phenomena with sapiens and things like that it's it's only a matter of time before <hes> the tech community gets excited about that. <hes> and most most of them already are it's just I guess in the periphery. It's not in there <hes> the forefront yet but I'll tell you what it's also really interesting because if you're studying it from an A._i.. machining standpoint <hes> the the way they I machine learning as being approached today which is through mostly neural networks. <hes> is almost entirely inappropriate to to study narrator <hes> knowing that works very powerful doing a lot of things they're not good at all at and methane low level data in this case in words to <hes> symbols could represent the structure of a story and in fact the task of mapping low level data so words in there sort of in their semantics of words to symbolic representation is one of the most difficult but also most foundational parts of building artificial intelligence because when you start building machines or machine applications that can truly understand <hes> speech human speech or human narrative at a symbolic like level which is the level at which the human brain really understands that and they have been does that really well <hes> then you'll be they'll be a major step toward sound official dental intelligence and so that's kind of all what also so energizes me from a research point. Is that the problems that we're finding ourselves trying to solve our some of the biggest problems that A._G._I.. <hes> the interesting side of that is <hes>. There is such a focus right right now on a neural network based I that in I'm pretty confident this is not the right track to to to build what I'm talking about. We have a completely different philosophy where completely different set of tools that includes many many different methodologies including neural networks to try to create this sort of symbolic representation that through which machines cannoli process taxed but also really understand taxed and and really going from machine to machine understanding when you have that when you have the ability to map a low level data to symbolic representation at manipulating symbols. I'm going to see how these symbols exist within an era do and then you'll have the really big step towards towards Scher and so speaking of I- A._G._I.. And as we move towards that <hes> is one of the things that we can do to prepare <hes> just creating better human centric Eric Narratives <hes> and then putting them out there and basically creating more more positively in our narratives <hes>. Is this something that's like a <hes>. You know if we don't do this fast. Enough is a G._I.. Just going to be horrible for it's a difficult question to answer. There what I will say is <hes> the capacity to articulate a narrative which is what you will he talks about that ability will be the monopoly of humans for a very long time. If you look at the different kinds of knowledge you have declared of knowledge is basically fact Paris was the capital of France has his a piece of declared a village and for that we've realized I go a Lulu is is is <hes> a very good example of how now declared of knowledge is the monthly of machines and and thank God for that because there was really a stupid way to spend your life to just accumulate random facts and information so I'm really glad we've got that outsource because that was a completely meaningless <hes> way to spend one's life to accumulate facts now the second part the second type of knowledge is procedural knowledge. how We build a rocket? How do we how do we do things <hes> in that field humans will have an advantage for <hes> a certain amount of time as I'm technically how long <hes> eventually machines won't get better than us but for now <hes> human still have the advantage of as a third type of Knowledge College which I've added which is narrative knowledge which is <hes> once? We are trying to figure out something to do if we let's say let's say we have an idea for probably going to start a company. That's procedural knowledge. How do we how do we start this company? How do we build this product? That's procedural knowledge but then narrative knowledge. What kind of story do we create? Get people motivated to build this product is ultimately the most valuable and hardest to replicate the most valuable symbolic and is going to be a monopoly of humans for a very long time. Now doesn't mean that machines aren't going to help along the way but it really means that any of the day <hes> build something and sell something are going to be to skills the skills that are the most valuable in an Air A._G._I.. Future I learn how to build something learn. How tell a story that gets a lot of people excited about this thing? Those are the two things that we can be confident are going to be the monopoly of the human mind for for awhile very cool and so I'm very curious about this. What is your take on? <hes> narratives and their ability are narrative something that can heal <hes> may be generational trauma or trauma <hes> I in general in someone's life and where what's the research say about that narrative. Let's just go back to the to our definition of story narrator. <hes> we see narrative is an object but most importantly we see narrative is a process narrative is the process of taking the enormous complexity of the world around us and compressing it into a set of steps that we can into a view of the world a very compressed summarize view of the world's that is a procedural view of the world that helps us understand what to do in this context so <hes> you know your your the way you dress is a story right. Y You you <hes> the way you approach someone. Whether it's a stranger or someone the very short interaction with or someone who's really meaningful in your life you really creating a compressed narrative compressed representation presentation of that person and that representations going to dictate how you act with that person and so understanding that process we think we'd be very very important in <hes> changing changing people's view of the world's for the better right <hes> a lot of the times I mean if you think about racism racism is a type of taking the complexity of the world around you compressing it in a in a in a certain way that is going to guide your views to different people different races different genders etcetera etcetera if we can understand that and if we can understand what <hes> on the process that goes into that and the variables that go into that then we can change maybe we can change the narrative around it and you can change the narrative in news for example in a way that <hes> <hes> disempowers racism of its cognitive arguments that makes it his sure sure yeah the so we are really trying to figure that out right now where or that fits in the <hes> in society and health care frankly. I don't know <hes> We'd love to find interesting things and then talk to people who would be in charge of applying them about how all applicable they are and how to apply them and and how to be accountable for it because if you think about what we're doing it's potentially very disruptive and so we really work on debate and accountability and transparency around the stuff that we do because we think that <hes> only through community driven dialogue. Can we make sure that we're doing the right things were applying. These are very powerful tools to create good society. Yeah and I think that the <hes> a lot like open. I used to be open source. Maybe there should be something <music> similar like that where there's some open research about. Maybe mind brain interfaces or what people's <hes> brain does in inside an M._r._i.. When they're given certain narratives or something like that maybe maybe there's like some core body the of research that could be available to the public or not? Do you think it's not appropriate and would only like slowdown in industry that still tune isn't where it for it to matter I go back and forth on that. I like open source because it's the most accountable and transparent way to create disruption. <hes> what about open sources that it's available to the guys and the bad guys right. Would I prefer to open source is community driven <hes> accountability around the a meaning that we are giving this to a group of people and researchers that are accountable to the that are held accountable to the larger community to use it for good through <hes> <hes> the democratic process <hes> that's kind of what I prefer to open source. I mean it's a very complex question and very multifaceted question <hes> <hes> you know she think about you know social media social media was was can be weaponized for good and it can be weaponized for to stabilize communities and anti countryside so should we make of you know the the reason it is being so disruptive in positive and negative ways because it's available to all it's open source quoted so the whole open source debate to me <hes> can maybe needs fear factor a little bit. I think I would love to have a wider conversation about hey. What is open source mean and what do we make open source and why do we not make sway and I think it they conversation naturally moves towards well? It would be nice if we could like price. The have a fair price and then psych well. A market is pretty good at doing that so <hes> yes. I think it's <hes> it's definitely an interesting debate and it's an important one to have <hes> so wh what else is going on right now whether it's in the industry or in your research that your like that is top of mind right now you keep thinking about stuff that I'm real excited about is stuff that we're doing with categorizing content and audio we are building A._T._C.. Application Vivek which is gonNA take any input video video and audio and extract every single attribute about the idea is to create supercharged content personalization models content recommendation models <hes> if you think about ah your favorite movies and T._v.. Shows Right and I ask you you know what you like about those movies and T._v.. Shows are you gonNa give me an answer. That's very high level <hes> because <unk> even in your consciousness you're limited in assessing things like well. How much does the Look of the Godfather account for how much I liked the Godfather? How much does the Music Dick of interstellar account for how much I love interstellar in how much allot if you think yeah no obviously did a great job and music actually is is one of the most GonNa Deliberate and conscious attributes but but there's an enormous amount of subconscious attributes Scher <hes> you know camera angles <hes> color schemes <hes> you know in how all those lineup with emotionally of characters of moments in the film or or how does it how does cinematography and in color and editing and music how do they stack up to represent a specific emotional tonality of character? It was preserved Momeni movie. Nobody understands that today. All right we're well on our ways to create a system that is going to extrapolate that in an extremely granular manner so that suddenly you have a giant liar and since we are you know we're the A._T._C. and we have access to the entire catalogue of the entire entertainment industry we can train it on every single movie ever made and <hes> we are going to be able to represent <hes> any kind of video and it kind of film and it kind of media products across the hundreds of attributes that the has it's what we're doing is if you have time codes for example for each time cove. It's called the meaning code what then this could lead to is creating extremely granular contact gross personalization content recommendation models looking at <hes> <hes> color schemes and and you know in character emotions layered with cinematography in edited pace and in a musical Tonelli's and things like that and really try to really understand us how these moments that really resonate with us cognitively that are so powerful for us. What do they have in them? What is the D._N._A.? Of these moments what is the chemistry of these moments and that's what we're doing today and we're doing this sure I think that would be very disruptive and pretty amazing because if you think about it if I'm a movie maker filmmaker media maker and shooting bar scene for example if this system can pull up all the data about the bar scenes that were shot in the same context as mine and give me that information from a planning standpoint. It's so valuable what's valuable but what I'm what I'm hoping what happens is. We're not delivering data to create to tell them what to do. We're delivering data to creatives to push them to not do what everybody else has done before so maybe if you're shooting a bar scene and we're pulling data about about you know this is how bar scenes have been shot then. Maybe it's challenge. It's hopefully it's going to challenge the creatives to do something different and maybe you already planning to do something different. Maybe you were planning to do something you now realizing is very canonical Poland and traditional in that in that kind of scene and then it's pushing you to try to innovate and that's really what we're trying to do and and <hes> the we're we're very excited about that. <hes> we're very excited about creating conversation from within the creative community we're spending most more time listening into than than talk it we realize because we really want create something that contributes to artistic diversity and creativity and does not constrain it but but just unleashes creatives yeah and that's that's second part is uh so exciting to hear <hes> <hes>. Where do you think the world is at for creators in terms of making a living online whether it's through nonfiction or fiction storytelling I see that world as being dynamic and really exciting place with a lot of opportunity <hes> but I'd interested to hear what you think from your vantage point? I think we're standing on the cusp of an explosion in creativity around media. Frankly I think if you think about the kind of story stories the kind of character is the kind of topics that have been explored through media in the past fifty years. You think you'll see that it's really small spectrum of toys and characters in situations that have been depicted a fairly small. I think there's a there's a whole other world out there. There's a much wider spectrum of stories and characters and situations that can be told than we even are aware us <music> but in so if you can create a <hes> a representation data driven representation of that narrative field you can then again challenge only challenge creatives creatives to go outside of that but also demonstrate mathematically that there is a market for extreme innovation in Hollywood just in Hollywood but across media sure our goal is to make sure that AH films like get out more of these films get paid not less and so we want more of these films that were or T._v.. Shows or products that really push the limit that really tell different stories to different people and that can also create a language where we're trying to create a language that creatives can speak to the people who are funding them to tell the people that are funding them that the risk is not in innovating the risk is enough and trading because audiences want novelty and if you give them novelty today is the surest way to make money in media lose money in media is to create something that's been said before that's been seen before that's been done before and that's <hes> I think what's what's very exciting because it can feel because of our limited imagination and because of what's happened in the past and are you know all we have is the data sets that we've gone through before <hes> at this point so when we look to the future we don't see that the opportunity for new stories might be <hes> you know ten ten times a thousand times what we think it could be so yeah it it could be so much bigger than we <hes> think right now <hes> so in terms of <hes> mediums uh-huh. Are there any type of mediums right now that you're really excited about. Is it just video streaming content. Is it interactive video V._R.. A._R.. All of the above what I'm most excited about right now is reality so the things that we're doing A._T._C. is we're having this conversation across the media industry. About how do we leverage the Internet of things. How do we leverage all of these devices that we have innocent around us and on us and throughout <hes> you know our environment to tell a story at the scale of a city <hes> high and how do we integrate that story with linear content with T._v. and and <hes> some content A._R. V._R.? They all of these channels are incredible there incredible opportunities to tell really completely mercer really amazing stories and what we think about a lot not not seeing what we're really trying to do research and prototype is this notion of telling the story at a scale of an entire city and as you moving through the city the story changes based on who you are what you want <hes> <hes> what what other people around you or feeling what is going on in part of the city of their particular moment in time and has you moving through it you really the city talks to you in the narrative way and you talk to it in a narrative way and what does that look like and how does that project in a marvel cinematic universe for example how do you then how do you extend the avengers universe at the skill of the city. That's the stuff that we think about that stuff. That really really excites me because it's it's it's way way more than than data and machine learning. It's really about interaction relationship. How do you create these relationships serve that are very nurit negatively driven? That's what we talk about this over we do any to see yeah and I think what's so exciting to is this offers an opportunity to go outside of the outside of the the walls of social media basically soak it outside of Plato's Cave and <hes> or at least this offers the ability to turn social media into something that <hes> catalyze experiences <hes> basically yeah just look up from your phone at something like I just it's it's I mean we all know that experience where you're in the getting coffee or your third grocery store at the bank and everyone's looking down and you look up and you'll be looking at you like that's kind of want other people to look up sure I think I'm hoping I'm hoping we can sell that. That would be really really really good thing and I think if we can sort of create these I think as as we <hes> get rid of that sort of mobile phone screen interface and we try to attend dead the story on the content all around us it gives us a lot more opportunities mobile phones have made this kind out of an either or proposition. It should be both if I could you know I mean you have kids I so if we could like play video game with our kids can have in the same space together or consume and you know or or throw a story back and forth between us and them you know and and and went up each other in kind of a narrative tennis like this possibilities are endless and I think we definitely need this to to get back to kind of societal fiber diaper that we're more content with definitely. I think that there are abilities to connect and then empathize with people in in whole new ways right because there's something very intimate that happens when you're just watching a movie with like say a couple of people or <hes> something like that so I would imagine that the nostalgia or whatever feelings catalyze of meaning and there there's going to go through the roof right absolutely but else but also a lot of opportunities for manipulation in. The dark side of that is very oil and we we definitely shouldn't <hes> should we decide what should we talk by Shukri institutions around that yeah and is that something like the creation of those institutions <hes>. Do you think that's going to happen like inside the community or do you think that someone outside is going to pay attention because I I don't see any regulators paying attention to this. Basically you know I can tell you the way I wanted to to to happen yeah. No I'd love to hear through the community I think <hes> you know it's really interesting what's happened in the past fifteen twenty years and then with the introduction of the of the Internet is really that try to itunes disappear replaced by networks so things like the corporation corporation the nation state the government the church even the military has sort of disappeared as institutions at the really been replaced by networks and we can't really deal with networks because they're too complex and we do he needs institutions. We don't need the same institutions than we had twenty thirty forty fifty years ago but we need some kind of institutional framework that isn't that is in between the network level and the government and the nation shovel in those institutions our communities and I would really love to <hes> you know I would really love to have a more fleshed out more systematic <hes> ability to create communities communities at the local level <hes> or the city level or at the state level <hes> even at the national level that the government the dot aren't individuals <hes> to to really <hes> Organiz around it and <hes> and drive the dialogue both within the community also between communities. I think that's something that I would love to see in a more structured manner. Yeah I think that <hes> do you think that that emergence will happen happen around a shared data collectives where groups of people band together and they all own their own data or they take maybe they joined together and get like a joint income share agreement or some type of like nick economic package like that. Do you think it's going to become very tribal and fractured like that. Or what. Do you think the future is there of <hes> local collaboration yeah. That's the risk right so the big risk is is that notion that you know communities these get created with the specific identity specific flavor in that unedited includes rejection of the other communities <hes> and there's definitely a risk of that and so in regards to data sharing thing. I'm a big fan of looking at data like taxes. Would I n meaning that you you have a responsibility to share its contribution this society <hes> because you know my health data I would like my health data to be used to <hes> have to accelerate cancer cures and things like that <hes> so data is somewhere in between a and a complete obligation and but complete publicity frivolous contribution to society it is a substantial contribution to society but I think everybody should be in and we shouldn't necessarily monetize it or we should only monetize certain uses of it. The solution that I see it's it's very simple very elegant is <hes> we we have an obligation to share data because therefore the common good just in the same way that we have an obligation to pay taxes because we decided as a community that you know that we're going to put in the hands of someone that we've loaded for and then we democratically elected then that you know they will be in charge of spending the money <hes> once this should be the same thing with data with the caveat that we we should be in full control of what did we decide to share what they say not in what we decide to share the data four by so I definitely want my data to be used for cancer research. If if it can help I'm not sure on data to be used <hes> by corporations to sell me more ads or or two semi political ads or things like that so that we should have that ability frankly the big the issue that I see with that and really is the number one issue for me in artificial intelligence and especially when you think about artificial intelligence ethics is education. We all need to be better educated about data to be better educated about how they did. It is used about what data is how it's used who uses it what it's worth because it's really not worth much. Sometimes it's worth alive and what kind of value is created by that data at a societal level. I think the challenge of today <hes> is not a technical challenge as much as it is an education challenge because if we as a society don't understand better we're on a horrible decisions about it and and it's just not going to work but and so the <hes> the best way we scientists and researchers can contribute to society is by Educating Society Society into what is what data is what it means <hes> in in trying to create a baseline of understanding that we could make better decisions collectively about what it is very very very curse topic because it's very complicated and is very important and it's also lends itself to fantasy very well so these three factors <unk> adult contribute to very good public perception of but we really have to make to put more emphasis to educated peaking educating people are <unk> are educated about data and is part of that education. Does it start with maybe correcting the media's portrayal of A._I.. As being negative in almost every instance or what's what's that process like ill yeah I would say one of the things that I would love to do is apply the research that we do to telling you about a story about a very minute but but in a nutshell I think it really would help creating baseline of of knowledge about what actually is you know. It's really funny because anytime I talked to people about a I see the same thing and I think it has to do in. Maybe there's something about the human mind that's really interesting that people have seen the highest. They've read the hype but in their heart of hearts they know that it's wrong. They can spot cognitively. They can spot the B._S.. In in the Click Bait and so <hes> it's not necessarily having to walk them back from there Kerr understanding of A._I.. As driven by click beatty it easy about a I. It's really <hes> taking them by the hand they already. They're not really convinced by right they know in the media is trying to scare them and when it's like when they should pay attention when they show people are smart they're intelligent they get click bait generally not not everyone obviously but but a lot of people and certainly the more people than than we think are completely aware that they're being spun and they're being taken on a walk and so when I come in and I talk about no actually this is what's going on in this book predicted to happen. <hes> people already no what I'm about to say and <hes> so I think there is you know so if we can strengthen that with a baseline understanding of data and A._I.. I think we're doing really well because people are already prepped for that. They're not convinced by the hype they're not convinced by that. Just you know stupid declarations in in in clean beatty headlines I think they really know that that's wrong but they don't necessarily know what the baseline and bill and selling so we know what the reality is being very forceful about that is very important. Well said thank you so much for being generous with your time. This has been awesome for everyone listening. Where can they learn more about? You your work and your company A._T._C. Dot org and Corto dot awesome. Thanks thank you mission. Dot Org is a media company with a daily newsletter network of PODCASTS and brand studio designed to accelerate learning head to mission dot Org to get award winning podcast like the mission daily the story I._T.. Visionaries Education Trend's marketing trends future of cities. He's and more mission studios has worked with companies like salesforce Twi- Leo and Ca- Tara to create custom media channels that drive results make sure to subscribe to the missions daily newsletter admission.

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What To Do With Worry

The Mindful Minute

36:20 min | Last month

What To Do With Worry

"Welcome you are listening to the mindful minute. Meditations created for every day. Join merrill net. Mama meditate her and head of mindfulness for shoreline meditation. This podcast is recorded for my life. Monday night class where we have a brief discussion followed by twenty minute guided meditation. If these meditations support you and your practice please consider donating to the show to support. Its continued growth new offerings and its ever expanding team. You can find the link in today's show notes or simply visit merrill are net dot com and click on podcast are. Let's practice all right. Well officially happy monday. Welcome thank you guys for. Two men. the day. After the solstice. So i originally. I thought i was going to do a second solstice. Talk tonight you know. We're still sort of in that solstice energy but the truth is i've had a couple of conversations over the last maybe week unrelated conversations. All having to do with worry and secretly are not so secretly. I'm a total warrior. Like i absolutely and utterly worry about things and i thought maybe that shouldn't be a secret and maybe we should talk about it like maybe we should talk about. How worry works within a meditation practice because the truth is you know when we study the teachings of meditation all of the teachings bring us to equanimity. All of the teachings bring us to. We wanna get to this place where were able to experience everything and be felled by nothing. And i think we'll get there right one day. We're all going to be equity adminis- qantas but also there's right now. There's like the moment that we're in right now and we're all doing our own little. Meditation practices in our own little homes. Doing the best we can and there are days when we worry and feeling is so interesting right so on the one hand worry is at least in my experience. Worry where can be incredibly overwhelming. An almost suffocating like all consuming. This is the thing i am thinking about. There is nothing else that can take its place and on the flip side of that with worry. Is this knowing that the thing or person that you're worrying about if somebody that you love or care about immensely so it seems almost like we'll worry just is an unavoidable consequence of caring right. It's just part of our lives because we care because we're engaged. And i thought maybe we should talk about all right if this is gonna show up if this is going to be part of our lived experience. How might our meditation practice. Support us in it. And so i'm gonna give a hard and fast rule which almost never do and the hard and fast rule is this. I'm an invite you and me to stop sane. Don't worry this is going to be like a hard rule. We are just not going to say those words anymore. Because i actually think it does zero good and potential harm to the worrier whether that you or somebody else because like really if you could not worry when you have already done that thing. We all would have made that choice. Could we and here. We are worry and when we say. Don't worry the pieces that come on top of it is like well how people no i meditate and so maybe they think i shouldn't worry anymore so i'm gonna pretend i don't or like i wanna be this peaceful trusting of the universe type person so i'm just going to say it's going to be okay and really what i'm doing. Just tamp down all that worry inside which leads to why which leads to anxiety or even anger being the overt emotion that expresses itself instead or it leads to numbing sometimes addictive behaviors whether that's binge watching tv or online shopping or eating or alcohol or drugs rate you can go down the list there of ways to numb out so that you're not feeling the worry you're trying to not feel so we're gonna stop saying don't and instead what we're going to do is straightened per spines and say to ourselves. I am worried. And i'm gonna turn around to face it. I am worry and instead of runny. I'm gonna face it so when we're worrying about something or someone. This is fear the roots of worry our fear. We are worried about something bad happening and the invitation in our practice is to actually acknowledge the thing that we're most scared of happening because it's there it's already in our. It's already in our cells screaming at us and were trying to do all the things we can do to not hear it and not thinking which in turn makes us feel worse rather than say. I'm gonna sit down. And i'm just gonna acknowledge that actual fear that is present in this moment. Not because you have to do anything about it but what we wanna do is when we know were scared. How about we create some safety that i think that's the first step. I think this is the step that we need to address. Worry which is to create safety for ourselves as the warrior. And i wanna take a minute to say. That's not selfish especially. If you're worried has to do with somebody else. It can feel like well. Who am i to like. Stop what i'm doing and care for myself in this moment when i'm so worried about somebody else i love. Shouldn't i be helping in some way or doing something or sitting by the phone anxiously but if we're doing any of those things meanwhile spiraling out inside. How will we actually help. If we're called upon. How will we actually show up if we're needed so it's not selfish but rather it's taking the time to shore ourselves so that we can help when it's called for so that we can show up when it's needed and so that we can whether the more difficult moments in our lives so our practice tonight is a practice of in essence creating safety for ourselves and there's some specific steps that will take. I'm gonna talk about him first. And then we'll meditate so the first thing that we do when we sit down to meditate whether we call it this not as we ground like we actually connect ourselves to the earth because what happens when we worry as were up here in our heads and or outside of our body like swirling around in the atmosphere like a tornado and we want to settle our way down. We want to reconnect to the sense of gravity. And feel whatever's touching the earth whether that's your bottom if you're seated on the ground your legs your feet something. And you're going to connect to your breath in a way that slogan breath down and steadies your breath out because this creates a sense of safety in the body. When we're panicked. Breath is short breakfast. Choppy and we're breathing slow even brats the same. I'm ready for sleep. I am safe. I am relaxed. So the first thing we do is ground the second thing we do. Is we add a little message for ourselves. Like a little note of care and this is your choice of words like what are you most need to hear in this moment is it. I'm here for you. I'm okay the phrase. I use was given to me by my teacher tracy stanley and i repeat it tru-truly literally multiple times a day. Which is when i let go. I am supported. When i like. Oh i am supported so we offer our phrase we grow and then we do something really important to what tara brach calls a resource anchor. Resource anchor is something that ain't us to a more positive state. Something that angers us three more positive state. This can be a person it can be an actual person that you know living or deceased. It can be a person that you look up to or are inspired by. It can be an archetypal figure Jesus opinion buddha. If you're choosing to use a person this is somebody without question that you feel supported and or held by like i could lay all my worries down at the feet of this being and feel totally safe in doing so i will not be judged on will not be embarrassed. This bean will be there for me. So if there's a person it could be a person and if it's not a person perhaps it's a place a particular specific spot for you in nature in your home in a coffee shop of place of your childhood. A sanctuary of some type but again it would be a space where you feel the most at ease the most safe or supported that you can possibly be. And as i'm talking. Hope you're bringing to mind who or what this might be for you. I'm totally just tell you this story and truth because let's just be real about it so i can't decide if this is embarrassing or not My visual is it's a place it's not a person or it's sort of a place a person and really truly what it is is a painting by free to kalo which is not embarrassing. Totally proud of that. Because it's an amazing paint painting. And i think it's called like the love of the universe the embrace of the universe but essentially it's a mother earth esque image. The more embarrassing version of that is i also totally relate to the earth goddess in moana. If you saw that movie which door. And i like often picture this cartoon earth my meditations which is maybe embarrassing and totally revolt. Because like to me. That woman is real right. I see her rising up out of the ground and supporting made like actually right. So what is your person or what is your place and then in our practice. What we're gonna do is we're just going to hand over some of the worry not to get rid of it not to get rid of that but to have somebody or some fain helped carried away my and at the end of the practice we notice what might have shifted. Do we feel different in some way. The energy feel different. The body feel different. And if so can you just pay attention to that for fifteen thirty seconds. Because what we do when we really consciously acknowledge positive. State is we're locking in the muscle memory so that we know without even having to consciously think about it then not only does that state exists for us but it's accessible and then we repeat the practice frequently so that every time if you worry every day you do the practice every day if you're very very very worried in one day maybe you do in multiple times in one day until you're building that sense of a perpetual being held or a perpetual ability to over some of the way we're not holding it all on our own all the time all right. Let's try this practice together tonight. Go ahead and find a seat. And if you're already seated you might just want to shift around a little bit you can crusher legs crossing the other way let your hands rest onto your lap. You'll let your eyes close together. As a group here nice pig and helen accelerated by. And then. Just do that again. Inhaling deeply excel outta cy allow allowing your breasts to flow inviting yourself to land right here in this practice and we begin as always just by silently saying to ourselves. Now is my time to meditate. Now is my time to meditate. Unless you say those words to yourself notice if you can give yourself over to the effects of gravity feeling the fullness of yourself settle into your see letting go of your hips and your thighs of your legs or your feet against the air and there's something behind you right now you might just notice the way. It supports your spy. That's the wall or a chair bed. Maybe you can feel your shoulder. Saw fan and drop away from the ear. Living arms. So heavy in wade Feel the sturdiness of your head. Stain above your shoulders tall and away if you can you create a little space between your eyebrow broadening along the brow bone in the temple letting go of the skin around the eyes relaxing along the jaw Turn your attention here to the bra. Mm-hmm watching yourself as you breathe. Then breathe without any sense of four or strain see if you can perhaps slowly breath down touch. You're feeling a nice too heavy and helen. Accel perhaps as you breathe in. Y'all just count a nice even count. Four as you breathe out. You'll calcutt sane rhythm of for creating an inhale and exhale that are equal and laying in volume nice and steady hair breathing in for four really now for four again without any strain or struggle. Maybe you just start to eliminate any breaks are pauses between the inhale and the access so that are in hell flow seamlessly into the x hail or smoothly becomes the next and doesn't have to be perfect. Just feel your breath beginning to flow like a circle Then the circle of braff you can silently to yourself the loving and wise message. You mostly hear your choice of words. It's okay. hey. I'm here when i let go. I can be support A pd net with each circle of braff. Until you feel the emotional resonance of that. Now that phrase Feel ready bring to lie occur son or place. That supports you moss. And you really see you see smile. Feel as if you are seated in that specific place or with that specific beane Can just imagine yourself sharing the weight of your worry sharing that emotional labor with that being or place. When i let go i support. Kill the land itself or the being as it shores you up As we sit in silence for a time. Now i'll just stay with this image in the presence of the person are place that most support you in the way of your emotional labor share kerry by someone or something that cares to get distracted drift away. Just bring yourself back by review. Visualizing the person or place repeating your loving wise message and feeling your bra Last minute or so simply noda's how your body feels does how it feels when you hand over some of that worry you letting any sense of ease. Our support matter. How incremental lean. That's sync into your muscle. Memory as you feel ready might let your breath deep and a little man gymboree these more purposeful brats. You remind yourself of the place and time that you are in this particular moment knowing that that sense of support not exists but is accessible whenever it is that we need we wiggle our fingers in our toes just to feel the edges of the body once again. Take a deep breath and together here. Excellent not asai taking all the time you need to go with the practice to blink. Your iso thank you guys. Thanks for listening to the mindful minute. If you're enjoying these episodes please consider leaving me of review. Wherever you get your podcast. It really helps others to find the show to learn more about my live. Classes virtual meditation retreats my meditation app shoreline or to make a donation to the show please visit merrill are net dot com. Thanks again. i'll see you next week.

merrill tracy stanley tara brach qantas kalo moana fain helen Accel beane moss noda kerry asai
7 Ways to Never Run Out Of Podcast Content

The Podcast Domination Show | Grow your audience, make money and have fun doing it

14:17 min | 3 d ago

7 Ways to Never Run Out Of Podcast Content

"Let me ask you a question. Really quick does the fear of running out of content ever scare you. Keep you up at night or d. Ever imagined sunday in the near future. Where you're in front of your laptop with your mic ready to go. You've got audacity. Pulled up like i have right now and just nothing is coming out of you. This is actually a legitimate fear. But i've got seven really simple ways here on today's show to help you out plan and outmaneuver the fear of running out of content. Let's go in a world where add costs are continually rising and prospects are getting more and more skeptical about who they can trust. How can you reach new people in a way. That's authentic and effective a place where you can build trust at scale and convert skeptical prospects into raving fans and clients. Hey my name is louis diaz and you're listening to the podcast domination. Show the place for entrepreneurs and businesses that want to know how to build a podcast helps them grow their business get more clients and build their brand. I appreciate your time. Thanks for joining me. What is going on my friends. Welcome back to the podcast domination. Show it is your friend your buddy. You're pal lewis ryan diaz and. I've got something special for you today. And this may be something that i've talked about many many past episodes longtime ago. So if you probably dig to the archives you may have hit episode like this. However i figured i just got off a call with somebody who had this fear in trouble and i wanted to share with you guys here because i know it's legitimate if you're not a natural content creator like i am like i create content. Maybe once a month nowadays Repurpose a lot of stuff. That i use so. I just don't create a lot of content. You know if you're like me and you don't wanna spend your life on a content hamster wheel and you don't want to spend hours trying to come up with the next catchy idea the next flashy thing to get your audience's attention and you're you're just kind of sick of the whole thing like i am and i'm sure a lot of other people are then. This episode is hopefully going to give you some some insights into how i think about podcasting how to make it a a long term play and how to make it simple and easy and very very Planned methodical so that you don't have to sit there and create content all day or worry about. Oh what are we going to promote or push next week and some of the things that a lot of people come up with so especially if you're a business owner if you're a business owner and you're somebody who has other things to worry about just sales and marketing team and hiring and ads and all of the stuff you don't want to be worrying about what to produce on your podcast next week okay. So i've got seven ways year for you. We're going to dive right in on a share. A little bit about each of them. And then we're going to go into a recap and then i will send you off into the world. Hopefully better podcast creator. Okay so let's dive ivan so the first one is making a series so making series of a great client by the name of tom gaddis What the what's the secret podcast. He doesn't amazing job of this. He's making series around different areas that his audience crates with its marketing affiliate marketing sales whether it's How to get your first ten k. months etc etc. He's made series along all along his podcast journey and it's helped him make it super simple to create have very focused content and bring on experts that are truly a brilliant at what they do and be able to network with them. Okay so making series is a great way to do that. If you're wondering what. Am i gonna talk about week to week. Plan out three to four series that you could bring on experts or you could just tackle yourself and that will take care of four three to four months as a four to three to as a post three or four weeks. Okay so if you plan three to four topics you could likely stretch that for a couple of months and that will take that will take a load off of your off your back into content creation. Because now you're more focused as opposed to try to chase the flavor of the month for you. Know your podcast. That's method number one making series as opposed just making episodes. All right second one. This is a very talented counterintuitive. But take a damn brick. That's right your podcast. You run the show. You can take a break whenever you want. Okay i can take a break from the show. Whenever i want i can say hey guys i'll be back in december on busy up until then i love ya. I got one hundred fifty something episodes or one hundred something episodes. She got to check out. You should be good if you need content okay so you typically just do that say hey you you tell your audience. I'm taking a break. I'll be back at you know a couple of months and you guys are awesome. If you have questions. I'll send them in and get them for you out record for you when i get back so that second thing you can take a break remember. It's your show okay will affect your downloads will it affect your ranking stuff. Yes of course it will. If you stopped taking sales calls would that affect your your revenue. Yeah probably okay so as a consequence to this but just notice it's not gonna kill you. Take a break if you need it. That's the second thing to make this to make content creation easier and to make your life more manageable. The third thing probably easiest thing in the world is to do acuna episode. If you don't have people asking you questions already. They need to get your gear clients on the phone and need to ask them. What are there questions. Okay get someone on your team to do this. Get your clients to submit questions to you. Go and listen to old sales calls. Go and listen to or go and lurk around facebook groups in of your competitors and find out what questions are being asked it may be the same ones. You've already you've already answered on the show but it's it's a good practice continue to update those episodes anyways so doing an updated like this is probably what i've done in the past. I'm sure has a weird name to it because all the names. Why podcast is kind of weird. But i'm sure i've done this before and i'm just doing it updated version of it and sharing some new perspective on it okay. So now it's new content so qna even if it's old stuff you're even if it's stuff you've already answered. You can do an updated. Twenty twenty one twenty twenty two version of that abed episode. That's number three. So we've got make a series. We've got take breaks. We've got cuna that's three. The next one is doing interviews. Noda most people get into podcast just so that they can actually do interviews for those who are doing solo. Show takeda mixed in a an interview there or do a co host series. Like where you're having a coast camman for a couple a couple of episodes as totally fine break it up. Do something different. Get some different voices in there. Some different perspectives in there. So that you guys can actually You know takes take a a step back from having to create content on your own. All the time guy says for creating doing interviews or co-host experiments number five probably will my favorite things to do a podcasting and that is cree is create is to Bring on client success stories. Okay so i love interviewing my clients. I love Just talking to them a because it builds a relationship between us be because they are amazing people and they have amazing stories and then sees because he gets a share the results and then they get to talk about how this podcast is helped them and how our team was able to help them get to where they want to go so. It's a win win win for everybody. clients accessories are amazing. Go and grab your clients. Spotlight them I know for us. We have a document that shows you how to do that. If you've been in my facebook groups that i used to have. I don't have them anymore. But if you've been around facebook and followed me you you know that i've i've in the past couple months ago actually posted a complete kit till like how to interview these types of do these interviews. Where you're you're breaking down a client story and how to do it in a way. That's very very succinct. Very very efficient in a way that also shares their story in the best possible manner. Because you don't wanna you don't want an episode like that to go all over the place you want to be very very methodical and also Just structured correctly so that people understand the story or else he gets lost in all that back and forth so that's number five bringing clients on sharing their stories to it. It's also an interview but it's a different type of interview so that's why it's different all right. That's number five number. Six is flashback episodes. Okay flashback episodes. you don't have to produce new content. You could literally take facebook. Live or just take an old episode. Podcast put a new intro on it and turn that into content. It does not need to be something brand new or sexy it can be a flashback episode. My caveat to that is you need to make sure you tell the audience why you think they should listen to it again or they should listen to it. Even though it's from seventeen months ago so give them a reason. why compelling reason why and show the episode. it's gonna save you a lot of time if you're if you're stuck or stalled out for a little bit and you don't know what to produce next all right and the last one which i think no sorry the second to last one. I've got a bonus here for you. you know. I'm always giving giving you gifts. The last one number seven for it gets the bonus is listed goals. Listed episodes are amazing. This for example is a list single episode. The title is a squirrel. Appear seven ways to never run out of content for your podcast. Do you think i did that. For a reason. People like numbers people click on titles that have numbers listed episodes essentially where you just list out the five best seven best ten best. Three best three worst. You know whatever you wanted to call it the list out things okay. People like lists of things. I could have done also the three best hosting platforms or the seven best mice or the three worst mics or the five rules to never Five rules to never break in podcasting. I could have done all. That's all really simple stuff. You're just taking your your ip your knowledge and packaging it in a way that's listed out enlists form so political episodes in for seven real easy thing to do you literally could make an entire podcast on based on just listed type episodes and they will do really really well. I truly believe that. So that is the seven the bonus. One that i wanted to give you before we get out of here is takeover episodes so for example. If you're an expert in let's say sales and you have a friend that is a marketing expert and you're going out of town for two months and you don't wanna produce podcast content. You can have that marketing expert friend or maybe some other friends from like hr or finance or other people who are experts in what they do you can have them do takeover episode. Meaning they record an episode for your podcast sharing some things that are the most commonly asked questions from their audience. Because if you guys serve the same audience chances are you gonna have the same questions right. So let's say you're a sales podcast. You talk about how to enroll people into high ticket programs and you're going out of town few months. You don't wanna produce content great. Go get your friends who are experts in other fields to come talk to your audience. Now it's not an interview because that's different it's a takeover episode so they're doing a solo podcast sharing what they know your audience. Okay that's how you automated people like tim fares have done this really really well. They've actually he's the one. I got this idea from shout to tim. But that is a simple way to make the process easier if you have a podcast and has an audience already. What makes you think people don't want to get on there and spend thirty to forty or more minutes with your audience. There's no way they would say no. You know as if you've put the work in and build a podcast that actually is getting traction and good. Then you're gonna people are gonna wanna listen to people are gonna want to also be on there so and does not mean you have to spend the time to interview them. The last thing anybody wants to do on a friday afternoon know whether on vacation is go interview somebody okay. At least that's me so keep it simple. do take over episodes. Let people get in front. Your audience with them share what they know and share their knowledge. Now let me recap really quick. The seven ways so that you know leaving this episode that you can create content for years just using these seven and you know at the stress out about it so number one make series instead of episodes makes series and do three to four episodes within each series number to just take a break. You can tell people him coming back. And seven months. And i'll i'll be back with new content great. No one's going to kill you for that. They're not gonna hang yet at the you know. Hold you at the stake or hang had the cross. It's going to be okay. There were three. qna episodes q. And episodes are easy and very simple. Go alert ground. Facebook groups are get on the phone to client to talk about what their problems and questions. Number four interviews. I'm not gonna explain their views. We all know what those are. Never five breen clients on success stories. We all want to share success stories. You can even turn this into sharing failure stories to about like how you failed. You know very simple ways. Look at your past because some things you've tried and failed number six flash back episodes so grabbing old episode. That's good and actually take it. And add a new intro analysis your episode number seven listings listenable episodes are episodes. Were like they're like this one. I whistle episode kind of meta. I know but list out things that are important to your audience. The five best. Mike's the seven best foods. You don't wanna eat or the seven worst foods. You never wanna eat all right. And the last. But not least bonus one here was takeover episodes. Get some people in your in your space. That are experts to share their knowledge with your audience. That is it's My last ask of you here before signing off is to checkouts scale your show dot com or at scale your show dot com is going to is new website. We're launching that's has a case study in how we actually grew on our clients shows by five thousand downloads in thirty days legit downloads in thirty days. And it breaks down what we did and how he scaled that podcast right. So if you're a business owner and you want to scale your podcast grow your audience obviously reach more people than check that out scale your show dot com scale your show dot com right. I'll see you later. Enjoy your day.

louis diaz lewis ryan diaz tom gaddis acuna facebook Noda tim qna breen Mike
A New Lifes Vision

Girl Power Alliance

26:46 min | 6 months ago

A New Lifes Vision

"Welcome to the girl. Power alliance podcast. You're gonna meet and here from some inspiring women with incredible stories or leading in business and we are on a mission to impact the world by empowering women to dream bigger your kingdom minded mentoring and leadership. This is where women growth. Welcome back to the girl. Power lions podcast. I'm so excited to introduce my guest to you today. Let me tell you. A little bit about nevada. Naoto is the adaptability coach and leadership strategist at transition three sixty five. She helps higher achievers to conquer their hard earned skills and to find significance meaning purpose become adaptive in their personal and professional lives. She is united states. Army retiree with over twenty two years of active service. Thank you for your service. Her leadership and skills were developed and tested both during her combined. An enlisted and commissioned service with nada. You get to create a life's a new life's mission that helps you to get rid of limiting beliefs and replace them with powerful certainties. You get to use your purpose and compelling vision act up with bulletproof strategy to truly thrive on the other side of transitions you not only become more adaptable but create work that you love that pays well a personal life that is fulfilling and healthy body. That gets excellent sleep at night. Good other want that welcoming guests. Thank you so much. I appreciate you having me. Thank you so much. I'm so happy to have you on here again. Thank you for your service. And i find that anyone that i have been involved with either personally or professionally. That has a background at all with military. Training are just the most disciplined people. I've ever met you guys really have a skills that trans translate into business in such a beautiful way. Absolutely thank you. Thank you for noticing. Well i would love for you to share a little. I know i read your bio but share. Maybe a little bit more with our listeners. They can get to know you a little bit. Maybe on a personal level. How i even found my way in this. Coaching space is because my transition wasn't that beautiful They we amazing skills. Mazing leadership skills and everything that we learn in the military but what we don't learn about is the mindset of being a civilian man that click of bringing those leadership skills Our hard earned skills and Our structure into civilian life. And so i had a hard time with that and now since i figured out how to do it you know. I'm reaching back and learning that it's not just military people that struggle with their transitions or finding structure that it's people going from college to work on. It's people going from single to being married. Mary to being divorced having babies so we all have these transitions and i'm learning. You know that these skills are in all these different industries and at home while what an awesome thing for you to to be able to You know nudge people along in the process. I feel like we're always in some sort of transition. Aren't we like absolutely. I feel like the shortest time in. Life is is the time between transitions australia. Yeah that's what it is. It's the breath before the next transition. True it's just it's like a constant growth right like absolutely as the constant grosso. I'm how you accomplish so much. You have a very you know Successful path that you've gone on now. You're helping other people on this path. What has your faith played a part in any of these either but both your career for twenty two years in the military and now as you're transitioning into taking all these skills that you have giving them other people absolutely absolutely And i'll just start from home. 'cause that's you know that's where it starts. You know how people say that. I had a praying grandmother. I had apprai- grandmother. And i swear today right now I am still living on the prayers mother. She taught me how to pray Not just You know how to pray but she showed me what prayer looks like you know she showed me What being a christian look like you know that a christian was loving and caring and although she only made like this much money she always had money like she had that bottomless barrel that she was a picture of open up the windows of heaven and pour out a blessing. That was my grandmother. And i swear just having that foundation of what a good christian woman is not just looks like but what a good christian woman is. It inspired me to be that same woman in In just being able to know how to pray and knowing back got always had my back and my front and my side I mean. I should have said that part of that leadership and part of that even making it through those twenty two years of service and making it through. Today's especially now i get on. It's because of prayer and trust and believing in god and knowing that. I'm not doing any of these things that accomplished or that i will accomplish or through and two people by myself. I know that. I know that to be true. And i hope. And i pray that That goodness in that faith on transit routes in my mesh then my messages. I'm certain that it does. I think it would be difficult for it not to do that. I mean you. You're obviously an extraordinary woman very authentic and so when that's just part of who you are at comes out and everything that you That you do and so did you. Okay so here's the question. I always asked us of coaches. Because i i don't think like naturally people set out to be a coach. It usually what happens is like you just find yourself that you're helping people at comes very natural so how did you. How did you even start this business like you said people. Don't stay in the military or join the military unless they have a heart of service. And i have a heart of service. It's sometimes i would try to deny it. forget it. i'm not helping. But i can't i'm a helper I'm a fixer. i want to. I want people to be the best version of themselves. And i want to help them. Do that My sister would always tell me that. I should have been a teacher And i was like a teacher and she was like because you never make me feel like i'm stupid. You're always helped me. You're always helping other people and so it's not just It's because teachers also have that same heart of service and and that's what that's what it was. I just found like bound. That i was The things that. I learned the skills that i've learned on the experiences that i had. I just naturally share them and naturally can like oh. I've that that happened to me. And i just naturally gravitated to the people that needed my help and that investors how someone in someone told me one of my friend tours she was like you are a coach and i was like no. I'm not a coach was no no. You're you're not. you're not listening. You are a coach in. That's how just start. I was like well. What does that mean. And then i just kind of started digging into it and it's like i am a coach. I am a teacher. I am educator. And i do come from a place of service so it's just natural for you at found me. Coaching found me. I i would venture to guess that if you look back like when you're maybe even in high school that's probably. You probably were always this way i was. I was not sports girl. i was. Fb la girl. I was student council girl. You know i was that you know leeann person liaoning already yes. Yes and it's important. It is important. And i feel like when you have the ability to really discover who you are on the inside. The person that god made you to be then it just feels like any Hindrance or block to self discovery is gone when you really find it and once you've found it it's you can never go back to doing something that isn't in that space nope you see. It's hard to go back to anything. That isn't an alignment in we. We know you know whether you're a hardcore christian. Whatever that means to you got talks to us and he whispered to us and if he can use the jawbone of a mule he can use me he can use your friends he can use podcast like ours and he can use anything to talk to you and tell you and to remind you to stay on course to get on pat and you know better. Get away from their. Get back over here. That is not the job for you. Those are not the friends for you. don't read that. Don't listen to that. Listen to this. Listen to this person. They're telling you right and listen to your heart. Because that's where that's where he speaks to us in that's where he lives so Just knowing that entrusting that still small voice distrusting and believing that god loves us he's not gonna steer us. I'm not gonna steer off course. Do you find that when you're coaching people that you use this type of vernacular when you're speaking to them. Even if they're not a believer do you still. I mean because what. I am the reason i ask is because what i have found is for me earlier in my career before i really started walking in a holy who i was kinda filtered stuff about my faith out because i didn't wanna like i don't know i don't know if they believe that way i didn't want to offend people but once i stepped into it. Holy i can't not. It's like i can't not speak about things when i know that it's directly related to something that has to do with faith or their walk with the lord. What the lord's trying to say you find that at all so how i find myself at the beginning i give disclaimers right. I tell them you can use the word universe. If you want but i use god i will say jesus. I do cuss a little bit. Perfect the perfect tee shirt for you. I love jesus. But i cuss a little bit little bit. Just a little bit but you know i i feel like You know i give those disclaimers. I will say jesus you know because i know I know my walk. you know. And so i give those disclaimers at the beginning And i say if it's for you it's not prayer. Then it's meditation if it's for you writing down what it is that you want and end just thinking on it and being grateful for what you have so i break it down into what it means in personal development language chef but hoping and praying that when they see how i show up that they know it's something better than personal development. That's awesome and i was thinking the other day about about this. 'cause i was writing some content and the word transformation god-like highlighted the word transformation on you know we use it kind of haphazardly in different things and i was thinking about it. You know as a leader you're influencing people's lives you're helping them to get on the path for them and you know but really our job. We're just like tour guides. Kind of like we're just pointing people here or there or wherever but really we don't create transformation you know god is the only one that actually creates the transformation and so. I think sometimes that it's important to know that. Yeah i i. And i use this. I think we spoke about this at i. You know i think people get so wrapped up in the religion alma bang and they don't realize that religion is a vehicle to get you to god yes and we get so wrapped up in the car or the truck or the person and you think that that person is the transformation. But it's not. I'm just trying to show you. I'm just helping you get to god and and if i have the best vokes. The best wills the best tinted windows. And i look so shiny and pretty but you still need to know that at points i could break down you know i am not the only i am not the way at all. I am just a vehicle that is leading you to this guy that has been so impactful in seoul transformational in my own life and it is that god that can lift us up in times of trouble and it is the continued to lift us up when we are like thriving and shining. And you know we don't have to just call on god when things are bad like we continue to call on him and be grateful for what he does for us you know and when times are wonderful because you know can trust us with a little like what is he going to do with a what is so awesome in. Just think if people realize that it's it's not the vehicle that gets you got like you know it's not it's the vehicle like but i'm not the only vehicle you might have to jump out of my car and getting your car you know. Have to get out of your car and get in someone else's car but knowing that we're just the uber to get you to where you're going. I love that. I love that. Oh my goodness yes yes. Yes and more. So what are you what what's next for you. What do you have in the hopper. I mean your your coaching people Is that what you're doing time. Do you have events when we have been again do you. I mean what do you have what you have in the hopper right now i'm really trying to condense Down so right. now. I've been it know how you'd be like no that's not it. That's not what i'm supposed to be dead. Yes you are supposed to make me because you know. God talks to me. How i he's like you ma'am are supposed to be helping. People be leaders in their homes and let them know that leadership starts at home. Because if you can't lead yourself and you can't leave within your home then it's going to be hard to go out into. This world is going to be hard to go to work. It's going to be hard to lead your employees or properly be lead If you don't know how to lead in your home and it's not just for people that have jobs it's for those moms for those dads because now they're not just leaders at home. Their teachers their instructors their coaches and they're always had been that but just to or people to know that you're not just a stay at home mom or a stay at home dad or you're not just just and i hate that word. Just you know just teaching your children how to you know learn online. You are leaders in your home and you are leaders in your community and that has really been on me. So i'm actually starting to do a few workshops A hint saves on. You know what that leadership looks like at home and how it just facilitate your entire lives around those daily Transitions so that's kind of what god has been telling me what's next in it's big and i just want to speak into that until you. Yes the i mean. That is so important. Because you know there's been more books written on leadership than any other subject like around the world. There's more but there's no leadership the more talk about leaders and leadership and there's no leaders and it's very very hard to actually find good authentic biblical christ lead leaders and so what you're talking about is so important and i just want to encourage you to do it. Go all in on that. And yes that is so needed in the world and i have had a similar call not specifically in the homepage in leadership in general one of the things that got his weighed so heavily on my heart is the fact that it is our job our job as leaders to go out and empower and bring up to help develop more leaders biblical authentic lead leaders. That aren't worried about analytics. How many likes how many follows none of that stuff doesn't matter like you're talking about it always begins with you and if you cannot lead yourself it is impossible for you to lead. Even one and i think the most important place is in the home the most important like for people that are out there in the world and there may be their leadership experts. You know i. I would hope that. The most important job to them is who they're leading behind the four walls of their own home. So i'm just i'm so happy you're doing that. Thank you so much. Thank you and it's funny. How it just comes like you're like oh. What should my tagline being. You're like that sounds good and it was like You want people to be powerful adaptable. Caring leaders thank you out the that. Thank you and and i am so happy that you're doing it and i have a feeling that you and i are not the only ones that feel the call because i believe it's a call upon the earth. God is calling out the generals to build up an army and kind of when i launched girl power lines at the vision. He gave me that we are. We are building an army of women who are literally going to impact the world I'm gonna meet this for a second because my dog she's putting them away I the vision that god gave me girl. Power alliance was that we are building an army of women around the world who are going to be the catalyst for global revival. And i believe like within that it really it stems from their ability to be leaders and so i just wanna bless you and pray like crazy amounts of supernatural discernment and over you as you as you embark on that because what you are doing is needed desperately on the earth. Thank you so much. Thank you thank you so much. 'cause you know sometimes you you fight against it because it outside of what i think i should be doing outside of all of these things and list that i built on the walls and this is how i should show up in awe. She so q. Bless her heart. 'cause that's not well i think that it's it's a weighty call like it's it's heavy it's it's a lot and it feels important and it's so important and so i i just like as you speak and as you were saying and i just felt the anointing on you and so you just do it. Thank you you were made for it. Thank you for saying that you know. And this time we get so caught up in this conversation around diversity and inclusion and. They're missing that part in their compartmentalizing. This from something separate from leadership in in it's the it's the conversation of leadership because if you're leading from a place of love if you're leading from a place of power if you're learning the skills and the struggles that you've been through and the wins that you've had and you're using that as the skill of being adaptable. Then you know how to talk to people you know how to look people and you know how to lead and you know how to follow and you know how to use that peer leadership that we have and people are trying to dissect this conversation into something different and it's all about leadership in caring for one another if you can start that at home then my god you can do that anywhere. You're gonna change the world and and you're exactly right. And i think that's part of the enemy's plan right. He takes the main thing and he splits it down into these other things and then people get stuck on the one thing over here and it's a it's a lower conversation. It's it's like you're missing the point you're looking at all this stuff. This then of this is the point. The point is this. This is the point and so we have to add leaders. We have to bring the conversation back up to the point like it's not i mean it's the wild political climate that there's very polarizing conversations. People are very passionate on whatever side. They're speaking on not that they shouldn't be not social. Social justice should not be discuss. Not that any of the things shouldn't be discussed. But but i feel like a exactly like you were missing what we should be talking about because these are symptoms and we're not going to the heart of the problem absolutely absolutely like break it down. Break it down and it's not about that work leadership and what leadership truly is it just really turns into how do we further. You know not just bring god further. But we've moved humanity forward. You know toward god and just using that as the the magma that cools higher and we just want to mess around down here and be distracted and that's not what it's about now and so what you're doing is so important and The enemy will tell you a million times that you're not supposed to be doing it and you just stand and now that you are. You are supposed to be doing it. Thank you thank you so much. Thank you thank you so much for saying that. I'm so excited for you. I'm excited to see what you're doing. I'm excited to watch your impact in the world. I'm how can the people that are listening today. If you're listening on the podcast Don't worry everything that she's about to tell you. We'll have in the show notes and if you're watching this all of her information will be below. But how can people find you and connect with you. I'm i am easy to get at is have you can follow me on my My web page is transition. Three sixty five dot com. I love that name. It's because every day we have an opportunity to transition and be more be more half wars They can easily find you there. You can find the hashtag transition free sixty five. I'm the hardest. I don't want to give it too many options for that. Want to okay. Well we will make sure that we. We not only include her. Her website will also include your social media handles and so that people can connect with you and find you reach out to you and just like get under the get under the pinata of all that you're of all that you're giving away this because the sweetness and the leadership in the draft ability is coming out right. Thank you so much for taking the time today and Just appreciate what you're doing. Thank you so much for having me. Thank you for thank you for doing this podcast. Thank you for blessing. Just thank you for being you. Thank you thank you man. I hope you enjoyed that. Podcast as much as i did. I absolutely love connecting with these fireball. Women like noda who are just on a mission to change the world. That is what girl power alliance is all about. If you're not getting it yet. It is about celebrating these women who are so passionate and feel so called to specific places in the marketplace in the world and they are using it to further the cause of christ. I love that oh boy. 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Julia Kristina

Dead America

43:32 min | 1 year ago

Julia Kristina

"To overcome. Educate. Educate, not only yourself. But educate anyone seeking to learn. We are all dead American. We can all learn something. To learn. We must challenge what we already understand. The way we do that is through conversation. Sometimes, we have conversations with others. However. Some of the best conversations happen. With ourselves. Reach out in Challenger so. Let's dive in and learn something right now. And we are happy and lucky to have Julia with today Julia would you introduce yourself and tell people what you do in how you got there? That is always central question. I am a therapist. So, I'm a registered. Then I'm also been doing a lot of coaching I think I call myself a therapeutic coach in Insofar US, kind of a mix of therapy to explore the past and understand the passes people and make peace with their past, and then I help them learn the tools for moving forward and recreating the life that they want and. Setting their lives up the way that they want them to. So kind of that perfect little mixture of. And I work with adult So I don't work with any children and his work specifically with adults and mostly people who are doing okay in life. But WANNA be doing. Great feeling. Great Yeah, heard of people who are I say that a lot of the things that I work with kind of regular people problem. The problem everyday living of stress and of expectations and of demand, and of just people wanting to be happy. I think so much of. Our existence is about trying to be happy we don't really know. How to do that in a way that is sustainable and a way that is deep and meaningful, and so I helped people are help people a lot with that and grow. It looks like. Dealing with problems but I remember learning this that I was in Grad school that the absence of problem doesn't equate to having their. That Problem often just goes on Noda. And if we want happiness, we have to create it. We WanNa feel good. We have to be intentional about it. It doesn't just happen on its own so that a lot of what I help people. Yeah that's very interesting. A lot of that. You know. We all have to set boundaries in life, and that is hard to really learn for a lot of us we get stuck and we don't quite know how to say no sometimes and we don't really know when to say yes, sometimes. Yes. How deal with those things in how bad those boundaries properly. And and it super interesting that you talk about that with boundaries at I say if you have a problem if you have an overwhelming problem, if you have an anger problem and you have a boundary problem and most people don't realize that they have boundary issues, they just think that you know just alerts to do and there's so many people that want things from me and about so much on my clean I can't keep up with all in all not enough in the day and that is descriptive. That goes here head or even something like people are always taking advantage of me I'm never being appreciated I give so much and nobody ever really notices it or appreciated and working so hard and not really getting you know the response or the craze or What I want back I'm not getting not getting what I want back in return and so that is. A global thing Russell Tae yourself then you my friend. Problem and we don't realize it. Don't even know that this is happening. Get so many other things. But I love boundaries. Boundaries RUT LANGUAGE BECAUSE Personally growing up in a really enmeshed family. That's just sort of a fancy word for like everyone's. Everyone. Everyone's business. It was just there wasn't really any real privacy There was a lot of catering to Well, I mean I think it's often you know common an issue in a lot of people stories that they're growing up. There's one parent that has either a mental health issue or an addiction issue, and so the whole family is really just sort of catering to that person. And so then it becomes the loss of self in the whole process, your identity becomes news. To the person in your family who was kissed wheel, who everybody else was trying to to accommodate and please and and stop from upsetting. and. So then it becomes this loss of identity. We don't really know who we are never really had the chance to decide what we wanted to decide how we felt. GONNA become become adult, and that doesn't automatically just change. We still have the same beliefs that it's my job to make other people. Happy. It's my job to do what people want. It's my job to just give giving give and to try to please everybody else. It's my job to be a good person by taking on more and not saying, no because they know means that I'm being selfish or difficult considering myself means that I am being difficult. and. So we don't want to have that. We don't want to have that belief about ourselves. So we try to do other things to prevent ourselves from feeling like we are selfish difficult self-seeking you know. Bad People. And so that that's where the boundary issues come in. Yeah, it was really hard for me to set boundaries in my life. Actually I didn't get that I did in life until I was in my thirties and setting those boundaries once I figured out hey, can say no and I can stand up for what I believe in. It felt good. So yeah. Once we find the boundary, it kind of sets US free from all of that all misery in. Band and I don't know if you understand that but it it really does it helped free this disparity inside of me knowing that Hey I do have the power inside of me to move myself forward. Advantage. Yet incredible that. You, know learning in life we keep. And learn to listen. That's one of the keys when we learned to listen, we can understand how life actually works and it helps set those boundaries too. So yeah. Are there any tips in learning the effect of listening? The that's hard to do. Yeah and I really WANNA touch. What you said there because I think that that's so important that we think that boundaries they're gonNA limit us but the truth and boundaries set free because when we have healthy boundaries we are acting out of free will and we think that we have free well but we don't have free will when we're doing things out of guilt out of obligation out of trying to prove something out of trying to be someone that we're not that's lying. And that's not freedom. And so really understanding boundaries mean that I am consciously making my own choices. and. It doesn't mean that we're not generous and we're not. We don't look out for other people absolutely not. It's not about you know this is all about me and I don't care about anyone else in you know that's not what it is. It is we are relational beings and so investing in our relationship being there for people and helping people out and and giving extra. Are Beautiful things when it is by choice. When it is something that I want to do not because it's something I have to do or I'm worried about you know people. Something about me that I don't want them to think if I don't do it I'm worried about what I'll think about me if I don't do it. If I think that I'm being a bad person or that I'd be selfish right like all of the mess that we create. Around our decisions instead of I call them. Making clean, decision. Right cleaned decision is when I'm doing something by choice. And understanding the consequence. So looks even found look at work if your boss asked you to take something else on if the choice is if I don't take this on and going to be fired. Then probably if you want to keep your job, it's a good decision to take that extra thing on. But if it's just because I wanNA maintain my reputation of being the person being a person that everyone goes to a being the person that everyone relies on because that makes me feel good. But in the meantime also feeling angry and resentful and burnt out. And frustrated because I can't possibly keep up with it all well then really have to at that and be like okay. Is that a clean decision because if I'm saying yes, because I want to be a quote unquote team player or like a good person. But. Meanwhile, seeding and resentful, and frustrated, and complaining and overwhelmed is that a clean decision? I think. So often the truth is when we don't allow ourselves to say no. It's because WHO's going to be a really hard truth is going gonNA smack a lot of people between the eyes but it because we would rather feel angry. Then guilty. We would rather do something that we don't want to do. So that we can be angry and resentful towards that other person asking for quotable making a do it rather than saying no and feeling guilty because someone else might be disappointed. We would rather. Not to. Play and it's not taking responsibility. And it's I mean I know I know harsh with this like, and this is like coming out you hot with all of this stuff and I you know and it's a lot to take in and I understand I have been working on down. You're still working like you said, you didn't I didn't really understand boundaries. So I was in my late Twenties early thirties I remember the first time this like. Every big deal, the people but I remember the first time. With we were all visiting we were all my family was together my parents, my siblings and I think the. I. Think it was about six years ago six and a half years ago when my first my daughter, my oldest was a baby. And I remember us all being together and I was saying at my sister's house and my parents were staying at my brother's house. 'cause we're all you know traveling for Christmas and where they live. and. There was one. They'd over the holidays where everyone is going over to my brother's House score cover. and it wasn't like a Christmas meal and you're just sort of one of those days in between Christmas and New Year's, and my parents said Oh we're all going over the call for supper Let's get ready to go. And I said. I'm going to sit this one out. And the look on my mom's face with like what do you mean allowed to do that? We do everything together. And I was like you guys go ahead go ahead I mean my husband I said, I, think we just needs a quiet night here to sort of relax it's been. We've been doing a lot over the past few days and we just WanNa, have a quiet evening and I'm like, no it's not going to be the same without you and like all the stuff like with good intention wanting to like you know wanting us to be there and not wanting to all be together and of course it intentions but I just sort of stuck to my guns and they said I I will miss you to. You I'll go ahead. And have a great time. And the look. Just like this was confused like we don't do this in our family, we do 'em. That that's expected that everyone's doing and it was like this moment of freedom. Ed Where I am allowed to make my own business. I'm a thirty year old woman. I. Have Allowed to make my own decisions about how I wanNA spend my time when I'm with my family and it was like the game. And this. Feeling of relief and freedom. I think you know this is a really mental occasion I'm sure I said noticing before in my life like don't get me wrong. But this was this really profound thing because of the family rules and I think a lot of how these unspoken family rules. That we've just always been going along west. Without even realizing. Without even knowing it other than we Kinda feel secretly angry and resentful and Kinda stuck and trapped in our family relationships because we're just like I don't know how to say or like I, don't you know I I don't get to choose what I WANNA do and I always have to go along with what everyone else wants. Right? Like we complain a lot but they don't don't actually take a step back and say, okay but what if it doesn't have to be this way? What no one is forcing me to do anything. What if known is making me do it what request? That I don't have spell. We don't even really think to answer that one. Or even asking. Yeah, yeah and the frustration Phil just behind that middle little tiny bit of our life that put you on the spot moment where you have to data side. Yes or no That really plays havoc in people's mind and notably that is part of mental health you know, and that's what we fight and battle against every day. That mental health. It. It's a big word. A lot of people. It holds a stigma and a lot of people don't realize a lot of us. Probably all of us have a bit of mental health issues and we need to understand how to deal with them properly. And setting those boundaries that's key. Yeah I boundaries are. Boundaries are so. We're going to say it. You know until the cows come home they're so incredibly important and we create a lot of our own suffering. We have we we create the negative impact on our mental health. because. We are not allowing ourselves boundaries because we have all kinds of stories and beliefs and ideas about what it means foundries I'm going to be going. To say as most at is that most of us don't have difficult people in our family. We have. A. Difficult time setting boundaries. Because boundaries or number about that's true. Yeah and and boundaries. I. Mean country in a positive belief that a lot of really backwards information out of there about boundaries and. a lot of yeah. Just a lot of misinformation that boundaries are never about changing. Their never behind get someone else to do what we want them to do. That's manipulation. That's not a boundary. About, hard to understand too. That is a really hard thing because you know we and and we're GONNA go super deep here is because we are. Our parents, our kids are we think it's their job to meet our needs? As we get mad when they don't. But the truth is it is. It a nobody's job to meet our needs except for our old. That people are there who share to share in our experience to build relationships with, but not their job to meet our needs and so many I. Know I thought it for so long and a lot of even couple therapists talk about this and it's your partners job to meet your needs that. That's not a relationship that's unhealthy interdependent relationship. Codependence that saying. I want you to take more responsibility for my happiness and well-being than I. AM willing to do. And we think only gos-. Right Like, Oh, it's my partners job to like no, what I need to meet my needs to be there for me to drop everything to know what time upset like ask me and commonly pushing pushing pushing until I. Finally, you know open up, they should know that it just needs to keep asking so that I'll open up. They should know that that what I need right now is more important with the when they're doing that. They see that I'm in pain they should know they should know they should do this. They should be you know acting this way. And you know. Okay. So we think that yeah, that's reasonable. That's fair. Yeah. That's my partners job we're married and we're in this together and we have a relationship looks opera second. Let's reverse that. And let's say your partner came to you and said it's your job to know what I need. It's your job to read my mind to drop everything to see what I'm going through as more important than what you have going on and I expect you to do that. I. Think most of us it'd be like screw you. Jog Together, my whole life to you but it's funny how in the ties there we did it and this is normal. This isn't about blaming ourselves. This isn't about saying that Oh. My Gosh is such a terrible caucus person for doing this is what we learned. It's just GONNA be learned growing up. It's just sort of housing probably were at home. Right. There was these expectations at home in our formative years by their called her formative years. 'cause they're warming how he's thinking feel about ourselves others life world. and. So we do this we continue on his these behaviors, but we don't actually stop and take a step back and realize. What's going on and so boundaries are never about changing someone else their about saying, Hey, you have a right to do it. You do and in light of that this is what I'm GonNa do. So your choice, my choice your choice might be to stand there and criticize me and talk down to me and my choice to end the conversation walk out of the room and not participate and I might ask you make request they. Hey. You're going to speak to me. based. Don't use that tone I. Don't like that I don't want that I don't appreciate that I'm not willing to engage with you if you're going to talk to you that way and then the person who keeps doing it and you say, okay, I said I'm not willing to engage to now I'm gonNA cut off the engagement and I'm going to myself from the situation your choice you can say whatever you want I can't stop you from words coming out of your mouth I cannot stop another human being from opening your mouth and having whatever words they want to come out of that. But I can decide whether or not I want to stick around for it. Again. Decide whether or not. I want to be there. For it. That is my choice of boundaries about saying this. These are the rules for playing in my yard. If you don't WanNa follow those rules, it's totally fine. Just, not welcome to play in the yard. But it's not saying you have to do this. It's not about continuously like why aren't you doing this? You have to do please do you got to do it and like keeping on the person is absolutely not willing to do that. and. It's being able to say your choice my choice. Yeah and the quicker we learned set those boundaries. The better our relationships are you know me and my wife? We've been working on setting these boundaries and communication skills for a long time, and it's a never ending process because were never ending this change process within us in around us, we have to be able to communicate and set the boundaries effectively. In order to have these good. Up Standing, relationships where Oli people both parties have to fill good. and. It's hard for a young man I know especially to. Put that mindset in order and stand up to the responsibility that's involved in setting these skills and boundaries in a relationship. So it really hard. So how how can we learn to communicate better to understand? Each Other's needs because if we don't understand each others needs, we can't really effectively set boundaries. So do you have tips and tricks on communication? That what specifically are you talking about? will say. Me and my wife are in a discussion. and. We get. To An elevated point. Communication breaks down then. So There's gotta be tips and tricks to communicate without getting these peaks especially right now I imagine now everybody isolated. You get these angry periods and we all deal with them. Yeah. So we have to learn to effectively communicate how we feel. Yeah, and that's hard to do when it's elevated. So bringing it back down and getting an stain on point. What is the trick in how only? Do that. Question Twelve. Yeah. I. Wish I could. Just a few I mean one in a one shot deal. But like ultimately, the what we want to be doing is building our own emotional intelligence and knowing what's going on inside of us. And taking responsibility for our own experience in our own feelings and our own emotion. And sometimes, that means taking a break. We notice I saw getting really worked up being able to take a break and take a breath and take a step back because when we're in the height of anger rate when when it's like five alarm bells, we're like seeing read that's not a great time to try and have a reasonable conversation and work things out because we're in, we're actually in fighter flight mode survivable and it really can be. An experience of take-no-prisoners right? Like I'm going to fight this battle to the death because I literally radio like my life is on the line. Right like our brain is in fight or flight mode when we start freaking out and spouting off and you know like we just become the like this, the devil incarnate, I don't know. I've done it where just like. Croisette and taking over and he's get like shaking dealing with like, I, have to win this argument. And right like it just takes over and because we're in fight or flight, that's why you're shaking 'cause adrenaline is pumping your brain thinks that you are in immediate danger and so it's trying to protect you and you think that if you can like word off the enemy which you think user partner in those wanting and ward off the enemy with with with verbal weapons. And you'll survive. and. So it's just of understanding what's happening in the human brain when we get to those peaks of emotion. And we can actually intervene the cognitive level at that point. We can't actually think clearly, which is why you're like I. Just I don't know what happened just like felt like I just got taken over and all this stuff started coming out of my mouth and I felt out of control and moving out of control because you're your limbic system, your fight or flight response, your survival instinct kicking in, and they're not in control. And so. That's when we have to recognize when we're getting heightened and it's really hard to do and it takes a lot of practice and I still don't catch it. Every time is learning how to take a breath. Like in the sound system and it tends to stoop, it'd be like what you're gonNa tell me to breathe and. I'm going to tell you to read. There's so much research about how powerful the breath is not only for managing our anger but for managing all of our emotions because when we're in that CIDER light mode. We don't have any oxygen in our brain because all what we do gives have some, but all the blood is being sent to you our limb. And away from our core because it's getting ready to run like heck to like pick up the DUKES and finally life. And so if we can intervene at the physical level. We can start to calm things down a little bit if you can take a breath. Take a few deep breath. And then you're that oxygen backups into your brain it sends blood black back into your core. And so Your body to have a more calm response, which then also send that message to your brain. That's like okay. We might be in imminent danger right now a partner not not cleaning up the dishes might not mean that I'm going to die. and. So then you know like we agreed, and then we're able to angry and annoyed and frustrated but at least then we're not in that red alarm zone. And we're able to just take it back and say, okay, what's going on here? We're able to actually rashly say feeling annoyed. I'm feeling angry my expectations weren't met and this is so much of what I teach in all communication is you always have to own it. Other people are not doing things again, you they're doing them for them. So your partner not cleaning up the kitchen after they made themselves from lunch is not a screw you right? Like it's not to Piss you off. It's just that they didn't feel like doing it in that moment 'cause they wanted to sit down and eat their lunch or they didn't really even notice it because they're not that naturally clean person. Or they had in their mind like I'll just wait till all the dishes pilot by the end of the day and do it all at once 'cause that's more efficient right? Like they had their own idea and it wasn't about a screw you to you right but we see it and we're like, oh my gosh, obviously, my partners jerk right now they know how much I like when things are clean and how much A. Max I can't get in here. I can't do my own thing. I can't make my own actually did this on purpose that they have. Unless your partner is pissed at you and they're trying to, you know do something against you well, then you have an issue need to sort out. But most I'm your partner isn't sucking on purpose. Even, though we think they are. And so being able to recognize that I, don't like it when the kitchen is an, but they might be fine with it. If I have a problem with it, it's my problem. It's not their problem and this is such a hard one I understand we're like what? No it's their problem. No, it's not their problem. They don't have a problem with it. You have a problem with it. I have a problem with I have a problem with medication I own it I. Hi, my name is Julia and I hate messy kitchen. I'm GONNA confess and but my partner doesn't really doesn't bother him. Isn't really he doesn't really notice it. And so I can communicate that desire not a need. So much like I need you to clean up after yourself. No, you don't need them to do it. No matter of life and death this isn't that survival thing right? You'd like them to you prefer it if they would be able to say I would like it I appreciate it. I, really like it. Clean Kitchen. I find it hard to come into the kitchen and they're to be a big mess. So I'm wondering if you could make a point of cleaning up after your stomach. Is that reasonable is that fair is that something you're willing to try or do and understanding that they're still not going to do it every time because it's not important to them they're gonNA forget. Because it's not front of mind because it's not relevant to them they're gonNA try but they're going to do it perfectly every time I think that's the other thing we have to recognize is you know here so people say well, ask them to do it so many times and they still don't do it every time and yeah. Because they don't really care. And it's not fair to say that someone else should care as much about something that you care about. Rate, they shouldn't care as much about it and you care about it because they don't. And so again, if the roles were reversed. And if your partners that came to you and said, you have to care about this as much as if you don't care about it as much as me that means you don't really love me. You really screw you. I do love. This just isn't important to me can't you understand that? Right, and we we have this double standard where we expect our partners to anticipate and meet all of our needs to know what we want to have, what for what's important to us just as important to them. Again. Healthy that's helpful and if the roles were reversed, we wouldn't want to do that for them. and. So it's really just being elusive. I have a problem with something. It's my problem I can ask for. a behavior change. I can ask them to do something different. And they can decide whether or not they're willing to, and even if they say they are willing to. They might not do it every time and I just have to be conscious of that and not it. Takes. So much personally we think everything is a personal attack on everything is about But Ninety nine point nine percent of the time it's not against us? It is four then the other person doing things the way that they do it. and not seeing that the way we wanted the way that we do it is important because not to them the way they do is important to them. I think it's such a huge thing and that takes away. So much of the anger and resentment and bitterness then you can actually have conversation when you don't think your partner being a jerk on purpose, then you can just sit back and be like okay. Here's what I need or here's what I want. Here's what I like. Here's what helped me. Are. You willing or what are you willing? To. Do to support me in that. And Not saying you have to do everything that I want you to do in the way that I want you to do because again, that's not a relationship that's a dictatorship. and. Also, asking a partner what's important to you? What is important to you? Are there things that I'm doing that could be more aware of that I could put more of an effort into that I could be changing modifying got are things that you would like. So that two way street kinda thing where we're. working together on stuff. But not expecting that our partner being our needs. Fulfill our. Dreams. Picks make it better do what we want to do all the time. Because like I said that codependent and a bit of a dictatorship. Yeah, I think a lot of us find. To be codependent because then we don't have to own up to it like I said in that responsibility is a big key and another big factor in that is when we deal with the opposite sex. We don't always see things. Mutually because we have different ideas, we have different mindsets in were built different. I exactly. We're different people. So. Yeah anytime we deal with. Another individual we have to learn to communicate so. The big key, there is finding out your partners. I did and sometimes. I get I. I. Don't know how to say it really but. You. Know I don't want to offend people when when I say, Hey, I don't like this about you and if I offend people, I don't really mean to but I'm a direct type of person and sometimes I don't really notice. The aggressiveness in my tone or My stature that I'm taking in my body language and. Sometimes my wife. She feels like I'm attacking her when I'm not really attacking her. I'm just trying to get my point across in. I. Know We all deal with that. One side is. Usually more timid than the other is at correct I. Don't know if that's true or not. One side say that again, one side is more timid. Oh man that that goes into so many things. because it's again, that is your. Ten there's a fine line in here because it's Your Wife. Like you being worried about accidentally your wife when you had no intention of that. And her. Allowing herself to be offended by your words. Saying to someone else you have to speak to me in a certain way so that I can be okay if saying well like I can't manage my own mind. So I need you to manage it for me. And I I mean you can make requests the other day my mom made a comment that I that I got offended by and I made a request I said, mum. I. said I understand that you probably weren't meaning it this way but when you said that It it sounded really judgmental. And here's why I found that hard. And right quite owned it and I didn't say you're being so rude or your. So inconsiderate I was like, Hey, this is how I interpreted it, and this is why I found it hard. I'm asking that you'd be more sensitive around that or just sort of understand my perspective on it but ultimately, it's I got offended because I'm made what she said mean and so you can make a request of your partner but not saying, oh my gosh, my partners making me so angry and my partners making you know my partner's hurting my feelings. Will the reason why we're angry and our feelings get hurt because of what we make? What they're saying and how they're saying it needs. But like this is a whole other like this is emotional intelligence four point. Oh, like this is that advanced stuff that usually people who are in my program for like months And we're really doing the deep work and developing the emotional intelligence and understanding of ourselves you know. Really getting down at that this is this doesn't come until God but I think we can be conscious of our partners communication preferences. But it also not healthy to feel like we're walking on eggshells. Whenever we're around our partner right like, oh my gosh everything that I say they take personally they get offended by, but that's not my intention but then it is up to the other person to be able to take a step back and be like, okay. 'cause if my partner has these good intentions and I'm being offended by everything that they say, then maybe the call is coming from inside the house. Maybe I need to be doing my own work around why I getting so offended. By how my partner speaks and acts. Right 'cause like what my partner is doing is just what they're doing why am I taking at something against me or something Yeah. Like why am I taking it? Personally they're just doing their thing they're not trying to hurt me trying to. offended me. So maybe I need to start doing a bit of my own work and ask myself. Why? Is Bothering me so much. Personal Discovery. Absolutely I mean and that's that that deep level of emotional intelligence and ultra doing our own healing understanding that our partner it's just hitting oftentimes by partner is hitting our old triggers are old wounds. It has nothing to do with them and has to do with our own wounds that has not been healed. And then love this analogy that I heard. One time is that we're all walking around in lifeless thorns sticking out of our body. And the soaring is pointing side is pointing in the butt and is on the surface and it's just slightly raised the surface and if anyone comes by and brushes up against the butt end of that sewer now it's GonNa poke in on something in us. But our somewhere in our to learn. Haven't in chapter. That's a good. Yeah and I I'm big on that always looking at yourself in identifying the problems within pulling them out. That a big win on any discovery. So. Yeah. We've been at this for a little bit already we can go really deep into stuttle lost a pretty quick. On, all but I know you do a lot of. Different things. With people and you have a lot of things going on out there. I know the courses are wonderful you do youtube. How do people get in touch with you? How do they get involved with you and how can they better themselves by listening to you? Well I think the big thing and I know you said this you're taking my speaking field heard affecting sort of communication masterclass. Workshop and that is a really great when really goes and gives sort of an outline and an understanding of a lot of what I talk about here today, and it has a workbook along with it and it has grass and things that sort of I mean yeah. It just helps. It really lay it out with starts to make a lot more sense and it has scripts in there how to say things and. How, to communicate, how to get more clear on what we're thinking feeling and how to communicate that with the people around us, and it has little step by step processes for developing that emotional intelligence. It's a super jam-packed workshop and it's a really low cost one as well. So it's a great place to get started if communication and building emotional intelligence and having healthier better relationships is something that's important to you. that that is that is an amazing place to start, and then the other thing to be able to do some of the emotional intelligence work ongoing and really understanding our own emotions in our own mind understanding what's going on in our brain and when we are getting a or hurt or when we are people pleasing or You know taking too much on whatever it is really understanding our brains and why they work the way that they do and why I mean do the things that we do I have a membership community called the shift society and at the monthly membership where I teach all of the tools. and. It's like full support from me and in the private community and we do coaching calls Q. and A. Session. There's prerecorded lessons, and of course portal that you have access to watch any time. So it really like where the human brain needs to be especially right now at this time in history I think everyone's brains needs to be in the shift society because our brains are going bonkers our brains are going crazy and it's hard but it doesn't have to be that hard if we know how to manage our minds no matter what's going on around. So that's what I t to the ships inside, and those are the two main things I would recommend. And we find you at Julia Cristina Dot Com. Yeah. That's my website Dot Com and it has links on there to all my social media channels. I've been doing a lot more and instagram lately and Kinda just showing on instagram stories how how we're coping with being? Pretty housebound and I've got. Three small children but two of them are home and one of them My oldest is staying with my parents which has been a massive blessing and it's been good for everyone but it's been hard hard having my daughter here. She's been there for almost a month but yeah, how we are coping in our? Eight hundred and Sixty Square foot apartment in the middle of Vancouver with a two year old and a five year old and me and my husband and I both working fulltime that been an adventure. Yes I live in a nine hundred, twenty square foot place and I have a force to go walk in get away from it all. So those people that are stuck in town. Yeah. I really feel for them because it is frightful right now. And I WANNA thank you Julia for taking the time out. You're a wonderful person. You do wonderful things and we are just so lucky to have had you here to share all your wonderful knowledge with us. Thank I've the driving laser. Thank you ED and with that being said folks that was Julia all the links and everything will be in the show notes enjoy your day and thank you for being with US Julia. Thank you gene. Thank you for joining us today. If you found this podcast enlightening entertaining educational in any way, please share like subscribe and join us back here. Next week for another great episode of Dead America Podcast I'm at waters your host enjoy your afternoon wherever you may be.

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100f - 1 Year Special Episode! (Surprises, Announcements, Listener Questions and more!)

What The Flip Podcast

1:49:41 hr | 3 months ago

100f - 1 Year Special Episode! (Surprises, Announcements, Listener Questions and more!)

"For those of you knew the what the flip podcast. Who's the into hilarious and explicit conversation about anime games comics mysteries and who the sexiness of geek culture with that said get ready. Because i'm alex well amok chemo and you're listening to what the flick let's go. Welcome to our super special episodes celebrating one hundred episodes and also one year. All what the flip. We're going to be going into things today. Guys struck in because there's going to be some announcements surprises listener questions and some more general discussions and i think we even go for best and worst moments of the year. The flip is also. I wanna kind of have some really cool off the cuff style topics and fun and this isn't a scripted episodes to a wit. We're kind of free styling. So first of off mark and louis thanks for joining us obviously for our special episode. Quick story about will When i think. I mean we'll used to sit next to each other at work and this is kind of how we got chatting about ten minutes ten months into our quote unquote work friend relationship. We'll turn to me. And he said alex you know are never friends with someone for more than one year and then oscar fees. I said what do you mean goes after year. That's the longest. I've ever friends with someone. And i said why can't i just get bored. The people and i was like well. I'm at ten months. Does that mean what does that mean because yeah you're you're times nelia hundred a conversation but luckily that was I don't know how many years ago that was. That was like six or seven years ago and we will. we're still here so thanks for for how how. How does it feel to to do one year of the flip with a with me. Your grace mission bizarre. So basically your cell by your expiry dates going to expire any time soon smart subscription could just the best before it was the best before it wasn't a used by the best performance still moldy. Yes i mean mark louis. You've kind of been well mark you. You started off as a guest and now you're you're quite regular as well and louis you've come in maine on our special episodes and you know i think i think is a good dynamic between us four so louis whenever whenever you feel like it whenever you freak always give us a shout because we can always have you on any episode that we're doing and mark thankful for coming so regularly onto the show is a spin. It's been good and all of the shows that we would the episodes that we do together do do really well. So that's good but We'll be this is kind of like a general off the cuff. Kind of episode really. And we're gonna be looking at a few different things. I've got a i've i. This is an announcement or surprised. I kind of want to start off with and this is as much for the listeners. As well as for you guys by if you open up your browser when you're opened when you've opened up your browsers okay. Go pornhub dot knojic good. My girlfriend isn't isn't into God and then go to the euro and type. In what the flip. Podcasts dot com. Now what you get is our official website and this is kind of like offers kind of announcement on a showcase this is. This is the official website. For what the flip and i want a quick brief tall around the website. And you guys can kind of follow along with me so you can see the homepage. We've got our recent episodes and stuff and we've got off. No we can subscribe to the website and all of that stuff and you go all of our links and stuff like that and at the top if you see the top bars. Want to kind of go food really quickly while my wants. If on episodes we've got all of our episodes there but if you are listening to what a flip and you only really like our anime content or our content about mysteries for example you can click on that new categorize it and we'll give you all the content through that puts specific category. So we've kind of got that we can go for the episodes. Which is i'm pretty cool. Go to the about page. This is kind of the hosts and the guests. I guess you guys louis mark. You're kind of of the family. So i've kinda done this nice little page. I want you guys to kind of. I'm a little concerned right now. Concern description after. I'm still slightly confused about the prince of the community. I i am as well. But i i think i think that's gonna that's gonna be there will want you to give me what you want to write for yours because i i don't know what to really. Why as a founder of this will need to kind of riot what you want me to look at the moment now way to go into the next next page at a wishes. Blog basically is is basically like a news feed bites. It's different to what we have in all social media platforms like twitter and instagram. And things like that. This is more generally related to the poco specifically so he's not like force or opinions or anything like that. That's kind of what we do. On social media this is more related to announcements and updates for about the actual. What the flip podcast itself. What we're doing Things like that that gets update with all the time. So it's kind of like a news feed there if you go to the reviews section. You have Just awesome reviews from people that have been writing us. So we've got some nice reviews there again we've got. This website is kind of for every people to go to if they want things. What the flip. So we've got our actual Social media stuff integrated into our website. So you can see things like our youtube channel. We go videos here to do. Go animate content here that you can kind of click into And again as as we're doing this you can see. I've done a new branding of the thing every every time. We have a mall stone on the poor. Cost kind of led to refresh the brandon. And the kind of cosmetics. So you can see. There's a kind of a new a new flavor to it You've got twitter feed instagram. Feed as well and the intergraphy takes a while to load for some reason by is there And then right. The end equal contact. This is what. I really wanted listeners. To to understand it too. So we've got a submission form am here. I'm your name and email and you can always submit to us things like opponents environments our. Let's rights as well as topics of suggestions. You want to kind of ask us. And things like that and context now all contact if you wanna manually contact us through email is contacts at what the focus dot com. So we're we're getting a bit more professional guys We're not having you know. Alex sixty nine at hormel contact. At what if podcast. Yeah always go to the website for submissions and a donate button and this is basically the beginning of something that as we grow. And i'm going to be talking about growth off the days quite briefly but as we grow your growth as we grow we kind of we've got. We've got a big long term plan. For what the flip focused austin. It's is going to go beyond what just podcast is. I i feel and that's what my my goal is in right. Now you know operating the the official website operating our podcast and things that you know it costs money and goes time and stuff so if people they're willing to donate they can donate eventually. We will have a patriot. And then we'll have some perks and things like that and the more we can get better we can give give back to the people where wherever it's you know upgrading. All mike's or getting better sound or more more episodes in things like that so if anyone wants to donate please do. We probably won't get any donations for a long while because people with no this is free but yeah the moment costs. It costs me money and You know you'll be appreciated by this. This is just. This is just if you want. So that's the podcast official website It's pretty cool. What do you guys think so far yet. Looks osima she i i. I'm still a big concern. About how in the center of my cake. There's a deep black hole but you know it's like the hell it is. That's that's what concerns me man. I've been trying to fill that deep dark black hole filled up trying man. That's four onlyfans content. We will be doing onlyfans a free optional. Donate since the last month. Guide you member before we hit a milestone got one thousand dollars just just hit one thousand downloads in the january. We hit thousand dollars. Now we're going to be mostly for us for that month this month. The month of march we were just shy by sixty downloads. One thousand five hundred downloads. Which is a phenomenal jump. One point five k. So we growing every single month. We seem to be more and more and from today's date the fourth of april. We are ready supposing by quite a quite a while choir way. Sorry what we what we were doing last month again so it is phenomenal on the sun. How we've been growing. We've been doing this every single mouth. And now i want to thank the people that are listening and stuff like that Like i said we got massive plans for the future. You know i wanna. I wanna do things like live. Poor costumes were live. You know. I want to do things like that. I want to have moved your content on youtube. Wanna kind of be like a mix between kind of funny makes we've all cd world on youtube. Like i wanna kind of mix that and create something out of this so yeah a lot of stuff in the future to look forward to you. Bought enough of all of that shenanigans. Let's get straight to the band target because some listener questions by offering would would do that. But later mark louis will was been on in your in your lives in your hoods. How long have we been out of. Lockdown like full-on lockdown. I don't even know. I haven't been keeping track so been side and just living in a cave just ordering food staying inside cutting into golden hall. I just like today. I just like worked out for the first time in a week and i just feel like really sweaty and tired slant all man and again if you wanna see that on only fans content clean right. Don't record my workouts. We'll review your silent and again i don't like the silent will because not enough it. Nothing nothing crazy. He's been acting But again i mean. We've just solve of semi lockdown in a way so we kind of been able to solve see relatives Better now so it's kind of. Yeah john Business to find out similar to you as well. Louis solve not ready going out of the house as well so decided to stay inside and just Style from any form of gems. So a will you send me a picture of yourself recently. And you've got long hair. Your ripta shit and i was so afternoon at this is almost lockdowns. A business line up she fucking ripped mouth feigin a now gonna say scripts so i was going to say when the description. Saudi redesigned variety foot streetfight ripped too long hair. Abedin sure got there. Can you picture for our twitter. We need to do some promotional stuff. All right semi pitcher saw. Some guy wasn't even game guy that should be like one of the white is in john wick or so thin really long hair shit so completely different dark skin from the tan from the law. Do will just on the block. Persons mike pay with the light doesn't meet in the way the shadow drops conspiracy theory foes. Bad of of like i. He seems to be like people in asia. Like in india and stuff and they'll be like really bad photos of them like photoshop online behind like a harley davidson clearly. Not they're not stopping they also gene. Absolutely please yeah. When things get bad will be good to kind of do kind of get together and do do a to govern kind of record or something. You'll be quite funny. I think it'd be. It'd be a good time. Yeah of course. Some kind of lease bullet points of things talk about kind of swayed anyway. If anyone's got anything that they really wanted to bring up will on. Not we can. Just keep his freestyle in. I think to celebrate Hundred episode Recording for year just so of about life the highlights of recordings of moments that we've enjoyed and just solve guess joke about for the i often just talk about what the flip in solve however enjoyed howard have we enjoy did not have got a few a few bullet points of light on my best moment some best episodes and things like that by a gun. Some of are most worst episodes in my worst moments of what the flip is well wishing we can both louis so I don't know exactly what episode that. I knew what is going to be but we'll seeming ugo wanted us thought we'd like. Is there anything particular that you wanna know what stands out to me to us to be like something that you really remember all. What's what's been enjoyable for me like the reason we like. I enjoy doing these podcasts. And i do enjoy them as this. Where is it my my sound. Go this because now i guess we can just we get to say what we want are. We can just be as volga on. Just gross will involve any gross. Yeah it doesn't really. It's just like guys being guys really Yeah i think i don't think there's been a moment that encapsulates that as a whole The last fight for me just because we can be a much to even be stupid. Under spe- yes so vile on not quite is is. It's a chance for us to kind of break away from all the seriousness of life in kind of just just be boise's reasoning series of that toys. Yeah i enjoyed enjoyed i. I never really when we started. What the flip never thought it would be like an explicit thing. I thought it would just be like you know like we have conversations by the your nature is quite vulgar in some way and i know by has added a really good kind of flavor to kind of differentiates us from from other as well so i kind of appreciate and i like to dabble in the dark. The dark calls. That sounds odd man. What do you mean south sure diddle in the dark marky mark louis favorite episode review on. Or you heard or a no market. You'd isn't a episodes. Yeah is is anything that stands off your any moments that you have enjoyed For me. I actually really like the Way to put out signed by on now of a. I'm a fan of Off the tournament episodes that we've been doing Really good fun as in have been very linked. Yeah house waiting for that way. I'm not saying talk. Mark again. Annoy if i kept on doing it by necessarily going on thanksgiving. Yeah i think that's what a minute episodes have been radio. Some just say here also all different takes on on characters and things of that and yes couch is that we love when we were doing it properly. Will i love. Amber heard and i can scrape biden rules louis. We did a tournament of talk. Ten me me will. We submitted our top ten all time. Most important favorite cartoon fictional correctional carriages. I was like. I was put in like mickey mouse characters. That really influenced my life. Mark was doing the same yet. I and he had like indiana jones. These these mccart will put joe biden. I'm i'm i'm specifically mirror off from akron. Five minutes screen time. No the fine rb is really funny. You know like like not real heard isn't real either johnny. Depp was she was actually made it. Funnier bo is it. is it like. That's why we like this in episodes and In times of lights actually going to carry on with the positives. Because i actually. We did like the you'll mystery episodes That was a really cool kind of alternative tool. That animates will can games and stuff so and you will put your detective hats on. I think i re- lighters episodes. They're really interesting to me. And yeah yeah. The mystery is something that i've i've gone massive passion for an poku. Listen to that pretty much kind of mystery. Pocus months old mysteries talking about the crazy things from the mt to too big for and all that as find it entertaining. Listen to And to hear everyone's opinions and stuff and stuff like that. So i always wanted to kind of bring that especially. They're more supernatural. Paranormal stuff and it will cost as well. It's not like it some random thing. It kind of works in a weird way. Yeah things yes really recall. Noda thomas also monitored they are like some of my favorite episodes. They don't they. Don't actually do as good as on numerous episodes surprisingly They they do. They do right But they i think because the nature of them I think when view is a listening. They can't see the tables. They can't see what we're seeing man and so. There is a slight disconnect. Not something that. I want to change something that i want to kind of put together or trying to change. Somehow if we do a life a livestream picasso if we free kind of find a way to have some type of interaction on on the on a youtube video or something like that. I think doing that will probably get more views. But i still like doing them so we're going to carry on them. Because you know this podcast is for us as well as for everyone else. Louis you've only been on a handful of episodes by any episode out to you. Well there's definitely is a couple episodes the standout one for the good and one for your annoyance plays but to say the good. I'm actually this is going to be twisted as you probably already expected. But when goncalo podcast in general yes. I actually want to see how bad my look control to get as on as i go somehow to somehow i just get the dumbest shit like every single time. Show up and to me. That's really really entertaining. Because is black. Lock it's cadeau. bring race into that. I could old black. It's just it's just always rough. I kick back relax all right. I'm going to hang out with my within. Podcast and next week i'm wearing if i could meet is a meet and this is why am i wearing dead in some abandoned engine. He's wrapped in fucking sausage league. Iraq's inmate so i think that's probably my favorite thing just like just it's twisted said but see how messed up. I really can get and how long that bad luck. It's not permanent. I mean i've had a couple of highlights but let's did pretty well. You had good powers. I think mark was the was less fortunate one. It was awkward to be not less fortunate. I was a sure to. Do you know god just said just my does have one. I di- i don't have the right my like my suicide note family. I'm sorry this is the end for me like what happened. I have seen me goodbye. What was your louis evolve. As the podcast is going on. He started reading. I mean asia policy and now he's getting bad powerlessness unlike. Oh like on all middle phase right. Now you know the the teenager phase cavaliers. Louis went through time skit black anonymity way you have the you know you the whole of the ruto and then it kind of does a time skip to putin and all the cartoons this randomly have new abilities and move sets and stuff like that and thereby stronger lewis kind of gone for his little time skip and so he's he's better now but he still he still has that essence of bad luck by. It's like he's he's better to cope with it now. I feel everyone stays tuned to see c. We die at some point. Drop get like my momentum completely crushed and i'm back in a positive although it's fair buffet. I don't think. I have the best luck when it comes to the less fights. Suppose of my powers games will normally are the best. I entirely agree. I have kind of mixed ch very mixed fortunes of i've kind of accepted my fate I'm all right with. It is for the audience today. Yeah right there you go low point. I guess the low haven't been on online. The low point was just arguing about gravity. even. I remember that as a listener. That was the worst. The worst moment and our relationship was that that was not my fault. It's not my fault shift. Gravity was set. You back a little bit grab. It works the way it does. Yeah for listen is that that might not know we did a. Let's five of louis. I think one of your first. Let's fight louis. I think it was your first. that's fine. we were daredevils in in london. That the the the the environment is zero yet had zero gravity and so me and we were like we can go into a convenience store. Do disney to louis louis. You start arguing your teammates who trying to count the virus alive. Let me start talking about you. Know confronted mechanics in quantum mechanics. Neutrinos passing through different reflective index. I don dude. It's just grab gravity technically. You can't do that especially next metal. Because it has this magnetic electrical. I charge if use of an office. Sakes just went on for about half an hour until the delete grab. No gregory. that's what it's like when you're an x. men and you haven't safai next the beast discounts. I am blue. It's not my fault. Alright i know a lot about physics. That's it and We'll do you have any lowlights who lies I think there's times when the have gone to fall enough said marie shit on those one episode will that i haven't ed i think i'm saving it for the patriots. I mean we've got few episodes. Haven't we will where we've gone a bit too. Far gone too far. It's just a mock louis you haven't heard these episodes. I must say i could send into you guys by am i think it was about. I think those three episodes that we've got Those one two yeah. We went to the police free. He's worth lead them to the awesome. You guys if you want privately by a fun. Episode is concerned. It's always oil is will that it's all will will throw it on the buckeye. Those one episode. I think it was. Let's fight where He didn't say the name will. But we will fight in this person and we didn't know the person who had actually passed away in real life but we were so disliking him off the family everything and then at the end of. I think this person's passed away will and then we realize okay. We're not airing this errands. We didn't need to talk about some into. We tortured the poor soul. Let's probably had so much power and it was. It was a horrendous a horrendous episode because in the last one hour we go to our brains. Isn't it really kind of nod to go see your brain main isis. I do miss the the old makela maniac will count as it turns on his teammates out just waiting for himself in hibernation right now. Because i think will y'all living conditions right now you can't shower around and scream around because you've got people people around you so ye kind of You kind of toned down a bit. But i think when you kind of move back place hours your back to your place will be unleashed from his case. My favorite episodes were actually did pass. Which i think was our first mystery. Episode is one of my funniest ones no show. we didn't. We didn't know if that almost gonna work was the first one but we did. He first mystery episode and eight call. A really good response did also wants in the mountains. Yeah yeah yeah. That was a good one and this is a this is a mystery. Seventy old year old mystery. That's been going on. Maybe ninety years old now other by mystery that no one really understands norden loads of theories and stuff and we'll kind of create his own hypothesis. At the end of it was that they were playing volleyball. The top of the mountain and it caused or catastrophes and it made sense it made sense there kind of it. Was that silliness. That kind of said you know what. I don't just want to talk about the mysteries. I want to try and solve on the mysteries in each episode of the sold so we spend like an hour solving a mystery that experts teams experts have been like dwelling over for fifty years. Now we we sold in forty five minutes and then my second one we did was the black-eyed kids want That yet. Because i think the scariest for me because it's about you'll expanded bobbers about basically these these gauss months children could an attack you wefa whenever site if it's funny or gross just in case i saw jinx myself and so from the these very reserved. This is a treat. These these are truth. Tree accounts of you know what people say in the are interested regardless if you believe or not is it is interesting to see how it's affected people's lives regardless if certain logical thing whatever is is is is interesting and i i like the the the more scarier the The mystery the better. I like and i stopped bring back. Nobis start doing a lot of mysteries. More true crime mysteries. Lie lisa lamb that we spoke about lost time and things like that. I'm going to get back to the most scarier that the monarch side of things like the The what's her name met. Mckell mccullough the the axiom based off exit emirates delays of it when we when we went through that story when you play the sound clip of a hate them hate them time my also just going to say my my other two episodes at kana standout. Oddly enough is the the by story inside us. I was gonna say that one because he. He's personally i like talking by and the other one was randomly one always sticks out is off. I fail four-way. We've louis and meet bags like one of the ones. That is weird. Why because it wasn't like any better than some of our other ones by ages stands out for some reason yes so i don't know what you just that image of and louis i think he drew yourself in a meat bag and you send it to me and said it was really cold and it could work. You could work like match league. Also like the fact that louis been similar to the gravity thing he spent ages describing the exit like wait. Wait behind his punches. And this is i told you physics supreme. He's wrong way. If you go to. If you go to the about the host section it says here pitcher chocolate cake with my icing. Scoped it perfectly with a beautiful expression. You can see the louise coming this is. This is what louise about. He's very expressive very detailed with these things us as harmless and tastes nights by senator. Kay at the black hole. Let's this kind of like you're going to detail over this random shit survive but how the momentum of the meat would increase your would though man i hit someone no if you hit someone. Why if you're gonna hit someone why would you not put weights in that hit where you put weights that. Hey you get hit harder. Hit some with an empty bag or a bowling ball. There's a difference. They're going to get into this office but can can write in and tell us if you think wearing a bunch of meat on your body's gonna make you stronger. You can agree on. Yeah i mean it's been it's been it's been a hell of a year so we got love are going to be interesting to see this next year. And where where we're going to be in a time will my. I'm among even be alive movie guard. We'll we'll might be hosting. This turned into only fans. We'll just will and louis. Ck work like we'll meet you. Leonard revie's the at lunch kids playgrounds sweat comeback to work. Used to be so funny like largest. See you random friendship you had with him. He's a really nice guy but it was going to like. This is a friend. Just someone that tag along. So lewis. i'll put around Work our our advertising agency He was a really nice guy. I don't know how it happened. But like you will and addict will pay usually used to just disappear disappeared lunchtimes. They'd be carrying like like gloves gloves in my bags. Random and then they and then they come back about like off now. Forty five minutes layer and they'd be sweat scenes then we have you been children's playgrounds context makes off the mark said destroy. Let me explain three. You'll be like hey the known you why you guys you stick at lunchtime. They randomly disappeared. Come back just me and we'll start like going for exercise at lunch but maybe we went for exercise lunch and it just so happened that the those children's playground that was always empty So and climbing frames always empty me with graduate use the climbing frames and do a lot calisthenics and stuff there so it was really good an mp of co onto it and he kind of joined got weird because like kids like to play as well but we were still watching the kiss. Your ass wills up being picked up sushi trying to offer. He picked dropped a crisp on the floor quite close and then he offered it to me off. Basically you know you're not moving rookie mark where he's causing sit ups but he's dangling from the balcony all so we're doing that. I mean when he wants kids sir for an off kids shit. Rookie trading seen would have been so different. All because good times may rabi chris. So we've got some some listener questions. We got a couple of listener questions. One long one short and probably bit more fun. I guess to answer bah. We're gonna start. We're going to start with the with the low. We need to spend on this other slow. Let's not because i've been gathering a few distant questions for me. Pick the lost gone. We're kind of just a talk about them quickly here this. This one comes from again. Mr chris christopher harrison louis him so basically saying i wondered if he could take a hot take on on what you thought of the future of storytelling would be. And now that we're able to engage your stories and narratives across multiple devices are multiple times and in multiple locations at once. I think he wrote quite long email. And i think he kind of gets lost in what he's saying but i think to it up into a question he was kind of talking about obviously cleaner like cobras common. The rise streaming has really kind of taken over and thing and cove it's kind of been a catalyst for that and you probably was going to go. I think streaming was on its way into where is now but definitely you know kinda capitalized on any kind of false attracted. Where is a cinema here And it's kind of like wilson still be around ten twenty years how do you think is streaming is going to be like when the pandemic's over his streaming still going to be what it is today Like how how cinemas but a massive man. Yeah yeah you miss cinemas with mom would be the amount i'm no. I'm don't miss it. Miss having the big screen experience. No i'm too sensitive to people around me so even though the big screen is really nice sound. Close really nice. Okay when that guy next to me lost the wrong time. We'll start fudging. His fucking candy wrapper. I remember that part of my experience for the movie and it really gets under my skin. I remember lost movie. i saw in the theaters. I just had these three guys screaming all year. fam fam. or what's he going. That's like what movie was interest. I can't remember i caught. All i remember is from the movie. That's why i remember. And i mean k. It'd be nice if i had my own theater. But i i don't i don't like people being around me to that degree i love. I love the just to champion. I what i love about. The cinema is day out. It's not just the experience of watching the film in cinemas kind of like the build up for every every day. I wake up and online film. It's like the whole day. I'm excited about it and i. I don't know if the popcorn is is the whole the whole sounds gay. The whole package is what had some in the gay handbook excited about movies. Is he uh the whole package. And like i've had good experiences that in my view mock oven. I love when we said we went to see how we went. We went to see loads of Will we won't see power rangers. Which i thought was an. I love that movie north. We weren't goes to show. That was pretty frat like we. I mean when the studio ghibli to see gravely five firefly's utah. Scott me in my life like it's it's is is like a day because it's that they are is. I always remember it. Like i remember watching this remember west napa when it streaming a home. I never have the memory of the first time i watched. They know so-and-so streamed on that point point. I remember it because this is more of an event and especially with the marvel movies like it was it got to a point where like i was just watching it for myself. I am watching it with with the fans like the thing is with the fans and is a foot will match. You know like he was like are one where we know with all comes to a condo. Everyone is just screaming on his cinema. Like never would like that in the film. When i think about a win it's happening odyssey's one is so i'm like massively going cinemas but i only really like him office massive blockbuster film that i've really want to say that that's definitely the positive definitely positive. Like if i could just get rid of all. Those people screamed at the thing at the wrong time scratching. This i'd be fine. I'd love to send everyone clapping. When was like you know when on your list. Yeah on on your life. it's not bad though. It malls the experience. I'm so i do. I do see what you come. Everyone but i do feel unfortunately that only studios and now going to push full streaming services. Because they the of profits doesn't have to be cinemas they pretty much take all the all the all the prophet so i think is going to be that push but there's also it's also shoot them because it's that by doing that they they lose a lot of that. The office revenue. They massive massive amount. Maybe like ninety percent of what they would go in cinema. That's why black widow was. They've been struggling. Shall we put this out in cinema. Should we put his streaming dislike. We we know if you put out in cinema. We're going to get like five six times the amount that we get my and is by gin if streaming changes slowly and different kind of packages of of of of how you kind of. I guess how you get that content. They is is either going to change the film. The film industry in a sense of gonna make films in cheaper budget to match the streaming costs Or the streaming prophets or they go into op the streaming cost to match the film this by dot com sena middle ground. Maybe speaking of which though say. Let's say snyder cut. We may see movies have their theatrical release in theaters but we might start seeing the director cuts that are million years long. Actually start shorting. i could use. That is something that from an artistic point of view having your actual full vision. They're like subject to always has to be two hours to fit five showings in one day. That's that's something that might be very liberating for a lot of artists. And you might see more of that especially with the fact. That snyder has done so well. Yes i agree that it's like a windfall for warner brothers studio. They released that film. I if there is a direct his car or an extended. They release that they wouldn't normally released in some other released on on. Pay to go services or like you know whatever blu ray. Whatever is if they're going to be doing on streaming. Then i guess they didn't ask a second revenue like few months late adama line for them. So that's the shortly not something that we might see with the snyder toco. We've we've kind of already stepped into that like it's it's been such a success is snyder. Caught wasn't a success. It would have kind of shaped the future now. Moving with different to what it is by east success. And everyone's talking about it. So what do you guys think about. you know. We've you like Disney gloss with latin on hulu on ryan the last dragon. I m blatantly. They will be the same how they You have to pay like you're paying will not going to see In the sense that you'll have to pay you. Pay his fee to disney plus but then also for prime you ask certain movies anyway. You have to pay extra on top. Yes how do you feel about that. I mean i'm not a fan of it. I get why they're doing it because he needs to make things but yes gowdy they. It's not goodbye. It's understandable is something that they have to do because if they don't do that then they lose money and then it's not good. It's not good for the studio to lose money because then the films that we will be getting from them are going to be less less films and lower costal lower budget and then it can affect things so they have to kind of. Come with this you know your paint plant spot if you pay extra you're gonna get these wanna films and so i'm not sure i'm not sure what the i don't know what the i guess the the structure will be for streaming but i think with that structure in place is not is not good like no one's a fan of it. No one's a final bit overseas because they would paint like. Why am i paying more for this. I'm paying for disease as act should be getting. Everything was sporting events. Don't like fox in an extra in events. I think are are. They are More this few few of them the you know you're gonna get like like for example football you get like the euro cup. Wherever the wo- copy is is not like every month something massive is happening whereas with films if every month is going to be big films coming out Like which ones are going to be for free which is going to be. I don't know he's isn't what i think is a good system could be is you can go on disney plus free and you get a limited amount of content on disney pass for free And if you wanna buy. Let's say rather lost ryan comes out and it costs. I'm just decide. Given example cost. Say pounds thirty dollars. You can do that by. Fewer disney plus subscriber. You get all of the disney plus catalogue and that ride lost. Striking doesn't cost thirty dollars. It can cost fifteen dollars so you get like a. I think they need to be a tier system or something. I don't know i'm a business person. But right now. I ended up going to pay for the days And then yeah i'm not. I'm not a fan of it. I get it. I get it. Yeah right nothing. Specific system does make sense. I think yeah. It's it's a tough. It's very tough for the toughest. Believe it or not. I think that that that system actually works out. Okay for the user because Because we're we're now releasing stuff straight to the internet We get to choose much quicker and much more informed about what we're not going to be spending our extra payment towards for example. Milan has been not a good movie. That moves i like tip. I never saw the original. I definitely saw the original What life actions not great. It's all yes so that allowed because at that goods you know released on disney. I was able to make that choice of going. I can now that so many people just added that bonus money to the thing sold movie. I don't have to go in and watch a movie. I don't have to get a bus ticket. Go in and find out. I've just watched a shitty movie. I i'm not getting man and yeah yeah so they. It also helps in terms of knowing what movies they're going to put up for say for free. That's part of the subscription. What movies they might actually be like. Yes this is worth your time to pay extra to watch Like so yeah. I think it could work out I'm not a fan of it simply. Because i am paying for this service service for especially with disney plus where almost all of their content. I've already seen twenty years ago right. Yeah so why. Am i paying for this. But at the same time if released movies latin milan. I know that. I'm not gonna pay the extra but if it was only in theaters i might have had to go and pay the extra which is probably going to be more money by the way by going to see in theaters and then just be as disappointed. So yeah. I think that's why that's how people are trying to justifying I feel like if you're going to pay extra the needs to be some kind of maybe added valley and that would be whether it's extra commentary nathan directors or something all night out on the deleted scenes some kind of extra content that makes paying the extra worthwhile. I think in my mind anyway to Secret cinemas and things like that before haven't actually meant to go to some kind of not secret cinemas by these cinema Mocking you invited me to a couple. It was like van damme night in news on route hollow yet the yeah. It was like these marathons where you get older. The army movies back to back to back for one night. Something down one yet the on all of undone movies and they make yeah experience. Mike stranger things when unhappy. I'm obviously going to cost you more money. But they all do you environment like the. I think it was like a hole in light kind of the upside down world Addressed open stuff so gone. I misread it. Not solve became the next evolution of cinema. I'd be interested happy to go out and do that. Because he becomes flat. What you're saying inside. Yeah something to me. I would remember more and more. It becomes an event in a way. So yeah the feel like. It's not just you go to a cinema. And then they just play the movies maybe The kid cinema decorated the cinema in like around the theme of the movies. Mother and maybe Entice me a little bit. More to dot But the of that is going to. It's going to go up is going to deter a loss jitters from wanting to do that although that that in theory and practice that's awesome and i think in american theme parks shows like that. What else will terminator three no. He got the cinema for the viewing arena. That you're watching the film or the clip. Whatever is of kitted out is as your you'll there Be awesome having terminated as the terminator sheet. Someone in the movie someone jumps out and shoots you fuck chest. Cinema ticket cinema. Either one is going to be meal. You louis sound really real feelings. I need your clothes. Your booze sleep centers. Difficult clothes was some hoodlum comes out with a really crappy monkey to you simply just puts a script. How i st- me. You definitely remember that. That's for sure. Always remember seeing where he dislike. When when you hear what people go. Ooh stick around. Did you see the whole that. A cigarette made in his chest. Those i can. You sure wouldn't some really week of issues yet. You fucking hole when his cigarette buddy belly as hot as a candle shit. Imagine if that akio banged up by those guys just you excuse me johnny. Five ship in was those stuff. So okay so i guess the also chris harrison question is kind of like your i guess streaming is gonna keep growing. Then i guess that's all kind of incentive is on my my right. Yeah i think you will. Cinemas will still be around by the way i think films naturally at least for the next five years they their budget is going to is going to be I guess squashed think films are gonna come out with a lot smaller. Production values moving forward. F- release a wall. And i think is going to be more experimentation on streaming services and to see what model they can get us actually going to work. I think people. I think people by definition are lazy for you know Yeah some of us really want to go back to malls and some of us. That remind the second question. This is a really good question. Comes from a mr robert jackson and this one is simply mike. Tyson vs bruce lee under what conditions site rules may i. This is the pride prime mike. Tyson vs prime bruce lee. And let's just say this ring that listener as reuss is allowed to use kicks and briefly. Yeah he's justify one's gonna who's gonna take out the other person flow the other person's of mike tyson light look kind of fucking is a base. He just he just takes place just absolutely insane. I love like no end gonna eat your children go to step on the head so they can feel the pain. I feel come on off. Slightly had a filipino. Twang i mean we'll take mike. We'll take mike laurie. You can join team. Hello bruce lee sitting an i. I love bruce but i do feel that. You know on no-holds-barred fight. There's no way you could beat mike. Especially when he's hops up on all that cocaine he is he is. I'm not so confident. I'm not to say my. Because i think breezy is smart increase smarter and nothing these going to be like. Wow i know. I can't get him mean strength. I know actually you know what i recognize. The bruce lee's kick. I reckon is as strong if not stronger than mike tyson's punches. So i feel i i would agree with you but have you seen my tyson. Take one of the hardest punchers taking jers. He just kept taking or in the leg in a knee. Even have bowls anymore. He says he's is leak. That's not the same time. I felt like bruce because she condones if he studied lots of different techniques took the best sought do feel like he'd be more equipped but then again if he gets caught with any kind of like hook for. Mike slight salman like is this going to but i don't know i'm leaning towards bruce just just i i would. I don't know i. I'm gonna say bruce. Only because i like bruce better. Like i love bruce lee. That's why i wanna say bruce to. I do fights him with rose tinted glasses in in some aspects like briefly him as a person i think he is he is like he is a legend mike tyson for his legend. He's like a he's a he's a hall of famer. Of course spot bruce. Lee's like a legend. Not he's for me. Mike is awesome. Though man like giannis been on what he's been for hobbies coming through the other side off off. Mike surgeon man. He's eastern oshima's woke the both legend height literally. Titans of off it respective was youtube video. It quite a few out of my way renewed chinese. Oh school mike. Tyson vs bruce lee chinese mine in walk around Kind of a chimpanzee attacking chinese mike toxic. I may come on so many lawsuits over alex to be black. Come on man. How the sorry calm woke on. Go with mike tyson with mike. Go so for mike ten bucks for briefly. That's right he's only one way to find out. Yeah listeners. Who you think would win in a in a fire would be interesting. I i if they were to die and briefly was to get towel or her. I we've action feel like i wanna cry by mike. Tyson get towel. I wouldn't really care about it. Especially the mike in his prime. 'cause he was the biggest awesome the planet year man's eaten fucking ears and shit like pool. Alexa anthony monterey fight vice. Yes yeah that's hilarious ship. It meant for. He makes the cut. The fight basically is like i think you man realizes that i can't keep fighting in because he's just too powerful so i'll have the. I forgot how ends something they often. They just kinda stop. Not if you lost three minutes of me or something. And he's he's like he's just a mountain of just power and he's con- do anything broadening. That was a. That was a question i had to. I had to get into will's vulgar seats for for a while. How did it feel intoxicate. Actually to be honest and missile. I've been watching invincible. yes. I no happen When did they actually start I think it was a few weeks ago a month ago. The risk the reason why bring it up his things on episode florida my resolving by the one not review or anything. But i think it's really good by louis. Iv if you've gone to the voice actors of invincible and seen just how many like special super big name fucking voice for some reason mental like you remember. The i heard with that with that kind of stone man and he was in it for like five seconds invincible. That was Herschel ali voicing that carter what why i'm saying these characters in there like ezra miller is in there. He's voicing like a character that's like little background car. It's it's weird. They've got so many mark when you when you watch the show. Okay and we'll if you watch donald shell fuel you you'll be into invisible invisible. Basically are animated like comic book. That's not marvel. Dc vice is really good but yeah. He's like they've got all these guests kind of stars the voicing characters and it is like so crazy hamill. Yeah mark simmons they go they go freaking jim on han soo who was like two different characters and the first car to shows up is not even speaking english. Like i don't even understand why he they needed him. Yeah to voice alien speaking martian. But we don't. He's not speaking words. Why is it him. Why is it like an intern. But it's adversely make doing this as a favor for the director or something in other gulf razi. Some pretty awesome. Stephen is stephen. Young is the same. The stephen young is that you. Yeah yeah. I think he's korean. Isn't he's former walking dead. He's like the main he's the main character and it The head zachary quinto is the robot guy and which funny because clancy brown one of the best voices in anything ever is Damian dot blood. He also does the voice of lex luther in justice league unlimited You've got you've got lennie james You so many so many people that is like yeah like more What's his name You know hans The guy from never backed down the black guy on garbage galaxy. Yeah he he's the he's the flex emperor of voice suffragans randomly allender alien. He's never ending. He's like when you go on one of the websites during this. They've got a love. There's a lot of characters still to come worrying episode full. But there's a lot of question marks and so we know what characters are being voiced by. Who by just crazy. I and i always a long long time coming. They were going to do a live. Action series originally an changed into into this kind of cartoon show so many crazy like main characters are right. Secondary characters stood characters voiced by these big people like jon. Hamm is steve. one of the security guards. This is zazie beetz. His in the she's One of the down at the high school girls this goes on. It's it's it's a bit wild. Yeah when i was. I was looking at the just the looking on amazon and seen these access pop up in nyc. Why why like these are lewisham of the biggest names in hollywood right now. And they're just in this cartoon like i mean it's a good cartoon. I'm getting wrong. It's not like cheap. Is saturday morning cartoon. Wow like some white favorite actors are in here like what's going on like is it made by Is an exclusive right other. They the production of it. I mentioned limit on the mid money for this thing. So yeah it's it's a lot of money behind on goal of backing his war because it had a lot of people involved in the project because it was going to be a live action show an took over and kind of change into a cartoon by very very bloody very gory. Not it's not. it's not for the faint hearted is weird because it has like another. Want to talk about this too long. This is not ready for this episode by easy like the visual style of it is like you're watching just a call to not justice league but it's it's a very dark horrible on the tone to it where characters off very mortal like someone who's super strength against someone like let's say for example like superman is fighting Other no let's say someone like fuck li like frigging akron is fighting the joker for example. Right right in the comics that would make whole battle but in real life akron one punch to the joke punch a hole his chest. And that's that's kind of how they treat this. They like super strength. And punching another superhero villain doesn't matter if the superhero villain doesn't have that super jer ability. The head's going to explode it encarta. Just die so quickly. Why as he is very raw but it's also very unpredictable because very unpredictable. Because they don't they don't do it a lot you know when when it happens. It's so so it's like. oh shit. Yeah that guy died really really fucking horribly. I did not expect that and it kind of it does. It does kind of come out out of nowhere not nowhere but it does surprise you when it happens. Yeah one one scene really messed me up his dark wing when he was under the tank. No no no no. I haven't sport anything trust. That seemed like was this like identity and things that seems not even a big scenes. Not gory or anything. But that scene of what happens is like you decided it gets to me for some reason but yeah so good is such a good and it's very unpredictable. So yeah i just wanted to touch eight big. Who is that something that interests you to watch some knocking. No shit you know. Go interested in the distant topic as interest in. Obviously i'm thinking way into future mattresses. I'm not yet not this. Podcast touchy became something like we got like you know. We like millions of viewers and download on How would you react to fame would be action. If someone came up to my on mock thought about how receptive would you be to that. And you think you would change i i i i would act exactly. How superman at the beginning ran. The caja kids are filming him. He's like us justice. Like yeah justice league and he's slightly camera just renault very a very noble and humble cgi cg upper lip randomly a me. You guys you go for it. Oh no i. I'd be the saying i mean we just got some follow is not. We like superset breeze or anything Speak for yourself annoying. Sorry this question is something that You need to watch out for will cause if you're the one that's probably going to get people attacking us games off. Sorry sorry carry on saturday. I think i'd be. I'd like to be the same. I think got be receptive to people. You're happened what you think. So y for me bit. I'm being on like if if people say recognizing in the street which other know how they would cause If the podcast branched off into youtube even in like will we know winning to us twitch and unlike most people and for alex from what the flip like that would make me so. Happy an wow. I've actually reached someone. Soft close to home like just randomly. I think it would kind of get my head or like if i went to comic con and go people kind of recognize me somebody that would be something like i feel really good about myself first time for me it be. I'd be absolutely shocked is amazing similar. How is now you know when alex is. We've got this may be downloading stuff I'm always just absolutely shocked and augusta's to yeah why people like to and go are you you diktats be. It'll be a thing common. You're walking around. We'll people were kind of walk around. We've like violence next behind how we would that be someone being to some clothes playing alex louis. Also man you call it. Cost played me. No one that for me down. I want to say that. I wouldn't change but the problem is that me not changing. Might be wait enough. Like i'm already like i'm a very very strange person. Sometimes and i. I'm i'm not. I'm not bipolar or anything. But i switch between mood so it depends on what mood. You catch me in when people talk so it'll definitely be a case of. I might be that guy running with a bag on my head trying to keep away. People never want to be spoken to be that guy that starts to like impersonations in the middle of the street and then takes a little bit too. Far gets arrested or some shit. You've got that so louis you've got that you're either hyper and you're just like no kid and you're just going crazy more. I'm really dark and like his old depressing toll to like. Sometimes guys are leona lewis up man. Life is so crap. i'm gonna kill myself. I want to arrive voice. Secondly talking about. And he's like i can't go into it right now but just whatever you do. Don't leave your house and they're not as weren't hearing this year for like four months. Say those like christian. Bale was batman having a good time. It's fun but have you ever set in darkness wondering why you're not good enough that guy who like you but there's also plenty of times the center of the fucking party right so it doesn't even on saying i'm not bipolar. But it's like it's just okay. I think me be myself is already. We'd enough so if i got famous. It's not that i'm changing. But i'll definitely be in the news. I think will would be the funniest of what speeding will be like it. Let's we'll tries to himself off as this kind of taco was talki- talking. Yeah you try to off as like something like that and like now introverted and like he doesn't socialize but deep down when he's in a situation he's like he's the centerpiece of of of like of of like every like i've i've seen i've seen at christmas parties. I've seen little social event. I will can. He can shine when he when he wants to. And i think if he was to ever get famous ever gain recognize the street. You'll have this like really co- charisma about him and he will just stop basic because he's ripped to shit now so just just interested in like Because i've got that famous business like it's the width thought. Like because we get not made allergies like like louis ordering a burger from donald. The dry for louis that the man meet now. Watch how you might want. You may meet wait. Well if you will the the meat bag suit louis in zero gravity how would you. How would you conduct yourself. You don't you don't want to know the also that already is that were formulated of already formulated the entire calculations that would actually snow benefit. Let's let's just move on. It was a rhetorical question. This move in a long time. You're reverend that engine revving that engine right the fuck up. i'm sexual. I remember another at the time we talk. I think louis into animals. I just don't like the mouse annoying ahead. Just do the right. St louis have the power to turn into a mound and for some for some reason he wanted to keep turning into louis. Don't need to turn into the mouse. He just got the power to do. So if you want to but right now you turn into a mouse would just kill you. And he's like well. Maybe i can turn into a mouse louis. Don't need your abdomen. Using the mouse i said areas. That was the same episode episode. I will remember louis always garden of knowledge. Softball question about your legs fights. Addison wills specifically at old episodes that you've lost which was the one. Which opponent did you feel. The most aggrieved by that you lost to. Oh i'll have a different one as in the one that i got annoyed i lost to the most. Yes yes. punish the punisher kosher Yeah he was fighting in a in a An underground pit kind of liking kickboxer when he goes to the tortures rob roy and hope. The whole place flooded and punisher had a gun. He had his gun and we didn't have hours that were capable of defending against that. So we could. We could attack him but audience. Dushi us in ahead with dead right. He's couldn't we just couldn't win. He such crap car. Like if i've these powers going to get shot and by is like eighty two annoyed me. I think we had like an acid vomit. Or something. And i i think like i don't know why had bought. That was one that really annoyed me that that fight with the punisher because i felt like we should have it was. It was a loss that we didn't need to have about. You will think I mean the ones always good Alex lipson cherish them so much. So defy Her in a slightly funny to make because like he loves him so much. so we're kind of the negative. Just is the legend. Alex smaller smaller speed hours. Because it was like. If i'm like i said if i'm gonna lose to someone needing to be aca goes up. You know fair enough yucky. go your respects anyway. You want this one. I will well on. But then i think we try to like do attempted rape on the among the second mammary one i think we all are hog tied him or something and then we started getting too deep. We detroit clara then. We decided to just. Don't money's had The the most impressive one will that we've ever done was was the guida match the second guy match where we were definitely gonna lose one of our strongest opponents and the ri- the end we got like two extra powers and it happened to copy one of the abilities of our ponant. And we and i think you copied his bio boosted chest armor chess chest blasting and that basically want us to match. 'cause we look against him the first read we've again regard. We lost against him. The first one that right we need to have a rematch against the people. We've lost just like guy. So what would you say is probably the strongest analyst fights. I i always think magneto the two top ones that. I think we would have ridiculous this week. Just 'cause he's just fossey strongest durable. He's got close-range long. Should beans a everything. Is this like but we won because we able to copious powers plus. I think i was able to copy. Your powers will so when you his alma thing i also got it so it was kind of like we. Were we do. We teamed him. We ended up winning again and it was a pretty good size. Find on Yeah the sci-fi familiar one was also way for for titans like bestrides the burritos birthday kind of entered that one. Didn't i recall strategies for that one. Check that one out as well. That was pretty cool but yeah last friday. 'cause i guess we just talk about like. I don't know halloween goblets. We'll talk about how the whole concept of less What the fifth came about under so people the history of insofar that Yeah we can give a kind of a brief kind of thing of how he started out am i do you want to do. It will join me to talk taper vote. I had this idea of of doing a podcast. I want to focus in like I think i'll speaking to you will at a time because we coming off doing youtube channel together with with my friend arlen and it was like. Let's try and do simple cosco be easier. We'd have to do video. Footage recorded like the video and stuff like that he's just audiotape easiest. We can their remote and stuff like that. And we're kind of coming up with ideas for the poor costs. And i was like i. I kind of envisioned it to be like bit. Larger rogan in a sense is like that but the topics are going to be. Kind of. Related sasaki geek relate joe rogan's kind of thing And in me and will had previously created a called game Power chords and we did this work. If we allow jury poulton important like advise me just playing her stone and power cards best an accenture and it we the weight the weights started offers. Me we'll hypothetical questions like oh if there was like ten bag had ten pills in there. I'm one of those pills will kill you. Bought by nine of the pills will give you like a superpower. How many pills would you take before you stopped taking them And it was kind of a hypothetical questions at that and then so we'll was like okay. Well let's actually write them down paperless right online superpowers and then one is like an x which means you die and then we like scrunched scrunched up these boring. Put him in a little bag and we started saying. Or i'm going to take one and then i'm gonna take two and then it was. I was like okay. I think i'll probably take two powers. And then i would stop her. Winning risky off to taken to was i. I know i might take four then and then from there it kind of like was like oh and how would we With the pows. We got like. I'll be like you think you could take me out like those powers and then i think colleague onto this discussion with me. Verses will with these powers and he grew in his like. Hey let's add some more power to it is at this not not and then we create this whole card game out of it. Coup power cards and It was basically conduct. Let's fight but instead of the oppo us to of the opponent it was it was activated opponent. It was asked to as as individuals. So it'll be me versus the opponent and will versus the opponent as to sarraj is and we're like we both need to be able to be our opponent and if we can both be the opponent emigrated sudden death which is basically me versus him only versus will and then we have. This game was like how would we translate that into po. Cost because we've obviously got these cards these environments game changing called these different light kind of rules and stuff and it kind of just evolved into let's fight whereas let's narrow it down make it simple just have one opponent reduced talk about some powers and re tag team it and kind of disavow into it and this is such fun so full it was never gonna be a last fight with just. It was just so that we just full of as whistle brainstorming. Things to talk about during the podcast destroy broiled while it's due to power conscious thing who has already translate into podcasting or we to solve mushed together or four of a different way of bringing not the same concept. Yeah how cards into less fights and The the my favorite things in my favorite thing to do in the I think it looks really well. And it's just such a fun unique concepts just yeah works at st i. I haven't heard it happened around too often. Not too many people want to share of each other with superpowers. Yeah so i like you know you and we kind of brought in the dna of of power. 'cause with the because we had weaknesses didn't really we had like we had game changers. Derision power calls things something that we don't have on. Let's fights that much but we had like game changes whereas like We can we can use like Like a this block so for example if we'll gets a card and it says you can still a power from alex during the fight then i might have a car that can block that steal. Okay you and as you into the corner is is. I'm still your flip. Because our. But i've got the block card and then you we were. We were printing cards at work using like took them into shapes and people guys do on. Contracts market was a small into as well. It took quite a bit of space. 'cause i pay the catania on this slide this yet this box on your desk. Alex like it was just like whoa. Those names had properly. They had like a pat on the back every call then especially professionally printed for some of them anyway. Yeah he really really cold. But i'm i'm glad he's evolved into white house woan like i think what you've brought. The precautions been awesome alike. The dynamic Didn't think we were going to make this ause friends. After what you said to me. I met one year. Well over jews like well. Overdue speech will the new competences. I'm what what i want in the future like. I win win things. Come come round. I do want us to go to come in and do like recording there on the day like on i'll be like a full podcast. But just like little snippet recordings of astle or maybe recorded the camera we can put onto youtube. Whatever just little things like that. You're gonna be so cool. Win lockdown finishes and suffered i artist. I just think you'll be. It'll be fun Yeah i just think it'd be fun. 'cause i mean we'll have had such adventures mark once me and we went to come on and then up with gen yes and yet they will dress up. As mario's you've modern stuff in those random. You're traveling around on the train on the way back. There was this random like asian mine wasn't there will and he was disliked taking photos of them like a typical of themes anime. Oh really i'm worried. I know that is but was like he like off the same. Stop austin will. He go off at the same stop. Assessing none of us really pitches. Thank you thank you and you just me. Like didn't have glasses. did he. And like sweatpants on swear remember. What was he like in a business. You know if if he was in the business. It's not who. I'm thinking for some reason. I had this feeling that. I know who that was but i'm hoping it's not. It wasn't like they were. They were trying to be like sexual like kind of plays sexy version. They just got the costumes off like amazon. But this guy which is purvie over these girls Taking these weird. I'm goes of the mall. It was they were loving it. How she is yeah. Yeah but like yeah. It's so weird i mean. We'll we've had some weird. i mean. obviously we respect about what the funding since comecon the flashes one of kind of things. What's from with flash. Do just say really quickly to louis. Because i don't think he knows the story but meanwhile we're playing a game we're like let's see who like let's pick two characters and we'll see these two cats we think most people dressing up as you go to comecon avon's dressed up as the joker and holly quin. Everyone's dressed up as the devil when he had the kind of the black mosque and thing it was. It was just like things to me and we were like. Let's find like the coolest of the funniest whatever and close by you know. Sometimes you see characters like the addresses goku but they like super skinny. So it's kind of like more on the character for you. See someone like the hope and painted green but they dislike really fat and they're really flabby so we walking out right. This is i think is kind of towards the end of the day and we'll just turned around just burst out laughing and he couldn't speak luik. Let's say laughing. He couldn't speak and he was pointing at this person. Like who's next person pointing when i turn it was. It was a person who has dropped flesh. And what's the flash known for. He's known for running fast and stuff but this guy was in a wheelchair and so we'll we'll that guy was actually He thought he was like taking a pace out of it. Like you know i'm flashlight. Sonic but i'm in a wheelchair. Ron flash. all the goes activity but the guy was actually disabled and was pointed at him laughing in his face. And we're not story. I've heard in my life woman. Always momma something kind of pushed him around. Economists gave us a like a weird. Look and i was. I was dying from lofta. But i was laughing at will laughing. The guy off he left. I think we'll miss you like we just kind of run outside laughing and cry crying on the steps one way or the the worst thing you could possibly do. The guy has a hero man. He wants to run mike the flash red pointing and laughing because it right in his face. The guy looked him. Bedding is pointed at him. Long time i'm a guy didn't move the goddess it bill like worst standards both with me. Will i got common condos like we walk into to the end of the line because we kind of got their bit late throughout the go to the line and seeing all the 'cause players like lining often see people yeah was really good we saw mystique and that was one black person in the whole like three hundred level that we saw or and yeah he what was he dressed up. He was sitting down wearing a boss costume law favor. Like he's even a character going on the may representation. Do i have this was before. I am sure he was. It was space. Jam was michael jordan. General co bruce t shirts. Yes boston close burden absolutely brilliant. We'd have to be fun. Yeah we definitely go go to court. I don't think it's going to be a thing this year but know the nike of it might be this year but last year definitely wasn't and maybe we would like we also went to like other kind of comical smaller. Konso like lou exhibitions anime anime expo in an ad like these of small ones and those one that we went to we went to you and i think angel clinton was like anime day or something. I forgot what the hell it was. We ended up going and we realized it was a university event. Might a university held their own like games and anime kind of day. Or something okay. I'm me rule like okay. We seem that with the oldest one's here. I'm walking around and like everyone's dressed up as tackle tyron pretty much. I want everyone to be on titan characters and and it was it was really small when he was really shit. I mean and i was like oh i should go this. I think it was the first time menu. We're going to go and do something officer. Yeah it was. Let's go to this and then we let you walk james. I wanna go. If i share and there was one guy is dressed up his Go geeta from drum for from dragon ball and it was just the worst costume of emphysema. You didn't see any like are necessarily tight. Trousers would like leading left or right like pets. Like my nightmare. Going into these places. Like i don't i don't want to happen to me. I could just walk in. And there's this guy there and he's everything's normal not normal man. It was not me and we went to. We went to go see outside. 'cause join that shit event. We went to go outside. And i think there's this guy just like a sword encounter it was offering people like scabby pieces of bike. Chicken nuggets. it just it just. It didn't say anything to us light halley's and have like chicken nuggets sounds are hard what you thought voice. Five guys didn't end up to five guys i think. What was it with random. People from food will with crisps and kids cheeseburgers. I got sit-ups offers us some some food rocky promised snotty nose breathing heavily. You want this clave like not. No acquaintance just took a bite and he carried on john's pushed to go window. Some game of thrones brand the broken on on the slice dysle- knows he's one of those things like some slides yay climate for ladder platform. There's a sly platform has the no the wooden edges the barriers. So he's like a kid for like a few seconds initiates after taking on this will topless sweat off. My god god while. Wow wow. is there any other kind of points or that. We wanna kinda go free or do you want to an end to this to this off cost. I think we should probably wrap up. Because we're getting a little bit crazy now. It was hoping to finds like our fans are going to people. That don't do seriously kind of skate. Escape my little kid. Listen this absurd now. True trying to be friendly. Thought you were hungry bro. Training up to get revenge on lou. He's got wills. Linked pin not rookies trading for a drag on the patriot. Need to screws up and frozen once. He's physical exercise. I'm ready guys guys all over. I would love to see. We'll walking in the street in some summer. This attacking general things say selena. Jai especially with the current climate aged eight. Of course get going on the ground on the got on this great content of the website. Get ready. Because i'm alex will alleged. No will your first power is trump just like me love it god right. Let's let's wrap this technique off to some creative. Editing may be needed. But no guys. Thanks for listening louis. Mark thanks for thanks for being here and this has been one year in the making hope to to keep growing and mark and we will be back More and Yeah we're gonna keep doing this. And again the new contact information to what the podcast dot com website. Everything you want their from lavar episodes boston media stuff toward egypt. Everything that you want. You can also submit stuff. They're off. You can email us at contact at pitt dot com. That's it i've been and i've been i've been marky mark how.

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Hosla Bnna kr rkho aapna | Yakshi Yash

Yakshi Yash Podcast | Teri Dosti

01:28 min | 4 months ago

Hosla Bnna kr rkho aapna | Yakshi Yash

"A chapter is donya may quickey seager noda is true. Is the key mccoy's other daughter commodity such though those need unique. I say that we go. The is beyond me up. I guess it is the app. Guess lugosi rose delivers a thin to secure many tokenism lucia to chico hustler. Recoup now host la banana coop. Do danny jay haas lebanon recoup to asia toward the potanin. ej gaga aghia. to me is to donna. sei shikai belly subsume guiding beliefs obscene. Omagh it's bad kiko will serve to isci rona mckissic. Assam new rona. Omni just bought tomorrow in the morning. Ej route bourbon. Our wrestle route above born always a key echo vase masada commoner j. gobble but only nikki deceased shot dot co for cheese tamari samna woon-jae hosta bernarda record. Nah to plenty.

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#ARSOLY REVIEW [feat. @archangeell_gabriel]

Up Gunners NG

06:05 min | 1 year ago

#ARSOLY REVIEW [feat. @archangeell_gabriel]

"The all right. Gregg my fellow of Guinness Funds. My goodness brothers and sisters I record the grits discovered d. All right my name. My name students enjoy nougat winks. Ngondo fly it but you know tomorrow and you know fly boy wonder not Ark Angel. Gabriel all right. I would like to model for disaster will happen for his emirate. Our hot brick we happen for us at Emirates disheartening. Issue happened for his at Emirates. Everything I said the new I said emitted every problem every disappointment apple. Who Got Olympiakos? Come home when it gets defeat the back on going go John Ga policies good admit. I don't come up for your backup. Okay constantly Gaddi very very speechless. I don't I never know which angle to confront because every will help over that particular teams. Don't cry about dispatcher. Glosses in all of two hundred nineteen avenue give any of also began fast joy no happiness no smiling fees from one loss to another from one draw. Noda for Paul game to another at a at a dot com with a better game brighter. Start a bright out style but the question is this guy's idea ready to play now. Think about that particular game. The biggest Christopher Dodd game players would it be there moti for that game? What MEDIUM MINDSET. Which come incident occurred to enter for that game against Olympiakos? When you said Emirates. Todd you wouldn't be that AIN wouldn't media set goals for that particular big question now doc. We still took for granted which instant runoff like this because there's new us. Negotiating tension for that particular team would will come out to lose if the juicy does get to. Goose will turn. Goose will get a particle argue. The WHO don't forget goose. We'll ask the talent attitude on cereals. Kind of mindset. They just take on C. N. How will qualify after wrote a gets one goal advantage? I've been adopted one. God vantage will get us a morale booster to ask for to us. No Placido Patrick login. But in that particular advantage goo get the boys get one hundred ten one coffee dance to lift up article again. What did you get at the end? We'll lost a now. Don't Recoleta honestly. They tried to your local honesty. Try another don't bring improvement too but there's no improvement they'll do the new improvement without resort. Unlv improve give better results if we improve on again. A better result. Macgonagall will undergo fee confident in notice DON NEXT SEASON TO WATCH. Us play a copy. Don't do I need years while you split up your sleeve up the fallout for so long over crews do not they debut Guti brought in wounded. Believe up who did not Enough Donald J Aznar Appears I've been experts. At least we'll wind up all will drop article. I give McCartney's qualified no matter how bad AC- beep who died only consolation right now. I did get for my mind. They showed US number fifty develops WC Macho stuff that you get done on knife or call if if if we if we reach fit for the for. Tabu for the local fifty qualify for Champions League but how far too many guys plan would it be the playoffs plan? They get the last two Champions League NECESSA- TO IRATE MIXTURES MIC on a Sunday. He gets his fits go. This is my goal. This is what I want for this. Isn't that your own? We'll go invisible advent a hot it long dude depletes until Terry Harry's Yoga my guys my boys. Satele want to make you happy. New almo going beaten. The Gosh took it for granted born. They're going to win consecutively KANU. This will. Google walked towards them. Would you find new pleased with one? Mind they got what they are looking for so his attorney to give this plus cassettes group within want from dispatched losses. Only call solution would be busy. If Aznar qualify for Champions League do very happy now the only two will give me Costa on your acting as every not in from them. You give me that Patrick lot in of content it all right. My Name. Management has wings that engineer. Fly Enough lead boy angel. Gabriel get a wonderful day as all gonna ask this. Production is brought to you by owning gold media shortage. Shell podcastone your favorite social media channels.

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445: Faceplanting, Feedback, and Finding Aligned Success with Sophia Amoruso

The Goal Digger Podcast

42:22 min | 4 months ago

445: Faceplanting, Feedback, and Finding Aligned Success with Sophia Amoruso

"I'm never someone who just ignores the feedback is more painful to do. Because you're actually paying attention at the same time. I think it's a great opportunity to learn when other people out constructive criticism. Hey my name is jenna. Qatar and i am obsessed with all things business marketing numbers and helping you navigate both the messy and the magical seasons of this thing called life. I'm a small town. Mama who took a three hundred dollars. Camera grew a successful photo biz and now work from home in romans. Seven figure online business. I teach you the tried and true secrets building career. You adore shy away from the real talk No way money. Hardship growth loss in marketing. Are all topics discussed. This is your one stop shop for happy hour. With a gal pal mixed with business school of pula seats make sure your cozy and get ready to be challenged and encouraged while you learn this is the gold digger podcast. So i'm russo. Started her business on ebay and it turned into the massive fashion name of nasty gal. Her story transitioned from a twenty two year old millionaire to a very public journey through incredible business challenges and that was just the beginning of the wild journey of business an live. This girl boss has continued to ride straight into the fine tuned version of success. She's creating for herself and for others. Today i am so thrilled for an opportunity to have a candid conversation with sophia about business highs and lows of creating a company that aligns with what you actually want and taking everything. She's learned from public success to missteps and turning it into valuable teachings for others. I am so ready for this. Are you here. She is sophia amoruso. Do you need a budget. Let me rephrase that you need. A budget get started with the app that makes it easy to build and maintain new habits as you get out of debt. Save more money and build wealth faster. Try unita budget free for thirty four days. No credit card required at you. Need a budget dot com slash gold digger. Sam carter helps you showcase what your customers care about. Most your products advanced features that boost your sales in a simple interface. Absolutely anyone can use. Start your fourteen day sam cart free trial at sam car dot com slash gold digger all alright sophia. Welcome to the gold digger podcast. I am honestly just so excited to have this conversation with you today to thank you for having me. Yes so bring this into your story. I want to know where did you get your start because you have been an entrepreneur for quite some time in many different spectrums. So tell me about your story. Yeah it is such a long story. I could exhaust myself. It's exhausting just talking. About how exhausting. So i got my start on ebay. What i was twenty two and sounds kinda like you know small beans and it was but i just kinda foot from the other selling vintage. I knew where to find stuff for cheap and i figured out how to flip it on ebay and left ebay. That became a really big business. Called nasty. gal eventually started selling other people's brands but a trade shows creating in we designed around product open to stores raised fifty million venture capital. After i had boots dropped it from nothing. Just it's important call out is that i've done both. I bootstrap the company to twenty eight million with noda annot investors in then the investors came in that change things pretty significantly but we ultimately grew the business to over hundred million in revenue and over ten years. You know lots and lots of ups and downs not a great exit but left in the end of twenty sixteen. I had written a book called girl loss wanna in your times bestseller and created this conversation about women becoming entrepreneurs in hainault becoming the bosses of their own lives and that became even louder than nasty gallon a lot of ways and so i was really ready to kind of serve that community win. I moved on so early. Twenty seventeen started girl. Boss through conferences. Had a podcast called girl bus radio no longer and after three years sold the company rape before covid hit stayed on for a few months was supposed to stay on for a long time but then we couldn't do conferences and we couldn't get brand partnerships because our main business was in events and the whole thing kind of fell apart so we had to scale way way down to the point of me not really being needed. There moved on to really just teach entrepreneurs now and that's what i'm doing with my online course business class which ensure will get into but like you know feeling my way around the world that you've really kind of created for so many people and just learning so much from you and from other women who are building interesting like online education businesses. So it's really fun just sharing all the stuff that i learned whether just learning hardware now. It's so incredible. And i want to know because you had so many different shifts in your career right in these like monumental moments where it's just that transformation of like wow. I'm going in a whole new direction. Do you have any tips or stories or anything to share about what it feels like to start over to start something from scratch. Because i feel like a lot of people are facing that in this time right. Now that we're living in you know i have the unique privilege of not starting from zero and so that's you know that's something very very lucky for but at the same time you know people don't look at moving on from a business is a positive thing like yeah not everything like it's like i didn't plan for either of those pivots or you know transitions or exits or whatever you wanna call it. But i'm also. I just became increasingly happy. Being able to you know my second business girl. Boss apply everything. I learned at nasty gal that it was too late to fix you know and to start a second company. It was a whole different set of intentions in ways of building a team in leadership in communication yen. Business was really like kind of healing to do it. The second time in feel like i did a law right also. I got to create another brand and same with business classes like while you know. Maybe it's hard to understand that. I've done more than one thing. Fifteen years people get very attached to like who they think you are. You're supposed to be supposed to be a fashion ceo than. i am. The girl boston's like i want to be the boss mar and and to create the business. Class brand was just like thrilling. I should have had like a creative agency year. Some point maybe in a past life. But i kinda late love just starving over because they get to build a brand and so my advice to people who are who are there is just treated as an experiment right. The whole world is lake. Covert is experimenting on us right now. The whole world is know shifting. There's so much that's our control. Nothing new but it's kind of been served up to us now in a way that we can ignore and so the variables are changing in. It's now just a matter of what we do with this new situation. That are in an. I feel very strongly that if people are thinking about starting businesses they should. We have seen that. Employers are jobs if we're in a kind of traditional career path are insecure as we thought they were. Nothing is as secure as we think it is and nothing's permanent takebe goals then on you but you know god forbid life tells you it's not permanent like it's okay to make impermanent for yourself and move on and push yourself off the ledge which guess my advice would be. Just push yourself off the ledge. What was it like for you as you kind of closed the door on things that you know bootstrap for example with nasty yellow and for starting girl boss from scratch. What advice do you have for anyone. That's in the midst of like facing challenges out loud in with an audience. Because i have to believe that it was really challenging to walk away from these things that you started from nothing and to be in the public eye and have people's mom interior on what decisions. You're making your way you're going. Do you have any advice around that or do you wanna share anything from that. He's in. oh my gosh. It was allowed so nasty l. Ended up filing for chapter eleven bankruptcy at the end of twenty sixteen long long story and i don't know the exact equation that led to that but i know raising fifty million dollars in having a company that was somehow worth three hundred and fifty million when anyway that's a whole nother thing in so you know that was loud because i had been this kind of poster child of entrepreneurship and so celebrated of course. When you're out there people are gonna cover that tune in sensational and headlines like are millennials. Vm roussos know. The downfall nasty cow are millennials. Really ready to lead. And it's just like wow so i must ample of lake an entire generation. Who's now in question. That's just so absurd so in some ways they kind of paved the way for like this new generation of entrepreneurs who have come up in Such an amazing job and same time. I think as we've seen in the last year or not alone in face planting. And i i was. I was like watching. All my peers. Founders build these companies in all my gosh like that owns a unicorn and you know. How do they have. Good glass door reviews. And then bam you know everybody's gonna encounter adversity. You know building companies really really hard. So he has pave the way for people to fail to which is great. It's really hard you know it's enough to question your identity when you're just wondering what people are thinking no one's actually telling you in into have whole world telling you i mean at least you know i guess that's maybe it's better to know who instead of wonder what people are thinking meals especially challenging because a few months after i left nasty gal and you know that was kind of virtual. There is a netflix series. About my wife that went into a hundred and fifty million homes across the world so then there was a fictional character. It was like who is she. Is she the girl boss. Shit what is she that person on. Tv that isn't actually be in. It just became this real like haze of identity crisis for a little while. I mean say in. This is kind of counterintuitive advice. You know when people call you out. It's an opportunity to learn and so instead of saying. Wow these people got it wrong and of course they're going to be things that are wrong rate like these people don't know you they don't know your intentions sometimes intentions on early matter but you know if people are talking about here you probably something right at some point in people do care about you enough to tell you how they feel because they probably want you to win at some point again in. So i've had to weed through a lot of feedback a lot of just totally like founded or out of left field or speculative within their patterns. You start to see things that you can look at it and say. Hey awhile you know. Maybe he could have done a better job building company culture or i could have had a better plan been less hastier. Whatever those things are that you hear from your employees or pinella other people where it's like okay like maybe i should. Maybe there's some truth this and so i'm never someone who just pushes just ignores the feedback more painful to do because you're paying attention when i don't read something that's like written about me but at the same time you know. I think it's a great opportunity to learn when other people you know have constructive criticism free whether it's public or private. Yeah i want to know what elements of your earliest business endeavors. We look back to the ebay days or even when you were first bootstrapping nasty. Gal what are you most proud of. Because there's so many things that you likely have identified now that you're like i did that. Rider can't believe. I pulled that off. I can't believe i was able to figure that out myself. Tell me about some of the highlights. It's a pretty big deal. When you buy your first home or buy a car for yourself like the nissan maranhao than i got in like two thousand nine used was like i mean the way. The light danced over the dash for lake. There's never been a car. Purchase more exciting than that. You know and i've driven a lot of cars since then so it's actually kind of those early moments of being like you know while i'm onto something in the omega. I am starting to see the fruits of my labor. In a way that i could never even expected and a lot of people you know. Look at people who've like done adder are winning and think that it's the fancy car that is the thing in. It's really just those most exciting burger kind of those first steps of like. Wow i sold out my store. And i made like a few grand. But oh my gosh. I've never made a few grand in a week. That's crazy i never. I don't think i've ever made a few grand in a month. I mean i don't know i don't remember. It was very minimum wage. Before i started this ebay store. So it's those kind of early moments of how you know. When i launched the chanel jacket i bought for eight dollars and sold it for over a thousand. That was huge. Oh my gosh anne. Hathaway was the customer on ebay. Or you know who wear wrote about me for the first time. Or i met the editor in chief of refinery. Twenty nine are you know. I launched the website and left ebay in the store. Sold out and then kelly ripa stylist commune and i was like. Oh my gosh. Those people are real lake. Hollywood like you know just like i'm on the map in like the tiniest thing ever but y'all just those moments where you feel like okay onto something. Those are the moments i'm most proud of. And then you know yet having house being able to afford a vacation but not that sharing it. It's really you having friends over to swim or going on vacation with a friend in being able to pay for it or being able by wasters and wine for a group of you know it's like that's i don't really drink much wine anymore. Coasters don't even exist. Further concern vibe. I think sharing you know being able to share that stuff is the some of the stuff. I'm most proud of talk to me a little bit. Because one of the things that i think is super intriguing and i think that. Is you continue in your journey of entrepreneurship. Let's face you didn't give up on entrepreneurship through all of your different pivots and your different startups. But i think that like for me. I can look back to even two years ago when i was about to have a baby and i was in the season i was really worried about like what's going to change in my business and i recognize that. No i'm an entrepreneur for the lifestyle not necessarily for the hustle culture or the more and more and more but so that i am defining success on my own terms. Talk to me about how success has changed for you over the years specifically as you kind of knee shop in into different directions and you define success today for anticipated the success that i wound up with so i didn't even know what success looks like until it kinda came for me. Everybody was like this is what success looks like it. Like oh cool actually. This is pretty fun but at the same time you know the people who are celebrating me or people who would like never have paid attention to me unless i had done this conventional thing this like you know it was unconventional in you know how big but this conventional just definition of success then yes so that was kind kinda weird like. I know. you wouldn't care about me if i hadn't done this thing that you think. Is you know what success looks like. And that's kind of a grumpy way of looking at things and also really grateful for the access. I've had a lot of people that i've met. That was always a little bit conflicting. You know there was a time where success was all. The things that i was experiencing in. I was in my twenties and early thirties. Mostly might twenties when you know is on the cover business magazines in on the lists and all that stuff and flying around speaking engagements. I can't even remember all the and i bought into it and it was fun by it wasn't meaningful and i'm really grateful that i didn't wind up in the sounds like such a cop out. You know what i'm good. I'm not retired but you know. Had i become a billionaire for nasty gal or something or whatever. People thought was ultimately happen. I think i would have still been in that kind of far away. Place of not really remembering myself or remembering what matters or even being able to explore that. Because i would have been so busy like you know visiting my friends super yachts or whatever happens when you make a freaky amount of money and so that really gave me an opportunity kind of reset and say wait lake. There is a person who i was. She still there. Now i want. I don't wanna go out and drink have a dinner drinks. Whatever every night. I want to get home at nine o'clock. I don't like wanna fly around and talk at conferences. And don't you know i said yes for so long that i finally got to a place where i was really comfortable saying now in now with your business class in online education. You know being able to teach entrepreneurs in this very finite window that is you can enroll business class for like a week and then the course runs for ten weeks you can access it for the rest of your life but i really put a lot of energy in while you know those initial ten weeks of guiding students through and then you know this business was also a lifestyle choice so it's not just like i was called to do this. It's like yeah. But also i wouldn't have done it if it meant billion giant team doing man like the same work over and over and over again you know. This is something where i've created like incredibly valuable content but like do it live every time enough to do a conference in books speakers and find brand partners and it's just very long you know. We opened the doors twice a year. It runs for ten weeks. I live my life the rest of the year. whether that's you know doing another podcast or just chilling. You know. i've never chilled. I never took a break between businesses. You know. I know people who i don't know how they afford it because i don't really think they even work that much in their taking like yearlong sabbaticals. I don't think i could do that. But i certainly understand. The desire for you know for space between work in life now that i never understood before they got given the opportunity to because i really liked cooking at home i love it. If the tax side of selling your products and services online has kept you from doing it well then listen up. This is for you sam. Carter is the easy way to showcase and sell your products without worrying about the tech. Start your fourteen day. Sam cart free trial sam cart dot com slash gold digger. Sam cart is the i e commerce platform built from the ground up for direct to consumer brands a robust drag and drop template library pre checkout at on's abandoned cart recovery pixel tracking honestly the list of features that are specifically designed to convert visitors into paying customers. Could take up an entire episode. Sam carton has been my staple in my own online business. We use it to provide a seamless checkout experience for our customers while also optimizing our end process by providing capabilities that drive even more sales. It allows us to meet people where they're at by offering things like payment plans while also connecting them to turn it products that may align with their wants and needs always in the checkout experience. Start your fourteen days. Sam cart free trial sam cart dot com slash gold digger that's s. a. m. c. a. Rt dot com slash gold digger to start your fourteen day free trial if you wanna take your side hustle and make it a fulltime job. You need a budget seriously. My budget was my safety. Net and guide is made the jump from a salary and benefits into entrepreneurship. You're thinking of making that leap get started with you need a budget at. Ut need a budget dot com slash gold digger. Their method will transform the way you think about money and they're at makes it easy to build a maintain new habits as you get out of debt. Save more money and build wealth faster. I signed up at. You need a budget dot com slash gold digger and started exploring the app. You can link your bank account. Set goals for spending and saving tons of categories monitor payments run reports to see how you're working towards your goals at a glance yes. The app is great but more importantly the union of team is committed to your success. They offer free live classes every day of the week video courses boot camps challenges and fan groups galore. There is something for everyone. If you wanna learn they will teach you. Average new budgeters saved more than six hundred dollars a month to you and six thousand dollars in their first year. Try unita budget for thirty four days. No credit card required at you. Need budget dot com slash gold digger. That's you need a budget dot com slash. Gold digger were good. That's a good thing especially with his last year. I feel like we've all become home. Shafts does you know all the things. So that's amazing. One thing that. I appreciate when i look at your journey and hopefully you agree but when i look at everything you've done and if you really do look at it as an experiment sometimes experiments yield results. Tell you what you don't want for your life and that's not a failure. That's a win. And i think that any time we can look at an experience and learner. Grower understand something deeper. I've had to build things that. I hated only to know that. I don't wanna do that again. You know and so. I think so valuable because i think these days we put so much pressure on you know the term success and failure and the and you feel like it's a black and white you can only choose one or the other but when we look at things as experiments that yield results that give us information. It's up to us to choose how we use that information and sometimes is just as valuable to be really clear on what you do not want as it is to get clarity on what it is. You do want so. I think it's just such a good lesson for people to remember. Yeah i mean there is a while in. This is kind of like not related to business and i agree. There was a period where i was like going out as much as i. You know at night to like dan snyder bar. Whatever seeing friends like around strangers mostly like going out and being like around strangers did more in my twenties and so we do it every so often just to remind you say i go out every so often just to remind myself why. Don't go out you know because the fomo heads in the near like we like my friends are having fun. Or what am i missing garden like. This is so shallow or email like i on a relationship. I don't need to meet anybody. What am i doing standing here in a room with like lasers and loud music or you know and so yeah we kinda have to sometimes put ourselves back in those physicians to remind ourself ourselves who we are and then in terms of experimentation a completely agree. If you don't move from where you are you're not gonna learn anything and that learning can be. Wow i really. Don't wanna be a photographer because after halloween of equipment around whatever that is there's always gonna be surprises with what it is. You think you wanna do. That are just like oh wow. This is not as glamorous or thought as thought was. this is not as rewarding in. I'm inspired to do this as a hobby. Right as an run that by trying it as business is anything ever is glamorous as we assumed like for real i don't i can't even think of a single thing where i'm like. No i mean everything when you dissect it i remember. Even when i was a wedding photographer in i would see you know. Photographer shooting weddings in paris. And i'd be like. Oh my gosh and then i think about it and i think they have jet lag. They have to haul their gear. They have to go through customs. They've got you know. Like when i started to list out all the things that it took for them to get that shot that they could share on instagram. I was like nope not worth it. I wanna sleep in my own bed. And so i think it's so important you know especially as women as we're prone to comparison it's like if we were to reverse engineer that moment or that thing or that on bush -ment would be willing to do the work that it would take to reach that i think most of the time if we're being honest with ourselves the answer's gonna be no and i think that like just like you said were for years you said yes and you learn the power of saying no think that's like kind of like a release a relief when you realize that i agree. I totally agree now. Because i know mice often have been around the sun a few more times. I know what i can say no to without you know i know the difference in. I know what. I'm giving up. When i say now whereas i think earlier in your career you're like well. What if this did this for me. Yeah the one shot. Yeah you don't wanna miss and that does happen. It totally happens. I do think that earlier in your career. You should say yes more but now i know have an idea of what it is you now saying no to in with the consequences of that are usually there. There aren't any talk to me about creating business class. You know shifting into the online education space from going from events in books podcast into the course chretien space. What was that like for you as you shifted into this new area on. It's really fun one. I love working behind a computer. You know. I did nasty go for years just behind a computer by myself. And i'm not as intimidated by large teams. I am less focused. I can do a lot of the work with a digital business. The way i did early in my career whereas planning conference like that's just not stuff. You can do not qualified to do that on a project management perspective. And it's just there's so many there's so many moving pieces and there's a lot of moving pieces with an online course also something where i'm not reinventing the wheel rate like i'm i've done that. I tried to have a media business slash on social network for women in. It's just like well. What's the revenue model there. And why is it so complicated ripe. And so i really learned a simplify and i've said to myself like if this i have kind of like this filter that i use for everything that i take on and it's like they're definitely opportunities where i could have a podcast again. Every single week did it for five years every single week. So if something doesn't feel like a project that i can turn on and off even business class like i'm not gonna do it so i'm saying noted things that could be like big opportunities to promote myself into even learn and i'm just not like i'm straight up saying no and so business class was very kind of it really fit that for me. This very economic surgical approach to how it is that i could share. What it is that. I now and doing it in a way that i feel like and from what i'm hearing from our students like hasn't really been done before. And so sure i have. Videos in there are worksheets and zoom calls weekly and you know a lot of the things that you see in terms of the mechanics in other online courses but the approach is really different know my personalities really different experiences different. The kind of business owner. That i'm talking to i think is pretty different from the business owners. That take a lot of the other online entrepreneurship courses. And that's a good thing. The branding is very different. Right in a few. Haven't seen it near lessening business-class sounds the most boring description of an online entrepreneurship cloud ever. But it's actually flight themed and let's say it's like pan am vibe since like me dressed up like sixties flight attendants really entertaining so many aviation punds. So buckle up in so yeah like. I'm now using existing software like i'm not trying to build anything. I don't have an engineering team. I have three employees. I don't want anymore. You know it's very nimble. And i don't wanna say it's easy but Able to kind of distill. Everything i have an could mentor and distributed different ways at a conference or speaking engagements or consulting one on one or coaching in a place where i could share that with as many people as possible in a way. That's really easy to digest. And so if business class we cover everything from you know. Of course like to finding your strengths in having clarity about your idea. All the way to how should i be an llc or a corporation. What's intellectual property. What's designed mark. And what's a word mark and finances building your brand marketing. Your business customer experience hiring and firing in leading teams. So it's like it's a little overwhelming. Which is why we're doing ten weeks this time instead of eight. Which did in the fall. And you know when i was researching you know how to do an online. Course there's just so much information array everybody's worse. The advice was keep it short and manageable because people wanna feel really accomplished at the end of it so make it easy for them. You know don't too much content. And i kinda did the opposite and so far. It's working out. Yeah so it's It's a very comprehensive course Everything that someone who is the kathan idea and wants to start a business you know can take in really get there with not for anybody. Who's like maybe. I should start a business. That's just you know there. Are you know worksheets. In in other courses for how to decide if you wanna start a business so it's cool. Starting with a group of students who are really wanna get. Momentum are ready to build things together over ten weeks so just a ton of fun one of the most compelling things you said that i think we have to touch on is that you wanted to build something that had an on and off switch per se and i don't think very many people even think about that notion or even have that idea in their mind win creating a business and it's funny because like most entrepreneurs don't even take two weeks off a year you know like like you look at the data of like people in corporate america and how americans don't even take their two weeks of vacation but most entrepreneurs don't even take a day off and so talk to me a little bit about that desire because i think that's so compelling to especially for women as our identity shifter we move in different directions or we want to enter a new stage of life. That is something that is so interesting to me. Yeah i am still not good at rock. Seeing as part of who. I am hint. I kind of have to force myself to buy. I never had space between things. I work for my business and not the other way around and so i've finally figured out how business can work for me and i can manage it in. It's not like an unruly child. That i just can't you know i'm not a mom but i know how much work being a mom is in his. You know that's what i was doing for my business all the time except it never grew up and it was always throwing tantrums and i feel like i have a much better grip on. You know how to balance my business. My life and i took a month off in november. I never taken a month off. I mean i did my weekly zoom calls with students because business class was still going but it created all content in two hundred pages of worksheet tonight recorded the videos and i was nurturing the community and you know giving people guidance while business costs i've i was doing it from hawaii like that's crazy. I didn't feel guilty about not in an office. I didn't you know because this company is bootstrapped in profitable wondering if investors thought i was off task or not being responsible enough. Like there's there's so many there's way less stakeholders now watching my every move. Who have opinions about how spending my time. Which is really freeing. Because when i did have investors. I was like oh man. I'm on vacation or are they gonna think i'm not focused on the business. I've is big team. Are they gonna now. And i started this up front. You know small team knows you know. This is how i want my life to be in. It's not not leaving everybody in the lurch and of course i'll check in but it's not like elma god. She's checked out the company's falling apart because she's not on zoom call every day like that's a really it's a really liberating place to be in my career at this point. Yeah think it's beautiful. And i think it's so important because most of the time when we become entrepreneurs relaunch an idea we start a business. We do so to claim back our life and the control and to gain some sort of freedom. Whatever that looks like for us in often times we build things that actually rob us of all of those things in while while it's so exciting to be working on something that you've created you own and you control. It's also important to remember why you started in the first place into really honor. What that definition of success is in. I think there are seasons of hustle and there should also be seasons of rest and it's hard for people like preneurs. Most of the time where the achievers were the ones that loved across those things off our lists and you know we find our purpose in the doing and so. I'm just excited for women to hear this and to kind of hear how you're able to kind of rewrite that script to be the role that you actually want to play and i think some of figure it out earlier than others. I think like younger generation understands the concept of balance that was kind of a baby boomer for years and when you start a business often yeah it's gonna be kicking and screaming lead you all the time but also easy to kind of get caught up in. I'm in that being kind of this. You now cultural calling card for all. I'm i'm accomplishing things. Rather than giving yourself that space. But i guess for the people listening to remind them that if you aren't able to take time off like that's okay but you should be working toward a life where you can do that because it is really important absolutely so as be closed i want to know. Do you have a mantra or an affirmation guiding you right now in business in life as we journey into the future yeah. I did this meditation. Training with saw. Disa- mon. I'm not sure if you know who that is. But he's them he teaches met. He's really crazy character on instagram. But he's also studied tibetan buddhism in paw and israeli educated on tibetan. Buddhism did a meditation training with him in the mantra. he told me to repeat over and over again which h. Probably do more often meditate today. As i think it's something like may i be happy may be healthy may live with ease another one other thing and it was just really. It's just very simple. may i be happy. May i be healthy vs one more so. I'm not really doing a good job at this mantra but that's the you know it's the most simple things that hope. Our bodies being healthy our minds being able to deal with what's not healthy and in finding ways to make our lives less complicated or stopping the ways that were making them more complicated for arsenal's says simplicity in freedom are really bored. Freedom keeps coming up for me at this point in my career in life. Which is. I don't know exactly what that means. Inbound train find out. I have so enjoyed this conversation. Can you let everyone know where they can find you. Connect with you learn more about you what you do and be connected to your resources. Yeah absolutely so. I'm just at sophia amoruso on instagram and severe amer so dot com and business class opens twice a year. Just take business class dot com if wanna join the waitlist role and not sit around some sophia thank you so much for coming on. The gold digger guests. It's been a treat to talk with you so much for having me. I think that so. Many important topics were covered in today's episode. I think that as we navigate entrepreneurship as we try new things as we gain our footing or as we change our courses we are constantly learning and adapting and evolving. And i think that a lot of times we can get feedback sometimes in the form of a criticism but that is important to understand what is meant for us to help us to grow and move and evolve and also just love that sometimes learning what we really want has to come in the form of learning of exactly what we don't want and i think that's a fia has gained experience in all of these areas through over a decade as an entrepreneur is really fine chatting with her today in hearing all about her different experiences. And i just wanna say thank you so much for listening to another episode of the gold digger. Podcasts you are the reason why we create the show. And i'm so grateful for the opportunity to hang out with you so until next time gold diggers. Keep on digging your biggest goals. I'm over here giving you a virtual high five because you just finished another episode of the gold digger podcast tobacco by way too fast for anyone else if you want. More head over to golddigger podcasts. Dot com for show notes and all the discount codes from today's sponsors. And if you're looking for a new crew of movers and shakers like you bounce ideas and ask questions be sure to join my exclusive community for gold diggers on facebook. The links waiting for you at gold digger. Podcast dot com.

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BOX:259 Bananas, Coconuts And Stolen Cows

The Box Of Oddities

40:06 min | 11 months ago

BOX:259 Bananas, Coconuts And Stolen Cows

"What follows may not be suitable for all audiences. Listener discretion is advised Stories. Stories of mysteries. Of. Curiosities. Join. An through Gilligan Tov for the strange. The boozers. The. Unexpected. As. The LID and wash asleep you inside. The box. oddities. So good news we got all the Hornets out of our RV. That's nice. Because we had a lot of work to finish up on the inside and neither one of US wanted to go in there. We actually have a carpet guy coming to put. New Carpet, in the bedroom and finish remodeling the inside and just in time to sell it. Yeah. Well, I mean you know plans change things change you move on and I have to say that I have enjoyed like I did the back splash in their own. That looks really nice I think and I enjoy doing it I did most of the flooring in there I love how that came out. I'm not sad about it I think there's a couple of. Issues number one it's it's really big. It is very bad and that makes you nervous and you don't want to drive it. It's like a thirty six foot class a motor, and it's just the two of us. Right? Why would have to do all the driving? That's correct and number two I think we're just at a point in their life. Now where we're downsizing, that's right. We're just getting rid of stuff. So I guess that makes sense if you need an RV. I I think my point here is. The RV. Hey, if you do three slides, two bathrooms. Thirty six foot IT'S A V ten gas. fleetwood bound two thousand eleven with only sixteen thousand miles call now. Turned into an infomercial. Anyone. No really though I have so much enjoyed working in a project so It has been a lot of fun I. Don't regret buying. It is just like you say things change and it's one of those things. What are you going to do? Why think maybe we should Do a story about you start us off. All right. This story begins in seventeen, fifty six. It's in February in the midst of the French and Indian war local or tells that the Blue Mountains in Pennsylvania were sacred to the. Native Americans. Early, one morning, a group of Lena emerged from the forests allied with the French. They were intending to drive out the colonial families living on the frontier and who can blame them and accounted. The attack was documented in a letter from John probst. To Jacob Levin he wrote that quote unquote the Indians attacked Frederick reichheld Dorfer as he was feeding horses but he was able to escape and ran toward the neighbor's home, Jacob? Gerhard his plan was to get the neighboring people together with their guns and fight them off a former a quick militia short when he came nearer to Gerhardt's. A lamentable cry Lord Jesus, Lord Jesus, which according to him made him run back toward his own home. But before he got there, he saw his house in his stables where inflames everything was destroyed his children were murdered in over at Jacob Gerhardt's house they'd killed one man, two women and six children. One child escaped this orphan child Jacob Gerhard. He stayed in the area and he grew up. Under the care of another family eventually, he settled in the mountains and build a house made a sandstone on the property that was in seventeen ninety three the building was located within the Hawk Mountain Sanctuary on a Ridge in the Blue Mountains, there was a popular route that took travelers over the. Blue, mountains into the neighbouring county established it as a tavern for peddlers and other traveling to an. Across the unsettled north, we don't use the word peddlers enough. We don't anymore I. Agree this is according to Hagenbach Dot Org. This building is also located along the migratory path for many birds of prey and provides spectacular views of hawks soaring through the air. It also happens to overlook the spot where a young Jacob Watch the gruesome murder of his parents and siblings men Jacob is described as. Never, being quite right. That's understandable absolutely after his death in the early eighteen hundreds. George Priscila Bolic bought the property and use the house once again as a tavern and indeed the place was perfect for travelers making their way over the summit of the mountain in eighteen fifty matthews and Margaret, Schambach came across the property and Matheus. Purchased it according to Hawks Aloft by Maurice? Brown he described Schambach is. Of medium stature lean, but unusually strong and definitely the silent type of Scoundrel and although the Sean box grim appearance scared nearby children. Brown road that the wife was just the opposite she was even tempered and liked by all. Yes, tough. When you move into a new neighborhood and you learn that you're scaring the children right and people immediately referred to you as a scoundrel, we'll stories began circulating. Were they cannibals, salesmen and others who were traveling through the area who reportedly had stopped at the tavern peddlers peddlers were going missing. Okay. All right. Rumors started to circulate about travelers who mysteriously disappeared after heading up the mountain and staying at the Schambach Tavern. Some told of how matheus plied guests with food and drink until they could no longer stay awake. Then once in a deep sleep, he would murder them. One of the first stories came from a man who claimed his father had visited Schambach tavern during a terrible thunderstorm I do want to point out that some referred to it as Sean box tavern some refer to it as Sean Bacher's tavern but we're GONNA go Schambach and also I looked it up and it's Shambaugh ball but my throat can't handle doing that over and over again so I'm not going to take care of your throat. After knocking on the door, this traveler was greeted by grim looking Matthews who pointed out the barn where the horses could be stabled as he approached the barn, the horses became spooked and reared up in terror the impatient man, the reins and entered the barn himself there. He said he saw traces of fresh blood spattered about the man decided he was better off continuing through the storm. Then spending the night in that tavern good call that's one smart peddler. Wait was the peddler I don't think he was a peddler it's hard to say it was said that Mafia had a system to dispose of the bodies. He would I hack them apart, some pieces were dumped into an old well while others were strewn in the forest for animals to clean. Do we know why he was doing this was a robbing these people first and then and then murdering them to get away with it or was he just enjoying the butchering of humanity? Well, that's the thing again, rumors were that it was for profit that he would rob them and then sell their their item. it was also local lore that he was just off and that it wasn't just matheus and Margaret that were off that it was the property that Jacob Gerhardt's having built that property overlooking his gruesome childhood memories and his being never quite right built a. Environment of unsettled nature so bad Mojo. Yes. Yes. Thank you so concise now. This was a perfect spot for migratory birds of prey to WHO. So they're the the idea was okay. Well, he strewn these body parts about and the birds would pick in any and all that. According to one story, a traveler stopped in and was served a meal of so-called old German sausage traveler found that the food didn't taste quite right. So and then he realized that there were no pigs or livestock on the property. This tastes like peddler. Now, there's nothing that backs up the the idea that these taverna owners were serving people to their neighbors. However, this was one story being told about the terrible nature of this tavern. Now, speculation grew as Schambach would bring clothing and other items to the town to sell days after a merchant selling civil war uniforms disappeared Schambach was seen trying to sell similar items at the town stalls or however they did it I don't know. The merchant was last seen at the tavern. Now, that story was related by Maurice Brown who actually lived in the tavern which might have been tad unsettling. I would think. Lor, had it that Matheus killed at least eleven travelers it does not appear as though there are any court documents indicating legal action was ever taken against Schambach and you know how small towns can sometimes be, and if someone's maybe a little off for a little weird or there's a legend connected to a region, you know rumors can flurry about also traveling salesman. It's a dangerous job. You know you're in you're out it's it's hard to keep track of those who travel for a living Schambach died in eighteen, seventy, nine at the age of fifty five after what is described as having suffered a mental breakdown even his death was surrounded by rumors one tells of. How matheus made deathbed confessions of his murders he claimed that an evil spirit within the mountains whispered to him day and night encouraging him to act on murderous impulses. Now, this is according to the website Hagenbach Dot Org, and while I'm at it I. Got Other information from the morning call dot com and a lovely blog on tumbler. There were also rumors of lightning striking nearby as he was being lowered into his grave that's ominous William Turner and his wife and eight children were the next inhabitants of the house like Schambach. They maintained the Tavern Business and Judy wink chief naturalist at the Carbon County Environmental Education Center who was friends with Maurice Brown said. The former curator told her that Brown had found old records in the tavern. It said that the Turner's the new owners of the tavern found human remains in three wells on the property. So I'm guessing not only to the sausage tastes tastes funny but but the water probably well, it seems really counterintuitive to do that. But there was even more support for the claims outside the hedgerow behind the House Maurice said that he found some kind of bones on the property which they believed to be parts of skeletons that that looked at the they had been picked over by the local wildlife so though no legal action was taken against Schambach and it looks Like the Bolck of this is just from stories of people who lived at the tavern or lived nearby to the tavern. The legend lives on Jim Brett who is curator for Hawk Mountain and wrote the book the Mountain and Migration said that on Misty Evenings Sean box presence is strongly felt in and around the mountain hotel and that weird things still happen within that region is the building still standing is it operating or has it been long since it is still standing? It is part of the US National Register of historic places cool and it is referred to in several articles as the old hotel whether or not it's still being used as a stop for. Travelers I don't now but I certainly know that it is according to locals hunted unexplained things happen things move about screams from wells so on and so forth no way I mean I wanted to go immediately when you started talking about this just for stoorikhel reasons. But now you throw in poltergeist activity. I'm in. It's one of those places. In the photos that I've seen, it's small salt box style buildings. That's about eighteen inches from the roadway your. Can Picture someone leaning their bike up against the? Front of the building But yeah, it is unknown if the legends of the murders are true, but it is still understood to be a A. Wicked crepe place where kid creepy plays well, I can see where a lot of that could have been just develop through urban legend being small town area kind of rural and and if Jacob Gerhardt was considered never having been right. After, seeing his family murdered people in small towns have their own way of doing and describing things like. This is this is we're in Maine you know that and it's A. Rural State. Especially, the further north you go and there is a small city in northern Maine called Press Kyle. It's Yeah. It's a big town. It's not really a city. It's a big town, but they had an active shooter situation there this week and which is just flippant on her. Stuff in the police, put out a statement that and this is this is so cool for a small town how they handled this particular situation. So I went to the press kyle police. Department facebook page it was probably like four hours after the incident had started hoping that there will be an update. And there was. Due to the strong wind and the active situation currently impress kyle we will be cancelling tonight's movie in the park. The strong winds got top billing over active shooter. Love small towns. It's amazing. That thing in the middle thing in the middle of this time comes from our freaks facebook group Olivia posed this question I know I'm not the only person who would love to have an option of a subscription box of oddities. What would be some of the items you'd find inside the box of oddity subscription box number five. Shannon. Suggests weird foods good luck charms did action. And our very own set of Banjo Win Willy Dolls Number Four Peter writes one box of oddities could have a simple mirror glued to the inside of the bottom. So when you hear inside the box of oddities, you see the oddest of all yourself. Number Three Olympia Chimes back in and says, how about a camper full of bees perhaps. There were horn into Libya but yeah, I get your point. Number two mackenzie rights I just want bones any animal, any kind of just one balls a number one, a little exchange between Stephen and Sam Stephen writes a human thumb, and then you realize it's yours spooky who sam says, you check your hands you see that all your digits are accounted for have you not yet lost your thumb was this procured from an alternate time line that my friend is just one of the many mysteries of the box of oddities Stephen Response to Sam see that's why we get along. This was I actually got several private messages about this particular query and yes, please can we have a box of oddities subscription and I'm like? I mean sure but you're going to end up getting garbage. Like. This is what we have for you today a fig bar, a packet of dramamine in some semi dried up whiteboard markers. Infront of US right now, the box of oddities with cat and JETHRO Gilligan off. Allow us a moment or two to sing the praises of Shudder shut its. Video Service. It's kind of like the Netflix's of horror and it's brought to you by AMC networks. So you know it's all good stuff. I'm unbeatable selection of expertly curated horror, supernatural thrillers, Uncut, and commercial free they. Also have exclusive original titles to shatter has the largest fastest growing human curated selection of thrilling and dangerous entertainment. There are new spine tingling thrillers, shocking horrors and edge of your seat suspense added weekly. You'll have unlimited access to stream ad free on all your favorite devices like iphone ipad Apple TV box. One Google Chrome cast Roku android device is pretty much everywhere. We got shudder I think the first time maybe six or seven years ago we're obsessed sometimes you know how you're kind of like, I don't know what to watch tonight and law and it won't even be like will think Oh. Let's find something on shudder we're just like let's watch shutter it is its own magical little ball of creepy entertainment and I love it I particularly enjoy supernatural thrillers. They have got such a great collection of the shut up. I was so thrilled when they released the revenge and the creepshow TV series reduced by Greg Nicotera and based on the famous films by Jorge Romero. There is never a shortage of amazing selection on shutter and it's only five, ninety, nine, a month or fifty, six, ninety, nine for an entire year. But right now, you can get started streaming the best horror thriller and Supernatural Content Shutters Expertly curated collection. Includes titles tiger not afraid one cut of the dead three from Hell by Rob Zombie. That's an exclusive to shutter dry shudder for free for thirty days go to shutter dot com and use Promo code box. That's S. H. U. D. D. E. R. Dot Com Promo Code Box that's S. H.. U. D. D. E. R. DOT COM and use Promo code box to try shutter free for thirty days. I did it again I fell asleep with my Ira Connie, twenty-five-year buds in and and that might not sound like a big deal. But but for me it is because I have never been able to comfortably lie down with ear buds in the con-. twenty-five ear buds are the best ones yet with six hours of playtime seamless Bluetooth, pairing more base in a more compact design. So people like you and I we can have a little snooze will time with the ear buds in recalls wireless ear buds are so amazingly comfortable and I've mentioned this before I'm aside sleeper and the other old other types. Of Ear buds that I had before I discovered the rake on two thousand, five's they would just poke into my ears. I felt like I was sleeping with shrimp forks in my ears, but one of the things I love the most is the price. These are high end ear buds. They will go toe to toe with the best brands out there and yet they're far less expensive. So if you're working from home working on your fitness listening to podcasts, wireless ear buds from Rakhine are for you ray kon great quality great price. It's become our Goto gift items like need something. Here's some CON earbud. Now's the time to get the latest and greatest from recon get fifteen percent off your order at Biracial con dot com slash box that's by RECON B.. R. A. Y. C. O. N. DOT COM slash box for fifteen percent off ray con wireless ear Buds Company was founded by Ray J and celebrities like snoop Dogg and Jethro are obsessed by ray on dot com slash box get fifteen percent off your order. Yes, celebrity. Soon. What did we learn this month give Cata compliment or tell just throw these are difficult times either way someone's getting punched in the throat. This is the box of auditees. Simon. Sandison email from the UK. Hi Guys. Loved the show thought you might be interested in this coincidence I live in Scarborough UK on the East Yorkshire Coast I work in construction and back in August of two thousand twelve, my friend, and I were working on a house on Royal Crescent that had previously been modified into three flats. We were turning it back into one house again as we tear down the partition wall. Between a bedroom and a bathroom I noticed something written on the back of a piece of plasterboard at Red Dave Right August twenty, second nineteen, ninety-six show this to my friend and he immediately goes I know that I we used to call him wrong me and he proceeds to call the guy up the Guy Answers and tells him that he did the original work to turn the House into flats back in ninety six. So that evening in the POB. into, my old Canadian friend, John Munro who have not seen in ages and start telling him the store he goes my first flat was on Royal Crescent. When I came to scarborough and ninety seven, which incidentally was the year that I came to scarborough from Manchester and met him he asked me what the number of the place was but I couldn't remember. So I, described where Royal Crescent it was and he goes. Did it have a big sticker on the glass of the back door with two. Dogs yes. I exclaim he had lived in the top floor flat, which was where we found Ronnie's writing. I couldn't. Only that, but it just happened to be the twenty second of August exactly sixteen years to the day that he wrote that on Plaster Wall. That's crazy is crazy. So my story begins in the early days of world. War. Two in one, thousand, nine, hundred, forty hero Onoda enlisted in the Japanese. Army he trained as both an intelligence officer and a commando. So in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, four, commando. The Americans were getting set to attempt to retake the Philippines and he was sent to Lubang to prepare for this attack. His orders were to destroy the island's airstrip and the docking area. So he goes to Lubang island when he gets there the local higher ranking officials overruled him they said, no, we're not gonNA do that, and this was a really big factor in the American invasion of Lubang. Island in February of Nineteen forty-five being successful eventually. Every Japanese. Soldier on the island was either killed or captured the only survivors were Onoda and three other men. Now, a notre was a second lieutenant. So that made him the ranking officer. So it's pretty much just him and three other guys. He orders the group to retreat into the rugged higher elevations and jungle regions of the island. Now, here's the crucial bit of information when he received his original orders before he went to the Philippines, he was told by his commanders that surrender or suicide were out of the question. He took these orders very seriously. He and his unit continued to launch guerrilla attacks against both American and Filipino forces engaging an occasional gun battles. And even though the war had ended, they continued to fight on for decades. Did they not know that the war had ended? No they believed that the war was still being fought and they continued to fight Onoda continue to fight for thirty years. Now now, one thing to get him Oh, or something they tried. They tried you see allied planes flew over these areas dropping leaflets, and he actually found some they. All did found some jungle flora that they'd been dropped from allied planes and they were told to stand down at the same time when they would forage for food at rural farmhouses they would come across current newspapers that would also declare the war was over and that Japan had surrendered, but they refused to believe it they. are being trick. They thought they all seemed it was allied propaganda decide designed to trick them into surrendering. And they taught they were taught remember that surrendering was the same as desertion and that they should choose death before dishonor. But yet suicide was not an option either he was told many Japanese hit out in various parts of the Pacific long after the war was concluded but not as long as these guys. However one by one, a notice compatriots were either killed or surrendered the first to go just seemed to kind of grow tired of everything he you know he he grew weary of the situation and he abandoned. The group in Nineteen, forty, nine eventually turned himself into Filipino authorities in nineteen fifty. At this point, the authorities in Japan knew that the in the Lubang wilderness, there were other soldiers attempts were made to encourage the group to give in these efforts even included them finding out who their families were and getting letters from their families, as well as family photos and dropping those by airplane. Again, they considered this to be more war propaganda. So I guess my question would be like at what what would it take for you to? Believe that you could stand down and it was later determined that he was waiting for orders from his commanding officer. Okay. In until he heard from his commanding officer, he didn't believe any of this but his commanding officer was just done boring the war had ended yet. They went home. The second guy and his group was eventually killed by gunshot in nineteen, fifty four by Filipino by Filipino forces who are out searching for the remnants of these Japanese holdouts. The last hero, a note as men would survive for another twenty years before being shot to death in nineteen, seventy, two by Filipino op police. At that point, the two men were on a mission to destroy crops grown by local farmers. By this time Japan had long since declared them dead but this made them reevaluate the situation. This left just hero Onoda but he continued to fight on well into the nineteen seventies are not routinely shot it patrols that were out searching for him and he aggressively attacked farmers. He later said he wrote a memoir and later he said I wanted my own territory to expand. We had to break in the locals. I materialized to destroy things threatening them lighting fires in empty houses. Residents were routinely killed sometimes pretty brutally. According to one inhabitant of the island of quote the murders always took place when they were farming was attacked from behind as he stooped down, the body was found in one place in the head and another that's tear along a prominent local Ben Abelida had this to say quote almost every year usually about harvest time there was a casualty. That is rough because you I mean as far as the farmers are concerned theories no war this is not something they should be worrying about and I also I mean, I feel for a NOTA because that The mental state of being at war for thirty years by yourself. That's part that's heartbreaking. That's a an entire life just taken. According to an article in rancor. He was able to survive for such a long time on a diet of fruits and vegetables ready found in the jungle, typically coconut and bananas, and occasionally. He'd steal in butcher a cow from one of the local farmers. So he lived on bananas, coconuts and stolen cows he would enter a an empty house and steal rice and other staples like that. During this time, he had to tolerate extreme jungle heat and humidity mosquitoes, insects, rats, and of course, the occasional violent interaction with police or residents. He had constructed some bamboo huts and somehow kept his weapons in uniform in good condition for thirty years how he continued to believe that any information that he received about Japan even from his family's was the result of American. Propaganda that is shocking I. got a whole am one of my shirts the other day and I've had that for like eight months. Yeah. Yup In one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, four, a self-proclaimed Japanese hippie named Neo Suzuki decided to embark on mystical journey. He wanted to find three things in this order Lieutenant Onoda a panda Annan abominable snowman I'm so he starts looking for Lieutenant Onoda, and even though authorities had been unable to locate this guy for nearly three decades only took Suzuki four days to find him a a recalled later that he was tempted to shoot the stranger but Suzuki's initial. Statement gave him pause he said a notice on the emperor and the people of Japan are worried about you. He later said in an interview this hippie boy Suzuki came to the island to listen to the feelings of a Japanese soldier. Suzuki asked me why I would not come out. Onoda explained Zouqi that he would not leave until officially ordered to do. So he agreed to wait for Suzuki to return with his commanding officer. This is twenty nine years. After the war had ended. Thank you Japanese Hippie. So Japanese Hippie Norio Suzuki immediately set out to find Kiro and notice commanding officer twenty nine years later I mean is he still alive? He was really the commanding officer who had ordered a note to continue his mission unconditionally his name was Major Yoshimi. Tanaguchi. He was now a bookseller in small shop and he agreed to accompany Suzuki and a notice brother back to the Philippines in a Noda's memoir. No surrender my thirty year war. Onoda described his emotions when he was told to stand down quote I stood still waiting for what? Was To follow I. Felt sure Major Taniguchi would come up to me and whisper quote that was so much talk. I will tell you you're real orders later Major Taniguchi slowly folded up the order and for the first time I realized that no subterfuge was involved it kind of seems like he wanted to still be in like he was actively working against information he was getting which doesn't seem healthy to me. He went on to say this was no trick everything I heard was real. We really lost the war. How could we have been so sloppy suddenly everything went black Jeez. So, even though over the years, Onoda had killed at least seven Filipino citizens on March. Eleventh nineteen seventy four at a televised ceremony at the Presidential Palace in. Manila. Noda received a full pardon from President? Ferdinand. Marcos he was also told that he was welcome to stay in the Philippines Onoda was dressed in his thirty year old military uniform. Personally surrendered his military soared to Marcos, and then graciously refused the opportunity to remain in the. Philippines telling him that he admired his courage Marco's immediately returned a notice sword. A noto followed with a live statement on Filipino television saying quote from now on I will try my best to contribute to the development of my country and the closer cooperation the Philippines and Japan. Wow. So it goes back to Japan. He was he was met at the airport like the Beatles. He was greeted by both his parents cheering flag-waving crowds, front-page lines, nonstop media coverage. His decades of deprivation in a commitment to a hopeless mission seemed to strike a chord with people. In fact, one major Japanese newspaper wrote quote his task was impossible to achieve but he did his best he led a faithful life true to the orders given him even in the most severe conditions even after losing two of his subordinates or not I was determined probably due to his soldier spirit to do his duty. So now he tries to resume his life in. Japan thirty years later. And everything's different right? I mean completely, we come home from vacation for two weeks and I'm like is this my house? Why does it smell like this? I don't need. Any more. Well. When he left of course, the emperor was still raining they were under imperial rule. And he comes back and now it's like they're really focused on commercial manufacturing and very materialistic stuff by his. Interpretation Well of course, he thinks anything's materialistic. He's been living in the woods eating coconut and stolen cows. He was so disappointed in modern Japan that he left moved to. Brazil. To live in the woods well, no, he had a little ranch there. It's kind of cute. And he stayed there for a while until nineteen eighty when he heard about a terrible crime in Japan where Japanese teenager murdered his own parents. So he decided that he had a mission to help Japanese youth better and empower themselves. So he moved back to Japan and he started a nature camp. Oh my gosh. What a treasure he just needed a way to continue serving his people I I love that I respect that after returning to Japan in Nineteen eighty-four he opened the note a nature camp at this, camp? Students received wilderness. Training and encouragement to allow them to achieve mental toughness and self-confidence. He also began to lecture at other schools and universities about his life experience and his beliefs about life and society He described his camp as a place for seeing the sky looking at stars touching nature I want them to get an idea of what they want to become i. want them to notice the purpose of life. Early. Now, that's great. He made something really positive out of a pretty nasty experience, but he remained an unabashed militarist and he subscribed to the revisionist attitudes and the more conservative Japanese mindset in his memoir. He stated quote history is written by the victors since the end of World War. Two the Japanese history taught in our schools has been based on a US program to promote war guilt and on left wing propaganda. I don't blame the United States for this. They wanted a week Japan and their mission is accomplished Japanese educated after the war do not have any competence in their culture or themselves Japan was forced to participate in World War Two. The ABCD powers. America Britain China in the Dutch East indies imposed such strong sanctions on Japan that we had no way to import oil steeler anything we were going to die or we were going to be invaded in in enslaved. So even though he got on with his life, he still was fighting that war in his head I mean that seems completely reasonable. I can't say I ever on board with war I'm not someone who's like, Hey, that's a great idea but I do think that a dedication to helping your people is admirable and I love the he found a way to help the youth of his country that wasn't murdering farmer. Yes you're young really good. Point I guess hero Noda died in two thousand fourteen. At the age of ninety one girl. There you go. Wow. Euro Noda I have to say I'm embarrassed that you said, Ferdinand, Marcos the only reason I know who that is Mel DeMarco center shoes Yup. That's probably the way most people remember the marcoses that all the corruption. Listen before we wrap up I wanted to mention this because you guys. Are, like family to us and we know you love Willy and Banjo. Oh. I didn't cat. I was going to bring this up Willie's not doing well, and difficult decisions are going to have to be made pretty soon. And because we do consider you guys family, we just wanted to let you know also if we miss an episode. We love you guys and we look forward to seeing you next time. That is the worst way possible to end episode, and now I think it would have been all deserve pugs Nortel's. You Os that all right come on up here, Willy. Joe Ugo. Banjo show with. We'll see you next time. Until then keep flying that freak flag flies proudly beautiful freak. So let it be known that the box of oddities belongs to. And its fleet is in your hands. Therefore it's been listed by those to whom. To Beseech Oh for assistance, we asked one thing of you to provide a five star rating and applause it of review. True. That is to thanks however is merely a five star rating and a positive. Also, subscribe to us. Okay. So three things is all we asked three things and three things only henceforth the box of oddities commits to the telling of stories, stories of the strange the czar the unexpected. Offer our deeply felt gratitude and appreciation for your patronage the box. Dot Com, like twenty, twenty, all rights reserved.

Japan US Lieutenant Onoda Philippines Maurice Brown officer Schambach Jacob Gerhardt Noda Schambach Tavern murder William Turner Schambach Jacob matthews Gilligan Tov Suzuki Marcos Sean box tavern
Why John Deere is as tech as the OnePlus Nord 2 (Jaime Rivera)

Pocketnow Weekly Podcast

38:52 min | 4 d ago

Why John Deere is as tech as the OnePlus Nord 2 (Jaime Rivera)

"Most people think top-quality comes from spending top dollars. But had harry's we're here to disprove that logic. Our razors are made in german factory. That's been crafting precision engineered blades for over one hundred years there well designed to stay sharp deliver a close comfortable shave and refills. They're still as low as two dollars with harry's you don't have to choose between a great shave and a fair price. We believe in making great blades. That won't break the bank. And if you're not satisfied we offer a one hundred percent money-back guarantee new harry's customers get started at harrys dot com slash. Stitcher you'll get a five blade razor a weighted ergonomic handle foaming shave gel and a travel blade. Cover eight thirteen dollars value offer just three dollars. There's never been a better time to try. Harry's go to harrys dot com slash stitcher to redeem your offered. Today hello everybody and welcome to the pocket weekly podcast. I'm your host joshua regar- what's going on everybody. This is a very special episode for a few different reasons. We have hymie bag also in the flesh. He and i were actually able to talk about a few different topics. Mainly the fact that he recently went on a trip with john deere and gives us some insight into that particular trip but also and i were able to catch up over some coffee. Some taste at earth cafe here in so cal and that meant that we had to use a different type of way to record this podcast on. I'm officially using the road. Wireless go to for a lot of things now. I figured you know what. Let's just clip these or in my case. Magnetized them to our chest. I actually a couple of magnets to make them easier to mount. Let's go ahead and clip these onto our shirts and we'll just talk for a while while we catch up. So that's what you're hearing now. what i love about. This is that These little microphones if the or this effective will be one of the ways that we get a lot of these on location one on one podcast done at places like cas or at any of the shows that we might end up going to hopefully soon as things start to sort of get back to normal but in any case enjoy this actual chill conversation with knee and high may talking about the john deere trip. He went on also a little bit of talk about the one. Plus in order to. And then i wanna get high meza. Preliminary thoughts on nothing. You know what. I'm talking about all right. Let's go in and get into this episode enjoy. This is good. I want proof of concept easy to podcasts. Easy to person podcasts. From birth calf. After i finally got to take one of my main spots rookie so long it's It's a far drive. Hope you enjoyed the lose. Amazing i i got to see the guards again. Sorry for anybody from china. I know it's un guard view. And something like that. yeah. I didn't think i didn't make that connection. I just think to myself chinese in pasadena. I don't know it's. I was a zach. Replica of in a lot of it is my guy you know i've been to she and Beijing shenzhen and shanghai. But i've only been to garden like that entering like the un noko your again keep looking in. Our tastes finally arrived. Like i wanna ask. How have you been. And how was the corn. Okay you see a lotta people. Blab about tesla's autopilot. Do you know the john. Deere has been doing autopilot for fifteen years for fifth. Okay but this might be a of over-simplification gross oversimplification. You haven't even said it but is it a little bit like how a roomba would map a living room now. Oh can you map it in your you map at prior and then you just talent. Okay so yes no but the. It's it's hard to explain. It's all gps race. That's all but listen. What is the most difficult thing that self driving car still haven't solved. It's really not the ability to self driving. You're doing radar almost driving on your on your cruel. I'm doing it on my accord. The problem is not that it's being able to talk to the other car. That is the solution that has not been solved which john deere solved ten years ago. So for me to see like the combine be able to control the tractor like you're literally controlling the tractor that's next to you every single movement that you do it will do. It becomes your slave. So i for that for the sake of our viewers or listeners. I should say Explain the term combine. Because i remember it was in cogan had to explain it on. Combine is a really big machine that you can combined to do a lot of things like harvest and a lot of stuff and it just the whole process of harvesting corn which is not just picking corn. That's one job. But then picking corner appealing. It out removing the colonel separating ed that whole thing is done by one machine instantly and so you know it's funny. When when we were invited to the trip i was like what are we gonna go do. How does this. And then. I land there and i realize how be a lot of other technologies in automate in automotive for example. How behind the like you get on these tractors dude and you look like if you're on a spaceship and you're like whoa like yeah. These are eight hundred thousand dollars. Five hundred to eight hundred thousand dollar tractors You know but dude like if you like in a country as big as the united states there is no way like it's in humanly possible for you to harvest all the corn that you need to harvest within a specific period of time with how big the farms are here. So it's not really just an option of. Oh we want to save money and we don't want to hire people to harvest our stuff. It's how many employees would you need to do woulda combine does in an hour. It's insane and so when you talk about economies of scale who i you know i come from a country. Noda's you get off some soula and you see the sugar. Cane fields and everything is harvested by hand. And you know good for that. But it's not like if they're paying people amazing treating them like peasants like it's a very difficult conversation. I guess when it comes to labor but it's just the amount of effectiveness in efficiency that has provided but the by these machines. It's really hard to describe. Like i got there and they were like no no video commitments. Don't worry we just wanna show you the place. And utah's what you think your feedback is and i'm like damn now. I feel i really wanted to do a video because there's a lot like week like this is clearly a fortune one hundred company taking advantage of all the logistics and aren't dealer you can think of but performing you know and i just i would i. Would i find it very hard to think of an industry other than aviation that is as complete as with john deere can do agriculture agriculture side. Like i. i've never seen something like that and you can still do farming. The old way of you want. If that's your thing you don't need to buy the sophisticated tractors. The interesting thing is you know if you've got a farm that big wouldn't you do. Is there a lot of. I'm sure they would say is by Do you get the sense. That a lot of our big farms in the us are already using these do. There's just no way like you half to belga. These farms are so massive. You just have to know like i. I cannot imagine. I like i. I look at these. Obviously during me looks at this and his like you know. I wish that i had some sort of leverage in my government on buddha for example. Because i know that farmers in countries like who can pay for these things but i would be one of the one of those government of representatives. That would be like you know. Let's just by these machines and just see them to the farmers to improve our effectiveness in our efficiency. Because do these things even have cameras to tell you. How if the corn that you're harvesting is good like in the way you can plant corn one after you know the way you can plant corn so close to each other because the machine is so effective. I had never seen something like that before. Or you know things like for example. A lot of people don't even know or remember how the mayans died like a lot of people. Don't remember that you know. The mayans thought that the that the you know that the land was cursed because it was not producing cornyn and the problem is it was running out of nitrogen because they were only planting corn and i had no idea for example that you know that you have to. You can play a game which was learned by. There are indeed aware if you plan soybean during us during the the alternate period where you don't you're not planting corn you're actually bringing back that nitrogen to the soil free to be able to plant corn unlimitedly whereas in my country for example. We stopped planting corn. I would say about thirty to forty years ago because the land ended up without any nitrogen. Like it's it's those kinds of things where you know you walk into these places and i'm like okay now. I understand why the united states is the powerful economy that it is and also why soybean is everywhere exactly exactly but now you think about a year. Your family's filipino. You have you know your your family works on. You have farms you know. That's that's you know. Part of the way your family living in just think about you know if you because of how important is for an economy of scale to be able to do things in a specific period of time to be able to compete without that technology the united states would not be the monster agriculture that it is. It's just there's just no way you know unless you're like insert economies like china where you have so much labor available to you. It's very difficult. And you know. I think about it. I'm like damn. I wish i you know that our countries could take advantage of this because our four countries are third world countries will not be able to compete against the economies. Like this one. If they're not able to deliver and the timeliness that these farms are able to because of the technology so for me. It's just shocking. I thought that i was just going to go there and see tractors walk in there and i see that we've got you know there. Are there some technology in those tractors. That's better than your average tesla. Yeah i'm like. Whoa what's keeping what's keeping to that technology from permeating more automotive industry and one. That is a good question. I'm like you guys not patented this know and it's really interesting. They bought their gps country. They've got their own. Gps company in nineteen ninety seven. Something like that. You know at the time there you know. I started working in aviation in ninety eight and at the time having. Gps on a plane was still optional. Like you would buy a plane and what it would most likely not included ups because it was still not considered an exact form of navigation. I'm not exactly sure if it's now certified but at the time even only get one slot to put it. Whereas i'm they're playing legally you have to have to a beach for anything to be legal. I say But like do these guys like jumped on that wagon. Pretty early on you know and it's just crazy like it's it's pretty. It's crazy like if you go to the smithsonian one of the one of the things is considered one of the hundred Most important inventions of humanity is the john deere plow which is now turned into a combine. Combine yeah pretty much. I saw that our good friend. David logan He did you get to drive one. Here's what was that like. Oh do well. A lot of it was kind of boring. Because you all you had to do. Autopilot follow the map and then it would automatically route itself automatically turn itself. you'd automatically connected to the other tractor. You could do those crazy. it'd be. Yeah we did a little bit. There's no manual. like no. of course the automation was the crazier part town. And then for me. It was like awesome to meet like their current. Cto and be in the vp. Like it's interesting the vp. For example of of their tech industry is the designer of the tractor. Pretty much the the show the of their technology department and is just dude to like to sit down with the person that actually designed tractor seats a lot of form that a lot of the operation. A lot of the technologies to you know. I was starstruck in a lot of this. But it's interesting once you get to meet these people after you've tried it and then there's like why did they explain it to you like this. Has the purpose of this. The cooler is there because the dude some of these farmers are in the truck for like four hours. Fourteen hours fourteen hour days and this and this is all stuff that the average i'll use consumer yes doesn't realize about dude i'm like oh my god you know. I can't tell these companies to pan. Whatever it is that they do but it is just really interesting to see how certain like you would have never assumed that. Agriculture was so modern. Who would have ever told you that. Agriculture was so modern at the that other industries were just so behind do they do they ever talk about. Let's say perception of farming today ever kind of soothing. All the time okay and it has a lot to do with like it's interesting. The first tractors that they built john deere like one hundred years ago infrastructure that they design actually designed it with horse rains. I think i've seen that one right. So the reason why they did that is because they had a problem with farmers wanting to use their horses so they tried to make the tractor as similar to a horse's possible and so it's the same thing like they don't remove like if you want the tractor to be fully manual and operated on your own you can but it's not because they need for it to be it's just because even the perception of farmers lot of these men are in their sixty seventy s. They don't wanna stop farming and so they want to continue feeling link the tractors something they control so its that perception then. It's our perception. Like if i told you i'm sure you saw me on the trip and you're like what is he doing. I did be honest. I did but i also thought i was kicking myself because once upon a time i say it was the twentieth nineteen cbs. I mean we did go to twenty twenty by twenty nine thousand nine hundred eighty s. John deere invited me to go to the roof and they have the big actor there. I actually declined. Because i thought what the heck am i gonna do exactly and so i did the same thing and then i did the second one but then then i did their presentation at their cs presentation that was virtual pretty much that was that was the highlight of my cs. That's how boring the rest of c. s. only the vr. Like i mean. John deere was nice enough to send everybody in oculus. The new oculus question. We were able to test their whole experience out but to see for example. Not the combine but the planter to see how that machine in a second will dig the whole plant. The seed fertilize. It closed the whole. And do that repeatedly like i i. I don't know what the number is. It's like one hundred percent in or something like i. I'm sure that i'm giving you a far lower number than evacuated. you'd be shocked at just. How much accurate. How complicated like my dad will tell you. My dad is a farmer and he will tell you how important it is for the specific seed of corn to be planted a specific depth and then soy at another depth and so depending on the kind of seed is the treatment gets. Do this machine knows that. Like you tell what it is just tune. Yeah just tune it and they will know it's corner will know this will know is that will will. They will adapt to it and so dude like i'm like what kind of read are these engineers on. It must have been they planted and they're like no no. I'm not we'd so here's my question for for what we do for future endeavors. Because i'm sure that will have more opportune you. Maybe we will have more opportunities to check our john. Deere asked offer. What kind of. What message are we getting out to the audiences that we usually have on pocket now like what would what would we be trying to tell our. I think that it's it's not just an audience for pocket now but it's a general consumer awareness of. Wow what our content look like is really what no i dude for. I would totally make a wlac. Just about how like i worked in so many industries. Like you know. I've worked in supply chain and we like even i worked in ups for how long you know it's difficult like is this. Is this cater pocket now. Not necessarily but does this catered to the entire audience over generating awareness that tech enthusiasts second. Boozy over how accompany very silently and very in its own niche has already solved the lot of humanity problems and that could serve anyone in so many industries. Yes you know i mean. There's just the the they're not just into tractors they. There's a lot of different again. It's it's complicated for me. Cogan handled it well with the block video. Did he did it was it was pretty cool and i think that he really encapsulated what you know. What the experience was which you know. I think that it's very difficult like think about the fact that you know when we created pocket. Now it wasn't it was catering to operating system. It wasn't really catering to the fact that it was something that fit in your pocket. Yeah give me one thing. That doesn't operate what your phone right now. and so. it's very difficult when people you know and i get like i did a peleton review right now. You watch and people are like yeah. I can't fit that peleton in my pocket. I'm like well. I mean you can't fit a tablet in your pocket. You can't fit a laptop. It's not just that it's like how much is enabled by mobile technology today of not everything and so we can't encapsulate that where just product view channel like we review technology. I mean if people are going to be happening they wanted to change the name to tech now or whatever where mean we can save. But like i'm not gonna deprive myself from having an opportunity to try out and really awesome tech over the fact that it doesn't fit in my pocket i mean. Don't get me wrong but phones. You're getting pretty boring. Yeah i've been. I've i've had that dilemma myself to be honest. Like i thought she'd been mulling this over. This may is a conversation. We can dive into some other time by. I'm actually starting to aside from the work. I do you guys pocket now. I'm actually moving to. I'm actually starting to move into a space where i don't really leave. Comments myself a reviewer anymore. Right especially on my main channel. that's the dam. Sure but in general. It's like we get to try these things out. And we share it with their audiences grant you know. I don't even remember the last time we actually put the woodwork. view in one over. It's not about that. And so i i hate to say this but it's just true. I mean how different how different or phones right now. It's not for the z. Foale to that. I'm carrying in my pocket. Don't worry. I don't have any embargo devices. But you know it's it's that lake like why should we encapsulate our scope based on products that what is the for the difference between one and the other of not. Yeah you're gonna end the buying a phone and that's all cool. But what can you do with. The phone is the question. Yeah exactly. it's pretty limitless control pretty much. Tell one of those trekkers what to do with your phone. And that's insane. There's a connection. There's always a connection. And i guess that's that's like the takeaway i wonder audience to have is like you know. Of course we want to share this. Because i mean you can hear the enthusiasm even your voice right now just like it's cool tech. It's pretty awesome. Yeah who would have. Thought i'd certainly didn't when i decided to go. I you know for me at first it was. I saw the tractor. I that if i didn't see the c s oculus presentation i wouldn't have been interested in going and you know what a good on them for for a company that has such old school routes. Yeah to keep up with the tax due and keep up with you know they may be an old school routes company but what they do is fricken out of this world. Yeah you know when my slight jealousy of you being on that trip right became real. One was when my parents were. They were watching the local news and they started talking about the john deere classic. Oh snap and i was like oh my god the the hallways there right now and i was hoping to see you guys in the background at one point. They didn't know it was. You know obviously Tim scofield was. He plays golf so it was like for. Leo's like yeah. I think the last time i played golf was like twenty two years ago and i suck at it. There's a reason why i stopped and so but it was like From the experience of going there you know going to an actual golf tournament to see the united states like work normally in certain places trulia. That was great. Two things i do fit in our pockets. There is one other thing that did happen this week. i woke up to it. I didn't realize it was actually happening. In india in europe but one plus went ahead and just the nerd too. Yeah so I didn't get to watch the entire thing. But there's a really big production. Apparently i didn't watch it at all. It was like it was like a future link movie really practically like was that kind of production quality and then moved into the presenters being like a perfect white space so is that kind of pursue ended. They say guns lots of guns. They absolutely could have it. Have that look the matrix. Yeah so The nor to okay. Quick one way to sort of Builds this this narrative. How did you feel about the nord. One i'm talking about one not the end one hundred. I'm gonna give you a broader question. Okay do you think that this is the beginning of the end of one. Plus no i. I think enough people are loyal enough to the brando stick around. I think that the brand is going to stick around. But like chrysler has plymouth and dodge and well open now. Has one plus always had one plus official. It's just the official but okay. I just inbox the real meat. Gt the What is it the. Gt too or just just treating. Okay did you get the alabama can. Yes of course. If not i wouldn't be making a big deal out of it but then i'm holding it and i'm like this is a one plus nine same plastic same plastic border leather. Shell like like on the findings through next to throw looks. Pretty awesome. doesn't have the bands to work. Effectively here is now. But i was so bummed out about but you know it's not designed for this market hager yet. I'm like in my holding the new one plus here is this. The new ship killer has one plus become You know his oneplus become the new algae in the united states. Where the and you know. It's it's not that. I i have a problem with it. I think that the north strategy where they have the roots company in the nord and the high quality company. The regular one brand is a thing. I'm just wondering if one plus has a powerful enough brand recognition in countries like the united states for them to. Actually you know i. I'm wondering of the jump was premature. I sometimes wonder. Yeah because one nor does not necessarily north american facing now. Yeah and so. This is just their strategy for these countries and but in the in the united states we've got the north two hundred or the hundred. Yeah i mean we did that review budget. Yes that's the only way. I can put it exactly. But that's the thing like i. I'm sort of confused by the strategy. But you know they're finding success in it it is working for them l. just exited the market. And it's up for grabs and you know while way was pushed out with with you know the lack of google play services and so you know one plus to a certain degree alone now. You have samsung galaxy a series. You've got apple with their s e series and you've got one plus with the nord and then you've got the high end and i just sat to i'm sat at. The high end is not really what i would consider the high end dan. It didn't it. Didn't while i wanted to do you know how much of a su i have a soft spot for one plus and i haven't even bigger soft spot for oboe. I think that my first ever relationship with that's when you were you. And i met on an oboe traffic in singapore and so for me like i that was like my first ever like full blown business trip. They treated us really well. We got to see some really cool products with the end series. And the are at the time this thinnest phone ever the flip over camera like that was a very interesting phase for oboe. And then they went into. Let's copy the iphone mode because it just works china. Yeah and you can't blame company for looking for ways to make it you know and they have. I think the thing. I feel the thing i found weird though because you mentioned the gt. And i actually have a phone in my pocket The the reno six pro the thing is i. I think my main issue right now with the north to is that it's just another flavor of the same phone all of these phones that come from the greater. i keep forgetting beat k. K. mckay bb. I keep saying pkk but that'd be busy. Isn't that the beijing airport It's the you remember. The original name of beijing is packing. And so the name of the airport and he he kicked or p. Some i keep mixing those or pk. Pk i think he began. So be all of these companies would be became. They're taking the same exact specs and putting them in different shells. Yeah and while. I get that that would be effective for white markets. Those come out in. It's kind of hard for us. Because we're literally seeing deja-vu it's all deja-vu for us which is why i think the nor to doesn't necessarily excite me when the real gt already happens when the reno six. Yeah it's very much a very much less problem you're pointing that out because the for the average consumer you have to remember this is pretty much like the I'm eight dope. Oh No it was a dope. Org no no this hcc so if you remember it was the a. I'm eight hugh tech I don't remember half of us like all these brands were. Htc brand off. Like for example. In latin america we will we would see was cute tech Okay yeah yeah. Yeah and so. For example you would see the. I made k. Jam and it was actually an hcc phone. Like hcc didn't really start using their brand told much later like initially. Those are the brands that they would market with. And then they brought their hcc brands of the knicks. And so imagine opo not using its opo name and instead starting one plus a real me or vivo which is what we see today. Yeah and It's just a different strategy. Yeah india well. I mean i do say that. It's the same specs in different shells but there are some key no difference. There are some significant difference too. I i other Which i call it would be with the nord to the first other disappointed that i had was no more wide angle camera on the front. That was something we liked on the first north. Yeah so there was that and also the Main campus on the north to is the. I mech seven sixty six. Which is the lighting camera on the plus. Nine pro. okay. I'm but that's the primary and the white angle on the on the opel next three pro. Yes they got. So they're they're putting the right in the right places. Yeah but i will say that all of these phones the one in my pocket the real. Gt now than they are approving ground for one thing and that's density twelve hundred. Yes i have to admit. It's doing a good job. I haven't tried it. So i'm period. I think you're gonna like it because when you think about it like there's this weird link connotation when it comes to mediatek that the mom you hear the word it's like cheap and bad. It's not though like another dynasty series. Exactly it's it's affordable. Yes but that's the point that is the point it's good but it's also affordable exactly saying the end. I'm really curious because we're in a world. You know every time that we would go to not every time but when we went to india like the word snapdragon was everywhere but then most of the people that we met were carrying folks running mediatek chips and so to a certain degree it became like media tech has been like the democrat democratize of technology. Just bringing it to the masses. Like your Were you in the trip taipei now so in that trip when we had a conversation with their ceo which by the way nicest guy ever nice guy ever like. You know having like an open conversation about their future. And he's like you know we. We know companies that are focusing and like the higher end. And that's all great and we will have something or that. This was before diamond city. But we're really worried more on the next billion not on the people that already have a phone but on the people that don't have a phone markets like africa where the you know. The people have a harder time being able to afford a product and we wanna create products for them. We want to actually solve world needs and at the same time we all obviously do also want to cater to every single part of the market. It's just interesting because you know is doing. The i was doing the the peleton video which is sponsored by taking the technology on the peleton media And i was like I had not noticed the play of words media tech because they focus more on. Tv's like medium. yeah like like pretty much most smart. Tv's are powered by media attack. Yeah aren't videos are busy. Yeah that's a good question. I think that some of them are not all at all I know that pretty much of a lot of. I think you know busy this. Tcl there their think. Power like ninety percents of the smart. Tv's and the power. All of amazon's law obama servants products. All of them pretty much. Yeah there're places in power. I don't know if they've howard. The new the the new sony ear buds by they've had the previous ones Did their everywhere. A apple has not admitted that they collaborated with the with the new beats the beats. That apple launched The earbud ones right. Yeah that's a media take media tech yes everywhere and like apple to make that jump to work with media tech naked man. Yeah that's true. And i mean how many people have you heard saying. Oh my amazon. Echo just broke like dude. I've had echos for years in those things still kick man. I still have the Show ten right now. 'cause you say well you just mentioned audio and we're keeping this show fairly short but There's one last thing i would ask you about. We can't say much about it because it hasn't happened yet. I want your preliminary thoughts on nothing. Because that's next week. And i'm actually thinking of having What do you think of having. That'd be great. Yeah i wanna talk to him about are you kidding. That'd be fantastic. join me. i'm gonna hit him. he's awesome then as insight on audio is crazy. And i. I don't i'm curious to lake. Yes they've they've brought a lot of publicity over the other. Nothing brand and everything the question. Is you know right now with the galaxy. Buds in the market with sony's mark for is in the market with apple in their air pods and most of the united states. Most of the people in the united states rocking iphones and loving their air pods. Wow this nothing has got to be something like. It's gotta be something major for people to want to be like okay. I won't use my air pods for this. Yeah it looks radical. And don't they already said it's what ninety nine dollars right. Yes but it could be fifty like for most light for a lot of people like it's hilarious. How my my son. Somebody gave him a pair my younger son. Somebody gave him a pair of chief airports and he calls the airports like the have become a name. They have become a thing like they're like it's crazy. How apple launched the most expensive pair of ear buds that i could recommend the least with the exception of the pros that could recommend the least that people love so much. Did people door there air pods and so i'm like wow these like nothing. I'm i'm curious. Are they have to be something. They have to be something every time everytime i bring it up. It's always a funny game. Like oh now we will talk about. So we'll see. I'm sorry crawl. We love you dude. But that name. I mean it's nothing which would just wanting that we're talking about opo one was then now. We're talking about karl. The app which who who we met originally opo then became one. It's very trope. Good times all right. Well keeping this one a little bit short just a nice chat catch up with me and i may But yeah Just proven proven. These road wireless go to's man you never saw road. Who's your pr man. I really you know we should be touch. 'cause like fisher. Swears by these microphones. He adores them. Yeah i the onboard recording is really my favorite thing because it just makes these super versatile. Yeah so that's why. I'm like i'm going to try lake li- like i said on the podcast yesterday or last week. He says finally coming to the states and finally going to be able to go again and you know that she married gonna do podcast. Goes of course. Yeah so i'm looking at you have time if you're sober. I'm sure you'll you'll figure out a point where you're going to be like. Should we go do technically together. While i might have her on for a pocket now weekly as well that like like. I think i think we need to do like a joint group chat. Can we need nick grain we need. Tk go to's from pandemic. i owe them the world because they have always been there for all those times sharpton. nobody's launched the bed called pandemic grunge bands. That would like yeah dude like we need to do like a group chat Somebody who thinks to talk about you know tech. I feel that this year has become you know. A lot of companies are becoming a little more conservative samson. Being one of them. Like i think i love the strategy. That samsung has been doing lately. Where they're you know. They could launch pro. They could follow what they did in twenty nineteen with higher end no-holds-barred throwing the kitchen sink out there but no like every single park that we seem from samsung like i review their galaxy. A fifty right now dude at that price range we going back to the topic of opo. The northern everything and oneplus do galaxy series from. Samsung is really hard to beat. Really hard to beat and so i'm curious like if there is one company that recognizes the impact that one plus has made in the market it is samsung with their a-series series with their f. e. line of like it is clear that the are out to compete that they are not out to let go of the crown. And so i i haven't seen too many. You mentioned if he. I haven't seen too many rumors lately about. Oh i'm sure it will happen at some point. Yeah because i i've revisited. The s twenty f- he was. This was a good time. It was a good all right. Well i think we should do it. I think there are cafe or cafe. Cast which may or may not be more or less. A thing with these microphones. But in any case i'm going to go ahead and call it on this end Yeah we'll get into the altro. Starting now all of the links for high me and myself or in the show notes make sure you head over to pinault dot com for all the latest headlines and find pocket now on social media at pocket now on twitter and instagram. And then of course over to youtube dot com slash buck now for video content. That is pretty much coming out every single day. All of that said we're going to go ahead and call it on this episode of the weekly podcast. Thank you so much for cake with us on this one and we will see you in our next episode.

john deere united states harry joshua regar earth cafe tesla un David logan meza china cogan Noda Foale shenzhen
092619 ATJ in 30

Ace and TJ

21:52 min | 2 years ago

092619 ATJ in 30

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It is some of my Hoa Sri on the way in today's. TJ and thirty along with SAS as weird Internet had technician but let's get started with Ace's photo shoot basically gave in theory. I mentioned y'all a couple of weeks ago that I have this. this song coming out being released in November about and so now you gotta do all this stuff we shot a video for it and then then I will we we gotta do a photo shoot. Oh Man I'm not good at photo shoots. I don't like him. I don't like pictures pictures but here's where it gets worse so I go to this place yesterday. I have to drag all this stuff down the street photographer super cool the makeup makeup girl lady person. I don't know what the proper term is makeup artist guess awesome but I'm dragging all this stuff down the street and we're in Noda Coda here in the Mothership Market of Charlotte which is a sector very hip cool laid back section of town and we're doing some stuff in in the studio and all that goes something about the lighting having a hard time Leninism. Obviously I'm redhead. I'm very fair skinned. It's kind of you know. It's it's working but let's take it outside. I think he's going to be better. It's going to be a better fit out that my outside in the parking lot outside on the street corner both Oh damn so I spent about an hour and a half standing on the street corner in Noda pretty busy the area at five o'clock in the afternoon okay so we're going to go to this place and I sit here in the door of Kabo Fish Taco. Nobody's going in and out of that. People are like who's the do. I sit in the door with them and I'm shooter. Give me serious. Okay Smile look off. Mb pensive okay but I'm in this guy's way he was it was it was rough like an influence influence or an instagram model TJ. Why are you taking a pitcher because I'm wearing this jacket. No didn't take your picture. You just took a big. It just went off. It wasn't my phone. It was just thought you're holding your phone your one because it's so cold. I'm looking at thank you notes that people have sent for making them laugh today. It's so cold in here. I had to go get this ugly jacket that I've kept in the amish forever just to try to warm. It's freezing here yeah so the last arrived wanted to know there was one oh if you wore that jacket and your photo shoot not what did you wear shady and different things just like different it took a bunch of clothes and they put the combination together and like try this and this and this and this and we'll see what works to match your hair and all that kind of stuff yeah so so we're at this point. I'm having lean up against this There's an outside railing at this really cool place. It's on the corner and I'm trying to remove the chairs around him. Which I'm I'm sure the place appreciated me just moving other leaning over landed up against endorsed landed up against the counter on the bar like serious. Look Smile Smile. Let me look away can't pondering candidate. I wish you would've asked us to come help. We would've loved that I'm sure you would have. I would love to have been a part of that. Was your girlfriend there. No No. I don't want anybody to be in there. We could have been very helpful as part of the crew for that definitely yeah. You would have been extremely helpful. I'm sure all of you would very helpful yeah as much as we're going to be be helpful helping you pick out the perfect shot when they all come back for your album cover. 'cause that's what I'm going to be doing. S No way of bringing them all in here. I recommend the one where you're standing in front of a TACO stand national Ashley. NEVER DO TJ in thirty podcast so far this your participation in this radio wjr on the ace and Tj show is not disappointing ripped from the pages of love after lockup the reality show on Friday nights on we TV. What is the one thing. His mom has a problem with about you. The one thing on the show the one thing that the the fiance inmates mom has with the soon to be daughter-in-law's that she thinks the daughter-in-law in-law fooled around with her husband. That's one thing the only thing standing in the way this one and is great all the way through my mother-in-law has been on drugs since twenty thirteen and has stolen from US multiple times last Christmas. We purchased cameras one day. She snuck into the House because I forgot. I left the back door unlocked. Take the dogs out and I watched turn on the camera. Go through the entire house. All of our drawers and eventually rating are pickle jar full of change so do I blasted her own facebook so now she hates me. Oh well no she didn't want out of our family and friends. Hans knowing how she really was. This happened five months ago and we have yet to talk. Oh and we live. Maybe a hundred feet from each other awkward. Few can't use the last year on facebook is talking to her about it. Well tough love what that is you wrote on. That's opinion is because she stole our pickle jar full of change in a blast at her own face. What else was I supposed to do yeah but Blass asser on facebook. This lady says my mother-in-law doesn't like me because I have red hair. She was married when she was married to my father-in-law he. I cheated a lot with redheads. She told her sons that red heads were evil and she never wanted any of them. Get mixed up with the redhead allow. This is a good one before we got married my husband. Let it slip to his dad. I was an exotic dancer so my mother-in-law in law hated me before. She met me because of that he let it slip. He's Hey dad remember place. We used to go. You took me on my eighteenth birthday going ever since then got me. Got Me a girl from there. Don't tell nobody I let us live to you. Daddy accident. Please keep keep me anonymous the one problem my mother-in-law has is that I have a baby with her son and we're not married however she got pregnant by her husband now now when she was still only separated from her first husband wow follow. Here's one the one the one thing mom has a problem with about me is because I'm not Asian. Oh Wow I'm very outspoken spoken in Korean culture. That is a big no no when it comes to your elders it's been sixteen years and I've learned a lot. Our relationship is great now but I push her button every now and the okay within it's not the one problem has with you had with you. Everything's all good now. You do things Mui Bueno as they say in Korea. Yeah my mother-in-law hates me because I won't support her fifty two year old son and let him stay home. Women Play Video Games all day. That's your job. That's your job anonymous please. My mother-in-law hates me because I know all about her fake social media counter what she's done with them straight up catfish these make accounts yeah multiple sounds like it what Kaolack catfish people. I enjoyed a catfish and makes me happy noodle in TJ and when we return to the TJ in thirty podcast we hear about SAS as weird intimate technician and I'm GonNa Redo some of my world famous poetry that's all next on the ace and TJ thirty podcasts. This is the thirty podcast this is the TV and thirty podcast guard now Jason Dj on demand on Ace and TJ DOT COM TJ APP or through iheartradio. Rodin and fields has been named the number one premium skin care line in North America for the last three years. There's something for every skin concern now at ace. TJ Dot com click the road and fields is add on our partners page. There's a sixty day money back guarantee and new monthly specials go to a C. J. Dot Com and click the road and fields add on on our partners page. I'm not a doctor but I give myself collagen implants every night of my life implants well. I implant Collagen into my throat and then swallow it down because it's the product called calendar and it helps helps you lose weight and it's not a stimulant or medication or any of that stuff. It's just college in that. We lose over time as we age and then it replaces that Collagen so yes technically I give myself collagen injections every night by swallowing capsule and it has lots of other benefits does you'll sleep better it helps with joint pain it helps with acid reflux and it's drug and stimulant free so it doesn't interact with any other medications right now you purchase a ninety day supply and you get two months free plus ten percent off its the top loss. Dot Com T. O. P. L. O. S. DOT COM and use the Promo Code Ace. TJ and get free shipping so get calendar and get the special deal today at top loss dot Dot Com Promo Code S. T. J. for free shipping it could never duplicated for the past week or so sas has been tell us about how she's having to move and all of that stuff and as you can imagine. I mean I've been kind of tuning all of it out because it's boring brat correct but she happened to tell some little story this morning that I saw you know hey. That's kind of interesting. I'll pay attention to that and inquire well. Thank you for your attention but it wasn't. It wasn't when you remove yesterday was when you moved last year when you got a victim yes so yes sure wait. What a victory yeah so yesterday I had someone come over to installment Internet and it just reminded me of my experience last cheer because it was completely different and what happened last year. Just buckle your seatbelts. The technician not only did his job but he stayed a little later in the day to give me advice on things that I didn't think I needed advice on like ways to workout workout how to meal prep. He decided to give me a slide show of his does that he took on a cruise this is he's the technician for Internet Internet technician right and he he was telling you how to Demille. How does that even come up. He see you and meal prep in or something. No I was washing dishes and he just came downstairs and it was just like like I say that you you eat healthy because a lot of vegetables laid out. I'm assuming that's probably what came up and now he eats and so how much longer after after he was done with the job did he stay chatted up. I'd say thirty minutes a minimum of thirty minutes my house. What are you doing. I'm into as it's early. I'm thinking ourself. Why why are we having this conversation okay but the Kudarat took it over the top. Oh what did he do so because he was trying to show me how to explain how to work out how to do ab workouts and stuff like that when I'm doing with my body and my weight. He told me that I should lay down on my floor so you can properly show me how to do a workout and he was not only talking to me in a weird way. He was showing me. How do workouts in a weird way did you. I did not I should had have but it was just so weird off. The Internet technician asks you to lay down in the floor. We could show you the way to work out. He said let let me just show you. It's easier that way and you didn't ask him for any assistance two zero before he got down there. I was like no no no. I'm okay. I think I know what I'm doing. I've worked out in many times in my life. I'm good I'll just show you. I'll show you saw lay down my back and he showed me how to work out. Did it no oh no. I lay down. I did oil laid out but what I just got down real quick okay. This is how I do it and then he ended up getting close me. That's when I stood up. He's stood far away the kitchen while I'm on the carpet in the living room. I'm like is this. Is this what you're talking about and I didn't feel too creeped out because he seemed like he was close to. My Age didn't look like a creepy Kinda guy but I ended up getting real weird. That's what I was going to say we. He must not have been terrible looking or really now. He was good luck okay. That's on the floor if he would ugly. You said I'm sorry man. I got a lot of stuff to do. They come in Ah Call you if I need. You Yeah Audio's yeah yeah but I don't care what you look like. Don't don't do stuff like that because once I got down the floor and he approached me closer to me. I was like all right this is I don't care who you are. Don't get down on the floor far. Yeah don't now see that could have been his His goal to begin with was just watch you down on the floor what he wanted all along okay then then run off to his van or whatnot. I regret doing it but one of the situations where he's just pressuring you like No. It's fine. It's fine. No it's fine all right ladies ladies you should never worry about being rude to a stranger amen that you you feel threatened by in the in the least bodyguard's will tell you that actually the bodyguard that they used in the movie as there as their case study. Whitney Whitney Houston's the bodyguard sure Kevin Costner yeah. The Guy Kevin Costner was playing he said dateline year ago years ago. Don't lay down on the Internet tells you all the floor one of the few days poet he is take Iraq every day. After the show we do something called more show after show and thirty minutes live on our our APP sponsored by Papa John's you can download our APP free in your APP store. It's also available every day at noon. As a podcast it gets it gets a little crazy because we don't have the same rules and regulations on Moore. Show but yesterday we just ended up in a discussion about relationships and take the rob was telling US explain exactly what this book is that you gifted your girlfriend with Ron. I this is a treat for me because I wasn't here for more show. After the show yesterday I tipped out early to get the the the Brunch at the booby bar so I didn't stay for more show after show so yeah this is all up into so it was a an anniversary present wile back it is a little red book called me without you and it has a whole bunch of different rhymes like she sent me some of her favorite examples from the book as well so like it says Dr Without who doctor who a a picture that's a skew. That's what it'd be like me without you. Essentially the gist of the the book itself and there's a little space where you can write your own yet. TJ's got up there. There's there's little space at the end where you can write indoor beginning. I don't remember exactly where I wrote it but you can write what you WANNA. Ride in Okay and you wrote a a little poem to go in. There did okay so you are going to share that moment. Is it long why I it is eight lines okay. It's follows the ABCD Ryan ramous gave me okay. Okay Sounds Good Eight Lines Aka Saturday night the hell cocaine. I'm I'm sorry go ahead so this is awfully okay all right. I have very little space so all right what I can you and your laugh make me a happy man can never in my life. Have I known such joy such ecstasy but like I said I must maintain my brevity. I love view more today than yesterday. I hope you don't mind the use of cliches. You're one of one hundred or hopefully more because me without you. I'd be he done for wow. I know seriously read the real. I'm I'm kidding. That's very sweet and very uncharacteristic yeah. That's I think that's the the thing that everybody is taken aback. buys it. I mean you don't you don't mess around like that usually no you're like you know premium oatmeal kind of don't give me any. Christmas was gifts or I'm GONNA throw a fit that kind of thing running during more show they were like well. What does she do for you like hopefully nothing. Please don't Yeah Eh Ecstasy. I mean like I mean that's amazing to write poetry a lot in high school but it wasn't very good just just reading the room when rob you started about the fourth line. I think S- ask even got the little like Oh. The hands are up then she put them close to our heart but once you use the word ecstasy. Reagan looked like Whoa what expected that word in there now not at all. I think this whole thing is shocking. I mean obviously so sweet. Yeah we have two aces his own show podcast subscribe now to Acer. TJ On demand now on I tunes hey it's T. J. and I wanna tell you about my recent. Stay at the Ballantyne. You know the the second you walk in. You know you're in a fancy hotel is not only beautiful but the staff goes out of their way to make sure you have the most luxurious experience of your life to go to the Ballantyne Dot Com and see all the great things you can enjoy everything from their spa to golf. They're beautiful. Pull fine restaurant and everything else. A true luxury hotel provides so book your stay now at the Ballantyne Dot Com. I really think League you're GONNA love it. Hey excess this month the Ason. Tj Show is giving away five hundred dollars to one raynham listener just for completing a short survey the the only way to enter is by going to ACE TJ DOT com or our APP plus. The Grand Prize winner is going to get an invitation to the first ever lunch with me. Sass Oh and I'm bringing ribbons and rob to enter to win five hundred dollars cash plus join me on my first ever lunch with listeners. Don't worry I'm buying Inter now as T._J. Dot Com and the ACE and T._J. APP good luck.

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