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Fresh update on "nobel prize" discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

The Peter Attia Drive

01:08 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "nobel prize" discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

"Indian proposing project. What's the evidence that it's going to be successful? And you know as well as anybody? There's substantial. Scientific data that EM- tour inhibition will extend health span in many preclinical species, certainly all the ones that have been tested now that was not obvious in two, thousand, eight, two, thousand nine. People had been speculating. Of course there was a major publication came out in two thousand nine. I have the correct timeframe. We started our new indication discovery unit in two, thousand, eight or nine. I think Jones started the project in two thousand ten got it, so you already had a very important study behind you yet as a catalyst for that, let's take a step back now and explain 'cause. It's been awhile and there's going to be people listening who don't recall all the details of our discussion with David Sabatini, and with Matt Cable and let's talk about what is M, tour. Sure well I can't add anything to David Sabatini about what. Nobody can, but let's assume people have not heard what David has to say. Sure in a nutshell 'em tour is the master integrator of external availability of nutrients and growth factors. and. Then is the master regulator of the outputs of that integration, deciding whether cells are GonNa make proteins make lipids make nucleic acids. Grow, or are we going to circle? The wagons conserve resources recycle and wait during times of little for hopefully future times aplenty, so that's the role of 'em tour. So it takes a bunch of signals which are external to the cell, ultimately become internal to the cell. Because M tour is in the sell out of this L.. It assimilates and integrates across that signal and makes decisions that lead to. You said at the risk of oversimplifying grow or don't grow yes. I think that's exactly right. The signals it takes are Amino. Acids Glucose cellular energy growth factors from other parts of the organism is probably major ones, and then decides other sufficient resources that the should grow or not. And between just a little history lesson for the listeners sorta between nineteen, ninety one when hall I identified what was not called at the time tour, but would go onto become tour. In Yeast and ninety four when Sabatini identifies it in mammals. You basically had some of the just the heaviest hitters in biology, all sort of converging on this idea which is, this is a really ubiquitous thing that has been preserved. Across a billion years of evolution with very little change. You don't see that everyday in biology. Why is that relevant? The simplest argument is that things that have been concerned from single cell organisms to us are probably important. There's some interesting comparative zoology. That's relevant 'em tour here. If you think about where in the cell and tore lives. It's active on. Something called a license some. And that is a structure in the cells that's responsible for breaking down either cellular material or material that's been quired from outside the cell. into its component elements that then could be recycled like amino acids and sugars so forth. Very early in development. Well in. Biology when there were single celled organisms, and then the early multiple cellular organisms. The way that the organism eight was by creating a vacuum all from whatever was on the outside, and then creating a license on. So, we'll consider picture this endocytosed processes, the the cell membrane or wall, depending on what if it's eukaryotic appropriate sort of sucks in a little bit which creates basically a space, and then the outer parts of that wall, reach up, reach around it, and can actually seal, and now you've created like a vacuum oil that you pull into the cell. Yes, and in the early multicellular organisms there were specialized cells for doing this, and they were called phagocytes for eating cells later on, it was learned that phagocytes could also serve in immunologic role in other words that they could eat pathogens as well as nutrients. This happened in the late eighteen hundreds when higher quality microscopes were available. A Russian scientist named. Ilya Match Nov did a lot of the pioneering work on this. He was working in Paris. And he described he was an embryologist and comparative zoologist, and he described by looking at small animals that were completely transparent, so he could see all the cells inside and what they were doing. He actually image them. While they were alive when he could watch them eat, and he could watch them fight bacterial infections, and he was the major champion of something called cellular immunity at the same time. Some German scientists notably Paul Erlich. We're working on. What we now understand his antibodies, and they said no, it's humor. Immunity are soluble immunity in your blood, and they had the cellular immunologist. Paris and we had the. Humor immunologists in Germany eventually they figured out they were both right, and they both got the Nobel Prize in nineteen eighty eight. This is why. Am Tories probably on a license on vacuum. Because in the context of evolutionary development, it was on these vacuoles that very simplest organisms used to ingest food and nutrients. And so you want to have it close to. Because it's their to sense those things you WanNa have very close to where they enter the cell. Yes, exactly so if we take given EUKARYOTIC cell today, take one of ourselves. How many m TOR complexes would exist in a cell? What Order of magnitude? I, turf that question to David Sabatini but I. Don't think I've ever ask David that question I. Don't know I would guess it would be on the order of thousands. Not Millions not tents. So one of the other things that David's done is not just recognizing this in mammals, but also recognizing that M tour which again it's one of those things it's funny when you start to explain it to people because you can't explain what M Torres without somewhere explaining rapamycin is given the name 'em tour stands for mechanistic target of Rapamycin. But David also played the fundamental role in elucidating that tour can be organized in a couple of different ways and it sort of two main different ways it can be organized known as complex one and complex to explain a little bit about what those to mean. How do they organize differently and perhaps more importantly their functional difference between those sure, so in yeast to separate tore proteins, one and two and in I, think all other species. There's just one door protein. And it can be assembled into two different complexes, one of them or called Torque. One per target of rapamycin complex one regulates many of the things we've been talking about so protein, synthesis, lipid, bio, synthesis, protein, translation, and so forth. The other complex torque to regulates site a skeletal, so in other words, the skeleton of the cells, organization. And growth decisions so different. Now this is sort of interesting, so let's talk about rapamycin now. How does rapamycin interact with tour its target? That's an excellent question because you think about tore being the target of rapamycin. It's not exactly. The target of Rapamycin is an Immuno Fillon. Called FDA binding. Proteins are F K BP. And there several of these, there's three different classes of immune felons. The complex of rapamycin bound to F K. BP then binds to Torque one complex..

David Sabatini Rapamycin Paris Phagocytes Paul Erlich Jones Nobel Prize FDA Immuno Fillon Scientist Ilya Match Germany Matt Cable M Torres
Fresh update on "nobel prize" discussed on Snap Judgment

Snap Judgment

00:46 min | 13 hrs ago

Fresh update on "nobel prize" discussed on Snap Judgment

"I am Tracy K. Smith Smith is a former poet laureate of the United States. Her father was an optical engineer who worked on the Hubble Space Telescope. Smith. Best known poetry collection is called Life on Mars. I usually have a large I mean, ah, particular question in mind. Maybe it isn't like what is the answer to this thing? But why do we do This to one another. Why is it so hard to really love? Another person. Not just strangers, but the people we love. Why is it so hard to keep loving them sometimes? Why is it so hard to love ourselves? You know those kinds of questions. You can't get an answer to that. But it could certainly set you set you in motion. And then the way I often tend to write is to sort of speculate. Like what if I mean my book Life on Mars is really just a bunch of hypothetical questions? What if the universe is Like this. What if it's like that? I found that kind of pointing Those questions back down on Earth can be useful and thinking about like the really world, the social or the political world. I was one of those kids who just always want to know. How the world worked and see the owner's manual. What you how's this whole operation happen? That's Saul Perlmutter, who also wanted to ask big questions. And I guess the places that looked like they were asking those kinds of questions were physics and philosophy. And so at the beginning, I always thought I might study that the two of them until I discovered, of course, that either one of them would take up all your time. And which did he choose? I'm a professor of physics and I study cosmology. Perlmutter is at the University of California, Berkeley and the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. In 2011 he won a Nobel Prize for helping to discover Contra the belief of earlier physicists that the universe is expanding at an accelerating rate. One possible explanation for this acceleration, dark energy, largely unknown force that may make up 70% of the universe, and this is meaningful to know. Why? So this is one. These really Weird aspects. I think of basic science that almost every time we've learned something really deep about how the world works. It's ended up not only providing us with your huge philosophical satisfaction, but somehow it makes us more capable. We should be able to do things differently. As we learn these Odd ways in which the world is actually built and constructed. I mean, a good example of this is ah, Einstein's theory of relativity. It was talking about things like you know what happens when clocks travel near the speed of light? I mean, we're never going to get one of our clock. Will these files we know we're not going anywhere Clocks near the speed of light, and it seems like these were the most abstract concept that you could have been working with. And yet you every cell phone in my pocket that uses GPS all those measurements. I've been corrected by what we learned from Einstein's theory of relativity because of those explorations, and you could never have guessed it. Right now, We cannot think of anything that dark energy, you know, is likely to Ah to effect except our poetic vision of the world. Doesn't I mean especially for someone who started out thinking about studying philosophy? I'm just curious whether That fact alone. That dark energy comprises you say roughly 70% of our universe. And we have no idea what it is. Isn't that does that present you with a bit of a If not an existential dilemma, at least a kind of mind scrambling question that is a little unsatisfying to go to bed every night. Not knowing is Well, I mean, it didn't bother me until you told me because I didn't know anything about it. But now I feel like wait a minute. 70%. We really don't know. And you actually know this stuff, so I'm curious whether it weighs on you in some way. I mean, weirdly enough, I think for me, it's it's one. The real pleasures of life. The idea that there are huge unknowns for us to explore. A lot of what you do in cosmology is is mind boggling, and you have to enjoy having your mind completely bottled you that just the idea of imagining infinite space is already saying that I think we just have a very hard time getting our heads around and then having an infinite space expand so that you know it's not that it's expanding into anything. It's just that there's more distance between everything in that space, and that's Is our two. And for some of us, That's just scary feeling, Tio. I have won. My siblings doesn't like to even think about this stuff. It just gives her the willies. Where is for me? I just find there's a real pleasure in feeling like us. Puny humans. Working with the bit of the sense is that we have and living in this serve You happy medium somewhere in between the huge and they really, really microscopically you and subatomic tiny have been able to use our little senses to figure out stuff that's happening on this ridiculously big scale and in these ridiculously tiny scale and that the two have nothing to do with each other. I just find that it makes it feel like we're right in the mix in the thick of things that were that were you know, we're getting to play with the universe. I'm convinced Now I love your way of looking at it because You're right. There is a there is a kind of potentially a downside of that puny anus. But the way you've expressed it it you know, we're punching way above our weight by being able to even ponder what's going on so many dimensions beyond so that's encouraging..

Saul Perlmutter Tracy K. Smith Smith Einstein Hubble Space Telescope United States Nobel Prize Engineer Berkeley Professor Of Physics Lawrence Berkeley National Lab University Of California
Fresh update on "nobel prize" discussed on Monocle 24: The Bulletin with UBS

Monocle 24: The Bulletin with UBS

02:46 min | 13 hrs ago

Fresh update on "nobel prize" discussed on Monocle 24: The Bulletin with UBS

"Inequality boss domestic inequality in international inequality just take the twenty top tech companies right now. What else the majority? Well, the only two National ID's. Eleven are American and Chinese. There's not a single European and Russian Indian President or whatever? So that means the value creation now in tech and tomorrow in healthcare to because as as becoming more and more tech. Is going to be busy into countries. That's going to create a fair amount of inequality across countries where we actually are very dependent on the platform of those two countries, there's a brain drain which is small, but very significant, because the best people often will leave for the US and those are, people are not going to create jobs in Europe. We have to wake up in Europe. We just don't realize what's happening outside and today it's a US. To Moi will be China Singapore, and above the Asian countries, so whereas Europe going to be we, we have to react. There will be a big inequality. With people gain from tech and lots of people who are going to lose their job. You cannot stop technology. Go Progress, and that would be mistake. What we have to do is to I anticipate, and sit on of the kind of regulation, which doesn't kill innovation, but products society. When Thiru won the Nobel Prize in twenty fourteen, he said his role shifted from being an academic researcher to a public intellectual in his two thousand seventeen book economics for the common good, he addressed a broad, non academic audience and disgust, Major Global Challenges, relating to his work or market, power and regulation, but also about digital economies and climate change. He explains the shift. Prior to the Nobel Prize side was already engaged in policy making so I was. Talking with experts in academia in government in regulatory agencies in business and so on, and then there was a tipping point of Nobel Price I was walking in the streets of to lose Paris. And you get a brief moment of fame. People wanted to know more about economics and say we're looking for what you have written, and it's unreadable in. Mathematics and. Why don't you write something for the lepers? In retrospect, it was a good thing because in two thousand sixteen year, this wave starting in populism. People distrust experts dismiss expert. especially extremists are dismissing experts, and it's smelt. Only true in economic is missing through in genes in climate, science and many years experts. Disregarded sometimes for good reason, but mostly for bad reasons, so democracy cannot function unless as some kind of sharing of knowledge, so that was a starting point for for doing more on that. Main job is actually. To create. Right that's main in mission. The Internet is expected to generate twenty percent of global carbon emissions by twenty thirty in his book Chiro discussed how to make everyone accountable for the climate challenge, looking at the role of tech companies corporate responsibility in.

Europe Nobel Prize United States Thiru President Trump MOI Chiro Paris China Singapore Researcher
Fresh update on "nobel prize" discussed on Monocle 24: The Bulletin with UBS

Monocle 24: The Bulletin with UBS

00:40 min | 13 hrs ago

Fresh update on "nobel prize" discussed on Monocle 24: The Bulletin with UBS

"Freshest thing in the world of finance, taking you beyond the numbers in height, getting to the heart of the big issues of the day. Now, if you're a regular listener to this program, you'll be aware that be acids interested in addressing the big questions that shape our world to help answer them. They sought out a number of Nobel laureates in the Economic Sciences to ask them to share insights, discuss their research and their ever enquiring minds. This week we're hearing from one of these laureates. Jaunty Hall who won the Twenty Fourteen Nobel Prize for his analysis of market, power and regulation. Jaunty Roy was born in France in nineteen, fifty three, and is an economist and researcher, Blue School of Economics, and at the Institute for Advanced Study into lose two zero certainly knows how to manage corporate power in the modern economy since the mid one, thousand, nine hundred, and he's worked on developing frameworks.

Jaunty Roy Jaunty Hall Nobel Prize Economic Sciences Institute For Advanced Study Blue School Of Economics Researcher France
Fresh update on "nobel prize" discussed on Pat Thurston

Pat Thurston

00:40 min | 13 hrs ago

Fresh update on "nobel prize" discussed on Pat Thurston

"Aerobic capacity. It supports normal and dramatic activity throughout the body. It's just an amazing combination, and that's why we call it the advantage that Preston. You know, I love the fact that in the new Coke, you resveratrol super formula from purity products. You combined the Coke, you 10 with resveratrol. Now the resveratrol, the key molecule found in red wine, which they're studying at Harvard. And I know that it activates jeans for those who've just tuned in. Talk to us about all the excitement surrounding resveratrol and why you specifically wanted it in this formula. Well, let me tell you, the researchers at Harvard under the leadership of Dr David Sinclair. This is what they found Caloric restriction. Eating less slows the pace of aging. That's pretty darn impressive and what they found in laboratory studies of animals is that extended life span and it appeared that caloric restriction eating less food than you're eating right now, by a certain percentage increases your longevity you live longer. It increases the activity. Of what we call a longevity gene. They get switched on. They help improve metabolism. It increases your ability to cope your ability to adapt. In fact, this gene helps increased tissue repair, and it's switched on by a group of genes called Shorty ruins. Now they found two things at Harvard number One caloric restriction increases these longevity genes. These cartoons. Well, so does resveratrol, at least in their animal studies. And this is exactly why resveratrol been making all these worldwide headlines because if it works in humans, as it does in these animals, and I'm optimistic it will. It represents an entirely new approach to managing health and wellness, where we potentially used a nutritional compound like resveratrol selectively target the exact genes associated with these various areas of improvement in our health and our aging and Our longevity. Well now, Doctor President, you say that Coke, you 10 holds an elite status in the nutritional supplements industry because it's been so well documented. So well researched. You call this evidence based nutrition. Maybe give us a brief overview of the research and explain why Coke, you 10. Research is so widely respected. Well, let's go back 1957 University of Wisconsin The Nobel Prize for Peter Mitchell in 1978. The University of Texas Medical School Purdue University in Indiana Stockholm University in Sweden. The great study recently at the University of Ancona in Italy, on mitochondrial Energy and Coke, you attend University of Granada in Spain. Talking about Coke, you 10 being a powerful antioxidant articles published constantly throughout the world. The archives of Biochemistry and bio synthesis, the proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, major studies major universities right here in the United States and abroad a bottom line in these studies. Energetic mitochondria without coke, you 10. You don't.

Coke Harvard Preston University Of Ancona University Of Granada University Of Texas Medical Sc University Of Wisconsin Dr David Sinclair Archives Of Biochemistry National Academy Of Sciences Nobel Prize Doctor President Spain Peter Mitchell United States Indiana Stockholm University Sweden Italy
Malala Yousafzai Graduates From Oxford University

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:29 sec | 2 weeks ago

Malala Yousafzai Graduates From Oxford University

"Nobel Prize winner Malala Yousafzai is now an Oxford university graduate she tweeted earlier this week that she completed her degree and she included a photo of her family enjoying a celebratory cake another photo showed the twenty two year old participating in the Oxford tradition known as trashing which letter covered in food and graffiti Malala was nearly killed by the Taliban at the age of fifteen when she was shot in the head while on a school bus in Pakistan where she had been an advocate for girls education and

Malala Yousafzai Taliban Pakistan Nobel Prize Oxford
Edited by Andr Naffis-Sahely The Heart of a Stranger: An Anthology of Exile Literature

Bookworm

06:00 min | Last month

Edited by Andr Naffis-Sahely The Heart of a Stranger: An Anthology of Exile Literature

"I'm going to be talking about an extraordinary book. It's called the heart of a stranger. It's an anthology of exile good richer. And you know once upon a time that was an inevitable subject when we were talking about Joseph Conrad who wrote in English when his native language was Polish or about a -demia Nabokov when he was an exiled Russian aristocrat native language Russian road I in German and then in English but here we have an anthology. I think it's one of the most remarkable anthologies I've ever read it takes us from the ancient Greeks up to the present and shown us how much of the world has been living in exile. Odysseus returned to Greece at the end of the Trojan. More is the story of a man going from an island to island exile. Sometimes the exiles in this book are like the Britishers in Africa. They're exiled in Paradise. They are really. What is the expression you found for this Andre Parasites parasites in Paradise Andrei Nafis a? He is the editor of this book. The heart of a stranger. He gathers essays letters diaries poetry from every continent. How many authors are there in this book? Do you think there's one hundred contributors. We're reading not just homer and the Old Testament and the new testament but all the way to Palestinian poetry. This editor is born of an Iranian father and Italian mother he was born in Abu Dhabi and he brings the travels around the world. He's Taunt in England. He's currently teaching classes both oxydental college and Ucla. Now I'm telling you my listeners. This is the book to read if you want to know what is happening in the literary. World Today. Who are the people were talking to us? Who were their predecessors people like Emma Goldman? How did the idea for the San Thaung G Begin Andrei? Well I thank you for having me on the program. It's really quite quite a privilege to be able to talk to you about this. You know the the first question I usually get asked a dealing with. This book is is why now and I think. A lot of people pointed to the fact that this seems to be a particularly good moment to talk about exile. Although of course there's never been a bad moment to talk about exile others sixty five million displaced people that we know of this year two major wars and of course right now. I'm living in Los Angeles which is a home of exiles. We tend to think of the the homeless here in Los Angeles is coming from somewhere else attracted by the Clement California weather but of course a lot of them are Californians. So there's that they mentioned of the book. The other one is personal while it took me roughly around three years to put the book together after I signed the contract. Publishers in reality of really being preparing for it my entire life my father as you mentioned. Israelian he was exiled from Iran in nineteen seventy nine for belonging to a French Communist group. He was forced the Liberals leave the country my grandfathers on both sides where economic `exiles of one kind or another and so. I think there was the intense personal history on the one hand and on the other the need to create a very modest platform for some of the writers that I think need wider exposure. Let's pretend that I have not seen the San Thaung achieve before. What is the literature of exile? I know it has many definitions and that's one of its definitions that it can't be defined of but what is it well. I think it's it's safe to say that. Especially these days. We tend to think of as a by product of civilization so we are continually exposed to headlines The talks about political exiles exhaustive war tax exile governments in exile. But I think it's quite clear to me. That exile is actually engine of civilization. So take the founding myth of the Israelites with an exodus. The reason promised land. The American republic was founded by themselves the European Union likewise the Europe the Italian renaissance fueled by Byzantine exile so the literature of exile. Is I see. It really is a record of the civilizational process because again without exile you cannot have civilization the very first story actually in the book is a a retelling of an ancient Egyptian myth by the fantastic novelist. Keep Foos who one of my favorite authors Name of win win a Nobel Prize. He did thus to date. He is the only middle-eastern Nobel laureate

Andrei Nafis Foos Los Angeles Nabokov Nobel Prize Emma Goldman Odysseus Greece Joseph Conrad Abu Dhabi Africa Ucla Paradise San Thaung European Union Europe England Iran
CRISPR Office Hours with Hamid Ghanadaan

CRISPR Cuts

06:57 min | Last month

CRISPR Office Hours with Hamid Ghanadaan

"However presently the new thing in everyone's lives is over nineteen pandemic most of us are working from home and a distinct to this new non but we know it is difficult especially for scientists whose daily routine is to work in the lab and now they after transition to award from environment so in this episode. We're going to do something. Different can have a crisper officer session a platform to come together and discuss the impact of Covid nineteen on science and scientist Kevin Harlan head of signs at Santiago and additive empathy. Vp of marketing. It's Anthonio will host the session and our special guest is how Meka Don. Ceo of the Liners Group. I hope you enjoy this episode and feed supported by the scientific community despite being confined to homes right now so let's get started. Good morning everybody. We're all actually working from if you will but more likely in reality were trying to work in poem through a crisis pandemic so my name's Kevin Holding I'm the head of scientists go so hopefully this'll be the first of many of these weekly chats we can do. We'd like to engage you. The scientific community and people working specifically either genome engineering or maybe a working in a different area science just interested to talk to us and let us keep you company through this time so awesome. Thank you hi everyone. My name is Hamid Gone. I'm the founder and CEO of the strategy and insights firm. Linus and we are focused on the life science and health and wellness industry and we provide insights and strategy and innovation for this industry. And I'm delighted to be here with our friends at San Diego and to participate in this crisper office hours. I'm very passionate about science and looking forward to seeing what I can provide to help. Everybody get through this time. Great thank you to meet in elementary myself. My name is empty and I'm the VP of marketing Ago One of the biggest reasons why unbelievable scientific community is just the power to invoke change the power to really push humanity forward and while we are in a pandemic. I feel this is one of those moments where we can get together as a community as humans and make a difference so as we're going through this there's actually some interesting things that meet in. His team have done in this pandemic to really understand the community. What we're going through in. How can support one another? Do you WanNa take a moment to start off with. That means. Sure I'll just very quickly tee it up so as all of these stay at home. Guidances and shelter in place guidances. Were coming out in the early half toward the end of March. My team decided to deploy a global survey about what's happening in how the life science community is feeling. And so I'm here with the initial results of that to share with your ten season and going forward and Kevin is going to ask me some questions about it and we're just gonNA share some of the key findings with all of you and will go from there great. Yeah Actually Hamida difficult question. Actually I about Linus the company Wide You. Call it minus. Thanks for asking. So I'm the founder of blindness in the company is almost twenty twenty four years old and I was looking to pay homage to one of the great scientists that had influenced me and my life who is Linus Pauling. And there's a couple reasons why he really stood out to me as somebody who is really unique is that he is the only scientists to win two unshared. Nobel prizes one for his work in Chemistry and then the other one. He won the Nobel Peace Prize for his anti nuclear proliferation. Work and also what's unique about him is that he won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for a body of work that he had done not for a specific experiment and so he really struck me as somebody who is a renaissance person. And so I WANNA pay my loose on mosh to Linus Pauling and so and the name. Linus is easy to say. It's simple and I really liked it and so linus it is. I was hoping be Charlie Brown referencing there but I guess you know it's funny. You say that when I was doing research on the name it did invoke a lot of Linus Van Pelt. I think is the name of the Charlie Brown character and what I found is. I didn't know who this character was. I had to watch a whole bunch of Charlie Brown to figure out if this is a good person or not and I. I found him to be graded. He's he's a wonderful person. When people make that connection with Charlie Brown they actually remember the name of the company more and even if they've never heard of us they think they've heard about so. I thought it was all positive that that connection exists in even though that wasn't the original intention or the inspiration. I'm all very happy about it. Thanks for thanks for sharing that so I would say probably a lot of our audience. They're here most of them. I would assume are working from home. And they're not in the lab right now and so many of them actually will be genome engineers who are utilizing crisper for a bunch of different reasons in their research. Can you maybe tell us what inspired you to do this? Poll specifically now that we're entering this pandemic. Yes so my colleague and President Kristen Apple and I were actually on March twelfth on our way to a meeting here in Boulder and we received a call from the person with whom we were going to meet and that person decided to cancel the meeting and within a matter of minutes many of our meetings got cancelled and so we decided that we needed to find out what's happening within the life science community and to provide this information for the community for all sides of the community so the so that we can all understand and anticipate what's happening and more importantly for people not to make decisions based on panic or anecdote and so we want to provide at least some grounding on what's going on and what to expect so that decisions get made and better decisions get made and maybe even opportunities arise out of this. Pandemic that was the original impetus behind. We moved really quickly so I mentioned we had this experience on March twelfth. We launched a survey on March thirteen and we had an initial baseline so march thirteenth was a Friday and we had an initial baseline by the end of the day that Monday. And then we've taken to time points since then and we're going to publish the Knicks major time point at the end of next week so we're starting to look at how this thing is progressing within the life science community in what the community is doing. Great maybe when it started in and start talking about the work that you've done so we were able to gather just over a thousand respondents for what we're calling. The baseline study almost two thirds of the respondents were academics or working in university and then the remainder work in a variety of different institutions. Many of them private business like Pharma Biotech. Cro's and manufacturers of other

Linus Charlie Brown Linus Pauling Linus Van Pelt Founder And Ceo Nobel Prize Vp Of Marketing Kevin Harlan Meka Don Vp Of Marketing Ago One CEO Kevin Holding San Diego Knicks Liners Group Covid Officer Pharma Biotech Hamid
Struggling with Digestive Problems?

Dishing Up Nutrition

09:39 min | Last month

Struggling with Digestive Problems?

"I'm Shelby Olsen. I'm a licensed nutritionist. With a bachelor's degree in exercise science and a masters degree in clinical nutrition and I understand that education is really important when it comes to talking about human health and nutrition. And of course I learned lots of things about nutrition and health while I was completing my master's degree. But to be honest with you as a practicing nutritionist with nutritional weight and wellness. I feel like I've learned even more so much of that. Clinical experience working with clients helping people feel their best. You know they always talk about education's great you learn lots of good things but when you're out in the real world working with people that's really where you've got to use those problem solving skills you really have to understand what is going to make a big difference here for people. We don't WanNa talk about theories we WANNA talk about action step so theresa and I are tasked this morning with talking about how those of you can change your digestive health so our topic is all things related to digestion have digestive problems. You certainly are not alone. According to a survey in the Journal of gastroenterology seventy four percent of the US population has some type of Gi symptoms and Gi gastrointestinal symptoms. That could be things like heartburn or acid reflux that could be abdominal pain or nausea. And of course that could be bloating gas diarrhea and constipation. You Know Teresa when I was in my first year of my master's program one of my professors said to me. You know if you're not comfortable asking people about their poop you're in the wrong profession. Isn't that or digestive. Problems are a common reason. People make an appointment with a traditional or a Dietitian. You know three so. I know you're busy in the office. Always but I'm sure you have clients that are in their eighties or ninety S. I'm sure you work with kids as well. You know we see that people can have digestive problems regardless of their age in fact we were talking before we came in that. There's a nutrition educator with nutritional weight and wellness who is a physical therapist and specializes in helping kids with chronic and very severe constipation. And I was KINDA SURPRISED TO LEARN. That parents are flying in all over to get help with constipation. Whether it's some some nutrition help some physical therapy help as you might imagine. Childhood Constipation is not very enjoyable for parents. Oh you feel your paying exactly so when we think about constipation. Oftentimes we're thinking about processed foods. Excess sugar were really looking at. What could be that foundation of creating that slow digestion or creating more of that painful Experience so another culprit that I think is often linked to constipation in children cheese sticks. And we're going to talk a little bit more about foods that are more challenging for the digestive tract but cheeses often constipated for both children and adults so think about the foods. Kids eat MAC and cheese pizza. Maybe snacking on crackers and cheese or those sorts of things they can be really challenging for those little belly's to digest. Yeah those are the foods that I think are very common. That kids are eating right now. Just because they're they're easy to eat first of all. I mean as far as just the mechanics of eating them right and then Yeah I mean. They're very convenient for parents to give their kids to right so parents. If you're listening you do have a child or you. As an adult or struggling with constipation or other tummy. Troubles are tasked today. Theresa and I are really hoping to address what helps with good gut health. And what may happen? If you don't have that right balance in the intestinal tract now it may surprise some of you listening to learn that your gut is even connected to your brain. We talked about that gut brain connection now. You heard her voice Joining me in studio this morning is our co host Teresa Wagner. I would say First and foremost she's a mom that's where she's spending a lot of time but we also get her a few days a week to in our offices and of course on the show so theresa you're a registered and licensed Dietitian. And how long have you been practicing? I think I've been a nutritional weight and wellness for five years. Maybe it's six. Yeah this they time flies when you're having fun so you must be fine now at one time. Teresa you and I were talking a little bit more as Nutritionists Dietitians. We experienced some of these things too. And I think you've kind of shared you've had some day just of issues before so hopefully you can kind of bring us into some of that discussion. Yes and maybe before we discuss that and before we discuss heartburn diarrhea constipation. Ibs I want to talk about how your immune function is connected to your Gut Hill. So not just the brain but also the immune system. Yes everything's connected. Isn't it approximately seventy percent of your immune system is found in your digestive system and because of Cova Nineteen? Many of us are trying to do everything. Possible in order to have good immune function Have you thought about your gut health and how it affects your immune function and I know shelby you have for the listeners out there have you made that connection. It's interesting to realize that throughout your life your immune system has been shaped by the communities of bacteria that reside in an on your body. How you were fed as a baby is a very important part digestive health And it's important for your current digestive function so how you were fed as an infant affects your current health right. Breast Milk provided for those of you who are breastfed and abundance of beneficial bacteria. And if you were breastfed you may have missed out on some of the those most protective bacteria from your intestinal track And now as a mom when I hear that I know of so many moms who tried breastfeeding and forever. Whatever reason it just didn't work out so this isn't necessarily meant to be a guilt trip but what it is or it's not at all meant to be a guilt trip but What it is just really good information for you to know for your children or you're having digestive issues Or the prevention of digestive issues or chronic illnesses right and there's also really good information for us as adults who maybe when we were being raised or when our parents were feeding us that it wasn't maybe breastfeeding wasn't in vogue at the time or our mothers weren't able to breastfeed at that time just as good information to have. I agree and I often tell people you know. I know I wasn't breastfed as a baby. And when I talked to some of my clients and ask them. It's it's an interesting reaction they while I had never thought of that. Does that really affect my immune system or you know that sort of stuff now and I tell them well you know. We can't travel back in the past and we're not going to blame and shame mom for what she didn't know at the time but that also gives like for me personally. That gave me really good reason to focus on reestablishing that good bacteria. Because I know I wasn't exposed to that beneficial bacteria through breast milk. Yeah good information right Some babies who are breastfed have a higher proportion of that beneficial bacteria that protects them against pathogens Certain diseases are often linked to an unhealthy. Good which may not contain adequate levels of that beneficial bacteria that bacteria. That's crucial for good digestion. Which we're talking about today exactly and in fact Teresa when we're talking about bacteria we're starting to see the bad bacteria has been connected as one of the primary causes of ulcers specifically those peptic ulcers. So yes I said bad. Bacteria causes ulcers not stress and not spicy foods for one hundred years or more Doctors and researchers believed that ulcers were related to stress and spicy foods. You know but it wasn't until two thousand five that Nobel Prize winners in medicine Dr Barry Marshall and Dr Robin Warren made that connection between ulcers and a type of bacteria called heliotrope actor Pylori. Sometimes you guys have heard of that as H. Pylori

Teresa Wagner Theresa Constipation Shelby Olsen Severe Constipation Gut Hill United States Diarrhea Nobel Prize Heartburn Journal Of Gastroenterology Bloating Licensed Dietitian Abdominal Pain Dr Barry Marshall Cova Dr Robin Warren
Kevin Rudd on anarchy in the post COVID-19 world order, and could stable democracy be a reality in Iraq?

Between The Lines

12:41 min | Last month

Kevin Rudd on anarchy in the post COVID-19 world order, and could stable democracy be a reality in Iraq?

"Former Prime Minister Kevin right on the geopolitical consequences of the pandemic. He predicts the coming post covered. Anneke plus Iraq believe it or not. It's future looks brought today than it has an any point in the past Dick. I'd stay with us for my chat with Linda Robinson from the Rand Corporation. She'll tell us while we should not give up on Baghdad's fragile. Democracy Corona virus continues to take a toll on the health of nations around the world. One thing has become clear the winners and losers not who we might have expected a year ago. The virus is taking an uneven and unpredictable. Course through the world defying. I usual assumptions about power and resilience. Some small poor countries being left relatively unscathed all powerful prosperous nations. I've been ravaged. So what does this mean for global order and for the strategic robbery between China and the United States? Will everything change or is the virus? Mealy accelerating trends that were already in place. Former prime minister of Australia. Kevin Rudd is the President of the Society Policy Institute in New York. He's written an essay in the most recent issue of Foreign Affairs magazine in New York. It's called the coming postcode Enki and he joins me now. From Queensland's Sunshine Coast Kevin Rudd. Welcome back to between the lawns. Good to be with you on between the lines. Now you'll recent essays titled The coming Postcode Anneke Y Anneke. You're good real turns color of international relations you would know that realists assume that. Anneke is in fact the natural state All the International Society of states rent was Headley Bull who wrote about this crowd along time ago and Australian realist and Australian realist. Ten within the real documents that order actually represents the exception rather than the rule So why do I argue this I argue it because the current order as we've done since forty five is underpinned by and large by US geopolitical pound Gio economic power secondly That's become challenge at least by China Thirdly the Cova crisis has turbo charge The hit on American real and perceived power. But there's a full factor as well. Which is the impact which the Cova crisis has on China's Powell not least the damage to its economy the flow through effect to its ability to spend on the amounts of money on its military and on the belt and road initiative example but more importantly international perceptions of China in the developed in the developing world. So where do we end up? We end up not with The same old order as in the past but a slow and steady drift towards more anoc order. We're both China and the US damaged and the institutions of global governance with the UN. The will bank the National Monetary Fund the G. Twenty etc become increasingly the terrain for geopolitical battle. Between these two wounded POWs a K. Sunday the country's the victory he but some analysts say that China's heavy handed approach eccentric lockdowns violence. That's been a political win for Xi Jinping in Matt strengthened the Central Authority of the communist regime. How would you respond to them? Well let's look at That argument within China itself. There's been a huge hit on the accompany And as a result of that China will have its worst gross numbers twenty twenty the Ted in over half a century since the end of the Cultural Revolution almost That is huge. It undermines She Jinping's China Drain which was One pillar of which was for China to quadruple. Its G. D. DP by twenty twenty measured against two thousand levels this single year of itself. Economic non-performance blows a hole amidships in that and then secondly on top of that. Tom You've got the problem which arises in terms of internal political debates within China so and I think some growing levels of resistance to Xi Jinping's on leadership and finally as I mentioned before The blowback around the world in terms of the economic damage To economize both developed and developing causing a big question mark to a rise in terms whether China has in fact being the risk to the world's best friend because of the outbreak of this virus. So these factors I think. Qualify the overall argument you hear from some the China's authoritarian model in managing the crisis domestically translates into a geopolitical win the China internationally. I don't think that necessarily holes walk conversations. Do you think heaven. I going on right now in Beijing over China's place in the world I mean is the division division over this so-called Wolf Warrior this is the and diplomacy we often hear about a division between that Wolf Warrior. Diplomacy versus say China's desire to promote soft power. Chinese politics in some respects is not dissimilar to elements of politics. We and other countries. That is you find nationalist. Ten internationalists you find a local ists globalists' you find audio logs versus as it were reformers and pregnant at this and so the as political system while it's Control by Xi Jinping's leadership still has all these tensions and personalities within it so the debates now I think are of a twofold. How do we allow this to happen? In the first place what failed in terms of the processes insistence China put in place after the Saas Crisis of two thousand and three to prevent a pandemic or epidemic as it was then from happening again. The second debate is how the Hillary you get the economy back together again given the China a economy with forty percent of Gdp comes from the traded six or the economy and International. Trade is being blend. Bits by this crosses and the other debate again between nationalists internationalised is the one. You've just touched on the Tom. Which is China's wolf worried diplomats out there launching attacks against any critique of China's performance On the one hand defend the party's legitimacy and on the other hand older more seasoned diplomat saying this isn't actually contributing much to the improvement of China's global image those discussions and debates underway. At the moment we're talking about this wolf warrior diplomacy. What do you make of China's recent boycotts threats of boycotts of Australian Exports Bali? Beef what what's going on well as I've said in other recent interviews since those public statements by the China's ambassador Australia it's unacceptable in my view for any ambassador accredited to any country to receive public threats against the host country In City five years of more dealing with the Australian China relationship I don't recall previous Chinese ambassadors of having done that not by any Australian diplomat ever having done that irrespective of the crisis of the day with was ten on all the things that I went through when I was in office etc so I think as a matter of shall we say diplomatic practice. What occurred then was regrettable as as being some of the hotline commentary. Which emanated from the Chinese nationalist media? the bottom line is however the Chinese nationalists have seen The effectiveness All the some of these sorts of measures when applaud various countries in the past sorts of economic leverage which China replied to no way out to no way through the Nobel Prize Committee Awarded the Nobel Peace Prize to a famous Chinese dissident And I've also seen how those Economic Leverage points of work with various of the Europeans. So this is not alien to the Chinese playbook my argument about China's Australia's management of The relationship in prison is that if the Australian government's of the view and a view I in general support that there needs to be an independent international inquiry as to the origins the virus transmission of the virus notifications to the WHO and threw them to the world community etc. Then again to put that Ford isn't as trade in government and then do some work on it. I get a few other governments to come along with you an advance that through the multilateral machinery which rather than just blow it out as a thought bubble That's the way which you do. Real things in the international community rather than I. Fear sometimes pitching a diplomatic initiative primarily for domestic political leverage into straighter. What complicates matters? Further is president trump's theory that the virus was leaked from a lab in Wuhan and raises the question. Why would China agree to enquiry without losing this between the lines on? Abc Radio National. The familiar voice. You're hearing is former prominence to Kevin. Rudd is now president of the Asia Society Policy Institute in New York. We've been talking about his article in the current issue of Foreign Affairs magazine. Kevin we'll talking about China and how it's paid a price as a result of this current ivars. Let's turn to the United States. How badly damaged is the use in your judgement? I mean we'll recover reasonably quickly With a change of administration in November or does the damage go deep. Perhaps too deep for recovery has been deep damage politically. The the. The House is a divided house within the United States. Those of us who have followed. Us politics of the many years have rarely seen it This divisive and that actually is a real factor in terms of constructing a post presidential election national consensus on how America engages the World. And the future. American politics has become so binary including on America's own future will view on the economic damage. It's huge. This is the biggest hit on newest economy at least since nineteen forty-six and the recovery from the war and probably since the depression the end of the depression and thirty three So this takes a while to recover But the American economy know a history of resilience. Look what happened after the global financial crisis? But well I was going to make the point to is enormous capacity for change and renewal. I mean you think about its recovery from the civil war that oppression in Vietnam. You being a bit too pessimistic. Kevin. Well I live in the United States and I actually listened to the debate on back in Australia now and when my American interlocutors Republican and Democrat Friends of mine over twenty years who A positive let's call it. The Foreign Policy National Security Policy Machinery signed that it's become increasingly hard to forge consensus these days across the aisle on America's behavior in the world That is a real issue. Then it's not just my external analysis it's part of the internal analysis within the US itself. Do I think the United States can come through the domestic political Malays and the Economic Destruction? Which has occurred? Yes I do. Because it's remarkably resilient country But I think a precondition is that We see a Democrat. Win this November it's not that. I am a A cheerleader for Joe Biden. Personally I barely know the man Bought he's lucky to put together a mainstream Competent Foreign Policy and National Security Policy Tame as opposed to Frankly the chaotic nature of the trump administration on most foreign and national security policy questions. And that I think is necessary for America to rebuild. Its alliances abroad rebuild. Its credibility in the eyes of the risks of the will and to overcome what has been an extraordinary period where America rather than taking the lead in the global recovery From the virus both in public health systems and economic terms as simply being missing in action and in fact the unable to contain it's the damage domestically

China United States Kevin Rudd Anneke Xi Jinping Australia Anneke Y Anneke President Trump Prime Minister Foreign Affairs Magazine America Baghdad New York Linda Robinson Rand Corporation Dick Joe Biden Iraq Nobel Prize Robbery
The Big PhD Pause - postgraduate students, COVID-19, and the next brain drain

Science Friction

07:05 min | 2 months ago

The Big PhD Pause - postgraduate students, COVID-19, and the next brain drain

"Across Australia graduate students are always on taught deadlines to deliver a major work of original research. But now they're all important. Experiments are suspended or hanging on a precipice locked out of their labs or unable to travel to their field research sites. Many of lost the part-time jobs that pay rent or feed their families and some now also wondering what the future is for jobs in science in a post pandemic world. Could this pandemic trigger a as next GEN? Brian drying something that people don't realize about a PhD is that it's very isolating. You're like your. I'm in an office with other people for sure but we're all working on very different things and very niche things. Yeah it's really hard to to not feel learn in this when you've got that initial stress the initial problems that come with doing a PhD and then you wack pandemic on top of this is really Problematic for most of us being in a PhD being so isolated in this line of research. Which is why we get into it. We want to be independent research. Is We want we? It's our own body of work you know it's professional but it's personal and emotional. It's this thing that you divide basically three or more years of your life to and the idea of more isolation. I wasn't immediately helming but as as the month of gone on it's been it's been quite difficult. Scientists get this ID. We have the stereotype of being quite stoic and emotionally removed. It comes from the idea that we the work that we do is at. Its core unbiased survey of the world around us. Become at anything bias. What you're observing. What you're experimenting on So in creating a dialogue around it being okay to tell people what. You're feeling personally without letting gory. This old preconceived notion that talk about your feelings as a scientist today passionate young scientists open up it is a well established fact that went into PhD Students. Experience distress and one in three are at risk of a common psychiatric disorder. The focus the hours a PhD demands a damn hard at the based times. But how are post Grad students holding up in this pandemic and what Judy of k? Do strutting universities and the Australian government have to support them. I stepping up really daunting and obviously now during this pandemic when there's a lot of uncertainty facing aspect dot mental health issues just getting worse Ramana Ri- abuse of each is doing her. Phd At Curtin University investigating molecular mechanisms of aggressive pancreatic cancer to help develop more effective treatments like many students who crucial lab experiments have been halted but she also has the needs of the entire nations post. Grad students on her plate as national president of the Council of a strategy and Postgraduate Associations. Capa but I cannot believe that I inherited the Cup national president's position during a global pandemic. Got It thinking. Forty Years COUPLA existing. They has ever been a pandemic like this. They're doing pay is not like an Undergrad degree. It's MOLUCCA A job. It's the crucial foundation for your career. In Science. In fact it's the stage when many Nobel Prize winners of done some of their k. Work but this pandemic is already forcing Grad students to make really tough urgent choices. The thumbs students have already withdrawn and as a result some international students have already gone back. Herm other students Yet is T-o-n how long this situation will continue. We have a situation now. graduate Looking at what's enough or day. Students circumstances are so different depending on the project. They're doing what they're up to in the three and a half years I've got to finish. Universities are really going to need to respond to this crisis case by case Taylor roads and I'm a third year each student at Latrobe University. And I'm doing my PhD. In a lab that focuses on Christie says over blindness which is a neglected tropical disease caused by a worm. Basically this illness is found in sub Saharan Africa and it can lead to blindness in its worst kind of bombs. Epilepsy developmental delays. It's really a bad thing to how high low is genetically analyzing samples of the parasitic worm. Take him from African communities to understand its evolution and spray it we found the transmission radius is actually a lot larger than what the W. H. Pat originally hypothesized answer. L. Analysis is kind of informing the carrying out of Mass Drug Administration throughout Africa and all these areas to actually eradicate the worm or even control it. What is this pandemic donning? In terms of what you can and can't do. Now I would have been sequencing more ones to get at bigger sample size for some of the analysis. I want to publish at least in the state of Victoria we on able to go into a facility and US out lab facilities. My University universities very strict on this. Or you have to prove that the work you're doing is absolutely essential. Anton sensitive in my work doesn't come under the umbrella. Sir. I'm not able to access the lab and I'm not able to access my computer in the office but I have my laptop at home with me so I'm able to do some work on that right now. I'm just coming through the daughter. I already have and seeing. What kind of story I can make with that Dada? I've it in a publication which is your pending. More daughter Nell yes. I'm Kinda just trying to fill time with whatever I can do. That will be somewhat productive. But I wasn't the merced affected by this. There are people who were on a really long time course. Experiments with moral animals hats euthanize. All the animals basically just pick up and pack up and Gar in the middle of a three months costs which would have been terrible sir trying to keep my inconvenience in. Context

Scientist President Trump Brian Curtin University Australia Australian Government Africa Saharan Africa Nobel Prize Latrobe University Nell Judy Merced GAR Capa United States Christie Postgraduate Associations W. H. Pat
"nobel prize" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

The Jordan Harbinger Show

09:12 min | 2 months ago

"nobel prize" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

"Realized what had happened to the Nobel Prize was really done in a way to sort of accentuated as a modern day idle for scientists which is a little bit ironic because scientists are mostly atheists agnostic. If there anything very few of them are actually practicing religious adherence and so this is sort of a kosher. It's sort of an acceptable thing to venerate. And you can almost not even read a book about science without hearing. I don't care if it's Richard Dawkins or near the grass Tyson. They talk about the noble. It'll just go into come into play now. This is a prize again. That's awarded by four hundred mostly men in Sweden and it's not like there's some law physics that determines who should women about prize and I didn't know that until I had. I knew it wasn't allowed physics. I didn't know how narrow this was. How myopic the vision of the Nobel Prize is being carried out today and how different it has become from what Alfred Nobel left in his will and I also want to say to you like there's a big you know it's called a Mitzvah. Good thing to do but one of the biggest things in my religion is to take care of. Somebody's wishes after they die. And the reason is it's something done completely altruistically. You never be repaid right. The person's dead homer Simpson wanted. You know like I'll take care of your funeral if you take care mind like it doesn't work that way and in this case. I fought like well. What else could be done for this guy who wanted to do something very specific give it to a single person from the preceding year who had the greatest benefit to mankind. And how far we've strayed from that. So I realized at that point it really wasn't worth worshiping anymore and I also feel that that could be true of almost any look in any zero sum game which is a competition where only one person can win and other team can win the world series. I mean you know how there's as many second runners up of the world series as there are winners of the World Series and Oscars etc. So is it really that bad to be second? No in fact the law of averages says that you will actually be more likely to not get into the promised. Land not get to your personal goal because there's only one right so if there's only one winner than the majority of people selected at random will be losers of that particular accolate so why be upset about that and said use it as an opportunity to grow and look for the idols in your field and as I said I. I'm curious how you felt when you you want apple podcasts of two thousand eighteen. But you didn't win between nineteen right. And how did that feel because you got better right? There shows a lot better now truthfully. I one most downloaded new show so that was a different award because years ago having never won anything from apple or never won any like real award for podcasting at first. I was like. Oh this kinda sucks. Like my show's really good. I at least I think so and so does the audience. What's the deal right? And then I started asking about how these awards are given because I was curious it was like maybe I can sort of tailor what I'm doing. Yeah to the people giving the awards but what I found was that you know. After putting a few whiskeys and a few of the right people that a lot of these awards especially stuff that's from these major platforms. There's like one guy who just he gets an email and he's like hey our best of twenty nine thousand nine is due and the guy's like Oh crap what have I been listening to in the past couple of weeks. Oh this is good That's good. Let me look at the most downloaded. Oh Yeah. That one's pretty good too. Oh this guy's hilarious and I loved Lord of the Rings Okay. I'm done. Let's go eat lunch like there's not an academy. There's not this selection process and even in some of the awards were there isn't academy a lot of the people in the academy our people have been doing Xyz for a long time and they're the only ones that get devote so it's more a measure of M. I. Friends with these seven guys. Who won a podcast award in the last seven years? And are they gonNa vote me in an? I am friends with a lot of those guys so I asked some of those guys about it and they were like dude. You don't need our award. You could add all our shows together and they don't equal the size of yours like this isn't a word for kind of hobbyists right and they're like in any way I I love your show. I listened to it all the time and that for me made me feel really good because I realized wait a minute do I care what seven ranchos think or twelve or do I care what. Like the four hundred or four hundred. There are hundreds of thousands of people listening to this show in the email me all the time. Why the hell would I chase some people that may or may not listen that you know? I drink beer with twice a year when I go to podcasting events that are perfectly nice people. I don't really care it doesn't do anything. It doesn't do anything for business. And when I got best of two thousand eighteen or most downloaded new show I realized well. That's cool but the audience did that for me so it doesn't really matter so when I didn't win most downloaded new show in two thousand nineteen because you literally can't because it's not a new show anymore. I realized not only does this not matter but the other categories in which can win are even less relevant than most downloaded new show. It matters even less. Yeah and I think if someone said. Hey we chose you as our favorite podcast for this company I would say. Is it going to get more people listening to the show? And in ninety nine percent of cases it is not going to do that. Now look if spotify says we're GONNA feature you on the front page for a month because we chose your show that could be game changing for the show just as Nobel prize could probably be game changing for you getting funding for whatever later on. But yeah real talk. It doesn't matter it doesn't matter for me. I should say but I had to go through that process slowly. 'cause it was like well that's a bunch of crap. Why don't ever win anything? And then I realized do I care today even know this existed before I won it last time. No exact. In which case does it really matter to the majority of people no? I don't really care that much about it if it's not gonNA do anything for the business and I'm not going. Oh it's an old boys network. Screw it there. It's all I don't have sour grapes about it at all. And when other people in the words it's liberating to be genuinely happy for them especially if they're really happy about it. I've got a buddy who runs a show called dark diaries. And he's like just killing. It shows wildfire. He's grown to like the size of our show almost in like the last two years and he tells stories about hacking and stuff and it just caught. Fire caught lightning in a bottle. And it's a good show. I'm not pissed off about it. Which surprised even me so I guess that's kind of where we're at with it but it's a nice place to be but it doesn't happen overnight. Yeah exactly and and would you believe the same exact thing? Everything you said could be said. Replace podcast with the Nobel Prize. It's literally assigned by one single small Scandinavian country. And it's taken on this outsized importance and the reason for that is because I believe and content in the book. People love to worship things they love to have these you know like in. Jack Nicholson says in a few good men. Yeah you want me on that wall. You need me on that wall. In order to settle an argument all you have to say is a Nobel Prize laureate said the following etc. That settles things. Now it's a little less cut and dry in the case of entertainment etc Albert Einstein. How many Nobel prizes do you think he won? He won one and legitimately he could have won seven or eight. I mean just. According to like how many brilliant discoveries and creations he had now. Why didn't he? Because her some unwritten forces and things that are nonscientific at work in fact. There's only one human being in the history of the planet that one more than one Nobel Prize in physics and for this obscure kind of things in The physics of what are called semiconductors and superconductors. Now should he be exceptionally proud? I mean you look. At Oscars Rita Hayworth one like four Oscars but like these are the selected at least by this one governing body completely subjectively as the greatest intellects of the world and they only win one or they don't win again. You're listening to the Jordan Harbinger show. We'll be right back after this. This episode is sponsored in part by skill share skill shares an online learning community with thousands of inspiring classes for creative end curious people or people that just need to like learn new stuff new skills in fact there are tons of membership sites but still shares interesting. Because it's a community that has people teaching individual skills. Yes there's productivity lifestyle entrepreneurship stuff. There's specific types of software but there's also people teaching random skills like bookshelves and other little things you didn't actually look at as skills per se. One of our designers is learning slash relearning animation software on there right now. Jason. I know you're learning some designs offer. I Rent Yeah Yeah. I'm learning in design. I came from the page maker in Cork expressed as back in the day. And I have to do some brochures for some stuff. We're doing here in the neighborhood for like local outreach during the pandemic and I needed to get some software and learn it which was in design and I'm like I don't WanNa read the manuals. Let me just go to skill share and find somebody to teach me the important parts right away. I basically got through it in about four hours in. Learn all the INS and outs of in design and got my brochures out around the neighborhood right now. It's pretty cool. Yeah it's kind of Nice to just be like. How do I make brochures using design? Not like how do I use in design? And it's like page one getting started in the manual or watching. The videos made by the company as always such a huge pain. Because they're trying to get everybody but you can always find sort of specific applications for software or other products in skill share. Anyway tell them where they can get two free months of premium membership. You can explore creative and get two months. Free of premium membership at skill share dot com slash. That's two whole months.

Nobel Prize Alfred Nobel apple Sweden Richard Dawkins homer Simpson spotify Rita Hayworth Jack Nicholson Cork Albert Einstein Xyz Jason
"nobel prize" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

The Jordan Harbinger Show

10:12 min | 2 months ago

"nobel prize" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

"You do here on the show. Do Subscribe to this course in the newsletter. So come join us. We'll be in smart company where you belong now. Here's Brian Kaeding Brian. Thanks for coming on the show. Thanks Jordan it's a. It's a real pleasure to be here. Yeah you sound like you meant that. That's true it's it's only taken me a couple of years. Yeah that's true now. The book is losing the Nobel Prize. Which is kind of an interesting angle. Because normally you'd think wow we have Nobel laureates coming on and you're like a Nobel laureate is at the honor that we're talking about here honorable mention our dishonorable mention. Yeah well actually you know. The book started off as a With a title losing Nobel Prize sort of as a double entendre French listeners. Might say and that's that you know. I knew personally for reasons we can get into that. I had created a Nobel worthy experiment and we had made an announcement that was covered all around the world. But I knew instantly that I would not be one of the ones winning the Nobel prize even it was instantly talked about and rap tones as being worthy and the other meaning of it came later as I wrote the book. Which is that. The Nobel Prize needs to be done away with at least it's negative aspects that we can get into and therefore it needs to be lost in its current form and kind of revived in a better form. First of all what was your. Can you give like thirty second overview of what was Nobel worthy because I think a lot of people are kind of well? What would you lose for? What what was it? That Lee lost. Yeah so I'm cosmologists. Ever heard of that book everything I needed to know I learned in kindergarten. I'm planning on book everything I ever needed to know. I learned in Advanced General Tippety. It's hard to give a thirty second overview but I will do my best. And that's that I'm a cosmetologist which doesn't mean I do hair and makeup but instead means that I studied the birth of the early universe and actually cosmology and cosmetology share that prefects cosmos because it means beautiful in. Greek is a of beautiful. If you think about it itself that the face that the universe presents US gives us an opportunity to understand her on origins and since I was a young kid I had to really arching desires. One was to understand the universe as much as I could before I left this mortal coil and to to win a Nobel prize and the kind of intersected in this experiment called BICEP that I invented along with some collaborators at Caltech and elsewhere and that we eventually took down to the very bottom of the world to the South Pole Antarctica where it observed for many years and finally did discover the very thing I want to discover or so he thought and that was the birth pangs of the Big Bang and you can think of the Big Bang as explosive expansion. If you like although it's not technically correct of all matter all space and perhaps the beginning of time itself and so what we thought we witness was the origin of time and so fascinating to think that a little idea that came up with as a twenty something thirty something year old young scientists would have such implications for not only science but philosophy even theology. I mean who hasn't thought about the universe in where we all come from when you look up on a dark starry night. Sure and then he lost it. Why it's rigged. That's right. Yeah they they. Certainly don't have any compunction awarding it to white men such as myself but the Nobel prize is given out. According to Alfred Nobel's will so Alfred Nobel was kind of the Steve Jobs of the eighteen? Hundreds He was one of the wealthiest and most successful inventors in history and he invented a little substance that we came to call dynamite and dynamite was incredibly profitable and was also used for warfare in addition to constructing and demolition and so He sort of invented this prize with an aim of recognizing the world's best scientists and those that contributed to world peace. Which is kind of ironic. It is ironic. I invented dynamite. You know what? Let's name the Peace Prize after me. This could not. This is never gonNA get misused. Actually he was impelled to create this prize because he was walking around Paris one day and he's came on a newspaper that said Alfred Nobel. The merchant of death is dead and that was kind of odd. You know it's as Mark Twain said. Reports of my death are slightly exaggerated. It was actually an older brother who died. But he kinda got this George Bailey. You remember a wonderful life. He got to see what life would be like without him after he's gone and it wasn't pretty and they were kind of gleefully celebrating his death in this. Parisien newspaper Obituary so he resolved then to redeem the Nobel name and in so doing created the Nobel Prize and it was meant to recognize the greatest and most beneficial invention or discovery that occurred that was created by a single person in the preceding year. And so we have come very far from what Alfred Nobel originally wanted but our discovery was really one for the ages. If it had held up the reason that it wasn't awarded to us no member of my team want it so we all lost it in a certain sense is because we were trying to study the origin of the very largest thing that possibly exist namely the universe and in so doing we were spoiled and actually ruined. Our results weren't wrong. We didn't make a blunder but it turned out we were kind of tripped up by the smallest substance in the universe namely dust. And so I know you've got a young child at home. I several at home and dust is ubiquitous for people in life. We dust everywhere. You didn't episode once about sand while sand is just the tip of the iceberg so to speak in the universe in the cosmos is basically littered. It's a filthy filthy universe that we inhabit and mostly due to stars that used to exist that blew up. And so we knew that these stars would blow up and they would litter the interstellar medium of our galaxy with DOS. And we tried to get rid of it. But the only team that held the key to the dusts reality or lack thereof was being maintained and kept close to the vest by our arch nemesis a satellite located a million miles from Earth. That held the key to really confirming or discontinuing. We were going to claim what we did at Harvard University on Saint Patrick's Day twenty fourteen. Which is the claim that we had discovered the origin of the universe via this inflationary that scientists pursued for literally twenty years at that point so you ended up not winning Nobel Prize and then you decided screw it. I'm going to market this into a book like I mean I'm trying to follow your thought process here from. Yeah okay. I didn't win. This look real. Talk where you super crushed at that point because you thought. I'M GONNA win this Nobel Prize. I'm going to go down in history. Then there was nothing. There is a kind of a whiplash of emotions. As that's for sure you know people talk about you just have sour grapes kaeding. You know you would have happily accepted it even though you know a lot of the book. Well I shouldn't say the book is a memoir. An autobiography of a scientist at a young age trying to achieve the highest heights in his field and for us that's unquestionably the Nobel Prize. There's no greater accolade. I claiming all of society I mean it's not like newspapers. Ask Some Hollywood star. You know who he or she should vote for in the presidential election there. They're all too happy to give their opinions. But they'll publish seventy Nobel laureates say that you should vote for you. Choose your candidate there. But in this case for what I wanted to do it was first and foremost to really understand how the early universe behave because I thought that there could be no greater mystery than that. I knew concomitant with that could come the Nobel prize and I have to say it was a huge motivation for me Jordan. I grew up with a very difficult but ultimately a loving father and he was a great scientist who a mathematician and he was a scientist and he had become a full professor. So I'm only a full professor for a few years. Now at age you know my late forties but he was a full professor at Cornell University when he was twenty seven years old he and I were really competitive as you might have been competitive with your dad. You know Florida football around the yard and you know like the Great Santini wrestling or whatever he was like that intellectual jousting and so I knew the only way to kind of come his shadow or get out from under his shadow. Would it be to do something? He never did which is Nobel prize so for many years I thought that was sort of not only a nice kind of accompaniment to understanding the universe worked but it became like you know winning an Oscar winning best podcast of the year. It became a goal into itself and when. I fell short of it. Two things happened one. I had to deal with this crushing blow as you say to come so close and not win. After all the blood sweat and tears and and travel and people that I knew and loved and lost over the decade it took to make these measurements and then to be shut out of the credit for doing in part the creation of the experiment that ultimately led to these results along with colleagues it was quite crushing but ultimately I came to see as sort of a journey of introspection. Why did I care so much to win this prize? Was it just for my father's kind of accolades and adoration. Was it for something inside of me need that I had to be you know held up in the steam. I mean it's like having the one million instagram followers for scientists is even more. I mean there are fewer people currently alive that hold the Nobel Prize in physics. Then you know have been in the space station the last couple of years or visit at the South Pole currently in the middle of winter there. So you know thinking about want to do. It caused a deep kind of introspective glanced into what drives a scientist. And not all my colleagues are like me. I don't want to say that but there are a lot. I was told when I was hired. Basically to to get tenure to get the highest levels of Academia. You have to be on the short list of Nobel Prize winners. I'm still told that by people that the research I'm doing is great. I'm still have a chance to win the Nobel Prize and I say that would be pretty ironic at this point. After all the criticism I make in the book they might give it to just to be like Mel. Let's watch a meet these words. I don't know do you think it's increased your chances or decrease chances. Well I had a book critic right. That was a wonderful book. She hated my conclusions and she disagreed with them vehemently but she said who knows he's such a good writer. He might win the Nobel Prize in literature and then I pointed out. It was cancelled last year due to an egregious alleged sex scandal that rocked the Nobel Academy so. I don't know if I want to win it. That badly. The Nobel Prize in literature. I do say you know as a joke. You know if you WANNA see if I'm sincere about the reforms that I propose for society's greatest accolade just get them to awarded to me and if I don't turn it down freaking hypocrite. Yeah that's a good plan. Because either you are a credible writer or you are a Nobel Prize winning physicist heads. I win tails you. Yes sir. Exactly exactly well..

Nobel Prize Alfred Nobel scientist Nobel Academy Brian Kaeding Jordan US Paris Mark Twain George Bailey book critic Florida instagram Harvard University Caltech Lee South Pole Antarctica Steve Jobs
Greta Thunberg: Leaders must act in unison during crises

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:36 sec | 2 months ago

Greta Thunberg: Leaders must act in unison during crises

"On this Earth Day climate activists credit to Berg urged world leaders to put their differences aside and act together based on science in addressing two major crises we need to tackle both the corona and I make this crisis at the same time as we tackle the climate and environmental emergency because we need to be able to tackle two crises as once a two year old Swedish activist meter comments in a digital Earth Day event in Stockholm organized by the Nobel Prize museum she said the climate crisis is not a slowing down even in times like these and a recent

Berg Stockholm Nobel Prize
Chlorine gas released at Second Battle of Ypres - April 22, 1915

This Day in History Class

04:18 min | 2 months ago

Chlorine gas released at Second Battle of Ypres - April 22, 1915

"The Day was April. Twenty Second Nineteen fifteen. The Germans released chlorine gas during the second battle of Abra marking the first effective use of poison. Gas On the western front chemical weapons have been used for hundreds of years at the end of the nineteenth century and into the twentieth treaties and declarations began acknowledging the issue of poison gases by forbidding the use of poisons in Warfare The Hague conventions of eighteen ninety nine and one thousand nine hundred seven for instance forbade the use of poison and poisoned weapons. But this rule was violated in the first world. War World War. One is sometimes referred to as the chemists war because of the role chemicals and technology played in the conflict chlorine phosgene and mustard gas all caused many deaths and injuries during the war the production and deployment of these gases posed a health threat to combatants civilians and people involved in their manufacturing processes once the war began. Germany put a lot of effort into researching and producing these chemical agents. German chemist. Fritz Harbor helped develop Germany's poison gas program harbor headed the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Physical Chemistry and Electro Chemistry he was also given an army captain and led the Chemistry Section at the Ministry of war and Berlin helping coordinate the production of ammonia needed in the war many people condemned harbor for his role in chemical warfare though he won the Nobel Prize in chemistry in nineteen eighteen for the synthesis of ammonia from its elements Swedish pharmacist. Carl Wilhelm Shula discovered chlorine back in the late seventeen hundreds as a gas. Chlorine is a greenish yellow color. And it is two and a half times heavier than air. Though chlorine is used in some household products and in drinking water it can be used as a poisonous gas chlorine gas stays close to the ground in areas without wind and spreads rapidly. It is very toxic to humans when a person breeds chlorine gas. It reacts with Moist Tissues like the eyes throat and lungs to form. Acid inhaling low levels can cause I scan an airway irritation as well as a sore throat and cough exposure to higher levels of chlorine gas can cause chest tightness wheezing shortness of breath and broncos spasm if a person is severely exposed could get Pulmonary Edema. A condition caused by excess fluid in the lungs. Chlorine gas is easy to produce and handle harbor turns to chlorine gas for use in chemical warfare. The French launched tear-gas attacks against the Germans early. In World War One and early in Nineteen fifteen the Germans fired thousands of shells filled with the irritant xylitol bromide at Russian troops blew off. In this case the weather was cold and the chemical could not vaporize to pose any threat to the Russians but on the evening of April Twenty. Second Nineteen fifteen during the second battle of. Abra the Germans released nearly two hundred tons of chlorine gas from cylinders buried along a friend. The gas attack created a several MILE GAP IN THE ALLIED LINE. Defending the city. Though it poison many of the soldiers and caused panic the Germans failed to take effective action in its aftermath in the allies held the bre position poison gas continued to be a part of warfare in world war. One technology and training continued to progress on both the offensive and defensive sides of gas warfare. The allies develop gas masks and the Germans introduced mustard gas in nineteen seventeen so more between ninety thousand and one hundred thousand people died due to chemical weapons in the war with most of those deaths caused by fos gene during after the first World War. Nations like the. Us Britain Italy Russia. Spain and Japan used chemical weapons in conflicts the Chemical Weapons Convention which took effect in Nineteen ninety-seven bans the development production stockpiling and use of chemical weapons though it has been violated.

Germany Fritz Harbor Ministry Of War Carl Wilhelm Shula Kaiser Wilhelm Institute For P Electro Chemistry Nobel Prize Berlin Pulmonary Edema Chest Tightness Broncos Spain Russia Japan
Why Are Fruit Flies Science Superstars?

BrainStuff

04:42 min | 3 months ago

Why Are Fruit Flies Science Superstars?

"We'll come to brainstorm production of iheartradio. Hey brain stuff lauren. Vogel bomb here. If you've ever swatted fruit flies hovering over the fruit bowl on your kitchen counter and wondered what purpose they could ever possibly serve humanity. You're not alone. They are small. Today are annoying but humans owe them a huge debt of gratitude for their contributions. The science modern genetics one species in particular. Drosophila melanogaster is a superstar of tiny annoying things at least five Nobel. Prizes have been awarded to scientists for their work on fruit flies. Yes the lowly fruit fly and the larger glorious urge human have together tackle genetics and done a lot of cool stuff but like why fruit flies. And how do you keep them out of your kitchen? And do we need to blame scientists for them? Being in your kitchen to begin with a fruit flies have been used in biological studies for a long time which means there are a lot of tools and resources for scientists using Drosophila melanogaster to ask interesting questions. But there are some specific reasons. The species has always been a darling of geneticists for starters in genetics. It's helpful to have research subjects that can cycle through generations rather quickly and fruit. Flies are great at that. We spoke by email Thomas Merritt PhD professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at Laurentian University in Ontario Canada. He said fruit flies create a new generation about two weeks making breeding them in the lab. Simple there are also small and easy to rare and care for and it's easy to house as many of them as you need in a single lab at one time also. Fruit flies are surprisingly similar to humans and other vertebrates their Sophomore Molyneaux gaster has fourteen thousand genes and we humans have somewhere between twenty thousand and twenty five thousand and about eight thousand of those genes analogous similarly must fly. Biochemistry is the same or similar to ours. Merritt said fruit flies are great to work on if you're interested in variation between individuals or genetic lineages there are also a great system. If you're interested in experimentally altering the environment they are so small we can do things like keep thousands of flies at different temperatures to see how temperature changes metabolism or gene activity in one. Study IN MY LAB. We used a small conveyor belt to slowly turn the vials. We keep the flies in this. Simple instrument is essentially a fly treadmill. And we can get literally hundreds of flies exercising on a small desktop but fruit flies can be annoying in a lab just as they can in your kitchen to begin with their small and it's very difficult to dissect a fruit fly in case you're wondering and although we share many of the same genes genetic networks were separated from them by hundreds of millions of years of evolution. So it's hard to make assumptions about ourselves based on what we find in these little insects because there are substantial biological differences between us. Merritt said there are certainly questions that are better asked and larger or evolutionary more closely related species like rats and mice a similarly. There are questions now. For example changes in genes through evolution. That are better asked and organisms. That are even smaller can be kept in even larger numbers and with even shorter life. Spans like bacteria or fungi but we can't blame scientists for the proliferation of fruit flies in the world. They would have been there regardless. Merritt explained Drosophila. Melanogaster is a cosmopolitan species. Meaning it's found essentially almost anywhere. We find humans. A fruit fly has pretty simple needs in order to prosper and multiply and those needs are usually met in our homes a moderate temperatures and a source of fresh produce. That's on the overripe side. This is why fruit flies live high on the hug and places like dumpsters compost tapes and Kitchens Merritt said a one interesting thing is we seem to see more flies inside in the early fall. I think that's from flies. That have been happily breeding and multiplying outside all summer. Moving into the warmer inside spaces as the weather cools. The good news is the fruit.

Merritt Kitchens Merritt Thomas Merritt Vogel Lauren Molyneaux Gaster Nobel Department Of Chemistry Professor Ontario Canada Laurentian University
It's a Major Award: Literary Medals and Prizes

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

08:27 min | 4 months ago

It's a Major Award: Literary Medals and Prizes

"For today's episode. Yes I decided. I know that we're like we're kind of an award season. Yeah absolutely will talk about the Grammy's and the Oscars and all that stuff but I'm not talking about that and more highbrow highbrow. Today's episode is. It's a major award literary medals in prizes so ooh I don't think I know a lot about those great great. That's what I'm here for. Thank you so I feel like sometimes there's different there's different prices that are for specific genres of literature will cover those on their certain prestigious swans. There's ones that are for like a specific work published during a year or sometimes prizes honor a specific person and take into account their whole body of work. So it's not just like a book award. Sometimes it's just like an author award or -actly exactly in the field of literature so cool the first one. I'm sure everybody's heard of this won the Nobel Prize in Literature. Sure to this. Is that Swedish literature? Prize awarded Bennett ordered annually since nineteen o one It can be to an author from any country who has in the words of Swedish industrialist Alfred Nobel produced quote in the field of literature the most outstanding work in ideal direction so while individual works are sometimes cited as being particularly noteworthy. The award is actually based on an author's body of work as a whole so literature is one of the five Nobel prizes established by the will of Alfred Nobel in Eighteen ninety-five Lauren. I know you hate it when I do this year. Can you name me? Can you name me the other Nobel? Prizes okay Health and services. That's a cab. No there's is there medicine yes okay. There's Oh God chemistry biology astronomy. Shoot up down just naming science physics yes okay. And then one more big one engineering. No and the big won the Nobel Prize. Yes these species so the fit. Sorry I know. The five Nobel. Prizes are literature chemistry piece physics and physiology or medicine. Okay I'm economics is sometimes considered under the name of the Nobel prize but it was actually added by Sweden's central bank in nineteen sixty eight and is actually named Nobel's memory. It wasn't one of the original prices. Okay so it's kind of a with an asterisk. Yes okay okay. So for literature specifically Each year the Swedish Academy sends out requests for nominations of candidates and members of the academy who are members of Literature Academies insiders professors of literature and language often sometimes for former Nobel winners and president of freighters organizations. They're all allowed to nominate candidate. And you cannot nominate yourself By April that year the academy narrows the Field Down to about twenty candidates and then a month later. There's a shortlist of five names so for the next four months everybody everybody like on the panel is supposed to read and review all the works of all the candidates like like you got four months. You have to read every book this guy ever Bro. If I know anything about academics. It's that they're not going to do that. Really really tearing back the veil here exactly so by October that you remember how to vote and the candidate who receives more than half of the votes is named the Nobel laureate in literature so no one can actually get the prize without being on the list at least twice what's unclear and so many of the same authors reappear and are reviewed repeatedly over the years. Maybe that's how they get around having to read all that stuff because they're like. I did that three years ago. I'm not doing. I'm not doing that again. So the judges are composed of an eighteen member committee. Who are elected for life. Why up until two thousand eighteen? They were not technically permitted to leave. But I can crawl can carl. The Sixteenth Gustav Amend the rules of the academy and made it possible for members to resign if necessary but at a certain point. It was like you're on the committee for that's very ominous so a literature. Nobel Prize laureate earns a gold medal. A diploma with a citation and a sum of money. How much money you ask. The amount of money awarded depends on the income of the Nobel Foundation that year but for twenty one thousand nine hundred it was nine million Swedish krona equivalent to nine hundred thirty four thousand two hundred ninety dollars and ninety cents American. That's nothing to sneeze sneeze out my man. No one hundred twelve Nobel prizes in literature. I've been awarded between nineteen o one in two thousand nineteen to one hundred sixteen individuals that has been to a hundred men and fifteen women. Geez it's been actually shared between two individuals on four occasions and seven times. They decided not to award at anybody. So the laureates have been writing in twenty five different languages over time so it's not just like not just English not just Swedish. Whatever the youngest ever to receive the Nobel Prize in literature was registered kipling. Who was forty one years old when he was awarded it in nineteen? Oh seven and the oldest. Was Doris lessing? When she was eighty eight. Wow got it in two thousand seven. Two Writers have actually declined the prize. Boris Pasternak in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight and John Pulsar nineteen sixty four assaults right but the most recent winner. And that's in this whole episode. I'm going to go over the most recent because if we talked about everybody that's ever wanted a frigging a word. That'd be boring. It would be boring and fun but that would be so. I'm going to tell you about the most recent winner. Sometimes it's a twenty twenty word sometimes. It's twenty nineteen. Sometimes it might be a little earlier than that so so anyway. The most recent winner Nobel Prize for Literature Twenty Nineteen Peter Hannukah. Who is a German novelist? Playwright and poet For an influential work with linguistic ingenuity that has explored. The periphery in the specificity of human experience is how is they declared it? So Peterman Kiss for twenty one thousand nine. Was your most recent winner of the Nobel Prize in literature. Another big one is the Booker Prize for fiction. Yes okay so this. One is a literary prize awarded each year for the best original novel written in the English Language and published in the United Kingdom so the price was originally established as the Booker McConnell prize. After the company Booker McConnell Ltd began sponsoring the event in nineteen sixty nine and it became commonly known as the Booker Prize or simply the booker in two thousand and two. The title sponsor became the Investment Company. Man Group which opted to retain booker as part of the title calling it the man. Booker Prize from two thousand to twenty nineteen. So you've heard that I'm sure yes But the prize money awarded with the Booker Prize was originally about twenty one thousand pounds and subsequently raised to fifty thousand in two thousand two under the sponsorship of the man group making it one of the world's richest literary prizes in two thousand nineteen a new sponsor crank start announced it would sponsor the award for five years with the option to renew for another five so at that point they just changed the title to simply the Booker Prize because the crank start prize. No historically the winner of the Booker Prize had been required to be a citizen of the Commonwealth of Nations the Republic of Ireland or Zimbabwe but it was announced in September twenty thirteen that future booker prize awards would consider others from anywhere in the world so long as their work was in English and published in the UK stomachs. The winner is usually announced at a ceremony in London's Guildhall usually in early October nineteen ninety-three to mark the prizes twenty fifth anniversary. A Booker of Booker Prizes. Given so three previous judges the award met and they chose Salman Rushdie's midnight's children the nineteen eighty-one winner as the best novel out of all of the winners and in Twenty Eighteen to celebrate the fiftieth anniversary. The Golden Man Booker was awarded so one book from each decade was selected by a panel of judges and the winner by popular vote. Was the English

Nobel Prize Booker Prize Alfred Nobel Nobel Booker Nobel Foundation Booker Mcconnell Ltd Literature Academies Swedish Academy Man Group Grammy Salman Rushdie London Oscars Doris Lessing Investment Company Boris Pasternak United Kingdom Bennett Sweden
What the college admissions scandal reveals about the psychology of wealth in America

BrainStuff

05:46 min | 5 months ago

What the college admissions scandal reveals about the psychology of wealth in America

"Let's say you're on a first date and anxious to make a good impression. The waiter arrives with the wine list. End Your date asks you to order a bottle for the two of you you know. Virtually nothing about wine. But you don't WanNa look like an idiot or a cheapskate. Eight so you quickly scan the list and point to one of the most expensive bottles on the menu and while yes it is ridiculous to spend one hundred dollars online. That's only marginally more tasty than twenty dollar bottle. It's actually standard human behavior. More than one hundred years ago an American economist named Thorstein Blinn Glenn coined the phrase conspicuous consumption to describe this very thing. You pick the expensive bottle of wine. Not because it's five times better than the cheaper bottle but because has you want to send a signal to your date. I have good taste and I can afford it. Wine is just one example of what's known as a veteran good defined find any good or service that defies the standard relationship between price and demand. Normally when price goes up demand goes down but for goods goods like wine. Fine Art Jewelry and cars rules change. We spoke with Ori- Hefetz an economics professor at Cornell University's SC Johnson in Graduate School of Management. He explained the high price is actually part of the attractiveness in Dublin's Classic Eighteen Ninety Nine book the theory the Leisure Class. He says that high prices have two functions. The first is basically marketing since makers and clothing signers know that most consumers don't have the knowledge or interest to figure out which products are objectively better than others they use price as a shorthand for quality consumers assumed correctly. Oh you're not that. A higher price corresponds to a higher value. The second function of high prices is what Feb Lynn called conspicuous consumption. In this case the consumer's decision to buy the more expensive option has little to nothing to do with the actual quality and functionality of the product. The whole point is for others to see you drinking the expensive wine wearing the brand name close or driving the fancy car heff it said when other people see me he driving an expensive car. That's a benefit in itself. They might think that I'm more successful or that. I'm more desirable as a mate and of course those two functions of high prices often work together. And just look at the recent college admissions scandal in which wealthy celebrities were caught trying to buy admission for their children into elite elite colleges one of the ways that schools market themselves as elite is through their high tuition costs if the University of Southern California costs more than seventy eighty seven thousand dollars a year tuition plus room and board. It must be an amazing education right and because schools like the University of Southern California used their high cost as a signifier of quality so do parents. The wealthy celebrities caught up in college admissions scandals were willing to go to great expense to win brandname status for their your kids in their social circles admission to USC is shorthand that their kids are smart and successful which in turn means that they as parents are also smart successful. Call it the virtuous circle of conspicuous consumption. In less you get caught cheating then. I identified conspicuous consumption. Among on the American upper classes in the late eighteen hundreds. But it wasn't until the nineteen seventies. That economists figured out exactly how it worked as a market force in Nineteen seventy-three we the economist Michael Spence landmark paper on signaling. In which he showed how are consumer choices send important signals that have real economic repercussions Spence won the two thousand one Nobel Prize and economics by explaining how education is used as a signal for productivity in the labor market. The logic is is pretty simple if an employer is looking to hire a new worker he or she will use. The status of the applicants college in which tuition cost is variable as a short short him signal of the applicants relative productivity as a worker Hefetz sites the classic example of someone looking to hire a lawyer the assumption is that a good lawyer lawyer winds cases and therefore has a lot of money so if one lawyer shows up driving a two thousand four Honda Civic and other arrives in a brand new Mercedes. They're sending two very different signals. If the client defines a good lawyer by how rich he or she is then the Mercedes lawyer benefits from conspicuous consumption. Of course a great lawyer could be thrifty or a lousy lawyer could still drive a fancy car. But there's a far higher cost for an unsuccessful lawyer to buy a Mercedes Hefetz said Ah for the good lawyer who actually makes a lot of money. The Mercedes pocket change it's cheaper and therefore more likely for a successful lawyer to send the same signal. The larger question is why do we bother with all these signals anyway. Have it says that there is a much more efficient economic solution Russian instead of buying a fancy car to show how rich you are you could just walk around copies of your most recent tax returns or introduce yourself to potential clients by saying. Hey I'm very wealthy and successful. But of course that's not socially acceptable instead. People who spend money on flashy cars or clothing can hide behind what communists call a functional alibi if you buy a very expensive car for example you can claim that you didn't do it to send the signal that you're rich and successful but simply because expensive cars run better and are more reliable or have better features have said but are they so much better that it's worth spending twenty times the cost of a good standard car. Probably

USC Michael Spence Ori- Hefetz Thorstein Blinn Glenn Mercedes Fine Art Jewelry Dublin Graduate School Of Management Cornell University Lynn Honda Leisure Class Professor Nobel Prize Civic
Fighting cancer with CRISPR

Science Magazine Podcast

10:23 min | 5 months ago

Fighting cancer with CRISPR

"Now we have staff writer Jennifer cousin Frankel. She wrote a story this week on Crisper and cancer immunotherapy to big ideas says mushed together for the first time in human patients. Hi Jennifer Hi. Thanks for having me sure. I said something scary. It's not every day that we get to say a something is a first. There's always a lot of pushback whenever we put it into a story or if it comes up in a research paper but this is some type of I. This is the first time that that researchers have reported on taking immune cells in this case the T. cells which we kind of think of as the soldiers of the immune in system that fight off infection using crisper to modify them together and then putting them back inside a human body and seeing what happens. It's that hasn't been done before. It hasn't been described before their trials that are going on. That are testing this and this is why we never put I in a headline exactly far to do was dive into the techniques. We're GonNa talk about cancer immunotherapy and then we're also going to talk about crisper. We need to kind of understand both of those things to understand what happened in this paper. This is a specific kind of cancer. Immunotherapy right yes. That's right so cancer. Immunotherapy is essentially trying being to harness the immune system to fight cancer. And it's something that's been really hot in the cancer field for the last several years in fact won the Nobel prize is just the other year. What this study is making use of is one technique in cancer? Immunotherapy that uses the T. cells and it tries to to sort of help. The t cells recognize tumor cells and then destroy them some of the problems that have come up as people have experimented with that. Were things like it. It doesn't really get into solid tumors and some other things. This is still a really new field and people are still working very hard to improve. Its success it's been pretty successful in blood cancers leukemia in lymphomas and there are two Cardi cell therapy's that companies have developed in that have been approved there are some additional additional hurdles in solid tumors. And it has been more difficult to consistently get the therapy to work in solid tumors solid tumors or things. Like brain tumor pancreatic host humor. Like I think yeah any tumor. That's kind of a solid mass as opposed to in the blood. That's the cancer immunotherapy side of things. Let's talk about the crisper side of things. Can you just tell us what crisper is. And then maybe we can talk about how. It's been used their politically or not so far. So crisper is another really hot area in biology Jay. It's a technology that essentially cuts DNA and then the DNA can kind of recombine in different ways it can be used in different settings to add genes or DNA to remove them. It depends but it can give a lot of flexibility around modifying DNA A and it's used in all different settings not just in medicine but strongly medicine is one area where there's been a lot of interest in using crisper because it's a way of modifying lying. The genome in this case crisper is used to modify immune cell so they took immune cells out of a patient and then use this gene editing technique to make changes to them. They had these three patients and what they did was they took out blood cells and then they modified those cells in the lab. They had to add in a gene gene. That was going to target a protein that was on the surface of their cancer cells. The other thing that they did was they used crisper to edit the genome such that they were knocking out three other genes and the genes that they chose they chose because they I hope they would make the T. cells even more powerful. They hope they would help them. Hang around longer in the body more effective against the tumors than they reintroduce introduce those cells. They gave them back in. That whole process takes several weeks. It takes four to six weeks to from the time you take the blood out to the time you put the cells back in. They had to go through a number of layers to make sure that they were really doing everything safely and carefully. So what were they worried about when they reintroduced these cells into the body. One one question was just you know with these cells even survive right. He just kind of disappear which has been a problem. In general with some genetically modified t cells it can be hard good for them to kind of thrive in the body and these these were cells that had been modified in several different ways. Then of course another question is are they going to cause harm MHM if they do survive and one particular concern with crisper. Is that when you go in to do this. Editing you can have these off off target effects. Were you accidentally cause modifications to other DNA. That you weren't aiming for there was concern that that could happen then of course that's changing other. DNA in the T.. Cells who knows what effects that might have on the patients so those are the big two questions and then also you know they probably wanted to know if the people would get better. Everyone of course hoped that that it would help. These patients get better at the same time. The trial was not really designed for efficacy it was too small and it was also also so new and so they made certain choices in the very specific details of the treatment. They offered that improved safety. There were certain things they did did to try and make it less likely that the immune system of the patients would react in a sort of dangerous way to the cells but in doing so that could potentially elite reduced. How effective the treatment is you know the target that they picked on the cancer cells? They pick that specific target because there had been a number of trials targeting doing that with traditional therapy so they knew was probably a pretty safe target. But it may be isn't the best target unfortunately and as you might expect from. I'm talking about it. The patients did not recover from their cancer. Because of this therapy. What were some of the other results of the experiment that we can talk about now so I would say the results were that for the time for which they've been followed? The treatment appeared safe so far. Nothing scary happened nothing. There were no showstoppers. They saw some off target effects. But those off target effects didn't seem to cause any obvious harm to the musicians in the cells that had the off target effects. The percentage of cells with those effects seemed to kind of fade out over time about the target effects like the changes made to the T.. Cells of these patients. Were those persistent in the body. One thing that I think was quite heartening. Is that these. He sells really stuck around in a way. That other t cells going after this particular target haven't in other published studies and so they've they've lasted so far up to nine months and they're continuing to follow these patients and also when they took out the cells over months which they did did they would take blood from the patients and then look at the sells again it could get them back and study them in the lab and those sales were targeting cancer in the lab now like you say in the patients. The benefits were definitely limited. There were three people treated one of those people has since died and in the other to their disease has progressed and they are getting other treatments. MHM so the effects were limited. You know it can be hard to kind of know how to understand that on the one hand this is just three patients and so we were very very sick. And so if we're thinking about what's going to be an effective treatment you need to treat more people to really know and then again you're thinking about this. First Time in people have focused on safety safety from your story from boats. It really seemed like that people in this field were saying this is a step. This is getting us over a really big hurdle. Yes I think it's a step and I think it's kind of layering on the use of crisper onto this other area of cell therapy that have gotten so much interest interest in generated so much excitement cancer but also still have a lot of room to improve and it's a way of saying can we make better use is other technology. What's expected to happen next more of the same thing? Are they going to try to infer different targets. One of the exciting things about this field right now. Is there so much happening. And people have so many he different ideas for what they could try and there are a lot of different theories and we don't really know what's going to pan out and what's not and so there are a lot of different. The group's thinking about different targets different cancers other diseases of course to apply crisper to their companies. That are involved. They're just a lot of different ways. You could go with this but right now. There are other trials that are recruiting patients for crisper modified t cells else and some people. I talked to said you know. There are surely going to be many more trials opening in parts result of this study. What kind of of regulatory oversight was there for this is there a body that governs crisper studies? There's not a body that's specific to crisper but there is as a group called the recombinant DNA Advisory Committee which is a a panel that has traditionally vetted the safety and ethics of different gene therapy trials funded by the US government or other other funders and so this went through the review of that committee. which is colloquially known as the rack of the and also so went through you know a lot of review of the National Institutes of health a lot of review from the US Food and Drug Administration? You know as you can imagine anything new. Where you're you're genetically commodifying cells to a degree? You have four earn away. You haven't before writing them into people you have to be careful and of course you know. Everyone has hopes for this therapy in the years ahead. And because of that you have to be so careful when you're starting out. The hopes of a lot of people were pinned on gene therapies. His and yeah you know some early problems. Really put a damper on the field for a long time. Yes if something really terrible happens not only is that obviously terrible for that individual it has these ripple effects across the field and so I think the people running this trial. We're thinking of both of those things as they designed and pursued the study. Thank you so much Jennifer. Thank

Crisper Cancer Solid Tumors Jennifer Hi Cardi Cell Therapy Nobel Prize Jennifer Cousin Frankel Staff Writer Us Food And Drug Administratio Jennifer Dna Advisory Committee Us Government National Institutes Of Health
Does killing Soleimani really change anything in the Middle East?

Between The Lines

13:38 min | 5 months ago

Does killing Soleimani really change anything in the Middle East?

"For a generation Iran's May General Sulejmani he was a consequential Fica League in the Persian Gulf for the Americans in the region Sunnis? He was a terrorist mastermind for the Iranians the Assad regime in Syria Hezbollah in Lebanon. Sulejmani was a hero who protected the Shia cresent in the region. So it's no wonder the Iranian generals death via a drone attack attack in Baghdad. That was a huge news story. Earlier this month cast into the money rainy and military commander assassinated in the US drone strike on mm struggling marks a huge escalation coming just days at was revered by Iran supporters in proxies being blamed for the deaths of hundreds of Americans in the Middle East over the we took took action last night to stop a war. What comes next? What's the broader strategy? Here we did not take action to start a war. Your since the American killing of Sulejmani Tehran launched a missile strike on your spices in Iraq and in the process mistakenly shot down a Ukrainian Ilana carrying one hundred seventy six passengers something. The Mullah's had initially denied responsibility but crucially the Iranians signings avoided killing Americans. which was the red line? The president trump has drawn. US military response. So we'll this episode. Leave Iran Ryan stronger or is tyron now more isolated than ever and what is the showdown between Tehran and Washington Maine for Iraq the US military Tori prisons there and Iran's nuclear ambitions. Danny Applica- is a senior fellow at the American Enterprise Institute in Washington and Co host of the AAAGH. Ah podcast what the Hell is going on. Making sense of the world get identity. Hey Tom and I'm in. Sokoll is author of Iran Rausing the survival and and future of the Islamic Republic and CO author of Islam beyond borders the Oma in world politics. Welcome back to Iran. How good morning now? Also Amani abetted genocide in Syria to keep the Assad regime in power. He's responsible for the deaths of many American troops. He armed Hezbollah in. Lebanon with rockets is to attack. Innocent Israelis killed many innocent Sunnis in Iraq. So I mean isn't the world better off without Sulejmani. Were president trump. I think so. And also quite a number of American allies in the region Probably I think the same way but at the same time demand was a national hero and in fact that he was the one of the top strategic brains behind Iran's overseas operations and expansion of eight onion influence in the region. I will just support related to the fair that it only leadership has about the possibility of an American attack or an Israeli attack on a combined and attack. But let me see this Tom that nobody is commendable. dimitris full of commanders. Top commanders into the Nobel Prize winners and so on General money is being replaced And I think e to the debt is a widespread view in the West. That if you bump one or two individuals isn't the situation is going to get better We duty cold in history that take for example a Prime Minister Anthony Eden go around the nineteen fifties and calling for the elimination of Jamaa Nasser as the national president of Egypt and has was that this man is removed from a then. Everything will be fine. Nothing died in nine hundred. Seventy and a situation has not improved a cold and and at the same thing was said to be so I mean the point though. Is that knocking off Salomon. He's not going to make a great deal of difference. But also can I just add to this Dani salamone and these Iranian backed Shia proxies. They did help inadvertently into why help. America Islamic state. So does it worry you that people cheering the loudest about this. Guy's death other suny jihadists in there are slighted areas in the desert and the mountains of Iraq and Syria. I don't think they're the ones who are cheering the loudest I. I think you heard pretty loud cheering from here. I think you heard some plenty of loud cheering in In Iraq and Lebanon and and elsewhere throughout throughout the region. Look you know. I think it's important to acknowledge that. That as the head of the cuts force Qassem Soleimani was a very powerful folks very influential very strategic and very effective leader and he brought that effectiveness to things. That would terrible And the arming of Hezbollah. The murderer of half million Syrians. The arming of mass. The arming of in Yemen. We could go on for a while here but but But he did all of those things but when when the challenge was from Sundays you had is. He helped set up and guide ride. The hoste. Shabby the popular mobilization units in Iraq that That that ended up being part of the battle to to defeat Isis. The problem here is that every situation in the region is is more complicated than the enemy of my enemy is my friend. Just because Stalin Fort with us to defeat Nazi Germany did not make stolen a good guy. And if you look at these anti-regime protests some and. I've been breaking out in Iran since Tehran admitted that its military military shot down. A Ukrainian passenger Ilana have the Iranians overreached because despite the Iranian successes in Iraq Syria and Lebanon on on their rule out officials sites there on stable they print across he so have the Iranians overreached. There's no doubt that many Iranians feel about the Ashim and today have protested over the last few months in order to bring about A structural reforms today as a system of governance and economy which is setting enormously under represent- trump's sanctions but has the Iran overreached. What are I pointed out earlier I mean Iran does fear a a very strongly as possible American that much Israeli combined attack and therefore what update on your the humans done his belt reasonable security and press such for itself which would really want? Shepherdess Arafat at all costs but that does not necessarily Saudi mean that Iran is only Aggressive power in the region aggressive actor in the region. I mean. Let's not forget that that that the destabilization Iraq really started the two thousand three. US invasion of that country. Okay so the. The American invasion of Iraq helped Iran on because it overturned the suny state and it created a Shia majority Stein. I saw a natural law with the Shia brethren in Tehran following following on from that Danny shortly a problem about striking at pro Iranian sheeham paramilitary groups as trump has done is the now part of the Iraqi state. So is it any wonder. Washington's increasingly modulation is part of the world. First of all. I think it's offensive talk about Shiites. As if they're all some sort of monolith. The share of Iraq are Arabs. The Shia of Iran are Persians. These these are different people this. These two countries Shia versus Shia fought a bloody war for eight years in which there were one million casualties casualties in the nineteen eighties. The notion that somehow Iraq is a natural satellite or or or or slave to Iran is wrong Iran has chosen to try to dominate that country and demonstrations throughout the central and southern part of Iraq. Over the last month have been against Iranian domination the Iranian consulate in Jeff was burned to the ground at the end of last year not by Sonny's he's not by Sunni jihadis not by Isis not by Kurds but by Shiites carrying placards yelling out to out for Iran. Get Out of our country and I think that that is absolutely right to suggest that Iran has gained more influence in Iraq since the demise of Saddam Hussein. I I guess I I'm just not that big a fan of Saddam Hussein and the and the stability that he brought to Iraq. I wish that the United States had done more in the aftermath of the wall. I think thinks that we I think that we failed miserably. In many instances I think it was absolutely fatal in two thousand eleven when at a time of genuine stability in Iraq Iraq. President Obama withdrew troops and really provided the opportunity for Isis. To rise up again. My guest Daniel Placate from the American Enterprise Institute. And I'm in Sokoll. He's the author of Iran rausing and Islam beyond borders. I mean how would you respond to all of this. Because we've got these tensions here between Tehran Iran and Washington and the Iranian backed Shia politicians released most of them in Baghdad. I support if not closer ties with Tehran. They want the the Americans out of Iraq. But don't the sooners and the Kurds fee for the Iranian intrusion in Iraqi sovereignty. I absolutely and of course sir. The APP is not only the president of the American so who'd be which are being the opposed to in Iraq but also the presence of eight onions there. No question Ah about that but at the same time if we know that the majority of the Iraqi population is made up of the Shiites and some powerful elements among the Shiites have got the value equals relationship and relationship. What they don't know in the meantime ago? The Iraqi parliament release the iranian-backed Majority Shia legislators I support the withdrawal of US troops Danny now given trump's ambivalence about the region and the fact that he was elected impact to get the US out of the so-called forever awards isn't a US military withdrawal from Iraq. Just what trump and many war-weary Americans want. Well it's kind of funny. Isn't it because we start off talking about the you know the Iranians and what they want and and of course. The number one goal is to get the Americans out of the region and that is in fact the instruction is that has gone out to all of their proxy groups. All around the region. Is You need to step up activities to get the Americans out. Then we've got the president of the United States. It's who dearest and fondest goal is to get American troops out of the region so so a couple weeks after killing Kassim Sulaimaniyah. We have this unbelievably in coherent bizarre response. Where we where we're doing exactly what the around him one let? This is what Donald Trump has to sort out. He has to sort out whether he's the president. He's the kind minded president who who leads in a forthright fashion against men like costume ceremony. Who Seek to destabilize the region and extend Iran's hegemony Germany or he is going to be the kind of president that like Bernie Sanders like Barack Obama wants to turn around and high tail fin is to the Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump's uh-huh Washington energy independent America Stein fought these endless wars danny well A? They aren't endless wars. We have lost fewer people in these. This was than than than we lost a single day in World War Two so while they are conflicts that have continued on and off to a certain extent. You know the notion Shen that we've been sold that somehow we've still got one hundred and fifty thousand troops on the ground and losing them at a rapid pace is just wrong. We lost six in Syria. I I mourn every single one of them but the Kurds lost eleven thousand in their fight against Isis. So what what. What is the reason? We'll tell you very straightforwardly woodley because every time we turn tail every time someone says let's get out of that bloody Middle East. Let's pay attention to something fun. Like Asia and you'd like that. Tom Would now but hang on your way but every time we say that we end up being dragged back because the dynamics in the region of the ones that bring us back we need. We need a long-term solution that lets us. Stay away for good rather than one where we run away. Anita did it come back every single decade I mean the two thousand fifteen nuclear deal Provided tyron with as much as apparently one hundred fifty billion dollar windfall. Aw and certainly many people who are skeptical of the deal side that the Iranian spent lavishly arming the Shia militias across the region. So what it was trump right to pull the US out of the deal and instead impose maximum Prussia built around these economic sanctions on Iran. I think he was totally wrong and and I can care. There has been a backlash president. Trump's would would you withdrawal has a basically a provoked said that on Not to really go for the for police. Speed to in order to rebuild that they have nuclear program and. I think you're going to really do that. And of course that also carries the risk of a possible confrontation from tation between the United States and Iran possibly Israeli attacks on Iran and that could easily dissolved in a regional warfare. That at the end nobody may may be able to control it Danny. Any I mean a lively debate. Thanks so much for being back on. ABC

Iran Iraq President Trump United States Donald Trump Syria Lebanon Danny Applica Hezbollah Washington TOM Tehran Baghdad Sulejmani Tehran Shia Cresent Middle East Saddam Hussein American Enterprise Institute
What is Russia really doing in Libya?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

04:55 min | 6 months ago

What is Russia really doing in Libya?

"During the twenty years that Vladimir Putin has presided over Russia it is fair to say that the acquisition of a Nobel prize for peace has seemed low on his list of priorities on Putin's watch. Russia has attacked Chechnya invaded Georgia Georgia and Ukraine and intervene in Syria to say nothing of lower level semi deniable operations. Where in Libya would have had reason to regard? Russia's offered to serve as a mediator in its ongoing civil war with an amount of suspicion and Libya might also have recognized however that the Western world has long preferred to regard the Libyan conflict from the other end of a barge pole and that as such they were somewhat stock options accordingly earlier this week the two sides in Libya's war. The government of National Accord led by Prime Minister Mystifies Al Sarraj and recognized by the United Nations and the so-called Libyan national army commanded by renegade general Khalifa after met in Moscow. Go at which a footnote. It's not entirely clear whether or not al Sarraj and actually shook hands at this encounter. These discussions Russians were what is known as proximity talks a common enough diplomatic set piece in which the parties to a dispute agreed together more or less in the same place at the same time and relaying messages to each other via intermediaries in this instance. Those intermediaries were Russia. Which has broadly encouraged half tas desire the two overrun Libya and Turkey? which earlier this month extended support for the government of National Accord as far as sending troops in Libya Mishra sure unit put just have ties attacks against our brothers and the legitimate government of Libya continue? We will never refrain from teaching him the lesson he did that Get Turkey's involvement of course adds another layer of proceedings given the involvement of both Russia and Turkey in Syria at various points during Syria's ongoing civil war. Moscow and Ankara have appeared to be allies enemies. And sometimes I the all both at once wants depending on which part of the map you're looking at and what day of the week it is but credit where Ju- as a precursor to the latest Moscow talks. Turkey and Russia did manage to wrangle a ceasefire in Libya. Though both the government of National Accord and the Libyan national army accused each other of breaching it Marshall Hufbauer Commander Army the talks in Moscow as we go to air appear to have been a partial success. which is to say that? While an agreement agreement was reached and Prime Minister Faez al-Sarraj signed it. Kelly for half Did Not so what does Russia really won't in Libya. Well just for fun. Let's consider the official position. Russia's Foreign Minister Sergei gala RAV has made several heart warming statements of the we'd like to teach the world to sing variety earlier this week. Level of spoke of a desire to motivate all Libyan sides to agree rather than continue sorting things out by force Russia as Russia portrays. It is all but lying. Awake nights fretting over Libya his anguish perhaps half tiles flounce really is a serious snub to Russia's pure hearted desire to see Libya at peace a skeptical observer server and where Russia is concerned. It's usually via smart kind of observer to be might gently suggest that there is perhaps something else going on here half tiles house refusal to sign. The agreement for example might be a preplanned theatrical device designed to demonstrate that he's no mere Russian stooge and that therefore Russia is not responsible. Should he return to his quest to seize the parts of Libya. He hasn't already with the help. Russia Beasley denies. Ever having sent him last last week Putin vouchsafed any Russians fighting alongside halftime. Should there be any who knows at Cetera not representing Russia nor paid by Russia. A STAG STAG party and or it may be that Vladimir Putin doesn't really care about Libya all that much not any more than he really cares about Ukraine Syria which is to say he may care about Libya as he cares about Ukraine and Syria principally as a device with which he can surprise and annoy and disoriented the Western in world and by so doing impose the view that Russia remains power which must be reckoned with and or just make life stressful tedious for everyone else. Quite a lot of Russian diplomatic enterprise starts to make much more sense the moment you start thinking of basically as geostrategic trolling

Russia Libya Moscow Vladimir Putin Russia Beasley Libyan National Army Syria Prime Minister Mystifies Al Sa Ukraine Turkey Prime Minister Faez Al-Sarraj Nobel Prize Georgia Georgia Al Sarraj Marshall Hufbauer Commander Ar Chechnya JU United Nations
Could There Be a Fifth Fundamental Force?

BrainStuff

06:38 min | 6 months ago

Could There Be a Fifth Fundamental Force?

"The four fundamental forces are the most important quartet in science so far is anyone's been able to prove the universe is governed by these forces forces gravity electromagnetism the strong force and the weak force. But maybe this foursome isn't alone in two thousand fifteen. A Hungarian and team led by physicist Attila. Credit Hawkeye reportedly discovered new evidence for a fifth fundamental force. Something previously unknown to science. The the group uploaded another paper about the subject to archive a research database in October of two thousand nineteen while many scientists are skeptical about these findings. The research search does give us an occasion to talk about the major forces that we all take for granted the Fab four fundamental forces are irreducible meaning. They can't be broken down into other more basic forces. These are the core phenomena behind every other known type of physical interaction. For example friction tension and elasticity busy are all derived from electromagnetism. And what's that you ask. ELECTROMAGNETISM is a force that affects all positively and negatively charged particles articles those with opposite charges attract while ones carrying like charges. Repel each other. Not only does this principle. Keep magnets on your fridge. But it's also the reason why solid solid objects are able to retain their shapes compared with electromagnetism. Gravity is rather weak surprisingly enough. It's actually the weakest of the four fundamentals including including the so-called weak force. We'll get to that one in a bit. A gravity is the attraction of any two objects in the universe to another moons. Dust motes coyotes. Whatever ever everything exerts gravity on every other thing but at least one of the things in question has to be pretty massive in order for it to make much of a difference? That's why we you don't have dust mites orbiting our heads like asteroids and why we don't fall into orbit of coyotes when we encounter them but let's turn to the appropriately named strong force course. This is what hold Tomic nucleus together. Even in spite of their charged protons which are constantly trying to escape and last but not least. There's the Weak Force Aka. The weak interaction. This one is the hardest to explain and honestly I'm not an expert here but it's the force by which which subatomic particles can transform by decaying into different particles by losing boasts on which disintegrates into positron and or neutrinos this week force force fuel certain kinds of radioactive decay which means it's responsible for everything from medical imaging to the radiometric dating that researchers use to determine the ages of fossils thousand artifacts to the nuclear fission that occurs in the sun. So kind of a big deal. Scientists have a theory that nicely describes three of those forces known these standard model of physics. It's made up of various measurements and mathematical formulas. It also breaks down. Elementary particles into categories is an subcategories. We spoke by email with mit physicist. Richard Milner he explained. The Standard Model of physics is the present framework for describing describing the subatomic world at all energies. It was developed post World War to end. I count at Least Eighteen Nobel prizes in physics since nineteen fifty that have been awarded for contributions tribulations to its development alike all good theories. The Standard Model has accurately predicted numerous scientific breakthroughs including the discovery of the elusive higgs. Boson particle back in two thousand twelve yet. It doesn't answer every question. The Standard Model offers no explanation for gravity and it hasn't brought scientists any closer to understanding dark matter a mysterious ingredient that makes up about twenty seven percent of our universe. Here's where crossing a Hawkeye and company. Come in during a twenty fifteen experiment at the Hungarian Academy of Sciences Institute for Nuclear Research They watched excited brilliant eight atoms decay inside a particle Michael Accelerator normally this process releases light which is later converted into electrons and positron are a type of Subatomic particle with a positive charge. And sure enough. That's what happened but then things got interesting. Normally brilliant eight decays predictable fashion yet. A weirdly Lee high number of these electrons and positron repelled each other at a one hundred and forty degree angle to explain the surplus crasner. Hawkeye's team argued that a never before seen particle had been formed as the atoms decayed by their calculations this theoretical subatomic body would have a massive around seventeen million electron-volts on volts. They went ahead and named the x seventeen particle and now ex seventeen is again making the news. Recently the same Hungarian Carrion scientists detected an anomaly indicates samples of helium four according to their archive paper. An unforeseen surplus of positron and electrons were released. Possibly because another seventeen particle was created. If this mystery particle exists. It might be something very special. Maybe just maybe it's a newfound carrier boasts on both sides are spinning particles that probably lack internal structure their known to carry forces making them an integral part of the standard model under the standard model. Milner Explains Forces take place by exchange of the carrier Bussan's between other subatomic particles articles. It's said each of the four fundamental forces has its own corresponding boasts on the one that transports gravity hasn't been found yet but the carrier bones associated it was strong force. Weak force electromagnetism are well documented. Presumably at seventeen would be the Kargbo sound for a fifth fundamental force that we never knew existed listed and perhaps said force is somehow related to dark matter but or getting ahead of ourselves. There's no hard proof that x seventeen exists. It's in the first place. The European Organization for Nuclear Research better known as sern has yet to find any trace of the particle and the new archive paper is still awaiting peer review and replication from other scientists milner and his colleagues have devised a proposal to try to generate seventeen particles in a scattering experiment at the Thomas. Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Newport News Virginia at present the standard model does account for any new fundamental forces. So if the x seventeen and the fifth force that allegedly carries a real we'll have to modify the good old standard model at any rate. It's clear the Potomac world is still rife with

Richard Milner Hawkeye Physicist Hungarian Academy Of Sciences Thomas Jefferson National Acce European Organization For Nucl MIT Tomic Newport News Virginia Sern Thomas
Could There Be a Fifth Fundamental Force?

BrainStuff

06:38 min | 6 months ago

Could There Be a Fifth Fundamental Force?

"The four fundamental forces are the most important quartet in science so far is anyone's been able to prove the universe is governed by these forces forces gravity electromagnetism the strong force and the weak force. But maybe this foursome isn't alone in two thousand fifteen. A Hungarian and team led by physicist Attila. Credit Hawkeye reportedly discovered new evidence for a fifth fundamental force. Something previously unknown to science. The the group uploaded another paper about the subject to archive a research database in October of two thousand nineteen while many scientists are skeptical about these findings. The research search does give us an occasion to talk about the major forces that we all take for granted the Fab four fundamental forces are irreducible meaning. They can't be broken down into other more basic forces. These are the core phenomena behind every other known type of physical interaction. For example friction tension and elasticity busy are all derived from electromagnetism. And what's that you ask. ELECTROMAGNETISM is a force that affects all positively and negatively charged particles articles those with opposite charges attract while ones carrying like charges. Repel each other. Not only does this principle. Keep magnets on your fridge. But it's also the reason why solid solid objects are able to retain their shapes compared with electromagnetism. Gravity is rather weak surprisingly enough. It's actually the weakest of the four fundamentals including including the so-called weak force. We'll get to that one in a bit. A gravity is the attraction of any two objects in the universe to another moons. Dust motes coyotes. Whatever ever everything exerts gravity on every other thing but at least one of the things in question has to be pretty massive in order for it to make much of a difference? That's why we you don't have dust mites orbiting our heads like asteroids and why we don't fall into orbit of coyotes when we encounter them but let's turn to the appropriately named strong force course. This is what hold Tomic nucleus together. Even in spite of their charged protons which are constantly trying to escape and last but not least. There's the Weak Force Aka. The weak interaction. This one is the hardest to explain and honestly I'm not an expert here but it's the force by which which subatomic particles can transform by decaying into different particles by losing boasts on which disintegrates into positron and or neutrinos this week force force fuel certain kinds of radioactive decay which means it's responsible for everything from medical imaging to the radiometric dating that researchers use to determine the ages of fossils thousand artifacts to the nuclear fission that occurs in the sun. So kind of a big deal. Scientists have a theory that nicely describes three of those forces known these standard model of physics. It's made up of various measurements and mathematical formulas. It also breaks down. Elementary particles into categories is an subcategories. We spoke by email with mit physicist. Richard Milner he explained. The Standard Model of physics is the present framework for describing describing the subatomic world at all energies. It was developed post World War to end. I count at Least Eighteen Nobel prizes in physics since nineteen fifty that have been awarded for contributions tribulations to its development alike all good theories. The Standard Model has accurately predicted numerous scientific breakthroughs including the discovery of the elusive higgs. Boson particle back in two thousand twelve yet. It doesn't answer every question. The Standard Model offers no explanation for gravity and it hasn't brought scientists any closer to understanding dark matter a mysterious ingredient that makes up about twenty seven percent of our universe. Here's where crossing a Hawkeye and company. Come in during a twenty fifteen experiment at the Hungarian Academy of Sciences Institute for Nuclear Research They watched excited brilliant eight atoms decay inside a particle Michael Accelerator normally this process releases light which is later converted into electrons and positron are a type of Subatomic particle with a positive charge. And sure enough. That's what happened but then things got interesting. Normally brilliant eight decays predictable fashion yet. A weirdly Lee high number of these electrons and positron repelled each other at a one hundred and forty degree angle to explain the surplus crasner. Hawkeye's team argued that a never before seen particle had been formed as the atoms decayed by their calculations this theoretical subatomic body would have a massive around seventeen million electron-volts on volts. They went ahead and named the x seventeen particle and now ex seventeen is again making the news. Recently the same Hungarian Carrion scientists detected an anomaly indicates samples of helium four according to their archive paper. An unforeseen surplus of positron and electrons were released. Possibly because another seventeen particle was created. If this mystery particle exists. It might be something very special. Maybe just maybe it's a newfound carrier boasts on both sides are spinning particles that probably lack internal structure their known to carry forces making them an integral part of the standard model under the standard model. Milner Explains Forces take place by exchange of the carrier Bussan's between other subatomic particles articles. It's said each of the four fundamental forces has its own corresponding boasts on the one that transports gravity hasn't been found yet but the carrier bones associated it was strong force. Weak force electromagnetism are well documented. Presumably at seventeen would be the Kargbo sound for a fifth fundamental force that we never knew existed listed and perhaps said force is somehow related to dark matter but or getting ahead of ourselves. There's no hard proof that x seventeen exists. It's in the first place. The European Organization for Nuclear Research better known as sern has yet to find any trace of the particle and the new archive paper is still awaiting peer review and replication from other scientists milner and his colleagues have devised a proposal to try to generate seventeen particles in a scattering experiment at the Thomas. Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Newport News Virginia at present the standard model does account for any new fundamental forces. So if the x seventeen and the fifth force that allegedly carries a real we'll have to modify the good old standard model at any rate. It's clear the Potomac world is still rife with

Remembering The Late Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.

In Black America

02:34 min | 6 months ago

Remembering The Late Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.

"Is in black. America came to be known as the blood. It is possible that the pre spend leave. I looked over that man on the ground and one of the robbers were still around as possible that they felt that the man on the ground was merely faking acting like he had been robbed and in ought to seize them over their love and bath quick and he's deceased so the first question that the priests ad the first question that the lead by squalls. If I stopped the help this man what will happen to me. But then the Good Samaritan and came out and he reversed a question. If I do not stop to help this man. What will happen to him? That's the question before you tonight. Not at past stuff to help the sanitation worker. What will happen to my job? Mount Stopping the help the sanitation workers. What will happen to all of Iowa's spending my office every day and every week as a pathway jeff question is not if I stuff to help this man and need what will happen to me? The question miss if I do not stop to help. The sanitation work of will happen to them. That's the question reverend. Dr Martin Luther. The King Junior would have been ninety one this year. Had He lived out a dream for racial equality in this country. He was a man walking down the oppressed and for a man who question unfair laws and went to jail rather than submit to them. King was passionate fighting for civil rights and although he died by violence his life and teachings were dedicated Kennedy to a deep disrespectful violence and its consequence he won a Nobel Prize for peace. His lectures and dialogues stirred the conscience of the nation. Doc in November one thousand nine hundred eighty three legislation was signed creating Martin Luther King Junior day making it only the third National Holiday born in the twentieth century in Fall Nineteen ninety-one National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis Tennessee. Sasser made it was dedicated to his remembers on October sixteenth. Twenty eleven the MLK memorial dedicated on the National

Martin Luther King National Civil Rights Museum Dr Martin Luther Mount Stopping America Mlk Memorial Sasser Nobel Prize Kennedy Memphis Iowa Tennessee
Kevin Spacey accuser and writer Ari Behn dies by suicide

Tim Conway Jr.

00:19 sec | 6 months ago

Kevin Spacey accuser and writer Ari Behn dies by suicide

"News the Danish author who accused Kevin Spacey of sexual assault has died of apparent suicide ari Behn it was a member of the Norwegian royal family for fifteen years until his abortion twenty seventeen that year he accused Kevin Spacey of groping him under a table a Nobel Prize event ten years earlier spacey has denied similar allegations bang was

Kevin Spacey Assault Ari Behn Nobel Prize
"nobel prize" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

12:37 min | 6 months ago

"nobel prize" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"To hear your local NPR station. And all your favorite. NPR shows as well. This is on point point magnetic Roberti. Were talking this hour with esther do flow and Abuja's Banerjee. They are two of the winners of the two thousand Nineteen Nobel Prize in economics. They on the prize along with Michael Kramer and they are co authors of the new book. Good Economics for hard times And so professor due flowing Professor Banerjee. Let's talk specifically about one of the areas that you cover in your book in your book about how to look at it at differently. Migration probably is one of the most pressing crossing first of all. Let me ask you. What is it that we get wrong right now? But our understanding of the major drivers of my migration on the we get to things completely all and migration typically one is precisely on the driver and that's only to this idea that peoples do not act in their immediate financial ensure self interest. So we think that If there was not very strong barriers to migration say be were from the southern border. Not that anybody has made such suggestions than People would immediately Florida's because The wages and incomes of so much coach higher here than they are saying in America that if it was only possible everybody would want to come here. People just follow a gradient of wages essentially exactly so so and that is actually on That's home for international and migration because factory when you're looking at the migration flows they are. I'm quite low. And that is one way to understand what is wrong is to just look also at internal migration where they are new. Such Berrios does and we can see that people just don't move really in very large numbers from willow areas to the towns in developing countries from uh-huh cities and towns affected by tweet shocks in the US to a other cities and towns where they might be jobs for Greece in in the middle of the financial crisis in Greece to other countries in Europe where they would be absolutely welcome so people do not move even even when they are no barriers to doozy to do so and where you would think that they are strong financial incentives. Okay so so when we when we actually the facts are saying that people don't move as much as we might expect them to but let me just back up here a moment because you said that that Right now migration is actually lower her than it has been historically that what you're saying because he said it's it's quite low within the US as a US Basically if you take from one thousand nine hundred fifty two now. The fractional people moving in every year from this county to the next has I think almost most hard okay. US much less mobile than it used to be internally into but international migration that's about stable from the nineteen eighteen late sixties to now the fraction of international migrants is roughly the same as it was I mean it's the same between now in nineteen. Seventy exception of some peaks like in the height of the Syrian refugee crisis. But I think the perception remains that all we must still be at the level level of migration that we experienced during that crisis when in fact it was really it ebbs and flew over a busy. That's almost okay. I see so then. You're also saying that. So therefore you're saying that people aren't necessarily it's just exclusively moving for better wages as as much as one might expect the what what what really push us. They are kind of to kind of people who move people who always super entrepreneurial and then maybe they moved to make a better life and but you would want people in your country because they are the ones who are beginning to become the entrepreneurs of tomorrow or people move ooh when they are pushed by by by something by connor dispersion convict exit. Okay so let me ask you. Then that so then in terms of why people move move. There are some Some truths that may find the face of what we hear politicians say but what about the fact that migration has has on labor markets. I mean you talk about that specifically in the book that there's a presumption that it has a negative effect on on domestic workers. Is that at the case. For low skill domestic workers. There is no evidence that wages go down when the large influx of similar low-skilled else could migrants from elsewhere And this is being studied by many people not us but many other people done very carefully. Lots of debate. But I think I think the burden of that. Evidence is very clear and that there's really no demonstrable effect on on wages. Okay so let's stick with this for a moment because You know the best data said I have is not a reliable one because it's total but frequently on on this the program when we when we talk about immigration I'll have people. We have people call in from from all over the country. Let's take the construction industry for example and and these are people who I off. I believe them when they say I've been working in the construction industry for thirty years and it's been difficult for me to get work in the past fifteen eighteen years because of the number of undocumented immigrants who are coming in taking low wage construction jobs so there seems to be a disconnect between the individual will impact that many people sticking with the United States that many Americans are feeling versus what you're saying the sort of macro level numbers says the question is what would happen if undocumented migrants. Well not there and it would not be necessarily be the case that the person who is now feels that they're replaced by documented undocumented migrant would get the job back so in fact it was a there is many other. I think that I could do. Instead of hiring the native workers of fog simple they could decide to make an is. They could decide to not build some projects or they could decide to do any number of things so the in in fact in the in the sixties there was a very much a kind of popular La demand for kicking out migrant farm work who are walking in funds And the idea was that they were taking away. The job from the form the Coordinative Waco Zeros and at some point Kennedy you kind of give to pressure on the procedure was sent home and they they are Visas got got revoked. And we can look at what happened before and after the employment and wages of Agricultural Joel Walker in California compared to similar places and the answer is nothing happened. Their wages employment didn't pick up and one of the reason. When is that the the company that defilement big fun goodwill employing bosseaux moved to mow cop that could be mechanized easily and mechanized there? So that is that that's A. I think one of the issues. It's a which makes I think migrant workers attractive to employers is precisely the fact that it's self selected. They're often living living on very little. They go the planning to maybe build a life. They work very very hard for very very little. And when you get rid of them you don't necessarily want somebody somebody else who just want. No one rather mechanize. I I think the idea that these migrants are all like you know e- exactly like like everybody else is also misleading. Because I think a lot of them are extremely motivated people. They come at huge personal cost to do it. They're not necessarily certainly going to be just like everybody else. So employers actually are often Particularly happy to have them and then when they go away day rather do without them. Okay now you have a couple of other examples about Sort of more more localized ways of looking at what the effect fact of sort of a surge of migration has had you reference work done around the Mariel boatlift for example. Can you can you remind us how. How much did did the influx of migrants at that time? How much of the change? The local labor market. What impacted actually have so? This is a landmark study by David David Car With studied the level of tens of thousands of Cuban refugees in a very short period of time When cast who cannot get mcgrane lied to leave an ill look compared to what happened in in Miami a compared to similar plans You know before and after the arrival of the of the memorial booty boatlift refugees. If I'm nothing no effect on wages implement and this was kind of one of the disclaimer. Little bit as Landmine it was very very surprising. It's in this results from the in the economics profession because people kind of assume that there should be an effect at least on some people and it was put under tons of scrutiny and and number one it kind of held up to skirt in quite a number to it was repeated by Simla unusual big wave of migrants in other the context in the The people coming back to France after the end of the Algerian war is another example. The wave of People going to moving within Europe in during the Balkans war so then how well given the information that you just shared with us. We still nevertheless in many nations right now many European nations the United States etc.. We see deep concerns over the level of of migration and perhaps the challenges. I I keep thinking sort of like local level impacts versus what the macro numbers say but there does seem to be a sense in multiple countries that this is a problem that migration is a problem. I mean what. What does your the research that you've done in poverty economics tell you about how? What would you tell political leaders about how they should be looking at at migration or or the all the people who do call in and say no? I lost my job because of an immigrant. I mean the message is a bit hard to deliver his message is actually you know it's actually very ought to know call causality part of the reason why we've spent our lives doing randomized controlled trials is because signing is a huge pain and you the example I just gave. which is the Brussels is exactly that which is that? You know you think that you would have had that job if these people went there but in fact the employs didn't want you they wanted machines instead of you. How would you see that you wouldn't see that you'll just see that you know these guys is there? I don't have a job you don't you. Don't think the counterfactual. which is that if I if these guys were not there maybe they would be a lot scale mechanization and and therefore? The jobs won't be there so I think this is the reason why one of the goals of our book was to serve restored faith in our competence as a profession which may be a long shot but nonetheless. It's one that exactly is in points like this. Where looking carefully at the data data and thinking hard about? Why the obvious intuitions not always correct is is critical and that sort of why we wrote the book? Okay so then so then take so then this straight into something you were saying earlier and I'd love to explore more with you about how. How should we look upon? What self interest actually is.

US NPR Nobel Prize Europe professor Professor Banerjee Michael Kramer esther Mariel boatlift La Greece Florida Brussels California Kennedy America Joel Walker Miami
"nobel prize" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

02:30 min | 8 months ago

"nobel prize" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"The glass window is placed on a top wall of the main chamber. The seat is movable coupled to the main chamber and configured for placement of the infant on the seat the leg holder is movable coupled all to the main chamber and configure to support at least one leg of the infant the safety belt is coupled to the seat and configure to retain the infant. On the seat the sprinkler is placed inside the main chamber configured to spray water to wash at least a portion of the infant at least a portion of the infant. Yes some to all of the infant. Why why why am I picturing those lake sealed up self cleaning? Public bathrooms that got in some places like we came across these in Switzerland. I've seen one of these. It's like a public public bathroom. You go in small little building and then you use the toilet and then when you're done like the door shuts a light comes on outside and it says like cleaning. Oh Oh wow. That sounds remarkable their little robotic. I Dunno sprayers wipers and stuff in there. I don't know what happens on the inside. I couldn't see. Oh surely somebody has trapped himself thousand found out. I should hope so. I have to admit what it made me think of was the surgery. pod In the SCI FI horror film premiere theus horrifying scene but I think actually one of the most effective parts of the movie. Oh yeah yeah because If you haven't seen it basically the idea is that it is a surgery. Pied created for a specific acidic male individual and an elderly individual. And then it's supposed to take care of any needs that individual has and then our heroine ruin in film eventually has to use it to remove Zeno more from herself but she's having to sort of improvise with the machine and it's terrifying Just not so much. Even I mean certainly it's terrifying when things starts cutting into her but just her climbing into a realizing what's about to happen makes four some some great great sci fi horror. Yeah so yes. I thought about that throughout reading this patent however the patent does have some sketches. And when you look at them them. The design looks less like a high tech surgery pod and more like a washing machine or an oven a dishwasher. Yeah Yeah Yeah. Yeah A dishwasher. You're not a washing machine. Yeah it's like a front loader doesn't have a spin cycle infant not this this maybe future model will so far. Rebecca is an associate professor of Islamic Azad University in Iran and his Engineering research involves nanostructures nanoparticles..

"nobel prize" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

12:43 min | 8 months ago

"nobel prize" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Hey welcome to stuff to blow your mind. My name is Robert Lamb. And I'm Joe McCormack making we are revisiting a yearly tradition. That's right every year and pretty much about this time. We look and see what was honored at at this year's ignoble prizes the prizes themselves come out. I believe that the into September at the very beginning of October bad timing for us because we that's when we want to get into our Halloween content and so we always do steamroll ahead into the Halloween content and then afterwards after especially after the dust is sort of settled on the Nobel prizes is the the mainstream media coverage of the event has died away then we come back and we we pick through the winners and sometimes we cover cover absolutely everything. Sometimes we cover a few choice elections here in there and that's going to be the model. We're going to be employing here. Yeah we're just GONNA take a look at a few highlights stuck out to us so For those who haven't heard before quick refresher on the ignore bells yeah. They've been awarded each year since Nineteen ninety-one by the publication Gatien the annals of improbable research the purpose of the award. According to the editors improbable research is to honour achievements. That first make people laugh and and then make them think. Furthermore they stressed that the tin prices aren't necessarily meant to pass judgment on the winners instead. The official website emphasizes that the prizes quote celebrate. Celebrate the unusual honor the imaginative and spur people's interest in science medicine and technology and the principal individual here is editor Marc Abrahams. So yeah every year it is just a you know. It's making fun of the idea. A little bit of the Nobel Prizes which which celebrate you know key the advancements in key examples of work that are really pushing forward our our understanding of ourselves and the universe in nature and the Nobel Prizes prizes tend to highlight more absurd in trees but none not necessarily entries that are that are completely useless. And I think that's an important thing to stress and something then. We tried to stress in the past when covering the event is that studies that are honored by the Nobel Prizes. Maybe snicker inducing. They may seem seem a little silly at first glance but they are all works of a real science of real ingenuity and if nothing else air expand helping to expand the that the threshold of human understanding Yeah I mean I think one of our favorite things to explore on this show is realizing icing that. There's an interesting question in place you wouldn't have expected to find it and that's what a lot of this research does. And so on that note let us turn to the first ignoble prize winning study that we would like to highlight here today. And that is the two thousand and nineteen award winner in. Physics awarded awarded to Patricia Yang at all for studying. How and why wombats make cube shaped poop? Bats are so cute they are there they here are so adorable to look. I mean obviously the babies any baby animals going to be adorable but even the adults look like living teddy bear creatures like living teddy bear air marsupials. I bet they're just nightmarish. It's cute they are. I'm sure they kill thousands of people every year. Now I mean to be clear they can protect themselves and sometimes they do harm humans if provoked or I think there have been cases where like there is a law that had the main or something like that and it was there for for a little more agitated. So yes there they can. They are kind of tough customers in their own. RIGHT ON RIGHT THEY'RE NOT STRAIGHT UP Warren's or anything but they can they can look after themselves so this particular paper how to wombats make Cube Pu. This came this was presented at the seventy fifth annual meeting the APS division Asian fluid dynamics. And I believe this presented in Atlanta Georgia. Where of course we record the show? Yeah I think at least part of the team is Georgia Tech Right. Yeah yeah so the species here vom. Data's your sinus is a Pudgy herb. or roughly the size of kind of thick dog. Like a really thick. Doc Marsupial they have pouches. But since they're borough offers they have backward pouches so as not to fill the pouch up with dirt and endanger the young when the maybe within the Pouch Oh interesting so like if they're pulling themselves forward on their belly through the dirt the the the dirt does not go in right. Yeah because we can all imagine imagine the cartoon scenario that just filling up with dirt. Right right they have slow metabolism they feed mostly on grasses and roots and they're largely nocturnal or popular scheduler. So they're gonNA you know they're not going to venture out usually in the brightest light of the day they may come out though on particularly overcast days and they can again. They can put up a fight if threatened and you'll find them in Australia and in Tasmania they're cute. They're not endangered Despite being treated by vermin by some farmers and I I love this groups of wombats are sometimes called a mob sometimes just called a group but sometimes there are also known as a wisdom wombat so man that's better than a murder of crows that it is I just imagined these wise Cute elder wombats that have so much wisdom to share with the world. I don't mean to be mean but they don't necessarily look wise. They do they look more clever than wise. What would you? What would you referred to the mass snuggle of wombats? It'd be a snuggie of wombats that's pretty or a slang slang bats. I like that but one of the more. Puzzling attributes of the wombat has long been there poop because it is cubic in. We're not talking. Necessarily perfectly cubic geometry geometrical sense the yet for a world mostly devoid pretty much completely devoid of natural squares certainly natural biological squares. This is pretty darn cubic. Yeah totally totally. I mean if you come across these things in nature you would think they were made by humans. Yeah they look kind of like chocolate marshmallows like really square chocolate marshmallow unless you picture of them. Yeah the cylinder call marshmallow is like more old school like carved out ones with corners. Granted I think the image that we're both looking at here. They're dried a little bit but it's still fresh out. The shoot they are. They're cubic in nature. It is really hard to imagine how these things are made just pick. I mean I don't know how much time one wants to spend contemplating a wombat Amos but like it. Just doesn't seem like a normal thing that would emerge physically Lee from a what I would assume to be rounded. Ain't us well. The wombat anus is not immune from the inquiry of science and that's where Yang and her team come in and and again yeah. Gang is local based out of the School of mechanical engineering at Georgia Tech. She's a post doctoral fellow centuries local maybe we should ever on the on the show because She's not just a one time ignoble winner. She's a two time ignoble winner because she and Co author David who also shared the two thousand fifteen ignoble physics surprise for testing the biological principle. The nearly all mammals in empty their bladders in about twenty one seconds plus or minus. Thirteen seconds. I don't know the plus or minus thirteen seconds ends. Buys you a pretty big window there but yeah I find myself very often thinking about this one in the bathroom so having turned away from the world of urine the researchers searchers were interested by this puzzle of the the Wombat Poop so they looked at how differences and wombats digestive processes and soft tissue structures informed informed this curious structure so they investigated they used that I just of track of wombats that had been euthanized following motor vehicle collisions. In Tasmania. You have to you have to have some actual bodies to look at their right. Seems like a reasonable way to go about getting them. They found that the shape occurred towards is the very end of the intestines. As the matter became increasingly firm it became clear that quote varying elastic properties of wombats intestinal walls alls allowed for the cubic formation and the result is a cube. The only organic Cuban nature they say and it's not made Yang stresses by the two typical local humane methods of creating cubes. We because we tend to mold a cube or we cut Q.. Right we slice a cube out of something the subtractive manufacturing facturing. But this is the third way. This is the way of the wombat where it is it is. It is formed through the the excretion process of the lower intestines so this would be not cutting cube not molding acute maybe pinching a cube yeah pitching cube and then excreting cube. Now you're probably wondering what is the why of all of this right of the. WOMBAT is doing something entirely different with. Its poop there has to be a reason. Well scientists believe it comes down to the fact that these burrowing nocturnal herbivores depend largely on their sense of smell they largely communicate by smell and therefore like various other animals. that are also smell dependent. Their fecal matter is they're calling card. I mean you have a dog you know how the how they behave. Sort of the. The The heightened importance of fecal matter in the dog world. Yeah out on a walk in the neighborhood. POOP is like a facebook status update. Yes like you know you're interested. You want to check it out like we just see something we you don't WanNa step in. Maybe the in the sense data there is just telling us not to step in it but to a dog with heightened far heightened sensibilities. There's a lot of data data in the sense. Emerging from that poop is interesting stuff and so why something like a key while something like a cat hides its Pu because it doesn't want to be known to either. It's mini any prey animals or it's many predators. WOMBATS are a different matter today. WOMBATS don't have many natural predators certainly adult wombats and they I used piled feces Tamar territory and to communicate with other wombats and they don't live on prairie. There are ups and down to the topography. The of their natural habitat in placing their poops at higher elevations. Such is a top some rocks on top of a log or on a ledge. It makes it stand stand out more visually to other wombats and again they don't have great Great you know the sense of sight but still you put it up there on allege Moore Wilmot able to see it and then the wombats could come in and take a more informed a smell of the wombat poop in learn something about About its maker. So the wombat rectum is sort of designed by evolution to create poop monuments. Yeah like testaments to the will of the WOMBAT. Ah Occupies this territory. poop that stays put basically which is Interestingly quite the exact opposite of the round goat feces and into many of these probably seen emerging from the rear end of Goat which is believed to have evolved to roll downhill and essentially self hide in hilly or mountainous terrain gene? So as better. Maybe to throw off a cougar that could be pursuing yours right. Yeah like for the goat. It's better that the poop just gets lost But for the wombat the wombat has very specific needs require the poop to remain in sight and to be found. And so yeah. It's basically with the wombats. It's it's highly highly adaptive to be able to poop cubes that stay put. It's part of their language Arabic expression now nationally. There are potential bio mimetic possibilities. Here in the future future young says we might see human created cubes produced not by molding or cutting but by this sort of excretion. So I can't help but wonder if this will be the future of our Valentine's the entire day chocolate so yes like like a mechanical industrial Amos for pooping out chocolate and exactly that shade exactly delicious. So that's the physics there's express and Yeah I just love the story. 'cause wall mattress such interesting creatures and and this is ultimately extremely insightful. Like this this is not this. This is something that yes it's laughable because it's Poop poop from acute marsupial but on the other hand it's it really illustrates something amazing about evolution and and Isn't that also highlights where we might go in the future when it comes to making cubicle candy and if you want to learn more about this Patricia Yang also has a website Patricia. Yang thing dot net excellent. Well maybe we should take a quick break and then when we come back we can talk about dirty money everybody all the recent news about online security breaches..

"nobel prize" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

02:52 min | 9 months ago

"nobel prize" Discussed on The Science Show

"Of to see value out the point of creation in chemistry the prize was awarded to three scientists for their work in developing lithium ion batteries professes John Bay good enough of the University of Texas M Stanley Whittingham of being Hampton University in New York and Akira Yoshino of major university Japan the small size lightweight and energy density of Lithium Ion batteries have made them an appealing choice for electrononics smartphones and laptops but they are also found in electric cause and in space including on the International Space Station and in the MAS curiosity during the oil crisis in the early nineteen seventies Professor Whittingham began work on fossil fuel free technologies developing an early lithium battery good enough and Shane made further improvements to the power and materials of the battery eventually leading to the lightweight and durable tech we not today the award makes good enough the oldest Nobel laureate at ninety seven and he still works in the lab every day you never know they come out don't retire early and of course the Nobel Prize for physics. This year's winners were emeritus professors James peebles Princeton University Michelle Mayor of the University of Geneva and Professor Diddy Kello of Geneva and Cambridge for their contributions to our understanding of the evolution of the universe and earth's place in it as Daniels put it in awarding apprise this year's Nobel laureates in physics had painted the sure over universe far stranger and more wonderful than we ever could have imagined of you or place in the nurse will never be the same again professor payables work is pivotal in our understanding of the primordial universe that time right after the bang in particular he focused on the thermal radiation from that early universe traces of which can be detected today this background radiation clues about how our universe formed professor payables research has also advanced the theories of doc motto and Doc Energy Nebulous Components of the universe I still don't understand Moore and callow received the other half of the physics prize for their work in discovering the first exoplanet a planet outside solar system this they achieved by observing the miniscule fluctuations in lot coming from a distant star evidence of a planet orbiting around it this finding kicked off an enormous search for other exoplanets we've found more than four thousand since the vast differences between these exoplanets has shifted understanding of how planets get made and the hope remains we might one day find life on one of them.

Nobel Prize Professor Whittingham professor Stanley Whittingham Professor Diddy Kello University of Geneva Hampton University Akira Yoshino James peebles Princeton Univer University of Texas major university Japan International Space Station John Bay electrononics New York Shane Michelle Mayor Daniels
"nobel prize" Discussed on Capitalisn't

Capitalisn't

10:40 min | 9 months ago

"nobel prize" Discussed on Capitalisn't

"Okay so it seems like the Nobel Committee's becoming a little more open minded about giving prizes too broad thinkers it there's a much more specific criterion that's important for the Nobel Prize Committee and what would that be Luigi so if you look at the statement of the price on somebody debt not only as contributed greatly to the field but also with some contribution as some practical application but improv actors if you WanNa try to predict who's going to get number price I think the first thing that you want to see is whether they are well site edge in the economic literature molded ten years ago I wrote a paper about the articles that more than five hundred citation at the time this was in two thousand and five there were only eleven authors who had at least three papers in that group of this eleven seven eight already got at the time since then got the nominal price and one of them unfortunately died so basically in this was could group of eleven they're only three that have now received a novel price yet so we're those three that didn't get the Nobel prize so one is Barrow and the other is Mike Jensen third one is David craps Robert bow is a vague good example of the Fox borrow research span across else many different aspects of Monaco why not the most important is his research on economic growth and particularly converges across country he tested whether it is true that feature countries go less and so we can hope to have a convergence solve were country at the same level of economic development which country and at least in his early walk this to be the case I think that in moist and he has the data the more mixed but at the time was pretty clear that erection ki as also very provocative paper that when a government issue debt in fact issued a promise to tax you in the future and so individuals are so rational than they understand taxes will go up in the future and so they don't see that as a net wealth but simply as a promise of future accession this India is probably too extreme but was paying for for a long period of time and quite important and also he had a maid role in the literature on microeconomics and time inconsistency the time consistency is a very simple but very important ideas that if I am a government I would like to Klay that I will never tax cap ethos so people in vast but one as they invested I'm very tempted to tax them because they can't undo fast that investment says for Mike Jensen I would say he's definitely a financial economist so to the extent that he's very much within one field maybe he's a hedgehog but within finance I think you sort of Fox or because he is known for a lot of different ideas for example Jensen's Alpha is now both in industry and enacted -demia a very popular way of measuring whether companies outperforming among other companies or the market and he's also well known for his research with meckling on the theory of the firm which among other things in forms us on how we should think about how executives make decisions I think my Jensen would be controversial candidate because he took some as strong position over the he is one of the papers these highly cited is a paper about the fact that ED executives were not paid enough that he wanted you see more pay performance TV in executive pays which by and large also meant more pay to his credit he is possessed Shinzo evolve over time he's always in war is about how the compensation my actually lead executives to lie and to bad outcome and he's most famous one is about agency cost of managers the fact that when manages round firm they might a apple pie value that firm and the reason why we need to have either contracts or financial structure to undo that risk is important driver for national decision so that that paper was Weeden back in ninety seventy six and as being extremely financial in the financial literature for the ex- almost fifty years he also shares with Jean Pharma the Mary to have invented a method that is widely used it is called the event study out to distill from the stock price the impact of particular news on the DOC price and separate to the effect of noise what happens otherwise he also call for with Gene Pharma some important walk on organizations and in particular the reputations play in discipline the board of directors the fact that they tried to behave properly in anticipation of what happens in the labor market subsequently but I think that he will be a fairly controversial figure even if he has been incredibly influential in EH field of financial economics the last person would be David Kreps at Stanford and he's best known for his work in Game Theory sequential games or dynamic games the sounds sort of complicated but I think it's actually somewhat intuitive you might have heard of the prisoner's dilemma where if you separate prisoners who let's say have done something wrong in theory might be best if they both said that they didn't do anything because then there would be no evidence that they didn't he wrong they wouldn't beautiful to extract confessions so they would both be best off if they cooperated somehow and lied and said they didn't do anything but the police are pressuring each prisoner separate league to confess or give a confession that the other person did it and if each one of those prisoners than rats out the other person they might both be in for a long sentence and so this is what's known as a one shot game by economists but there are a lot of situations in real life that are actually needed games where you have situations in which there are multiple players have to come to a decision and they have to make that same sort of decision over and over again in the course of let's say like managing a company or making some sort of corporate decision so the prisoner's dilemma might change if on the happens over and over again because you know that it's going to happen again and so in these cases something reputation might really matter like do you have reputation of being a liar do you have the reputation for cooperating and so this is the kind of work the David Kreps is done along with Paul Milgram and Robert will soon also from Stanford and they're very well cited for this work and they're probably in the running for Nobel prize if not this year than sometime soon he's walk can be used to analyze donald trump because reputation mattis if you have a reputation of being a little bit crazy people my he scared by you because in many repeated gain situation one of the problem is that you're not sure that the other person will buy through a threat because is not in Hazo her incentive but if you're crazy you do not behave always rationally that threat cons all of a sudden incredible and you can actually stare your competitors more of the people playing with you more by showing some signs that lease occasion yeah crazy so it's a very good description of the Meta rationality of trump's behavior yeah I mean I think part of the reason this work is owned financial is because it can be applied from everything to how our political leaders act to how business executives make decisions to how like children decide whether or not to lie to their parents by the way I tell you that I was in the prisoner's dilemma A few days ago you got arrested now wasn't arrested but I was trying to travel to a different country with my fiance and we had different reasons for traveling and for whatever reason to I guess the security on the US sides we're going abroad but they had security here in the US so they detained us and they separated US and they question us in different rooms so they were like looking for us to give different answers to something and I was like terrified the whole time because I knew what they were doing and part of what's difficult in our relationship is that like I go back and forth between Washington and New York a lot and so for questions like do you live together I don't really have a straight answer it seems like we're very suspicious and so we barely made the flight because they were worried that we were spies or something I think you definitely look like one thanks Luigia I'll I'll take that as a compliment absolutely Matahari Buick listen into capital isn't there's a good chance you're interested in pioneering research and groundbreaking discoveries big brains another podcast from the University of Chicago brings the work and ideas of the world's smartest thinkers straight ear buds with guests like David Axelrod if you know people if you understand something about them it's hard order to dehumanize him it's harder to hate them even if you disagree with them Richard Thaler those two words systematic bias that was the big Aha if there's systematic biases then you can make better predictions and imbuing we now in the past couple of decades have started thinking about schools not as things that we have rights to Ba- rather something that we are to consume ooh choose you'll hear the stories behind the research reshaping our world listen and subscribe to big brains wherever you get your podcasts..

Nobel Committee Nobel Prize Committee Luigi fifty years ten years Milgram
"nobel prize" Discussed on Capitalisn't

Capitalisn't

06:03 min | 9 months ago

"nobel prize" Discussed on Capitalisn't

"So finally October and most people think this is a spooky month because of allowing Bot for older Lee The economist this is spooky month for a different reason where is would that be Luigi they really getting frantic about the possibility great honor to introduce the laureate of the various Rick Spanked Prize in economic sciences in memory of Alfred Nobel in this year the noble price economics will be announced on October fourteenth just a week away from this episode so speaking of people getting nervous are you nervous Luigi no because number one I'm not old debatable but most importantly because I'm not in the running how do you know that you're not running now or it's very easy to get a sense of who is in the League who is not and so in today's episode we are going to take a break from talking about capitalists and we're GONNA talk about Nobel Prize comics out do you win it why it's important and how do you make predictions who might win it or not from Georgetown University this is Kate Waldoch and throng individual Chicago this is Louise's in Gallup's you're listening to capitalism a podcast about what's working and capitalism today and most importantly what is it so let's start with Khleifi one important point and even the pecking order of prices the Nobel Prize in economics is a distant relative it's not even a real Nobel prize to be honest he's not a real number price they correct name is the veges Westbank Prize in economic sciences in memory of Alpha novel Oh so it was not instituted by nobble himself was instituted by the Central Bank of Sweden in nine hundred sixty eight so if you're a hard scientists like physicist Oh you might win the Nobel Prize for a major discovery like the discovery of the transistor and for something like biology you might get a Nobel prize for figuring out the structure of DNA and the question is our and why do you WanNa know what price and economics and to explain most of the novel Price comics I think he's useful to use a classification that if famous for is i Berlin us one between hedge walks and Fox and because hedgehogs are Spiky Fox's are soft I mean does this have to do with like the relative cuteness of these two animals no it has to do with a Luik of an inch and Greek poets that said Fox is no many things the hedge only one but beak and so the some economists who about one big idea and basically they won the Nobel price for that contribution and then there are others that are kind of all over the place they contributed so much in so many areas but they're not identify one big single idea so who might we put in the hedgehogs category I think one example might be someone like George Acre Lav and he's on for his work in Lemons my paper the market for Lemons explored how markets with asymmetric information right for example the buyer of a used car fears that she will be stuck with a lemon the seller of us ars sees how little she will pay for one in there for will not supply a good quality car because of this interplay have concerns markets they should exist collapse the best example is the market for Health Insurance it's for the elderly and the other category on the Fox cowdery we ever chantal he's accurately two most cited papers are his books one broken industrial organization and the other book on regulation and procurement and both these books kind of close field rather than opening to do before after those books around my work which has been awarded the prize is on the regulation of industries the regulation of industries clued what we call antitrust which means that judges and courts and anti-trust authorities check on behavior of large firms check the new abuse of dominant positions that large from don't abuse of power it also include regulation regulation of what's called network industries so data come in that industry `electricity industry railroad post offices and also little bit the regulation of banks which of course it's been a very topical issue lately so Luigi Do you think there has been any trend recently and whether the Nobel Prize Committee is going more in the direction of hedgehogs or more in the direction of Fox's I think that actually we started to introduce the Fox category relatively recently in the past people Goma as being incredibly across the entire sort of financial economics field but I think the nobble comedian now more into a key prices to people who have massively contributed to the field.

Lee
"nobel prize" Discussed on Science Talk

Science Talk

05:28 min | 9 months ago

"nobel prize" Discussed on Science Talk

"This is scientific American science talk posted on October seven th two thousand nineteen I'm Steve Mirsky the Nobel Assembly Caroline Skins that has today decided to ward the two thousand Nineteen Nobel Prize in physiology discoveries of how south sounds and adapt to oxygen availability. Thomas Perlman Secretary of the Nobel Assembly shortly after five thirty am eastern time Greg Samantha was born in Nineteen fifty six in New York he performed his prize winning studies at Johns skains university in Baltimore where is still active Sir Peter Ratcliffe was born in Nineteen fifty four in Lancashire you're in the UK he performed his prize winning studies at Oxford University and he's continuing to do his research soared university and he's also at Francis Crick Institute in London and William Calin born in Nineteen fifty seven in work he performed his price winning studies at Dana Farber Cancer Institute in Boston we're still active in his own lab yeah I will not turn to professor Roundell Johnson a member of the Nobel Assembly who will describe some detail and background binder works so please ramble this year's Nobel prize is awarded for determining how oxygen levels are sensed by cells oxygen is essential for life and is used by virtually all animal cells in order to convert food to usable energy however the amount of engine available to cells tissues animals themselves can vary greatly this prize is for three physician scientists who found them switch that regulates how our cells adapt when oxygen levels drop the most fundamental use of oxygen by the cell is to convert food to usable energy just as a candle needs the right amount of oxygen to burn cleanly cells need to adjust their metabolic rates based on how much oxygen they have available to them this allows each cell and indeed our bodies to efficiently and safely burn fuel so as to create heat do work and build new tissues cells and tissues are constantly experiencing changes in oxygen availability as an embryo grows develops as muscles work the oxygen available changes as the tissues themselves change cells need a way to adjust to the amount of oxygen they have while still doing their important jobs sometimes oxygen levels change across the entire body such as when we high altitudes and sometimes they change and very small parts of our bodies such as when we get a wound that interrupts the local blood supply this triggers adaptive process called the hypoxia response which in turn can induce processes in the body as diverse as new blood vessel formation or genesis new red blood cell formation or rith rope and metabolic adaptations of cells including by Colossus before things get too complicated I want to jump to an interview Randall. Johnson did after the Nobel announcements Johnson's research on the effects of low oxygen so he really knows is this stuff he spoke to an unidentified interviewer but based on the programs in past years I believe she was Swedish journalist Joanna rose this use your water in the discovery of cells sense and adapt to oxygen availability. What does this mean well it's basically a price that says in your cell if you're an animal cell you have to always have some level of oxygen almost all cells use it to do there pollick processes and basically it is just like a candle burning or any other kind of furnace or engine you are burning things in order to make heats in order to make Gede and that's really what we do of course we need oxygen or do those things the problem is cells inside three-dimensional structure like the body are just getting different amounts of oxygen can depend on different levels and blood flow can depend on the fact that the the tissue itself might be using a lot of oxygen at any given time my brain is probably using fair amount right now my heart because it's eating a bit faster and so that's maybe got sort of its using oxygen and if I'm lying down and sleeping and so the because the cell has very tightly regulated little furnace in it it has to adjust to these different levels of oxygen fine-tuned way and if it does badly it can even be fatal for the cell so this is really the prizes for this sort of almost like a reestablish or a thermostat for the oxygen levels a damper that you'd have on your furnace to let in more or less oxygen at any given time so it's just right the flame.

Nobel Prize Roundell Johnson Nobel Assembly Steve Mirsky Sir Peter Ratcliffe William Calin Oxford University Dana Farber Cancer Institute Francis Crick Institute Greg Samantha New York Thomas Perlman UK Baltimore Johns skains university Boston London Lancashire Gede Secretary
"nobel prize" Discussed on Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

05:22 min | 1 year ago

"nobel prize" Discussed on Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

"Awesome. Lifetime achievement Nobel prize. Those are two examples of Wayne, you can get the noble price wrong. Meaning that you make discovery. But then later turns out to be not quite right. We were talking earlier that there's other ways in which you can get the noble prize wrong. Right. Yeah. The other direction, which is you can fail to give it to people who are clearly deserving of it. And that's you know, almost as big mistake in my view. Yeah. There's lots of examples of people who were kind of who are known to be crucial part of the team and the discovery, but they for some reason didn't get it. And one of the biggest examples is Vero Ruben. He's an astronomer who everybody credits with making huge contributions. And establishing the dark matter is a thing. She's the one who went out and be careful measurements of how galaxies rotating and really proved that there's huge blobs of invisible matter in these galaxies. And she's a. The huge figure in strana me. And and and dark matter is one of the biggest discoveries ever, but she never won the Nobel prize for it. Right. And she's passed away now. So she can't and it's pretty widely acknowledged those because of you know, gender bias on the committee and in the field in general. Field of men, and it's the committee's mostly men, and in the history of of physics Nobel prize only a few have ever been given to women. It's terrible. It's shameful. It's shameful. A lot of these things. He sent me of people who should have gone to noble prize are were female, they're women. Right. Rosalind Franklin, and yeah, exactly roles in Franklin Eunice. She's the one who made that amazing. X Ray pictures of DNA, which Watson and Crick basically stole and then used to claim the discovery of DNA for which they won the Nobel prize. And then she died of Duda radiation does fusi few years later. So they really stood on the backs of her hard work. They stole her data and win a little prize. That's really embarrassing. And there's other examples, you know, there's Jocelyn bell was a graduate student and she discovered pulsars. The problem is that her adviser got the Nobel prize. It's she was one out there doing all the work. I know how did how did they justify that? You know at the time. I think they just thought it would be demeaning to the Nobel prize to give it to a graduate student or something. It makes no sense. It's to me. It's really embarrassing. It's terrible. And but but in in some karmic Justice, she won the breakthrough prize last year, which is which is great. And she donated like there's more than two million dollars in prize money. She doing all that money to supporting women and underrepresented minorities in science like she's really a stand up kind of person. That's awesome. And that's bigger than the money. You get from the noble prize. Yeah. Exactly. I think the breakthrough tries prize trying to buy its way into cultural relevant having more money than the Nobel prize. All right. Well, again, we don't want to bash the prize or signs. It's still the most awesome thing to learn about the universe, and to know what's true in and we know that the committee is doing its level best and they've made a lot of excellent choices. And the folks that have elevated Nobel prize winners are almost all entirely deserving. Even those for whom the prize is incorrectly. Warded there's still deserving as we commend them for doing their best. But of course, it's human endeavor and sciences, human endeavor. And sometimes we make mistakes and one of the best things about science that itself correcting, we'll go back, and we look at these things, and we understand them better. We make improvements just like this podcast. We hope to get better. And better every time. All right. We'll thanks everyone for listening next time next time. You still have a question after listening to all these explanations. Please drop us a line. We'd love to hear from you. You can find us at Facebook, Twitter and Instagram at Daniel and Hori that's one word or Email us at feedback at Daniel. And or hey dot com. This is Ron burgundy telling you to listen to my podcast. Here's a little something to wet your appetite right now, I'm a little terrified because I don't know what a podcast is. Let's take some calls. Caller, number one. You're on with Ron burgundy what's on your mind? Carts. No callers. No. Because people aren't listening in realtime Schick got it. If you are listening to this and have downloaded by mistake. Please turn it off. Now, turn it off. We have the will crews here. Okay. All right. Okay. If you're Taurus horoscope is come on pull you together. Defecate was reduced to my basic. Vailable whatever podcasts are found.

Nobel prize Jocelyn bell Vero Ruben Rosalind Franklin graduate student Wayne Lifetime achievement Ron burgundy Franklin Eunice Ray Schick Facebook Duda Daniel Watson Crick Instagram Twitter Hori two million dollars
"nobel prize" Discussed on Inquiring Minds

Inquiring Minds

04:10 min | 1 year ago

"nobel prize" Discussed on Inquiring Minds

"It's Friday, October twelfth, twenty eighteen and you're listening to up to date on enquiring minds. I'm Andrea Scotus Kishore Hari. Now that's been heard for bit. Yeah. Listeners the case you hadn't noticed. I hope you have. I've been out for the last six weeks or so. I just had a new human being an entire human being. Her name is becka. Oh, congratulates. Thanks. But now I'm back and excited to dive back in. Okay. So where do you wanna start? Well, I guess there are some big news. It was like one of my favorite weeks and science of the year just last week. You mean beginning of them or. No. You probably mean the Nobel prize? Yeah. I mean, when you're waiting by the phone at three AM and well minded ring, but I don't know. I wasn't waiting by the phone. I don't know what you think of my my scientific background, but no one was calling me. This was an interesting set of Nobel prizes because even economics one touches on science this year. So where do you wanna start choose any of them? Well, except he's we're not talking. Yeah, we're not definitely not talking about. I mean, I guess we have to mention the fact that woman won no prize for physics for only the third time. So this is like every sixty years. This happens and it's important to note that there's been two major snubs in physics for Nobel prizes. There was Jocelyn bell who actually discovered pulsars in the nineteen sixties and her graduate advisor was warded the Nobel prize for that discovery, which is widely considered one of the biggest nubs Nobel history because she did the work and then there's beer. Rubin who did all the work that really led to our understanding of dark matter as being eight thing that exists by understanding sort like the twisting of galaxies and unfortunately she passed away. So there's no way for her to win the Nobel prize. This goes into my longstanding rant that I think the Nobel prizes are out of date because they can't be awarded posthumously the committee. See that selects them is oftentimes slightly biased in their construction and that you can only award three laureates per prize. And oftentimes, especially in these physics ones that isn't enough. Yeah, no, absolutely. And you know, I think that I want to focus less on the fact that women and more on the fact that you know, this is really interesting discovery. Yeah, I think this is a fascinating one laser trapping of atoms, which is one of her collaborators won the Nobel prize for is amazing. The idea that we can have a laser and it actually exert s- radiative pressure on an item and you can use that sort of energy that the that the photons are bringing to play to actually trap atoms by having sort of beams of focus. Lasers shine and use that radiate of pressure to keep an atom in place. And then you can use that energy to siphon off energy from the atom leading to its cooling. That laser trap in the cooling is is a really fundamental form of. Laser physics that that has changed the way that a number of instruments work. It is radically changed our understanding of atoms at their lowest energy level. I thought that was great. Now, Donna stricklin one for her work. That was a little bit different because now any anyone that's ever gotten Lazic owes owes a debt of gratitude to Donna stricklin for her work in pulsing lasers to generate greater sort of intensity empower and now that's in so many devices that we use it is it is amazing how lasers have really reshaped physics in so many ways. And just like anyway, is that a is that a Lazic joke? It's fellow. I don't if I have the brain capacity for jokes yet. Madison Reed is accompanying named by the founder, Amy, Eric, after her daughter, and it's revolutionizing the way women color their hair. So for decades, women essentially had two options for hair-color. You could get outdated care color that you bought the pharmacy or you had to spend a lot of time and money at a salon. So EMMY created Madison Reed because she believes that women deserve better than Justice app status quo,.

Nobel prize Jocelyn bell Madison Reed Andrea Scotus Donna stricklin Kishore Hari EMMY becka Lazic Rubin advisor founder Amy Eric sixty years six weeks
"nobel prize" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"nobel prize" Discussed on The Science Show

"For me, there's nothing to stop me doing some research. If I have the energy stood Martin reece's research, I believe was largely theoretical where he could make contributions by thinking and writing the solve area of research that I'm involved in this much more experimental. I do have a small research group. I have a small company that I set up and what I'm expecting to do is to spend more time advising the science in the company than trying to run a significant research group myself. So Gregory winter master of Trinity College in Cambridge on the sign show in two thousand twelve. He won the Nobel prize this week, and he mentioned his predecessor, Lord Reese. Now, astronomer Royal and Martin Reese talks about our future. Later in this side show I the Nobels, here's James Boleyn. Every second of every day, our bodies immune system fights, foreign agents, bacteria parasites, en- viruses. The might otherwise do Tom. In some cases, the immune system can recognize cancer cells as normal and kill them to the trouble is some cancer tumors have the ability to put the brakes on the cells of our means system, stopping them from working properly. This is Nobel prize winners in medicine, worked out different mechanisms by which this breaking occurs and how to stop it, allowing the immune system to fight and kill tumor cells. Professor James, Allison from the MD Anderson Cancer Center in Texas in the United States and professor to sue Honjo from Kyoto University Japan jointly.

Martin reece Nobel prize Martin Reese MD Anderson Cancer Center James Boleyn Professor James sue Honjo Trinity College professor Kyoto University Japan United States Gregory Cambridge Texas Tom Allison
"nobel prize" Discussed on Politico's Off Message

Politico's Off Message

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"nobel prize" Discussed on Politico's Off Message

"Today's episode is sponsored by the president's inbox a podcast from the council on foreign relations each week experts authors and journalists join jim lindsey the director of cfr's think tank to help you get a handle on the foreign policy issues facing united states subscribe to the president's inbox in apple podcasts or the podcasting platform of your choice welcomed off message i'm isaac dove air your nobel prize winner we've talked about north korea a little dent there is some taco ready among the president's supporters that he should be getting the nobel prize for the north korea communications that he's had so far how do you feel about that but not not so far but it a president trump is successful in getting a peace treaty chef of caboche sizes north korea i think he's certainly ought to be i think it'd be a worthy and momentous accomplishment that no previous have been able to realize today's guest jimmy carter the thirty ninth president of the united states two thousand two nobel prize winner author of thirty two books the new one is called faith and ninety three year old cancer survivor still has a whole lot to say everything about making this one happened was a little bit crazy i'd reached danta carter last year hoping sit down with him between his international experience is pressure politics he said he voted for bernie sanders in the primaries for example but he'd taken a more open approach trump than most democrats he's been all over the world working on all sorts of things but he has talked about in this interview not the best reputation out in the country and he's always the oddman out among the paternity of expresidents carter staff said no them but it stayed in my mind then just two weeks ago we heard from liberty university the jellicoe christian college in lynchburg virginia that carter was going to be there and willing to do.

president jim lindsey director nobel prize jimmy carter united states bernie sanders liberty university jellicoe christian college virginia apple north korea expresidents carter lynchburg ninety three year two weeks
"nobel prize" Discussed on Inquiring Minds

Inquiring Minds

06:41 min | 2 years ago

"nobel prize" Discussed on Inquiring Minds

"Concern. So I know he just wrote a book called losing the Nobel prize. But it seems to me a bit of species argument to say that scientists really about winning the Nobel that that really is the carrot that most scientists have in front of them. I mean, I, I don't know of any scientists who go into science in order to win a Nobel prize. I mean, we kind of joke about it, and certainly it would be the culmination of a great career. But seriously everybody knows that there's a lot of who Bris and a lot of luck that would go into that. And I don't think anybody starts out with that prime motivator. Yeah, I agree with that. I don't think any scientist. I know even ones that have when the Nobel prize would say the got into science because of this, but it is a really big deal even though it carries less money than the breakthrough prize and other prizes, it's the one. It's the most prestigious award in all of science and Yoon one might say, might be the most prestigious prize in all of the world. Like Oscars. All of that kind of stuff seems to waver alongside the Nobel prize because it's a legacy award. So I kinda understand his point from that perspective that they are really, really important. There's a couple of places that I think the argument falls down in the sense that he kinda intimates in the book that there were a few set of people that review the Nobel prize that that are able to nominate and it's much broader that he seems to indicate. In fact, every scientist in Sweden is able to nominate a new will someone for the Nobel prize, which I thought was kind of cool perk being a scientist and Sweden, I guess. But when it comes down to do you feel like the prize needs reforms. Well, I mean, yeah, it's a tough question to answer because I again, I think that the the prize is wonderful, and I think that it, you know it is it is a career maker reputation maker. It's like climbing. Mount Everest used to be right now. There are a lot of people that have called Mount Everest. So it doesn't seem quite as impressive. The Nobel prize still retains that that impressiveness to it. But again, I just don't think it's that important in science. I mean, I think that it's it's nice and it gets press and and there's a, there's a a soap opera around the call three AM that comes from Sweden and everyone. You know, it's exciting. It's like watching a America's next top model or the voice live, but for science. So yeah, that's interesting. But it's not like we spend the rest of the year worrying about it. I mean, it's like a few weeks in the fall. It's exciting, and then we go back to doing science. I have never heard America's next top model and the Nobel prize in the same sentence that's going to stick with me for. Well, I kinda agree like, I don't think the Nobel prize is important to science, but I do think it's really, really important to scientists and the institutions they work for. And yes, it is like a big deal for those three to six weeks. But what else? Like grinds science to a halt more than the Nobel prize announcement. So. And maybe coming from a place where I just feel like I have zero CHAD'S ever winning Nobel prize, and I still consider myself a good scientist. You have zero chance. I have a negative fan. But and you know. And I think that's true for a lot of people in particular fields, like there are just so many fields that are just very, very unlikely to ever get that. But I don't think it's a reflection of merit in that sense. I think that it's a reflection of a combination of luck and serendipity and merit for sure, but there's that element of winning the lottery. I mean, that's what we say. We win the Nobel prize. You don't earn the Nobel prize if you win it. Fair enough. I will say though, I think I think it's weird that there isn't one for math and other topically areas around sort of science and stem generally, and that's just are artifacts of Alfred Nobel's will I feel like that should exist just for consistency sake. The one re reform reform is probably a strong word for this is that I do think that propagation of the lone genius idea. I wanna see that evaporate over time, and I think the winners recently have done a good job of saying like, I didn't do this alone, especially with some of the physics prizes. So some sort of I would love to see the Nobel committee acknowledged how many people contributed to this, whether they were alive or dead when it comes to some of these big announcements because I did feel watching last year that ligon ounce -ment. Why Ron Dreavers named in come up more because you know he was the the head of that project for for decades. And so I realize, you know, he can't do anything with the prize, but I wanted to see that name listed an insult doing. I think they will recognize more women and people of color that have contributed to these projects and that acknowledgement will probably go a long way. I mean, I totally agree with you in the sense that I think, yes, I think that acknowledgment should should come in some more obvious form that it does. Now, which is usually just in the speech that the person makes, and you have to kind of rely on the person having enough humility to include other people and their speech, and that doesn't always happen. But I also think the Nobel prize is about telling the story of scientists and so there has to be characters in that story. There have to be characters and if and so that's why I think like just saying, we're look, we're going to, we're going to award this two thousand researchers that work at Sern. You know, to me that that loses one important aspect of the Nobel, which is the sense that it's a story about people. So on that note, that's it for another episode. I wanna thank you for joining us for this installment of enquiring mind. So we'd also like to thank our supporters on our patriotic campaign now more important to us than ever as we've left the mother Jones mothership, especially David Noel Clarke Lindgren Michael gal, you'll Stephan Meyer a walled, Kyle Rohullah Joel, Jonathan Worsely Yushi Lynn, Eric Clark, Jordan Miller, haring Chang, Shawn Johnson, and Nick Cadillac, and all of you news. Porters who have come online since we, we left mother Jones. You can visit our website at enquiring dot show, and you can support us at patriot dot com. Slash inquiring minds. Remember that you get at free episodes at five dollars or more per month. You can also find us on Twitter at enquiring show and Facebook, and you can send us comments, feedback, feature, guest ideas who you think should win. The Nobel prize is

Nobel prize scientist Alfred Nobel Nobel committee Sweden Mount Everest America Yoon Twitter Facebook Jones Sern Ron Dreavers Shawn Johnson David Noel Clarke Lindgren Mic Jordan Miller Eric Clark Jonathan Worsely Yushi Lynn Nick Cadillac Kyle Rohullah Joel
"nobel prize" Discussed on Inquiring Minds

Inquiring Minds

13:06 min | 2 years ago

"nobel prize" Discussed on Inquiring Minds

"Abolish the Nobel prize in literature. It's you may have heard is undergoing a terrible sex scandal where the the female director of the Nobel prize in literature, her husband committed adultery, and for some reason, they decided to fire her from her job. So it's it's very interesting. Accolade and I believe that it's become almost equivalent of an idol. You know, ironically for mostly atheist practitioners of science. And I think this is where it gets really interesting in a lot of ways like what happened before this. It was exceptionally dramatic, but it's just it's also a little bit of part of how science works in modern times. Like sometimes we get out ahead of our skis and fall down, but there wasn't a cover up. There was like a owning of the mistake, but what it shined a light on and something that's been coming out in science more and more is the pursuit of the Nobel is the shine on that prize. Like what has stood for in in common in in sort of like our common understanding isn't what it has meant. It doesn't live up to what is meant. And I think it's important to note a couple of things like they the Nobel prize committee definitely does reach out to a lot of scientists for their input on the on the prize awards, including a number of of scientists throughout Europe. But I think there there's been problems highlighted this award for a long time now, probably in the last ten years, oh, amongst the scientific community that there can be no award posthumously made, which which is challenging. I think it's actually saying that I think it's cruel because it rewrites the way that science is conducted luck in two thousand seventeen. The Nobel prize went to the lie, go creators except for the fact that one of the creators have passed away six months earlier in that rendered him or Andrea ver- forever invalidated from winning the prize. And to me what's worse is when I tell my colleagues while I think rendre Gershon still win it and they'll say, but he's dead as if. As the rules of this committee of five hundred, mostly white Swedish man really that their rulings in their arbitrary decisions are as inviolable as the laws of physics themselves like who says they can't get. I mean, they just made it up in nineteen seventy four. They wouldn't give it to accept they have given its at TED Swedish men before. So I worry for the prize if our the pri- about I worry but referee reformation most of all, and then within physics at self. Like if we just talk about LEGO, the prize went to three people, some great physicists, but underpinning them was the work of thousands of scientists, graduate students, post doctoral researchers, all the people that that did the funding, the engineering that went into the construction of the elections and they're not part of the fries, right? It's right. I mean, they are in terms of like the emotional resonance of the award, but they aren't in terms of the money and the actual. Recognition. And that's what you start to get to is. There's a way that the prize recognizes the wrong things in modern science that don't make sense in the way they may have when Alfred Nobel started the award. That's right. That's right. And you know, again, when I went to nominate the winners of the twentieth sixteen pros, I not only went back to offer Nobel's well as a primary source, but I went back to the first Nobel prize in physics, and I was given to Wilhelm rock mention for an invention of of something that everybody's familiar with the wrenching Ray, which is another name, the X Ray, the X rays back that now that had immediate benefit the within weeks of discovery, not just year after discovery weeks after discovery, doctors were using it, it had NFC humanity and and it was done by a single person. So and that discovery took place within days of Alfred Nobel running down his will so some possible to think that Alfred did not have an his. Mind, this notion that scientists done by loan geniuses working in isolation, and then that are have have a goal of creating an invention or patent or something like that, that will benefit humanity tangible. And how far are science has come in the hundred and twenty two years since will was written down is literally astronomical. So to to treat this this prizes, if you can't modify it, I think it's demeaning to the actual scientific method. I will add like, even though Nobel had his own personal wishes around this. There's a way though ward has what it's meant in society has transcended his own wishes, even though it still carries his name and I realize there's a little dissonance there, but there's that story has repeated in society a lot. We often talk about it in the US in the context of what did the framers. Meanwhile, when they wrote down the constitution, but there's a way that we we, we've sort of societies evolve past what they are. Are able to envision. So moving beyond that, I'm curious putting aside what Alfred Nobel's intentions were, what would you do to fix this? Or is there even fix for this while? Yeah, very, very good question. In the book I out on, you know, three specific problems with the prize that all relate to these three stipulations of the person preceding year in the greatest benefit. And then I come up with five projected reforms from the Nobel prize, and I believe if they were to enact them and I have communicated with members of the Swedish Academy of sciences and physics committee, and they agree with me. I run an bench for scientific American in October, and they forwarded it amongst academy, do not believe anything is going to come of it because the Nobel prize is a monopoly. There's no second Nobel prize. There's no close runner up even the prices that are worth millions of. More than Nobel prize Nick breakthrough, press those pale in comparison and many. Physicists said they traded in, you know, they're, they're three million dollars breakthrough prize for you know, one million dollar fraction of a million, three hundred thousand dollar one, third share of the Novell products. And I think shows you the lure of it, the luster of it, and what do all monopolies want to do? They want to maintain their monopoly dominance. And I think eventually, unless it's regulated in some sense and I and I see some hence of that happening with the scandal. Sex scandal with Nobel prize in literature because the king of Sweden is now personally involved in the scandal hoping to rectify. So maybe the king can can also spend some time in the physics prize because I think for its own good, the Nobel prize must be reformed and I lay out specific ways to do so in my book. Yeah. I mean, you talk about a number of specific things. One thing I wanna highlight if the Nobel prize was awarded it in times. In different times when we exist now and because of that, it highlights societal problems. That were embedded in insci- the fact that so few women have won the Nobel prize is not a reflection of an accurate reflection of women's contributions to science. It is a prejudice that has been built into the award for a long time. Are there of all the things you listed? Are there some that you feel like need to be enacted first and foremost, or should we as a scientific community start moving beyond the prize as as something that matters in the context of modern science look in the book. I talk about how you know I was always kind of laughed at the story in an Old Testament, the so called golden calf incident where you know these supposedly smart. Fellow Jews were relieving Egypt and they saw these plagues and they saw the sea split. I mean, if you take it seriously than you know, just a few weeks later they bowed down and worship a golden calf, and I thought how stupid that was, because you know, how could somebody who's intelligent, you know, bowed down to God that they themselves made out of coal and then came March, you know, a of twenty seventeen. Just about a year ago, I finished the manuscript. Pets submitted the first draft and Duncan Haldane came to UCSD with his Nobel cross, and he showed it off and he was very proud of it. And afterwards, people were there and they were taking pictures of it and they were taking sell fees and they were kissing it. Nobody bowed down to a, but everybody just wants touch it and it just it just made me think of an idol. And then all of a sudden it was in my hands and there's my iphone and I am taking a picture of me felty at this Nobel prize that I've been, you know, complaining about in my book for over a year. And I just realized right then and there that you know, even atheists, even non secular scientists need to have something that they aspire to in that, and that may be elevated to this idolatrous Stotts in. So I don't think the Nobel prize is going away anytime soon, but I think scientists should be a rare of what it's doing to their fellow scientists. As you said, women, you know, just don't seem to be able to win it and you have to ask what? Why is that? A one reason I discovered in the process of being nominated horror novel winners was that in a previous winners are able to nominate future winners for the rest of their lives. That means that if you're a Nobel prize, if you're the adviser has a Nobel prize air like five times more likely to win a noble prize than just a rank and file. You know, non noblest mentor d- graduates to. So what happens when no win win for fifty years, as the case has been since our new mayor. One thousand nine hundred sixty three. Well, you know, they're a no more role models. Or no living shemale novel winning or it's not. Can you call? And then they can't also you mentor students that can benefit from this Noblesse of lesions. I call it where they can have a higher shot of winning the Nobel prize themselves. So there's very concrete structural problems within it. And I think those need to change and I think that society, you know, perhaps needs to reevaluate the way that they look at these accolades and honors because you know if you go to, if you go to my university, I mean right here in San Diego, we have a street called Nobel dry, and that intersects with another street called Novon drive, which is Nobel spell back. It's literally built into the fabric of society around me, and I don't think San Diego's any more of an intellectual place in New York City or anywhere else. So I think it's Hennion traded so deep into society that it really need has a special obligation to be reformed era of human as much as you are physicists. So when the prizes are now nst again. Next year, what are you gonna feel in? How do you think people, especially our listeners should think when they hear the announcement? Well, I mean, I would love to feel that my book, Mike, an impact. I think it won't make an impact for for while if at all, I hope it stimulates conversation. I think as I said, I think the Nobel prize at its best can be a harmless game or kind of like staying up to see who wins the election or wins lottery or something like that. You know, there's not really that much in a day to day, but if things stop and think critically about the the way that the Nobel prize is affecting the fields, I like them to to at least think as to what is this doing to to younger people. I mean, I really wrote the book for the letter to young physicist. You know what? What did you aspire to? And I remember getting an email from a young lady who read my book and. She told me that at an early draft of the block, and she told me, you know, Brian, I really wish that I had your book when I was back in college because I had to leave my of astronomy program that I was part of, and and I said why. And she said, well, my father was a scientist. He said only you're only a good scientists to to win the Nobel prize. And I just wish I had my yearbook knocked down to give to him and it made me feel really good that that you know that people will perhaps read this book and perhaps the as I say that the real prizes the science that we get to do, it's the journey this destination, getting to Stockholm on that beautiful note Brian, Keating. Thank you so much for joining us. I think firing months, that's been a real pleasure concern.

Nobel prize Alfred Nobel scientist Swedish Academy of sciences an director US golden calf Europe Novell rendre Gershon TED Swedish Duncan Haldane Stockholm NFC ward Sweden physicist UCSD Andrea
"nobel prize" Discussed on Inquiring Minds

Inquiring Minds

04:43 min | 2 years ago

"nobel prize" Discussed on Inquiring Minds

"Proclamations like this is going to win a Nobel prize. This is one of the most important discoveries in physics in decades and that chorus continued all the while along it crumbled in your hands. The discovery disorder slowly fell apart. And it in a way that's I think that's set you up for for for this book because like the Nobel prize evaporated, but it seemed to have evaporated long before then there's there seemed to the sense of like, oh, the Nobel prize is gone for this work and Nobel prize. It was never really there for you. I want you to talk about like what your relationship to that prize was both during this time and and after because I think that sort of, you know frames what comes next. Yeah, that's absolutely true. So the title is a double entendre. You know, part of it means my own personal encounter and loss of the Nobel prize through, you know, both being kind of edged out of the top leadership. In the case in it turned out to be true or in the case that was false that nobody wanted to Nobel prize, which is which is what actually happened. But in the end, we we were able to to provide evidence jointly with plank that what we had seen was not what we really claimed and we have to retract it. And in that process, I did start to notice the the looming shadow of Alfred Nobel and things came to a head for me in October of the year. After we released day October twentieth fifteen, I was asked to nominate the twenty sixteen Nobel prize winners in physics. I received an official looking document that from Sweden. I don't know how they got a name. I don't know how they found out about me, but the committee seeks out experts around the world in certain subjects, and they asked them to speculate on their choice for the Nobel prize in physics, twenty fifteen was my year and it was to select a twenty sixteen winners. And you know, I'm an academic, right? So I I like to look at primary sources. I inform us. So when I got there letter and asked me to nominate the. Owners, I, I went back to to Alfred Nobel's will. So Alfred Nobel invented dynamite was one of richest men in the world at the time had no heirs had no spouse left all's money to this prize. The prize was meant to be given to in Alfred's words to a single person who in the preceding year via their discovery in physics benefited humanity the most. So there were couple of things to unpack there. It basically was saying that offering about wanted the price to go to a single person whose work was done preceding year and had furred the greatest benefit on humanity. And that was sort of opened her interpretation in the letter that they invited me to nominee. They essentially asked me to disavow all three of Alfred Nobel's desired stipulations, namely, they said that could go to multiple people. It could go for something discovered decades earlier and. The interpretation as to how much benefit of discovery in astrophysics confers upon somebody is is really very debatable in very subjective. So I was sorta startled to learn that an Idaho saw the number prizes this, you know, essentially an idol. You know that that many not also it's the Nobel prize. Yeah. I mean, it's the Nobel prize for people say to me, you know, all you just have sour grapes and you really are just bitter that you didn't win it. And I don't think anybody can come away from reading the buck thinking that I believe this is a prize that I'm, you know, would seek to. I would sacrifice in on his fire to anymore. I think it's at best harmless game or kind of fun thing, but it's not. It's not only that it's it's humanities highest accolade that there is no prize. That's even close to novel tries, not even Oscar Olympic gold medal. And so because of that, I think it has a special responsibility to live up to the ideals and the and the values that. For not wish for it to represent the fact that it doesn't has led people in the Nobel peace prize community. So several peace prize laureates bishops doesn't two two and others have sued the Nobel committee for violating Alfred gals will, and the case was thrown out in Stockholm, because Bishop Tutu is not a resident of Sweden, and so therefore he has nutritious diction over what happens to the process. This ridiculous there have been calls recently to abolish

Nobel prize Alfred Nobel Nobel committee Sweden gold medal Idaho Stockholm official Bishop Tutu
"nobel prize" Discussed on Inquiring Minds

Inquiring Minds

05:17 min | 2 years ago

"nobel prize" Discussed on Inquiring Minds

"This episode is brought to you by Phillips ever wondered what inspires someone to make a difference through their work. What get someone's neurons zapping during the nine to five, the spark is a new podcast about inspiration innovation and the mind at work as told by Phillips employee's whether it's Niki out of cancer wards or experimenting with laser-guided amp breathalyzers no idea is too big or too small, the spark available wherever you get your podcasts. It's Monday April. Thirtieth twenty eighteen and you're listening to enquiring minds. I'm enjoy the Scotus that I'm Kishore Hari each week. We bring you a new end up exploration of the space where science politics and society collide. We never to find out what's true, what's left to discover in wide all matters. You can find us online at enquiring dot show on Twitter at inquiring show and on Facebook, and you can subscribe to the show on itunes or any other podcasting app. And if you want an ad free version of the show, just pledge five dollars or more per month at patriot dot com, slash inquiring minds. Do you think the Nobel prize is good for science while I certainly think it brings a lot of attention to science, which is probably good for science. I mean, the Nobel prize is the Nobel prize of prizes, right? I mean, you can't discount the name and like the cultural value. Everyone knows what a Nobel prize is, but do the Nobel prizes make sense under the current rules. Let's take example last year. The prize in physics went to the people behind the LEGO project. The one that found gravitational ways the rules state only three people can be awarded the prize itself, even though we know probably thousands of people worked on that project, let alone the engineers that probably constructed the the instrument and whatnot. And one of the chief architects of the project rendre ver- actually, sadly passed away a few months before the award announcement. And another rule is that the Nobel prize can't be awarded posthumously. I sort of think those roles are antics. Waited because it perpetuates an idea of a a alone. Genius and science. Yeah, which I think is becoming less and less true as the tools that we use. Scientists become more complicated demand more and more people. I do think there's a halo effect. So if you even if you didn't win the Nobel prize, but you worked on LEGO or you know if you were in the lab of somebody who won the Nobel prize, there is some kind of reflected glory upon you the post to Mus thing. I'm up to minds on that. I mean, yes, it means that it's not going to be totally America Crecy because they're going to be people who died. Like a, not just Ron, Ron river. But another example is a most diverse Ke's. So Daniel Katamon won the Nobel prize, but not Amos. But also live longer and went on to do other things. So you could argue that you know it was in some ways more deserved, I don't know. But I do think that there's something nice about it's something scienc- about the fact that you know the Nobel prize really doesn't help the person if they're dead. It might help their estate. It might help the reputation, but it doesn't help that person. And I kind of like that. I have to say, fair enough. I mean, but you have to agree that the Nobel prize has a historical problem too. It's been awarded to very few women over over its history and chief among them that Rosalind Franklin was never recognized for her contributions to the discovery of DNA. Yeah. I mean, we, we could do tit for tat on this all the time. Then there's medically right? Who won to Nobel prizes who you know very few people in whether they're male or female have done. And I think I think science has women problem in history, so I don't know that it's specific to the Nobel prize. I think that it's it's more of a reflection of how science really does reward people who have been around a long time and have gotten a lot of funding and have developed their own prestige. And if that happens to be predominantly male and science and there, there's evidence that that that shift that's not. Merit based. I think that's a problem with science, but not with Nobel fair enough. But this argument comes up every year when the awards are announced a science writers and science, Twitter, especially seems to go off into this into this conversation about whether or not we need to reform. And so this week I interviewed someone that came close, accept things went very, very wrong afterwards. Bryan Keating is a professor of astrophysics at UC San Diego. He's one of the leaders behind the bicep experiment in ant Artika, and it successor bicep, two, which search for a signature and a wiggle and the cosmic microwave background. That would confirm that theory of inflation appeared in the very, very early universe and where there was rapid expansion, which explain sort of our large scale scale structure of the cosmos. Brian is the author of a new book called losing the Nobel prize about what went wrong after the detection was made it buys up to and how that made him. Rethink the pursuit of the grandest prize and all of science. So let's take a short break. Only back with my interview with Brian Keating.

Nobel prize Nobel Twitter Phillips Kishore Hari Bryan Keating Brian Keating Niki Facebook Rosalind Franklin ant Artika Ron America San Diego Daniel Katamon professor Amos five dollars