18 Burst results for "Noam Chomsky"

"noam chomsky" Discussed on Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

05:27 min | Last week

"noam chomsky" Discussed on Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

"And i think it relates back to this deeper story that we're going to get into but i'm going to layer fourteen different questions because i also want to talk about the money thing so i'm gonna ask you to return to those two points. One is the the move there cheese and these guys don't even have to be aware of the extent to which manipulated and also. Then we'll move into talking about evil in the money thing. Yeah well the moving of the cheese. You know you you you sit. It's an interesting thing you mentioned about. Neil degrasse tyson and it reminds me of the The quote from noam chomsky where. He's he's getting into a discussion. Or i don't even know if it's it's the beginning of an argument or disagreement where the guy who's interviewing him and he'd sit in the guy interviewing him says. Wait wait a second. What are you saying you saying that. I don't believe the things that i'm saying. Any in chomsky says no. No what i'm saying is you wouldn't be sitting in that chair if you believe something different and the guy just kind of was like. Oh and that's what it is with. I think with neil degrasse tyson. He wouldn't be there on. Joe rogan show or on history channel discovery channel. And all these things if he believes something different so i don't doubt that he believes the thing that's the things that he believes. That's a brilliant point. Tell me what you think about that. Relative to what. We're talking about. John stewart and joe rogan. I think i think. Joe rogan is on a quest to see what he believes and maybe he believes mike baker. Maybe doesn't necessarily. I'll tell you this. I'll say this about rogan. I don't know that he necessarily has to or does agree with everybody that he brings on his show. So i don't know that that is a requirement a prerequisite of going on the show is that he is not is that joe rogan is necessarily going to endorse everything that you say makes makes it less uncomfortable. You know if he if there's some sort of commonality there but but but I think that you know. I don't know i don't know joe i don't know joe either but i think you i think your point is is brilliant. It's straight out brilliant. It's norm chomsky's point. I guess we'll give him the credit. Here's what i'd say. What you're putting together is whatever you think about joe rogan. He won't remain in that seat if he believes what he isn't supposed to believe if you know what i mean. 'cause that's to your point right at spotify with that deal with all that right all that pressure and all that stuff if you start to get a little too far off the reservation they'll let them fight with the woke morons and all that stuff which is fun but if he gets off and starts going on. I mean what we what we saw. We saw. What happened when he got off when he said i did the ivermectin and through the kitchen sink at it. The the establishment went hysterical. And they said you're taking horse paste. And i hope you die and blah blah and. They just freaked out. I don't even think that's the end of it really..

joe rogan Neil degrasse history channel discovery chan noam chomsky chomsky mike baker John stewart norm chomsky rogan joe
"noam chomsky" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

04:27 min | 4 months ago

"noam chomsky" Discussed on 600 WREC

"19 Diane cracking. You can actually argued that it could have been the Covid 19 that cuts into crash, so I don't know they conclusion of that one. We looked into it, and there's still two people in their twenties on Orange County's data list for Covid deaths. So is this a contradiction? How the state says it's counting deaths. The Florida Department of Health sending Fox 35 a statement saying a covid death is determined if Covid 19 is listed as the immediate or underlying cause of death, or listed as one of the significant conditions contributing to death. Or if there's a confirmed covid 19 infection from a lab test, and the cause of death doesn't mean exclusion criteria like trauma. Suicide homicide overdose motor vehicle accident, etcetera. The only thing that I could said to people is that the data that I provided you The data that we consume from the state and we are offering you to the best data than we have. And Dr Pino tells us that the medical examiner's office has to sign off on all covid 19 deaths. We also reached out to that office and have not heard back reporting live in Orlando. Daniel Lama, Fox 35 news. So many lies were told. So many people. We've been told to trust In 1998 Noam Chomsky said. The smart way to keep people passive and obedient. Is to strictly limit the spectrum of acceptable opinion. But allow very lively debate within that spectrum. Even encourage the more critical and dissident views. That gives people the sense that there's free thinking going on. While all the time the pre suppositions of the system Are being reinforced by the limits Put On the range of the debate. Did we Honestly, debate lockdowns last year. Did we honestly openly fairly debate? Whether masks work. Did we honestly discuss? Where the virus came from. What Andrew Cuomo did to the elderly people there. Whether that was a good idea. People were put into camps of good or bad. Good if you followed the conformist belief Bad if you dared question it. If you've suggested a treatment Outside the norm. Hydroxychloroquine you were bad You were laughed at. You were terrible. Even if you were a frontline doctor like Stella, Immanuel or Angelina Forell. Oh, You were called bad names, and you hated Grandma and Children in society and science and You were a kook. The FDA has now removed the prohibition. Against using Hydroxychloroquine. So maybe the f D A is evil also If you dare say that. The Wuhan virus started in the lab and not at a wet market. You were silenced the platform and Twitter and Facebook with their fact checkers would declare that what you were saying wasn't true. The president was removed from those platforms. Twitter said last week that social media access is a human right. And yet they denied Donald Trump's Interesting, isn't it? At the very things that made you Quack a blasphemer a year ago. Are now being repeated as truth by the very people who called us blasphemers and quacks. These are the people who would have denied gravity or the earth rotating around the sun. These are the people. Would have insisted the leeches bleed us dry. As a way to treat an illness. Despite the Common sense and then scientific knowledge that it isn't Because they were so invested. And the leeches. I do enjoy when you write. I read them all. I can't reply to them all When you share story ideas, articles you've read. Books. You've.

Daniel Lama Andrew Cuomo Noam Chomsky Stella Donald Trump Immanuel Angelina Forell Facebook 1998 Orange County Orlando Twitter last week Pino FDA last year Florida Department of Health 19 deaths two people Fox 35 news
"noam chomsky" Discussed on Rob Talk Podcast

Rob Talk Podcast

02:37 min | 1 year ago

"noam chomsky" Discussed on Rob Talk Podcast

"So <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> really like <Speech_Male> that Noam Chomsky <Speech_Male> explicitly <Speech_Male> saying that <Speech_Male> most of <Speech_Male> the work is done <Speech_Male> outside <Speech_Male> of elections <Speech_Male> like you <Speech_Male> know the background <Speech_Male> work in the parties <Speech_Male> with. The activism <Speech_Male> and things like that, <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> then we vote <Speech_Male> it's <Speech_Male> a process <Speech_Male> ten or fifteen <Speech_Male> minutes every <Speech_Male> four years and <Speech_Male> as <Speech_Male> fun as it is, <Speech_Male> it has that <Speech_Male> sort of reality <Speech_Male> TV trashy. <Speech_Male> You know <Speech_Male> elections <Speech_Male> they're just like <Speech_Male> that. They're they're <Speech_Male> incredibly fun. <Speech_Male> It's just like it's <Speech_Male> trash TV it's <Speech_Male> good. It's it's entertainment <Speech_Male> <Silence> that's what it is <Speech_Male> but <Speech_Male> actually being <Speech_Male> on the left <Speech_Male> or the progressive left <Speech_Male> where I myself <Speech_Male> to be <Speech_Male> I think <Speech_Male> like trump's kids <Speech_Male> referring. To. Here <Speech_Male> is that we have <Speech_Male> to do the work <Speech_Male> constantly we <Speech_Male> have to <Speech_Male> activate <Speech_Male> on very certain <Speech_Male> issues <Speech_Male> and then vote <Speech_Male> and then move on voting <Speech_Male> for the lesser <Speech_Male> of two evils <Speech_Male> because that's how it is in America <Speech_Male> I. Mean <Speech_Male> I'm sorry. But third <Speech_Male> party is <Speech_Male> not gonNA do anything <Speech_Male> anytime soon <Speech_Male> and I will <Speech_Male> absolutely <Speech_Male> eat my hat on that if <Speech_Male> I'm wrong. But I <Speech_Male> know that I'm not <Speech_Male> wrong on this third parties <Speech_Male> in. America <Speech_Male> they. Don't mean anything <Speech_Male> they haven't <Speech_Male> met any just look at history. <Speech_Male> You can <Speech_Male> buy this into a historical <Speech_Male> context, third <Speech_Male> party candidates <Speech_Male> even when <Speech_Music_Male> they're good only <Speech_Male> get <Speech_Male> breadcrumbs <Speech_Male> compared to <Speech_Male> the Democratic <Speech_Male> and Republican parties. <Speech_Male> So <Speech_Male> this is not <Speech_Male> a value <Speech_Male> judgment <Speech_Male> statement. What I'm saying <Speech_Male> is <Speech_Male> it's <Speech_Male> just what <Speech_Male> is is <Speech_Male> the fact in <Speech_Male> America? Third <Speech_Male> parties do <Speech_Male> not work at <Speech_Male> almost <Speech_Male> any level <Speech_Male> I mean there <Speech_Male> are a couple of exceptions <Speech_Male> but <Speech_Male> other than that they're <Speech_Male> just not. Effective <Speech_Male> end to be very clear <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> believe that <Speech_Male> America would <Speech_Male> be much better. <Speech_Male> If we had say <Speech_Male> I don't know <Speech_Male> like five competing <Speech_Male> parties <Speech_Male> I think that <Speech_Male> that would represent <Speech_Male> the values <Speech_Male> of the people much <Speech_Male> more. So <Speech_Male> I think it's something that <Silence> we should strive for <Speech_Male> I just <Speech_Male> don't see a path <Speech_Male> in which that happens <Speech_Male> given <Speech_Male> history <Speech_Male> and the <Speech_Male> current state of affairs <Speech_Male> and the incentives <Speech_Male> that we <Speech_Male> have well, <Speech_Male> anyway <hes> <Speech_Male> that's <Speech_Male> pretty much all <Speech_Male> I've got. To rant about <Speech_Male> for right now, there <Speech_Male> will undoubtedly <Speech_Male> be more in <Speech_Male> the future. Thank <Speech_Male> you very much <Speech_Male> for tuning in I. Hope <Speech_Male> You have a wonderful <Speech_Male> rest of your day. <Speech_Male> If this show brings <Speech_Male> you value, <Speech_Male> be sure to share it with a <Speech_Male> friend and <Speech_Male> let them know they should be <Speech_Male> listening as well. Always <Speech_Male> make sure you subscribe <Speech_Male> to see. You do not <Speech_Male> miss the next episode <Speech_Male> like I said, <Speech_Male> the normal <Speech_Male> new show will return <Speech_Male> Monday <Speech_Male> August <Silence> seventeenth. <SpeakerChange>

America Noam Chomsky trump
"noam chomsky" Discussed on The Modern Spiritual Life Coaching Podcast

The Modern Spiritual Life Coaching Podcast

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"noam chomsky" Discussed on The Modern Spiritual Life Coaching Podcast

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"noam chomsky" Discussed on The Modern Spiritual Life Coaching Podcast

The Modern Spiritual Life Coaching Podcast

04:47 min | 1 year ago

"noam chomsky" Discussed on The Modern Spiritual Life Coaching Podcast

"Possibility. People will. Workman's. Gauge many are doing. Bring up a much better world which will also confront the. Enormous problems that were season. Right down through. Problems of nuclear war, which is. Closer than it's ever been. The. Problems of. Our mental tasks. From which there is no return. Once, we got to that stage. To. Him. Not far this this back, decisive do..

"noam chomsky" Discussed on The Modern Spiritual Life Coaching Podcast

The Modern Spiritual Life Coaching Podcast

04:35 min | 1 year ago

"noam chomsky" Discussed on The Modern Spiritual Life Coaching Podcast

"For everyone. because. Owen strong. Spring. Don't. Last. Summer. I. Don't have enough toilet paper. Go along. Being. And My kids fight. and. Bren. I'm not lonely. Only hours with games. School. How can I work with? You. No Sir. Greater. Thanks. Here man. Karuna version serious enough. It's worth recalling that there is a much. Greater Haro.

"noam chomsky" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

09:04 min | 1 year ago

"noam chomsky" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Back my next book it's gonna be coming out of your presence more scholarly so it'll probably even more boring but I my next book is called manufacturing consensus and it's a riff on Noam Chomsky's manufacturing consent and the idea behind the book is that we use these technologies to create the illusion of popularity for things that the more you make something look popular did more you make it seem like a viable idea okay one more person the last person last place last idea last person's Kathleen she's my boss now at the university of Austin she was formally at the new York times use the dining editor and before that she was a sports reporter I don't know how you make that transition off that's Kathleen but but yeah she's fantastic and when I went to UT I've kind of lost a little bit of hope because because everything's going on and because I've been writing this damn book spending time thinking about the ways in which the informational system is broken but I work in the school of journalism at UT and Kathleen's the director and Kathleen has taught me that we need to place faith in the institutions that we already have we don't need to create brand new things we have the federal actions commission we have the Federal Communications Commission to we don't need the federal this information's commission we don't need one more commission to do things in Washington we need to invest in those but more specifically we need to invest in journalism journalism in this country has done amazing things there's so many people that work for great publications around the United states that want to do good work and want to protect democracy but they're still having to learn on the fly and in fact in the book I talk a lot about the ways in which journalism has been not just challenged by the digital era it's not like their feckless individuals or organizations that can't handle the digital era it's that organizations like Google Google news YouTube Facebook Twitter massively benefit off the work of journalists without giving any remuneration or money to these folks the same can be said for organizations like wikipedia when you to face the crisis of disinformation wanted to do it started linking to wikipedia articles but they haven't even talked to wikipedia wikipedia is a nonprofit one of the five most access sites and on the web but a non profit and YouTube is using it as the resource that you to send people to and I thought it was just information same thing goes for journalists Google news for the longest time gave snippets of articles and when people started researching it you couldn't you couldn't click through to the actual article but the moon is gay snippets when you click the actual article sorry the research showed is that no one actually read the full article no one actually click through they just read the little piece and so the journalists but all the work into doing this investigation of writing the whole article Google post the article puts the snippet and then no one actually reads and we wonder why the news industry is failing why it's why it's having a hard time I mean maybe not feeling maybe that's the wrong word what I think is we can reinvigorate journalism eventually working up at right now and not to let the cat out the bag too much but I'm gonna tell you exactly my argument is the argument is that the technology firms around the country should have to put I don't know ten billion or twenty billion dollars into a public trust in the United States and that let it be overseen by civil society groups people that have a stake in making sure the money is spent wisely and well Google news labs has has has committed three hundred fifty million dollars or so to the Google news initiative Google gives out that money they make partnerships with organizations they make decisions about who gets it and who doesn't and for a long time what Google's done when they've when they've experienced backlash about their policies or their algorithms not prioritizing full articles they've D. prioritize the new science of complaint and so that's not good enough the technology companies have helped create this problem and they've admitted to it there's been a big mea culpa moment we all saw mark Zuckerberg sitting before Congress sort of saying **** you know I know that Cambridge analytica did some bad stuff we have a hand in that that's kind of our fault but they haven't really given back definitely systematize the response to this problem they've done some things and they've they've they've been working hard in in many ways but it's not enough it's really important to remember these are multi billion dollar companies some of the richest companies in the world they get treated more like nation states these days and they get treated like a regular company so Kathleen taught me to reinvest in journalism and to be skeptical of what we see today and to not think like I said earlier in my slip the journalism failed to sync the journalism there's a lot there with all these things in mind all these things taken together we have a really interesting picture and we have this book and this book is actually a book about the future I spent a lot of time talking about what we've been through but this book looks to the next wave of technology this book is about deepfake videos it's about A. I. it's about virtual reality it's about automated voice systems that sound just like a person like Google duplexer new assistant and it thinks a lot about the ways in which these next week this next wave technologies will make for more potent artificial art the disinformation and the the the subtitles provocative for a reason it's supposed to scare people but in best case scenario prove me wrong you will not let technology break the truth this is supposed to be a warning a provocation the do a little reading just for a few minutes and then and with some solutions will do a Q. and a conclusion designing with human rights in mind finding solutions to the problem posed by online disinformation and political manipulation is a daunting task this information landscape is vast and extends beyond our current ability to track it if containers actively moreover the internet grows larger every day according to a twenty seventeen report twenty seventeen on the state of the net from the software firm domo which combined indepth research from multiple companies news outlets we create two point five quintillion bytes of data every day two point five quintillion I don't even know what that number means moreover the number of internet users grew by one billion to a total of three point seven billion you active users in the five years previous to that report so from twenty twelve to twenty seventeen the internet grew by a billion users eighteen Forbes article asserted that ninety percent of the online data available in the world was generated in the previous two years I mean let that sink in ninety percent of the online dealer data available in the world was generated in the previous two years this means that people working to gain public opinion or exert social and political oppression using online tools have almost unimaginable amounts of data available on potential targets with new information beaming out to them every millisecond they also have access to a lot of potential targets and can leverage online and anonymity automation and the sheer scale of the nets remain nearly on track important important ethical and legal considerations along with the near impossibility of finding a skillful operative make prosecution a poor strategy for stamping out computational propaganda instead we've got to fix the eco system Sam Worley subtitles whose book how the next wave of technology will break the truth it's time to build design and redesign the next wave of technology with human rights at the forefront of our minds thinking about responses to the rising tide of computational propaganda I find it helpful to break them down into responses for the short term to medium term in the long term because of the quixotic nature of technology today I usually consider tool or technology based responses to be the shortest term fixes of all many of these efforts a bandaid approaches focus on triaging help for the most egregious issues and oversights associated with infrastructure of web two point oh the internet of social media such amendments include little tweaks to social media news algorithms or other code that identifies trends or software patches to existing tools they include ephemeral new applications for identifying junk news or browser plug ins the tracking catalogue political advertisements these efforts are useful as far as they go on a meticulous tactics are constantly evolving what works to track this information or bots on Twitter today may not be very useful year from now in fact many of the applications that have been built for such purposes quickly become defunct going to code level changes made by the social media firms a lack of funding or upkeep or propaganda agents finding a simple way to game there are useful products of this kinda like Macek answer say from about labs these detectors computational propaganda on Twitter and check for fake news sites using one browser but.

Noam Chomsky
"noam chomsky" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"noam chomsky" Discussed on KGO 810

"The operative fact is that man holding economic power during of economic position as the base and seeks to extend his capacity and enforce is well as far as he can do you want to shut down protest shut off smartphones in the internet in people are helpless exactly so there's there's no reason to believe that if the technology exists and the power exists that he this is my problem with Noam Chomsky he believes we should attack institutions we should be able to be political we should get elected and we should change the institution because its institutions that are to blame and ended up burl in his book power says point blank no it's not it's real why man who once they get economic position as a baby's automatically seeks to extend its capacity to enforce his will far as he can now multiply that by five thousand people sitting on each other's board of directors of the interlocking directorates of the largest multinational corporations and you have identified in my opinion you've identified a very large chunk of the empire exactly Tyler is with us in Kittery Maine hi Tyler go ahead hello George Craig I am a capitalist for haven't Friday go to Tyler okay I work for a subsidiary of UTC which you can see the words with Raytheon my question is does just wondering how merges with companies like this how how will that impact the our country and for that matter the world well it already has few years you're still seen it Greg every time company merges or choirs hostile or otherwise another corporation it does two things it consolidates the power of that corporation into the hands of its board of directors to direct that corporation look at the corporation see what they do for a living and you'll get it every time a cruise missile launches Raytheon makes a million dollars.

Noam Chomsky Tyler Kittery Maine George Craig Raytheon Greg
"noam chomsky" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"noam chomsky" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Noam Chomsky he believes we should attack institutions we should be able to be political we should get elected and we should change the institutions because the institutions that are to blame burl in his book power says point blank no it's not it's real why man who once they get economic position as a bully automatically seeks to extend its capacity to enforce his will far as he can now multiply that by five thousand people sitting on each other's board of directors of the interlocking directorates of the largest multinational corporations and you have identified in my opinion you've identified a very large chunk of the empire exactly Tyler is with us in Kittery Maine hi Tyler go ahead hello George Craig and I am a capitalist we're havin Friday go ahead of time okay I work for a subsidiary of UTC which your case is not work with Raytheon my question is this wondering how are somebody is like this how how will that impact the our country and for that matter the world well it already has few years you're still seeing it Greg every time a company mergers or choirs hostile or otherwise another corporation it does two things it consolidates the power of that corporation into the hands of its board of directors to direct that corporation look at the corporation see what they do for a living and you'll get it every time a cruise missile launches Raytheon makes a million.

Noam Chomsky burl Tyler Kittery Maine George Craig Raytheon Greg
"noam chomsky" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"noam chomsky" Discussed on WTVN

"Noam Chomsky he believes we should attack institutions we should be able to be political we should get elected and we should change the institution because its institutions that are to blame it on burl in his book power says point blank no it's not it's real why man who once they get economic position as a baby's automatically seeks to extend its capacity to enforce his will far as he can now multiply that by five thousand people sitting on each other's board of directors of the interlocking directorates of the largest multinational corporations and you have identified in my opinion you've identified a very large chunk of the empire exactly Tyler is with us in Kittery Maine hi Tyler go ahead hello George Craig I am a capitalist for haven't Friday go to Tyler okay I work for a subsidiary of UTC which you can see is a word with Raytheon my question is does just wondering how merges with companies like this how how will that impact of our country and for that matter the world well it already has few years you're still seen if Greg every time a company emerges or choirs hostile or otherwise another corporation it does two things it consolidates the power of that corporation into the hands of its board of directors to direct that corporation look at the corporation see what they do for a living and you'll get it every time a cruise missile launches Raytheon makes a million dollars.

Noam Chomsky Tyler Kittery Maine George Craig Raytheon Greg
"noam chomsky" Discussed on PodcastDetroit.com

PodcastDetroit.com

10:26 min | 2 years ago

"noam chomsky" Discussed on PodcastDetroit.com

"I think the comes down to these groups having as much influence as they do on public policy what I mean is that these people in academia who have been called into the White House to you know whatever they have been pushing so for instance they might disagree reminder look at climate science the state of perfect example. We do not even have to get close to that but what I mean by foreign policy foreign policy because that's the climate science kid. I'm not going to do that. I don't know I don't know what as well but take foreign policy. Almost all of the academic coming out of the Foreign Policy Elsa institutes have pushed us to no matter what administration have pushed us towards a particular type of American empire thing. It's not A it's not A. I don't think it's a it's not a it's not a bug cager of assist so you have when you're talking about this. You have to look at the numbers. Of How many people are these the people in academic institutions. How many people are they reaching. How much does it influence alto masses because the people that they're reaching are people who are going to college the type of acids don't matter in this case because they will know because in some K- always do they can't and I agree but in many cases these people go into power are they get close to power influence the power right to make a decision about foreign policy wherever and then from there the people don't get to vote whether we go bomb Iraq back the people no vote if the president goes and bombs Iraq and the people don't like it. They won't vote for him again. It's that simple yeah but the thing is like four years later damage damage done you know X. Amount hundred thousand people dead sure it's it's it's it's not a fast solution and the thing is like they don't necessarily need to care are about it. That's that's my point is like these people on the margins have influenced society mostly through governmental institutions. I would make that argument. I don't know Danny. What do you think about all this? I think you guys got locked into a sense of like feeling like you were on different sides but kind of know we kind of. I think you guys I think it's just a push poll right like like the the elites affect the masses and the masses affect the elites yeah it would agree and it's not like as black doc in white as maybe I make. No both of you guys just on the basis of something turning into a debate. I sure well I guess what the the point I was trying to make. Is that hat yeah. The the masses have influenced like the Vietnam War was one of those situations where you know generals are talking about nuking you know the coastline of China I can you know and they're like they're telling you know the president of the time. This was a great idea. We should definitely do this and then you know. Obviously the masses coming out in dries is but the thing is like the masses got their ideas from radical figures in intelligentsia that made those points. I'm saying always well in the case of the six in the case of a lot of cases in the sixties. That's the case now. Always I'm not saying. It's you know it's always the case. I'm saying it's mostly the case. I don't even know that I'd go that far. Okay well. Let's fair yeah. I mean that's totally fair. Sometimes I just think like I I would say yeah you can say I would say mostly and that's like I think the distinction here is like elites on both sides whether it's you know four piece whether it's for war whether it's for this whether it's for that whether it's for a particular particular type of cultural norms through censorship whether it's through allowing artist to have free expression out there also in in funding. I think all those things things are being all those groups who look at it in that way are being influenced by the intelligentsia in that in that part of it. That's that's all I'm saying and I think like those people whether their intentions are good or bad or the consequences of their actions are good and bad they exist out there and they influence the country and they influence individuals. I think it's important to say like okay. That's good. I'm happy that there's you know edge educators offers and people out there that are you know thinking about these types of stuff but at the same time I think there needs to be more of a balance between a lot of the stuff coming out so the sixties was an example of a lot of bounce or morsel of balance ideas that were against the traditional norms in society so for instance treating people negatively tiddly sixty well in that sense but you know what I mean as well as with the antiwar movement being kind of birth in in that during that time I even I would say that that's more about like taking the status quo and shifting the balance more than like keeping it balanced. The sixties was at time of a lot of change and upheaval evil. I would agree but the thing when I say balancing the status quo going on but there's nothing in in an is as far as the antiwar movement is concerned unlike the Hippie movement is concerned. I don't think that was disseminated from an intelligentsia community. I think that was very grassroots. Organic that people just start movement. I just started changing the way that they thought and it wasn't because of some outside force telling them how to think not telling them. It's not telling them how to thing think but telling them how to live. Even you know this society. This is the way society is structured. This is for your own benefit. Always Trust I'm saying now is just a message that was the the status quo has just been in the fifties where everything was going great so they had no reason to question the status quo but in the sixties like you mentioned the read some stuff started happening. Yes that started getting people thinking yes that open them up to the change in their mindset yes which was kind of outside of any sort of Intelligencia or high brow you know it wasn't that's not where that shift in social mood came from it didn't originate from. I'm a higher source and disseminate down it arose organically from the bottom and spread that way I in some aspects of movements during the sixties yes other aspects. It's not so much I would I would tend to there was no matter no matter such as so no matter what what side was going what was going down during the sixties. You always had people intelligence. Noam Chomsky was always there during any antiwar anything talking about the costs and benefits of what's going on always is in the moral implications of it. I mean whether or not they're accurate happy's in care about what Noam Chomsky nobody listen but they listen they actually listen and they actually took an what he had to say. I mean the whole base. He knew left. You could argue that known. CIANCI's writing was a reactionary. No I would never put reaction to the movement movement well. No I mean I would say wouldn't have written about it. If the movement hadn't started I and happened well. I would say it his his his whole. Starting writing political was an American America's called American power and the new mandarins. That's the name of the book is a bunch of essays on you know our things done in the past but primarily what was going on in Vietnam uh-huh and you know from from a lot of stuff there yeah it was it was responding to a lot of protests and everything but it was also primarily responding to what people you you know who were in power or you know doing and you know it was he was critiquing it on a level so that it could be passed throughout the world. You know that's why Chomsky's one of the most read people around the world is because regardless of what people think about him. he's wanted people admire he he he was able to put out the intellectual argument that could destroy destroy American imperialism. I think you know if you don't have the intellectual the argument backing you. You can't fight it. Fight it as well. You can have the grassroots but there needs to at one point or another be some type of intellectual. Oh discourse or discussion on how to move this forward and make something you know how to actually implement change so I think that Yes yes. There is a lot of grassroots things going on throughout the world's not just top down approach. I would say it's a it's a collaborative approach because you know these people talk to people in the movement and these people discuss ideas with people in the movement and then they get people to either they come around or they are they help bring people around in other ways and there the main some of the main people out there speaking about this stuff to influence people on TV like so Chomsky's interviewed on TV at that time but the average antiwar activists wasn't isn't and that is also an example of that. I guess you know if you know how the intelligentsia is putting out their ideas and their narratives out there about what's going on and that it's then influenced by the masses through TV radio shows through writing. I think that's how it's done more so than this howdy taty mustache toiling thing that a lot of people think and becomes for a lot of people who becomes conspiratorial snot conspiratorial in any way is just people who are influential influence yes but at the same time the masses are the ones who give them the platform they won't be on TV if people don't watch it exactly well. The thing thing is that people respond to the truth that person's giving out or the lie sure that could be the case in some cases people respond to all types of stuff. I guess kind of close the show around some of the topics and things we've been talking about today. I it's my last thoughts and you guys. Please go ahead. I've been talking much more than I should. I do think that when discussing culture it is is important to understand that there is a connection to the political there is a connection to in my opinion the psychological golden philosophical and that they all they all have an influence on one thing or another and at the end of the day understanding it. I guess they're putting putting you're making it. More understandable is probably best rather than just kind of leaving it in your mind leaving it out there and having it be us. I think you know discussions like this. Today can help people look at one thing that they have been looking certain way and kind of open their mind to a new approach or new of looking at it. I mean a lot of what you guys said..

Noam Chomsky Foreign Policy Elsa institutes president White House Iraq Danny China America CIANCI Vietnam four years
"noam chomsky" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"noam chomsky" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Read three takes place which is. which the world was looking up with utter astonishment who were miserable people families mothers children. fleeing from terror and repression for which we were responsible and in reaction the. they're sending the cells of troops to the border. as president trump escalate says attacks against central American migrants ahead of the mid term elections will sleep with the world renowned dissident ten linguist Noam Chomsky about US foreign policy in Central America and Saturday's deadly Pittsburgh synagogue attack. a revival. Hey. fear. much of that to encourage to. by the. for rhetorical Texas leadership. I will speak with the comedian and actress a line of Blahzay blazer of broad city fame last night she was forced to cancel an event at a Brooklyn synagogue after a vandal scrawled June. and it is now among other anti semitic and racist graffiti on the building's wall. we have a situation. there were. the minute. faces today. in the past couple hours so we don't feel safe. Alaina Glazer well talk to us about what happened democracy now without the event I was one of the people she was scheduled to interview about covering the mid term elections all that and more coming up. welcome to democracy now democracy.

Alaina Glazer Noam Chomsky Central America US president Pittsburgh Texas Brooklyn
"noam chomsky" Discussed on Bad Science

Bad Science

04:16 min | 2 years ago

"noam chomsky" Discussed on Bad Science

"Yeah. Another snob. Can we please keep track here? Yeah. I read up on her and her training. She's very well trained and her work looks really interesting. She does let us stuff on ergotisms, which was the super nerdy phenomenon in language that I'm not gonna talk about. We'll just because. It's languages of the world differ in the way that they Mark subjects and objects. So the different grammatical roles. Okay. And linguists really loved to divide up languages, according to oh, you know, things like their grammatical differences there sound differences. So she works on really interesting stuff. And it's done a lot of comparative work. She also apparently has done fieldwork. And that is something that I like about this foam a lot because it four grounds actually working with speakers in this case the help to pods. All right. So you're you're there with them. She does come from a slightly different training than I do in that she is definitely aligning herself. At least in what I read with Chomsky in linguists. So with Noam Chomsky and his ideas about language are different than how I was trained. So more of a focus on what is it about us that we're born with that allows us to speak and the chumps. Skin sort of come down and more of a formalist view that we're all born with this innate ability, whereas folks, like me linguistic anthropologists sometimes characterized as like, oh, you guys are crazy hippies over there. You're not really being scientists as I mentioned before we're very concerned with the relationship between language and culture. So we think that language really can't happen or we can't understand it outside of understanding society. Got you. Okay. Vague created a logo Graham bible which included over a hundred different completely operative logo grams, seventy one of which were actually featured in the movie, so I wanted to just ask your view on that did that seem of cool legitimate. Was that interesting? Yeah, it was very interesting. And I always appreciate when a movie goes the extra mile, for instance, the revenue like I have a friend who worked on that movie is vocal coach, they really, you know, research the ereck era and the and caddo and went for it. And the same thing here. I mean, almost like Klingon or you know, you read about game of thrones. They did. Lot to I think create a rocky language and worked with linguists. So yeah, this is definitely the way some languages would work where you have a particular sound. I mean, sorry particular visual image for one concept. So yeah, that's how you would go about it. They were talking about a movie like you would have to know the entire thing first and then like right with your left hand and right hand at the same time. I I don't know about that was I think I missed opportunity to explain where they were trying to go there. How would you explain it? Oh my God. Well, like that part of this group right now. I don't know. I mean, one thing that I think instead of answering that I think the missed opportunity. Yeah. Divert is that they didn't get into. I understand why it can be quite complex, but the different ways that alphabets can work. So if you think about the English alphabet, we have I mean, even though it's kind of a crappy imperfect alphabet with things like silent L and all sorts of weird things. Generally, the ideas that you have one symbol for one sound. And then we get to combine them, but there are other ways of doing alphabet. So you can have like this alphabet where there's one concept for one image. You can also have an alphabet that is syllable based eat Cherokee is like that. So you can have a particular image or symbol that stands for a syllable in the language. And so that was a missed opportunity the whole going from both directions. At once I think was an attempt to tie in with the way time was depict. Clayton's? I I would not know how to okay. Yeah. That was. Yeah. Are there? Like oh. This is talking about missed opportunities with there was there other things in the film that you were like, oh this not cool with me. I mean, I didn't have that strong feeling the whole. So it's built around the film is built around the Sapir wharf hypothesis and poor Amy Adams. She was told to say, it's the sapper Warf hypothesis, which, you know, no disrespect like that's most of graduate school is you learn how to pronounce these folks names correctly..

Noam Chomsky Amy Adams Clayton Sapir wharf caddo sapper
"noam chomsky" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"noam chomsky" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I hear the voice said is Neil Sheehan. There have to speak to him. It's urgent urgent need him. Whereas he and you were like intense on the phone. I didn't know who it was. I said who is this? And you said, it's Daniel Ellsberg. And I said well hold on. And I put my hand over the phone, and I turned to two of the editors right there. I said at some guys nealer. No, he was back at the Hilton. I said it's some guy who's really sounds like he has to talk to and he said his name is Daniel Ellsberg and the two editors went white. In the face, and they looked at each other. And one of them said it's the source. The editors wave their arms back at Rosie get rid of the guy. And I said I'll I'll tell them you called. I think I'd probably said I don't know where he is. And so Neil is not available. So I then pick up the phone and call Howard zinn who I was going to see that night to go. See Butch Cassidy and the Sundance kid for the fourth time or something for me given Howard about a thousand pages and Noam Chomsky as historians for their interest. There were keeping it under their bed. And this next part makes you wonder what was he thinking? So I should Howard. I've got a store somewhere stuff with the may come any minute. I said let me come by your place, and I wanna I wanna drop something. So somebody else also had given me of grass a little grass. That's about an ounce of marijuana and thought, okay, we're gonna come any minute here. So he took the little grass aired I gave Howard the stuff, and then we smoked as much as we could. And threatened flush the rest down the toilet. Yeah. So well Ellsberg was dodging the FBI in a movie theater baked and watching Butch Kathy. The presses were rolling for the Sunday paper..

Howard zinn Neil Sheehan Daniel Ellsberg Noam Chomsky Butch Cassidy Butch Kathy FBI Rosie marijuana
"noam chomsky" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:10 min | 3 years ago

"noam chomsky" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Amazingly elaborate process, they have to sit up in the other room and built a room within the times to set the type secretly actually they didn't want any the union people. Do stay took four men and managers to set the type secretly Ellsberg didn't know any of this was happening until he got a call on a Saturday afternoon. From a times editor who wasn't on the project Ellsberg had shown him part of the study, and the editor was planning on using some of it in a book, he said, well that study you told me about they have the whole study. Now, I said, oh, really and. He said they're coming out with the building is locked up. They have private police around here to check everybody who comes in and out because they're afraid of an injunction. Really this was especially interesting news to Ellsberg because he happened to have a full copy of the papers in his apartment. He usually kept copies. Spread out an empty apartments who with friends you can trust. If the FBI happened to stop by on this day, he'd be caught red-handed show. I hang up the phone, and I call meal Sheehan Neal is not available. So who you talk to do, you know, who you talk to at the times? No, no. I forget you spoiler alert. It was Rosie I answered the phone at the foreign desk and was about four o'clock maybe on a Saturday if right the tension in the newsroom was incredible. Because of that. That neighbor was coming out in the bulldog early edition, and we were worried still at the feds would come in and stop it presses were literally about to start rolling. And I answered the phone, and I hear the voice said is Neil Sheehan there. I have to speak to him. It's urgent urgent Anita him. Whereas he and you were like intense on the phone. I didn't know who it was. I said who is this? And you said it's Daniel Ellsberg, and I said well hold on. And I put my hand over the phone, and I turned to two of the editors right there. I said it's some guys nealer. No, he was back at the Hilton some guy who's really sounds like he has to talk to she. And he said his name is Daniel Ellsberg and the two editors where white in the face, and they looked at each other. And one of them said it's the source. The editors wave their arms back at Rosie get rid of the guy. And I said, I don't know. I'll I'll tell him you called. I think I probably said I don't know where he is in Okinawa. So dealers out available. So I then pick up the phone and call Howard zinn who I was going to see that night to go. See Butch Cassidy and the Sundance kid for the fourth time or something for me given Howard about a thousand pages and Noam Chomsky as historians for their interest were keeping it under their bed. And this next part makes you wonder what was he thinking? So I should Howard. I've got a store Schindler stuff with the company minute. I said let me come by your place. I want I want to drop something off. So somebody else also had given me 'let of graphs, graphs. That's about an ounce of marijuana. And they're gonna come any minute here. So he took the little grass Aaron. I gave Howard the stuff, and then we smoked as much as we could and threatened flush the rest of the toilet..

Daniel Ellsberg Howard zinn Neil Sheehan editor Noam Chomsky Rosie I Sheehan Neal Anita FBI Butch Cassidy marijuana Okinawa Schindler
"noam chomsky" Discussed on Reveal

Reveal

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"noam chomsky" Discussed on Reveal

"Neal is not available. So, you know, who you talk to do, you know, who you talk to at the times. No, I forget you. Spoiler alert. It was Rosie I answered the phone at the foreign desk, and it was about four o'clock maybe on a Saturday if the tension in the newsroom was incredible. Because of that neighbor was coming out in the bulldog the early edition, and we were worried still at the feds would come in and stop it. You know, the presses were literally about distort role. Calling. And I answered the phone. I hear the voice said is Neil Sheehan there. I have to speak to him. It's urgent urgent Anita m-. Where is he? And you were like intense on the phone. I didn't know who it was. I said who is this? And you said, it's Daniel Ellsberg. And I said well hold on. And I put my hand over the phone, and I turned to two of the editors right there. And I said some guys nealer. No, he was back at the Hilton said some guy who's really sounds like he has to talk to she. And he said his name is Daniel Ellsberg and the two editors went white in the face, and they looked at each other. And one of them said it's the source. Wave their arms back at Rosie kit. Rented the guy, and I said, I don't know, you know, I'll tell him you called. I think I probably said, I don't know where he is and up. So Neil is not available. So I then pick up the phone and call Howard zinn who I was going to see that night to go. See Butch Cassidy and the Sundance kid for the fourth time or something for me, given Howard about a thousand pages of it and Noam Chomsky about as historians, you know, for their interest were keeping it under their bid. And this next part makes you wonder what was he thinking? So I should Howard. I've got a store similar stuff with you, come any minute. I said let me come by your place. I wanna drop something off. So somebody else who had given me 'let of grass a little grass. That's about an ounce of marijuana and thought, okay, we're gonna come you know, any minute here. So he took the little graphs air. I gave Howard the stuff, and then we smoked as much as we could. And through in flush the risk down the toilet. Yeah. So well Ellsberg was dodging the FBI in a movie theater baked and watching Butch Cassidy the presses were rolling for the Sunday paper..

Howard zinn Neil Sheehan Daniel Ellsberg Butch Cassidy Noam Chomsky Rosie I Neal FBI Anita marijuana
"noam chomsky" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

02:50 min | 3 years ago

"noam chomsky" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"This is democracy. Now democracy now dot org. The wind piece report, I make Goodman, as we continue our conversation with the world renowned professor linguist and dissident Noam Chomsky democracy. Now's Nermeen shaken I recently spoke to him and asked him to talk about the twin threats of climate change and nuclear war. We spoke in the wake of a new report, by nature magazine that the world has massively underestimated the amount of heat absorbed by our oceans and President Trump's decision to pull the United States out of the intermediate range nuclear forces treaty known as the I n f professor Chomsky began by talking about the significance of this landmark nuclear arms pact with Russia. Well, the treaty was a very important development. Do I recall that? In that period in the early and mid eighties. The short this has to do with short range nuclear missiles. Do what has not been done as yet have technical experts from both sides neutral ones investigate the claims that are being made by both sides and determine if they're valid and to.

Noam Chomsky professor Chomsky Nermeen professor President Trump nature magazine Goodman United States Russia
Inside Trump's isolated days amid Russia fallout

Biz 1190 Overnight

04:15 min | 3 years ago

Inside Trump's isolated days amid Russia fallout

"On Bloomberg radio. I'm Jim Grasso President Trump stunned the world is past Monday during, a press conference with Russian President Vladimir Putin in Helsinki when he publicly sided, with the former KGB officer. Over his own intelligence communities findings about Russian interference in the twenty sixteen election I, have President Putin he just said. It's not Russia I will say this I don't see any reason why. It would be despite Trump's attempt, at backtracking the next day the fallout remains fierce here. To tell us more is Eli lake a columnist for Bloomberg opinion so what's your reaction to Trump. Siding with Putin over US intelligence agencies On a certain level mind boggling but I don't want to he didn't just side with, Vladimir Putin on the question of Russian meddling in the twentieth sixteen election and for that matter. Warnings of the twenty thousand eighteen election he also into que- or purchase Vladimir Putin equation of a completely unrelated matter which is a former. American could have been, named William Browder who is attempting to. Pressure the Russian government for Justice Former was murdered in two thousand nine in a Russian proven with the American. On forcement apparatus Beveren to hold Russia accountable for packing up leading Democrats and others are just posing fake online personas in order to try to influence the electric and while I certainly can understand why the, president would be frustrated at the. As of yet unproven charge of collusion is often drag up there and he didn't do any of this and that you know the Democrats won't let it. Go he should be able to separate that from. What I think is now incontrovertible fact that Russia hack eating Democrats and then distributed at them. On the internet that is a terrible invasion of privacy of individuals it's. Terrible stepping over the line in terms of meddling in the US election in wild questions certainly try to do the kind of thing before in the Soviet era it wasn't Okay then and out of a now and you know for Trump failure on this. Sort of knowledge even though he tried to walk it back is again. I'd say Mind-boggling you write that he's created another Charlottesville moment, how so Well. Real probably Charlottesville was a moral equivalency between people were protesting a group, of racists in white nationalist came to Charlottesville over confederate statues and then the people demonstrating. Saying cues And when you said there, are very fine people on both sides McMahon of nauseating And I think that it's similar in that on the world stage at Helsinki the president deems almost Elaine The, problem with, the US relationship is found on both sides and that Russia attacked, you sort of indicated that you know we had some blame in that and that is the kind of In, foreign affairs that we associate with, people like Noam Chomsky or rush Rush fringe. Figures for the president of the. United voice to that kind of thing it. Just really the gut check these are not our values for most Americans I. Don't think most Trump's. Supporters what you've been agreeing with any of that so it. Is extraordinarily I have refrained from speculating whether Russia has something on him, I think you explain this in some ways. Because Trump has these conviction, but he wants a better relationship with Russia there are arguments about that but, there is still no, excuse for this kind of moral equivalency between Russia which really right, now you don't have to characterize it a predator state and United States which is the world's most powerful nation that is the anchor of the system of free trade Mitchell I mean..

President Putin Donald Trump Russia President Trump United States Charlottesville Bloomberg Helsinki Russian Government William Browder Jim Grasso KGB Justice Former Eli Lake Officer Beveren Noam Chomsky Mcmahon