10 Burst results for "Noah Sneider"

"noah sneider" Discussed on The Economist: Babbage

The Economist: Babbage

06:30 min | 3 weeks ago

"noah sneider" Discussed on The Economist: Babbage

"In nineteen forty one. Father roberto busa catholic. Priest started using down as many uses of the word in as he could find in the works. If thomas coins it ended up taking him eight years and ten thousand eight hundred and to do having spent the best part of a decade on this fall. Booze expected you could probably do it much faster and more efficiently by using some type of machinery middle vedeno that the advent of computers was just around the corner. Father busa ended up in new york in the office of thomas watson. The ceo of off off to twisting watson's omits e collected a series of ibm punch. Cutting jeans to record all of acquaintances. Ten million words then my tapes which new technology for recording. The data ended up with nearly sixty people working on the project. But it's time in one thousand nine hundred ninety finished with all the magnetic take the nfl's miles of native full length of italy towards the end of his life. That's just how style that he was at the progress. That had been made in computational analysis surface humanities the phrase used was digits day he s hit the finger of god his natalie heard a story these two big trucks carrying these magnetic tapes. One of these two tracks at city called fire. There was no backup of. I'm barbara mcgilla. Free am a research fellow at the institute and at the university of cambridge barbara in fact worked on the basis project and museum. Today she is right to the cutting edge of what is being done with computers. A liberal arts. I can give an example from research. I've done on an ancient greek tax. We were able to trace the change of meaning of some words in ancient greek. That scholars had spent many years studying. What these techniques allow us to do is to see for example. How many times as an word was used in a certain meaning when the shift happened if it happened in the authors or in specific genres and quantitative the typical analyses that i just impossible to hand what father busa created this enormous field of digital humanities which today covers all sorts of crossovers between computing and the liberal arts. The ten million words of thomas acquired us drop in the ocean of all the great works of art and history and literature and philosophy that have been digitized. For example google books has at these two trillion words in it. They're even asked that have millions and millions of paintings and sculptures accord. It's you can point your phone at a sculpture. Jeddy what it is and who it's by when it's from so enormous speed and scale that have been enabled by decades of exponential growth in computing power. Now means the entire world all is available at your fingertips and just a few key strokes. Some of the most interesting research has focused. On novels of the eighteenth and nineteenth century one paper that was produced bud stanford literally lab created over the correlate which essentially takes given was. Looks at how often appeared over time when apple down usage and then looks at other words the follow a similar pattern so for example the word tree moves more or less than lockstep with the words elm and beech branch they found some really interesting patents specifically about the rise of more concrete novalis stick language most realistic language words but you and sensibility in pride. The sort of things we might associate with jane austen increasing fashion whereas words that was slightly more tangible body. Parts and colors came into fashion. If you think about charles dickens at the other end of the scan realistic lots of sights and sounds and sensations it you get they were able to track and quantify that change and to show how it really persisted throughout lots of different novelists over the course of the nineteenth century computers on quite as good. Humans weren't fun. Noah near members could humans as understanding. What words really mean. No rhythm is going to stan. Shakespeare solitaire 'til to get as much from a pub by byron as a human reader could but might be able to apply some of the same frameworks to add more insights tv thousands and thousands of all that platelets in office all as well remembered but still some interesting all the time that they were writing. It seems to be unlikely that the digital humanities to replace the traditional humanities just because they call it what you the same thing but they also met them by offering these extra capabilities and tools are thanks. To noah sneider oliver morton and james toaster. There are stories feature in our holiday issue alongside the long reads on a terrifying battle of sydney street and the art of military deception. If you're not already a subscriber there's still time for new year's resolution for the best introductory offer go to a cottam dot com slash podcast offer. The link is in the show notes. And that's all for this year's babich. I wanna thank our fabulous team of producers jason hoskin emeka short tino nolan william warn and of course the executive producer sandra morelli. And we think all of you. Our listeners have a wonderful new year after a very trying and we look forward to bring you more tech and science insights in twenty twenty one. I'm kenneth kooky and in london. This is the economist. And we'll see you next year..

roberto busa Father busa barbara mcgilla thomas watson thomas bud stanford university of cambridge busa watson ibm nfl italy barbara new york jane austen charles dickens google noah sneider oliver morton james toaster
"noah sneider" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

06:26 min | 5 months ago

"noah sneider" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"I up though. On Friday obey Shinzo announced he would be standing down as prime minister of Japan. To. Taito abandoned writer you. said. You handle I am article to the sixty five year old has long suffered from a chronic bowel disease, but his condition has worsened. Stir Obey said he didn't want his illness to get in the way of decision making and he apologized to the Japanese people for failing to complete his term in office. Last week that term as prime minister became the longest since the post was created for a post imperial Japan and it isn't even his first time in the role you'll remain until a successor is chosen successor will face some pressing challenges. So, the press conference where Mr Obey announced his decision to resign was somber say the least Noah Sneider is our Tokyo bureau chief I ran into one of his advisors who looked to to be honest like someone had died even his inner circle his closest associates seemed shocked by the sharp turn of events. The Japanese. Press meanwhile was peppering the Prime Minister with questions primarily about his legacy about the problems he left unresolved and the accomplishments that he felt most proud of will and and about that, how has Japan changed under Mr? OBEYS LEADERSHIP SO MR Had A first brief stint as prime minister in two, thousand, six, two, thousand, seven before stepping down because of the same chronic intestinal disease. When he took office again in two, thousand twelve, he came in determined to revive the country's economy and it's it's standing in the world. Lettuce Gentlemen. Japan is back. Famously declared that Japan is back in two thousand thirteen. for Mr Album that meant primarily an agenda of economic reform that came to be known as about. Monetary easing fiscal stimulus and on structural reform were the so-called three arrows and he also helped to beef up Japan's military. It's Self Defense Forces. He proved an able manager of Japan's relations with the United States especially after Donald Trump's election it was quite telling. The Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison said that the region had lost a senior statesman after other announced his resignation and about the program of economic reform, the the Ave nomex how successful has that been? It's a mixed bag on the one hand, the radical monetary easing the Bank of Japan pursued did help pull the economy out of deflation though it never quite hit its two percent inflation target, his his program of of reform helped inject a bit of life into the economy. But at the same time, this third Arrow, the structural reforms is probably the weakest piece of the puzzle. He wasn't as successful at promoting female empowerment and also promoting digitalization and Japan's bureaucracy, and it's a somewhat archaic corporate sector. Now, covid has threatened to erase many of the gains that were made In the last eight years in fact, real GDP is now down to the level. It was before Mr Obama took office in two, thousand twelve and what other challenges will his successor have to face well, there are some enormous long term, structural challenges, first and foremost shrinking population amounting Gargantuan public debt and anemic economy now, and and an increasingly turbulent neighborhoods with a rising China. What's more there are several short-term problems to solve managing the covid nineteen pandemic and figuring out whether Japan will be able to host the Olympic Games that were planned for for this past summer. And what about the hunt for that successor? How will that play out? So, Mr Abbas successor will be decided insides, the Liberal, Democratic Party, the ruling party of Japan this is going to be an insider's affair and whoever does. For whoever wins the leadership election that is expected to happen in the coming weeks that person will rule until the end of Mr current term. So until September of next year and then face another party wide general election, there are two candidates who are seen as possible transitional figures to serve out the remainder of Mr Bays term namely the Deputy Prime Minister also Taro and the chief. Cabinet Secretary Suge Yushi. But that would only delay the eventual fight for the leadership of the Party and. The country at large. There are a number of figures who pop up in discussions about potential successors, former defense minister, former foreign minister, as well as the current defense and foreign ministers, and there will be a lot of jockeying in the weeks months to come and and so in. In that you see a smooth transition of power. No big changes to the agenda. The policy agenda May remain consistent this. Succession will be decided on the basis of factional arithmetic and. Personalities. Rather them deep policy debates, but it may not be smooth historically long-serving Japanese prime ministers have been followed by strings of short lived unpopular governments. Japan in fact, cycled through six prime ministers in as many years include Mr obvious first stint before he came back in in two thousand twelve and in today's especially turbulent times Japan can ill afford another bout of such inst- Moody. Thanks very much for joining us. No. Thanks..

Japan prime minister Prime Minister Bank of Japan Mr Obey Mr Obama Mr Bays Mr Album Mr Abbas Taito Shinzo covid Self Defense Forces writer Donald Trump Tokyo bureau chief Cabinet Secretary Suge Yushi
"noah sneider" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:54 min | 5 months ago

"noah sneider" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Sorrow. I worked at the company for a long time although I'm not perfect to me. I felt like I was treated differently in May MS mismarked lost her appeal. I think another people may not know about transgender people that is why I came out and is this lawsuit. But this year different suit has had more success even without antidiscrimination laws. Chinaman in Beijing, she had a good job of the product director for Dungdung an ECOMMERCE company. And in 2018 Dongguan. Out had to take some time off gender reassignment surgery. He Amy Hawkins, writes about Foreign Affairs for the economist but that's in three months after the surgery Dung Phya Thai, a continuous absenteeism faithful debts amiss cal, the real reason with transphobia. Cohen in Beijing agreed with her and all the down to restore high contract and pay back wages. That court ruling within January Bay went viral number this summer and attracted attention in Chinese media because that's quite an unusual ruling. Yes. Very unusual mid guy the first transgender person to win an employment discrimination case in. China? As far as we know any to other from tried, I'm part of the reason. So few people have tried it because lgbt people aren't protected from discrimination China Employment Law. But it does have specific productions, agenda base rights, and if you are transplant who legally changed agenda, you're entitled to the same rights as anyone else of gender. which was the basis for this positive rolling for Moscow. In January, apart from the Trans. People for the handful of. People who have gone to court saying that they'd been unfairly dismissed because of the bachelorette station. The courts are reluctant to even comment on the issue that the Lord's mentioned that Short attention what they do if. Off The issue saying there's not enough evidence of this nation even in some cases seems to be a lot. Jordan wants to avoid questions of big implications which would be the case if they did rule someone had been invited Smith being gay that if the bath evidence really high. And so how did MS go get over that Bar of evidence? is she go by having weak- cool smoking gun evidence from London the company Miss Genita-, they also go to mentally ill and they said other colleagues on council working with her particularly regarding bathroom access. But the court ruled that because you can change agenda, she was legally female dumped on with obliged to treat her the same in any other female cloudy. Case that went beyond just ruling in favor. They also issued an unusually liberal statement tolerance and CENA. Society must respect and protect the personality dignity and the rights of transgender people and so given that this is going viral around China to you get a sense for how people feel about this ruling. Yes. So lots of people online have responded to the need publicity by one pleasant he was. An. Innovation in Beijing and Bay. It's. The online commentary doesn't necessarily reflect you from the ground. For example, two-thirds minority say they feel pressured to get married and transactions are still classified the mental illness and homosexuality was classified at the men's until two thousand one and there are some staff to suggest that lgbt people have a hard time in China. For example, any five percent of them come out to their colleagues. And one survey of transgender people specifically found that they had an unemployment rate that was double, the national average, and what about the Communist Party does it does it have an explicit view on transgender issues transgender rights? They tend not to comment on child issues specifically. But certainly under Xi Jinping, they'd been a renewed emphasis on family values, marriage having children and general traditionalism, and obviously thought can be seen to exclude a lot of lgbtq people and recently the government excessively rejected campaign for gay marriage, which some activists had gotten quite high from the belts and so how to view that that ruling and the commentary that came with it do you do you see a time when the law or the party view or the general public view is really changing about these issues? Chonju, issues outside of this ruling rarely discussed in official media. into. Nazi. China makes the positive noises about LGBT issue. They made a statement to the UN in two, thousand, fifteen, the LGBT I people face some real challenges and tom the exemptions. and. In fact if yet they made a similar statement to the UN talking about gay conversion therapy where they said they supported lgbt people. But domestically, they don't really the same kind of statements sometimes international news about trying this, you'd cut three two. Chinese media for example, recently the flurry around jk rollings, blog posts on people, which made it three two Chinese media. Although that post of controversal, some people thought it was good because it brought triumph issues to the forefront in China which normally not discussed. So do you see things changing for Trans People in China anytime soon, do think Ms Gals case could shift the landscape here. I mean, there's definitely if xfl the community entire an activist. Very excited about I'm watching on this issue. People in big trying to be more liberal than ever before but perhaps not a watershed moment and and of huge game for L. D. position in general. Amy. Thanks very much for your time. Thanks for having me. For. Plenty more analysis from our international network of correspondents subscribe to the Economist to find the best introductory offer wherever you are just go to economist dot com slash intelligence offer. I found myself aboard a tanker beside Captain Kuwahara. who were off the coast of Singapore trying to get report into the open water. Noah Sneider is economists Tokyo Bureau Chief Ship rocked back and forth as he offered me a turn of the helm. I tried to maneuver us through some congested waters, but set us straight on a collision course. He took the wheel steered us away from the danger. then. He flipped a switch and the windows went dark. We walked calmly off the simulator and into the offices of Japan. Marine Science. Shipping. Consultancy. So so what is the purpose of this simulator? Japan marine science built it to help train shipping captains. But now a days they're using it to help develop algorithms that will one day help ships. Dear themselves as well. They're one of many. Japanese. Firms that are investing heavily into developing autonomous shipping technology. Recently, the Nippon Foundation, a Philanthropic Group announced a thirty one million dollar investment in to a consortium it's working to develop the necessary technology giant Japanese shipping firms like Mitsui. O S, K lines and Nippon. Houston Kaisha have been working on similar efforts since about twenty sixteen and why is it that there's So much effort in this direction in Japan over Japan it's a problem of both demography and geography. So Japan has more than four hundred inhabited islands and many of those smaller islands are inaccessible by road they depend on coastal shipping and there are fewer and fewer transport options to reach them nowadays, and that gets us to the problem of demography more than half of the twenty one thousand mariners in Japan's coastal shipping industry are over fifty years old in fact, more than a quarter of them are.

China Beijing Japan UN Amy Hawkins Dongguan Moscow January Bay Nippon Foundation Foreign Affairs Dungdung London product director Cohen Marine Science Mitsui Jordan Xi Jinping
"noah sneider" Discussed on The GM Shuffle

The GM Shuffle

04:53 min | 7 months ago

"noah sneider" Discussed on The GM Shuffle

"There's a lot of reasons for not wanting. To be a minority partner in the Redskins, starting with Dan Snyder, I mean he. He's really in. He's not very. He truly defines the dunning Kruger fact. He's in a job that he has no business being in. Even though he's a multi-billionaire, you know he can't you know? He kept the putter around for nine years even though he was a disaster I. Mean my dog Balak with knew that that GM was never going to be able. Able to make a good pick, and you know, and now with this name, it's just been horrible. He brought. He brings no one in to help them manage the PR, the damage control, and now he stuck with. He's got one of the sacred, Fran. He's had George Preston Marshall's name up there for years, and he knows and finally took it down at some point. When did you become aware that that's the thing that drives me crazy? All these senators that that M reading the book the Master of the Senate, all these senators that are on their high horses that are talking about black lives matter and we've gotta stop racial injustice and we have to. They go to work every day in the Richard Russell Bilby. There could not have been a bigger racist than Richer Russell. There could not have been. Every civil rights bill was blocked by him and his. Constituents so you know actions speak louder than words you know, and you know all these senators they go to there in the Richard Russell. Building a d you can't. You can't have a more. If you talk about, and if you're not aware of your surroundings, how could and that Dan Snyder? He's never aware of it. And I'm not sure what name they pick. Because I mean I would have I loved the helmet just like the Blackhawks. I think the Blackhawks uniform beautiful I asked somebody at the blackhawks the other day. Are you getting any any heat from this? And they said we haven't gotten it yet. We may have to change our uniform, but we do have some of partnership with the Blackhawks I don't know what that means but you. You know I would think that you know. The redskin are helmet would have to come back this year even if they don't change the name even if he waits because they have that helmet in place to your point of being aware of your surroundings. I was listening to Joe Box. podcast Charles Barkley was a guest and Barclay Quote Obama Ali, and he said if you're the same person at twenty when you're fifty then. Then, you're not living like you know you have to grow as a person right? You should not be the same person you should open your mind. Expand your horizons. Opinions should change and so maybe if somebody's twenty and they said okay, we'll. Redskins is the name what's a big deal when you golders hill listen if this is offensive to somebody. If there's a groups are being alienated by the Etymology of the word is just. Just not right in twenty twenty, then yeah, change it, and that's always been my belief. If it's not like, it's such a great name that we have to keep it if it's offending people, it's offensive native Americans. The animal GM at the root of it then change it what it gets interesting. Is You see these options? The ones that are ridiculous trump's are five hundred to one. The snowflakes are five hundred to one. I mean what I saw that I thought of curb your enthusiasm when Larry. Where's the trump? Pat Just to get out of things, so that was a great episode. L. D. like somebody had. Put trump at odds, so I don't have to go meet Phil to go meet. Somebody loves fill. You know we need to review. Somebody loves that guy could be the most annoying person on television. have. You ever watched that show. Oh Yeah I love Kirby enthusiasm and Friend of mine who can't watch because he goes God. Larry David seems like such a prick. I know that's what makes them so great. You know we're GONNA pandemic. He's been social distancing for years I love Larry David I'm talking about that. Phil Rosenthal Guy. He's a hoster graduate by the way the writer. I got some point like he knowing I mean like I. Don't Know How anybody watches somebody feed fill his facial expressions after he eats anyway. I don't know how he got off that, but what I saw the trump's on the list. Is Somebody. Had put that in there so right? Another option Hajj route fifty to one I'll give you the top three that I like. The generals are four to one. I mean the Washington Generals Right? You and I Love Basketball The Washington capitals I listen. I prefer the hockey team have that, but the capitals Find Teo L. S. nine to one and. And, here's why like the. Washington monument because you could just call them the monuments men. They'd be better than the George Clooney movie. You'd say okay. It's the monuments and the eagles. The monuments men against the birds. Here we go I like Noah Sneider. He's GonNa want to have something in there I. I could see red tail or or read hawks or Read like for me, you know if if then go to the to the command cheese, get to there and see if you can make a deal with them and say listen I will pay for I. Want to use your name with your blessing, and I will pay for the will be the Washy Comanche I. WanNa. Use Your like this. I want to promote your tribe. You know pay X. amount of revenue to do that. I I have a feeling that that's what Snyder is going to want to do. Because I don't think he's GONNA WANNA lose the element of some form of Indian tribe, but he's GonNa get his just like Florida. State has in a Florida state has done that that is true..

Dan Snyder Blackhawks Larry David Redskins Phil Rosenthal Guy GM Richard Russell dunning Kruger Richard Russell Bilby George Preston Marshall Florida Balak Senate partner George Clooney Fran Noah Sneider Washington monument
"noah sneider" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

The Ben Shapiro Show

21:54 min | 1 year ago

"noah sneider" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

"Lucas and and create for yourself the intense sort of agenda for for the coming day it helps coordinate with something beyond yourself and this is why get more prone to accidents weight gain depression with pray dot com you'll discover a new daily and nightly prayer routine as well as Inspirational Bible stories designed to strengthen your faith and lifted a plus Noah sneider will discuss joker be there on the Andrew Klavan show I'm Andrew.

Lucas Noah sneider Andrew Klavan
"noah sneider" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

04:39 min | 1 year ago

"noah sneider" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"There's a sort of similar dynamic in in his success. Thank you very much for your time. Jason. Noah Sneider is the economists Moscow correspondent recently though he's been having a taste of life in Crimea speaking to some winemakers there. Allegra in is vinter in Crimea, peninsula, that Russia annexed in two thousand fourteen he launched a boutique wine brand in two thousand ten and has been trying to revive local making traditions. He's one of a small number of boutique Crimean winemakers who've been plying craft on the peninsula. And having to contend with new set of challenges once an insular was annexed by Russia. So hang on a minute. No does Crimea have a big wine growing history does. And that was actually, one of the things that Russia, really coveted, when it took the peninsula, back in two thousand fourteen obviously ports and geopolitics, where of greater concern, but the winds were nice bonus doing Soviet-era central planners had used the region to essentially mass produce wine for the entire so union. They pumped out a lot. But the quality left a lot to be desired as well. And so what happened to the wine industry after the annexation, the wine industry is, is a great microcosm. In fact, for the Konami peninsulas, a whole, one of the first things that happened after the annexation was a wave of nationalizations of kiosks and the peninsula, including twos, are esta, wineries noise fail, and Masandra, the Russian government began pouring subsidies into the winemaking industry in Crimea, offering a lot of support for vendors who wanted to plant new vines and launched new honors. So it sounds as if at least for the winemakers things have been pretty good since annexation. Well, yes and no things haven't been all sweet. The upside is a larger market the Russian market being significantly larger than Ukrainian one, but the flip side of that is, is no access to international markets. Exporting has become impossible, and the drinking culture in Russia, largely still revolves around spirits and beer. So winemakers are, are kind of struggling to break through same time. They're having to contend with being in a bit of a legal black hole, as a result of western sanctions, banks are hesitant to service, the region there, just to state banks, that really offer credit to local businesses acquiring property and holding it can also be tricky place where the legal system has been going through steers of transitions and it's unclear often who holds the rights to land. Will you mentioned the sanctions on Russia? How does how does that influence things? It influences things in several ways. The most simple is by adding costs to things like Quiring supplies. Oftentimes local businesses will set up either parallel company and the Russian mainland or try to partner with a company that's registered, and the Russian mainland in order to import supplies that they need. And on the whole Mr. Repin reckons that such roundabout means add an additional fifteen to twenty percent even to, to final costs, and it's led to some occasional crises. Most recently, a bottle shortage that came as a result of one of the main factories, that's been supplying glass where the peninsula, deciding to cut off contracts with Crimean winemakers after western shareholders installed a new director, the company, Crimean vinter hope that supplies will be restarted soon. But for now, those a bit of a bottleneck, so I, I can't imagine that you visited a boutique winemaker and didn't try some of the wine. How is it how to say this diplomatically? It's a work in progress. There are some Crimean wines that have certainly. Moved far beyond their Soviet era predecessors, and Mr Evans winery, in fact, makes surprisingly subtle, who are the most interesting thing, maybe local sort says a range of native, grapes, grapes, native, to Crimea. Many of them have sort of died out or falling out of doctrine in recent decades, but local vendors like Mr. Repin are striving to revive them, and they hope redefine the reputation.

Crimea Russia Mr. Repin Crimean Noah Sneider Mr Evans winery Russian government Jason Konami Quiring partner Masandra director twenty percent
"noah sneider" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

09:03 min | 1 year ago

"noah sneider" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Hello. And welcome to the intelligence on communist radio. I'm your host racing polar. Every weekday. We provide a fresh perspective on the events shaping your world. Museums are finding themselves under uncomfortable scrutiny, many of them house artifacts stolen in fits of colonialism or mere greed, but the calls for returning objects are getting louder at the same time. Protests have broken out against one family known for its enormous museum donations. And there's a slow doughy crisis. Playing out in France in the past decade bread consumption has fallen by a quarter inequality in the rise of processed foods play a role, but the truth is that a good baguette is just really hard to make what does the future hold for the beleaguered? Batum. But I. Visit so much. We. In the hit Ukrainian comedy show. Servant of the people. I history teachers, expletive strewn anti corruption rant goes viral. And this man of the people winds up being elected president. But throw which but there's some fifteen. The comedian who plays him load. Amir's Alinsky is trying to turn fiction into reality voters head to the polls on Sunday for the first round of Ukraine's presidential elections and not only Mr. linski in the race. He's the front runner. Five years ago. Ukrainians took to the streets that overthrew their former president Viktor Yanukovych since then they faced a simmering war in the east of their country with Russia, which also annexed the Crimean peninsula. Noah Sneider is our Moscow correspondent, he recently visited Mr. Lansky onset in Kiev. They've seen their economy crash and come back from the brink. And they've seen many of the promises of the revolution unfulfilled, especially when it comes to fighting corruption that's opened a huge Gulf of distrust with the authorities and that has led to a strange situation where the front runner in. These elections is a comedian an actor with no political experience whatsoever riding this wave of anti-establishment sentiment and frustration towards a likely victory. And I understand that you you met Mr. linski recently. I did. So I went and saw him onset where he was filming latest season of his TV show serving the people. And the scene that was playing out was telling it showed the Lansky character taking the oath of office. He enters a sort of historical flashback a dialogue with a trio of important figures. Plato prince flood of Kiev, and the Slavic philosopher Grigory Scotto, the, and what ensues is sort of philosophical dialogue on the nature of power. And this, of course, has a double meaning since he may be taking that oath right soon. And so when you met him after he was filming how did he come across? Mr. charming mound. And actor who knows how to hold the room. But at the same time, he's had a hard time being very specific. At all about what he plans to do. Once he becomes president in part. It's a need campaign strategy it allows voters to see him as an empty vessel that they can fill with their hopes will what about his own hopes. Did he speak to you about why he wants to run for office? He talked about wanting to change things about wanting to make the country better. He came around eventually to answer that he summed up as I want my kids to be able to say that my dad was a normal guy. Great guy and these motivations for many voters raise questions because of his somewhat. Murky ties with color mois key, the guard who owns the TV channel on which Mr. Lansky show has aired the to maintain that they're not in cahoots and that there's nothing to their relationship beyond the business one. But missed his Lansky vague answers have fueled the suspicions about why he actually has decided to run then without prejudice to wear his platform might be coming from. What is he actually said he'll do first and foremost, he's promised to maintain Ukraine's course, towards western integration integration with the European Union. He's talked about fighting corruption and somewhat vaguely about ending the war about finding away to negotiate with mister Putin at the same time. His ideological stance is. Quite over the map, we talked to him about which world leaders, he admired which figures he associated himself with global politics, and he invoked to names in particular day able scenario the right wing populace, president of Brazil. And France's among well Macron. Mccall who's liberal technocrat the Gulf between their policies and their positions is enormous. And again, perhaps suggests that Mr. Lonski is is a bit unfamiliar with the territory he's wandering onto. And I guess that's particularly worrisome in the sense that he's up against a ladder Putin for a chunk of his country. Absolutely. Mr Putin has nineteen years of executive experience under his belt. He's a wily operator and will not miss the opportunity to use his opponent's inexperience to his advantage, and how did Mr. linski and up here. How comedian with no political experience leading the polls. I think the main reason is frustration frustration amongst ordinary Ukrainians with their post revolutionary leadership when they overthrew the previous president victory on the kovic in two thousand fourteen. There was a great deal of hope that the deeply corrupt. Oligarchy political system that has gripped Ukraine since the fall of the Soviet Union would finally change and that fundamental promise has been left unfulfilled. So although Ukraine has made some important reforms, although the country is moving closer to Europe citizens now enjoy visa-free travel to the U, for example. They don't feel like the system has fundamentally changed three quarters of Ukrainian say the country is headed in the wrong direction. Just nine percent have faith in their national government. That's the lowest figure of any country survey by Gallup polling agency. And you see that frustration spill out onto the streets quite regularly. They're anti corruption protests in Kiev in the same place often has where the revolution in two thousand fourteen began. And so who is Mr. linski running against are there more. Let's call them standard candidates. There's nearly forty candidates running for president. But the front runners are a pair of old faces from the old guard. There's the incumbent president petro parsh- Anco who came to office in two thousand fourteen in the wake the revolution promising to root out corruption and change this old system people largely feel that he's failed to do. So the second major challenger to mister Lonski is Hewlett Michenko. She's a former prime minister came to prominence after the orange revolution two thousand four and she's reinvented herself this time around as populous. Okay. So you've got two establishment candidates and one wildcard does that look like it's going to be a fair fight at least at the polls. That's big question. And it's the thing that people are most worried about in key, if these days, there are not only fears about the influence of oligarchy television. But also. Hello fears about straight up vote, rigging and vote-buying and vast majority of Ukrainians, in fact, don't believe that these will be free and fair elections, and that could be the most dangerous outcome of all. But let's suppose things are relatively clear cut and Mr. Dolinsky gets through the first round as expected. What do you reckon happens? Then the polling shows the in most cases, he would win head to head matchup with Mr. partial go and with Mr. machine go, but a lot of it depends on things like voter turnout misters Lonski basis, younger less reliable. So it's really hard to say. And if he were to win in the second round and become president he'd inherit the simmering war with Russia, which has massive implications for relations between Russia and the west he would inherit an economy that still struggling could benefit from further reform, and he would face a brutal fight over parliamentary elections in the fall. The perils of politically inexperienced television personalities heading for leadership. No, thank you very much for your time. Thank you for having. To

president Mr. linski Ukraine Mr. Lansky Kiev Mr Putin France mister Lonski mister Putin Batum Russia Viktor Yanukovych Moscow Grigory Scotto European Union Noah Sneider Mr. Dolinsky Europe Soviet Union
Comics relief? Ukraines presidential race

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:40 min | 1 year ago

Comics relief? Ukraines presidential race

"In the hit Ukrainian comedy show. Servant of the people. I history teachers, expletive strewn anti corruption rant goes viral. And this man of the people winds up being elected president. But throw which but there's some fifteen. The comedian who plays him load. Amir's Alinsky is trying to turn fiction into reality voters head to the polls on Sunday for the first round of Ukraine's presidential elections and not only Mr. linski in the race. He's the front runner. Five years ago. Ukrainians took to the streets that overthrew their former president Viktor Yanukovych since then they faced a simmering war in the east of their country with Russia, which also annexed the Crimean peninsula. Noah Sneider is our Moscow correspondent, he recently visited Mr. Lansky onset in Kiev. They've seen their economy crash and come back from the brink. And they've seen many of the promises of the revolution unfulfilled, especially when it comes to fighting corruption that's opened a huge Gulf of distrust with the authorities and that has led to a strange situation where the front runner in. These elections is a comedian an actor with no political experience whatsoever riding this wave of anti-establishment sentiment and frustration towards a likely victory. And I understand that you you met Mr. linski recently. I did. So I went and saw him onset where he was filming latest season of his TV show serving the people. And the scene that was playing out was telling it showed the Lansky character taking the oath of office. He enters a sort of historical flashback a dialogue with a trio of important figures. Plato prince flood of Kiev, and the Slavic philosopher Grigory Scotto, the, and what ensues is sort of philosophical dialogue on the nature of power. And this, of course, has a double meaning since he may be taking that oath right soon. And so when you met him after he was filming how did he come across? Mr. charming mound. And actor who knows how to hold the room. But at the same time, he's had a hard time being very specific. At all about what he plans to do. Once he becomes president in part. It's a need campaign strategy it allows voters to see him as an empty vessel that they can fill with their hopes will what about his own hopes. Did he speak to you about why he wants to run for office? He talked about wanting to change things about wanting to make the country better. He came around eventually to answer that he summed up as I want my kids to be able to say that my dad was a normal guy. Great guy and these motivations for many voters raise questions because of his somewhat. Murky ties with color mois key, the guard who owns the TV channel on which Mr. Lansky show has aired the to maintain that they're not in cahoots and that there's nothing to their relationship beyond the business one. But missed his Lansky vague answers have fueled the suspicions about why he actually has decided to run then without prejudice to wear his platform might be coming from. What is he actually said he'll do first and foremost, he's promised to maintain Ukraine's course, towards western integration integration with the European Union. He's talked about fighting corruption and somewhat vaguely about ending the war about finding away to negotiate with mister Putin at the same time. His ideological stance is. Quite over the map, we talked to him about which world leaders, he admired which figures he associated himself with global politics, and he invoked to names in particular day able scenario the right wing populace, president of Brazil. And France's among well Macron. Mccall who's liberal technocrat the Gulf between their policies and their positions is enormous. And again, perhaps suggests that Mr. Lonski is is a bit unfamiliar with the territory he's wandering onto. And I guess that's particularly worrisome in the sense that he's up against a ladder Putin for a chunk of his country. Absolutely. Mr Putin has nineteen years of executive experience under his belt. He's a wily operator and will not miss the opportunity to use his opponent's inexperience to his advantage, and how did Mr. linski and up here. How comedian with no political experience leading the polls. I think the main reason is frustration frustration amongst ordinary Ukrainians with their post revolutionary leadership when they overthrew the previous president victory on the kovic in two thousand fourteen. There was a great deal of hope that the deeply corrupt. Oligarchy political system that has gripped Ukraine since the fall of the Soviet Union would finally change and that fundamental promise has been left unfulfilled. So although Ukraine has made some important reforms, although the country is moving closer to Europe citizens now enjoy visa-free travel to the U, for example. They don't feel like the system has fundamentally changed three quarters of Ukrainian say the country is headed in the wrong direction. Just nine percent have faith in their national government. That's the lowest figure of any country survey by Gallup polling agency. And you see that frustration spill out onto the streets quite regularly. They're anti corruption protests in Kiev in the same place often has where the revolution in two thousand fourteen began. And so who is Mr. linski running against are there more. Let's call them standard candidates. There's nearly forty candidates running for president. But the front runners are a pair of old faces from the old guard. There's the incumbent president petro parsh- Anco who came to office in two thousand fourteen in the wake the revolution promising to root out corruption and change this old system people largely feel that he's failed to do. So the second major challenger to mister Lonski is Hewlett Michenko. She's a former prime minister came to prominence after the orange revolution two thousand four and she's reinvented herself this time around as populous. Okay. So you've got two establishment candidates and one wildcard does that look like it's going to be a fair fight at least at the polls. That's big question. And it's the thing that people are most worried about in key, if these days, there are not only fears about the influence of oligarchy television. But also. Hello fears about straight up vote, rigging and vote-buying and vast majority of Ukrainians, in fact, don't believe that these will be free and fair elections, and that could be the most dangerous outcome of all. But let's suppose things are relatively clear cut and Mr. Dolinsky gets through the first round as expected. What do you reckon happens? Then the polling shows the in most cases, he would win head to head matchup with Mr. partial go and with Mr. machine go, but a lot of it depends on things like voter turnout misters Lonski basis, younger less reliable. So it's really hard to say. And if he were to win in the second round and become president he'd inherit the simmering war with Russia, which has massive implications for relations between Russia and the west he would inherit an economy that still struggling could benefit from further reform, and he would face a brutal fight over parliamentary elections in the fall.

President Trump Ukraine Mr. Linski Mr. Lansky Mr Putin Kiev Mister Lonski Mister Putin Russia Viktor Yanukovych Amir France Moscow Grigory Scotto Noah Sneider European Union Europe Soviet Union Mr. Dolinsky
"noah sneider" Discussed on The Economist: Babbage

The Economist: Babbage

07:40 min | 2 years ago

"noah sneider" Discussed on The Economist: Babbage

"Table. I like to imagine that bit like a map cer- Martin paalea cough is a professor of chemistry at the university of Nottingham an honorary professor at Moscow state and Beijing chemical technology universities on his suggestion. The United Nations declared thousand nineteen the international year of the periodic table just like in London, depending particular facets of of London you want to illustrate whether it's the underground connections. Whether it's even the house prices in the different areas. So you can use different versions of the mat to the straight your point and the power of the periodic table is that you can have different versions illustrate also different properties of the elements melting points, whether they metals gases and say one an each person will be slightly different. In the appearance, but the relative positions of all the elements to thank. Thanks. There's aluminum selenium and hydrogen oxygen and nitrogen nickel neodymium neptunium germanium and iron Ruthenian uranium. Table has even been immortalized in music by the American satirical, song writer and mathematician, Tom Lehrer, but as layer noted for most of the time since its discovery, the most interesting thing about Mendel table has been it's unknown. These are the only ones which the news has come to Harvard, and then maybe many others, but they haven't been discovered. Seventeen element discovered since I got my first periodic table school and in nineteen sixty one. So that's about one every four years since I started studying chemistry. It's really quite exciting that it is. Living organisms you like, and I hope for soon that the team led by urea Guinness Dubna will discover new element hundred nineteen hundred twenty and that would really be quite a theoretical breakthrough. Because it would show that we had broken into a new hairier of the periodic table in theory. It's actually pretty easy thing. All you have to do is take to lighter nuclei and fused together to make every relevant. That's Jacqueline gates. She leads the heavy element nuclear and radio chemistry group at Berkeley lives in California. Researchers there have been credited with discovering sixteen elements over the last century, including the aptly named California and Berkeley in practice since a little bit more complicated than that nuclei are very small in still trying to smash to atoms together. Most of. The time you're going to miss with two nuclear. So what we do Berkeley lab is we celebrate beams usually of things like calcium or Tataviam, and we bombard targets that are Imerese him with Tony on something like that. And hope that in this embark -ment two nuclei fuse together, and that we can create a new element or a heavy element that we can study, and how long do these single out of superheavy elements exist for inside the particle accelerator. Not very long, the heavier, you go the shorter is in general have you're making something that's kind of easy to make like element one. Oh, two Nobel it lasts for fifty five seconds on average. If you're trying to make something a little bit harder say wants seventeen or eighteen then you only have a few milliseconds or tens of milliseconds to study before disappears. But if the new elementary Lou. For a moment wide, scientists keep searching for them in creating them. There's multiple reasons. So one is just the quest for figuring out where the pair table ends. What elements exist out there? What are their properties? There are theories that say that as you go heavier, and heavier you should actually be able to break the periodicity of the social down given column you will no longer. See the same chemistry for the heavier isotopes as for their lighter HAMAs part of it is to understand how elements formed stars. We think that these super heavy elements may form in Nova or neutron star mergers something like that. And this is what the hunt for new element sounds like after the discovery of element one eighteen organise on the international. Consensus was that current methods had been exhausted bigger better accelerators were needed. If scientists were to hope to extend the table to its eighth period. The eighth wrote down from the top our correspondent, Noah Sneider visited flea rob labs into not just outside Moscow. Where researchers hope they've created the means to push the table beyond its current limits from northern. This isn't any old particle accelerator. This is flare of superheavy element factory. A brand new sixty million dollar research facility built to test the borders of the periodic table of elements. It's a futuristic room size structure, anchored around a massive Magni that bans accelerates particles and central chamber at full speeds, new accelerator ought to produce beams ten to twenty times more intense than previous models. Nineteen years will help be happy. Produced one atoms. Was still okay. What will happen is one week at one hundred was produced one month's creating today. Superheavy element factory. We make not one day. But. The urea going John is lead. Scientists of the fear of lab now in his eighties. He's been working here since nineteen fifty six if his name sounds familiar to should gonna is the only living person to have had an element named after him element one eighteen one nineteen would be next in this crucial. But the just the hand the new one Moylan does keep you. Super formation. You know, we actually made the one night way would be to the capital. Because for both of you believe me of existence seems to us firms Diori that will very closely today when around one eighteen I took in the world one twenty three or twenty four connote close from your perspective in the laboratory, do you feel the connections, Mandalay of his work to fill yourself, a part of the same historical continuum? Today. Steal alive. Programme to to get the answer to this question would reserve in. The the homemade element in experiment. The next generation may find that on.

Moscow California London Berkeley professor of chemistry United Nations university of Nottingham honorary professor Harvard Tom Lehrer Martin HAMAs Jacqueline gates Beijing Diori writer Lou Noah Sneider Mandalay Moylan
"noah sneider" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

09:47 min | 2 years ago

"noah sneider" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

"And as I was mentioning before right around the corner ideas are tech fifty awards October twenty fifth at the wind. And this is like our twenty second year doing tech fifty. I know an, and you know, it's great. And the categories are hard because one of the things about Pittsburgh. That's actually very different than a lot of other cities is that we don't have like one deep sector. Exactly, we've got many cool sectors. I mean, we cut across everything, I know. That's why I think we've been so lucky of the past thirty five. Yeah. A little bit. Everything kinda mix really is think about materials about autonomous vehicles. Artificial intelligence. Machine learning all of that has been. Heavily research and now percolated into companies tackling. And so it almost affords the opportunity that if you want to be in Pittsburgh, and you want to work almost on anything. Can now evening when build a birdhouse company. Anything? I mean, listen not long ago. I was with a company called near earth autonomy. And they're doing really interesting things as well. And in the aerospace industry, that's a whole other area. That's going to be able to blow up for our reasons about that. And is like Astro botic going to move noon? It's like, oh my goodness. It's it's just crazy. So tech fifty as you mentioned we have different categories because we don't have one big deep category. Pittsburgh, we have many different categories and this year, actually, Audrey added a new category as I look it to just go we have artificial intelligence in robotics. As our news category for this year. I was really excited about because it seems like Pittsburgh's making a ton of headlines internationally when it comes to AI in robotics. And we were rated the most second most livable city with number one being Honolulu. What? Yeah. Yeah. It's kind of fun. Yeah. Every second best makes the Honolulu. All right. I mean, listen, here's the deal. Had a couple of thing when I love just getting exposure, right? Pittsburgh in the headlines under positive stuff. So so are are robotics category. This year, Audrey, let's talk about some of the finest this year. So we have pets them Aurora innovations in Boston Nova like these are what's called these are very diverse even within their field here. I think is kind of interesting there in diverse markets in their diverse problems. Exactly. We also have advanced robotics for manufacturing the arm institute in rapid flow technologies and average so let's start with Boston Nova company. It's been around for a while. And they've pivoted many time. They have. Yeah. Remember when they started in toys Pemba in primate, right? Where the two kind of robotic that they had that was great. I remember my dog used to be able to open up the standard of Obama in the mini Pemba would come out and would wireless. To get it out. Do that anymore. No now when you talk about a company that's pivot really found their way in. In the market daily in the market working with WalMart. I believe well, I mean, if you just forget about the companies that they work for but actually being able to go up and down the aisles to make sure that things are stocked. Right. And you know, looking at all the skews and making sure that their Stockton. It's really hard for human to do that to do that. Right. And it's also very repetitive monotonous, and it also has a lot of bending picking doing picking and then replacing is not necessarily the best way to us. Exactly. Right. Exactly, I know people get scared by that people get scared, and they're like, oh, I can know some of these jobs are not great job. Now, we can create opportunities better. Right. Exactly. So Boston Nova in the running as a finalist now. What about Aurora innovation? I mean. Jeez, come on. That's a fascinating company at the end of the day. You're talking about Thomas vehicles here. Right. I mean, that's a it's a big deal. The more. I the more and more in behind the wheel. And I like you car gal or guy, right? Yeah. And I've been seeing the Aurora cars around lately to something. I I wouldn't seem to many Aurora cars. Yeah. It's time for Thomas vehicles. You wrote something about that one time. Yes. People to get their hands off their hands off. It's not getting safer. No, it's not it's not. There are more accidents with all the safety features. I think it just makes us a little more. Like, hey, it's going to be taken care of. But in our lives are much more busy, silver multitasking. Right. Exactly. And think about all the people that are using phones while they're driving GPS people drew the appropriate card. It'd be mourned actually driving. Oh, I see. That's all I'm saying. Carla. Get it. But I also get the fact that people driving around with a ton of steel gotta be a little little dangerous dangerous someone's going to laugh at us. Hundred years from now, they're gonna say remember all those transportation systems and all the death. What's with you? Exactly. So Audrey so from robotics to life sciences. So we have a life sciences category this year as well, which I think is really exciting. And our finals, and there are Phillips. Aerial precision medicine can image enforced devices in you can see the diversity even within the life sciences category. We have diversity within diversity when it comes these companies, Audrey and Philips is as now making a a move into the city now, I know there can you moving into east liberty right behind victory square. Jan one to maybe I think so it's three and they're talking about like a thousand people are moving in. I got to tell you when I go to Phillips. I'm blown away by the kinds of products that they actually have designed and brought to market. I can't even it's amazing. It's amazing absolutely everything driven Phillips toothbrush. I to humans a toothbrush. Electric. I've got one of those of traditional manual style. Co gates myself, but I know they make gravy. You got one of those. Yeah. With all my dental problems. I thought I might as well. Invest in something right? Very very cool so outside life science. So do we have so many categories? It's like unbelievable, and I can get to the mall because we're we're going to spread this out over many many shows you little bit that on October twenty fifth if you get your tickets in time, you can learn all about these companies mingle with them celebrate them because they're all doing such great work we've manufacturing category this year, Audrey, we do we do. And it's an actually that category is an honor of Kerr. Trae Lescott is the third third someone who was a big supporter of the work that we all do here and unfortunately passed away a few years ago. And so we created an award in his name. I love the fact that we did that because it's great to be able to honor some great work of folks like that in this category. We have watt fuel cell, which is an amazing company. Did it on the show before Marie had came on the show talking about how they actually digitally print the parts to make fuel cells. I think it's so exciting. That's when we were at the energy innovation institute. Exactly. Exactly. So he's bringing the cost of things down. You can actually through companies like people's gas put them in your basement in Crete electricity from natural gas. And I think that is really really cool guys relocated here from New York day. Did he bought the company's making it happen here? Got about a minute left about one last category. Audrey real fast talk quickly about our CEO category this year. Right. Absolutely. So we have a, you know, of course, Theresa Hebrew from inter Vala, really cool manufacturing out there. They're making circuit boards, and all that kind of great stuff and Jim Glaspy. He's been on our show is well to from from gray matter, and we'll have all these people on our show throughout the year. That's the whole point man because these are the men and women that are making it happen here. Pittsburgh and real fast. The last four in his category or Barbara van Kirk from IQ Inc. Brendan Carroll from sky says he's a startup entrepreneur interface materials is Noah Sneider. And of course, we have Jessica Gibson from aerial precision medicine. So I don't know. I can't wait because you know, this is my favorite time of the year. I know it is these it's like the one we get all these folks in one room to celebrate. And I it's hard to say we're picking winners on any of these guys. Because in my opinion, these everyone who's been named a finalist has done some seriously, great work, and we're there to honor it in and have some fun with it. So good PG h dot org. Learn all about the finalists there. We got some some background on each every one of them. And register for the event if you can because it sells out every year Audrey last year, we have like close to seven or people. It was pretty pretty amazing. It gets bigger and bigger. So we'll keep it happening. It's great simple that you got a lot of tech five in front of us. Rumor has it that we have Tyler pal calling in Tyler. Yes, he's a good, dude. He said he's he's got a lot of kids right now. So he is busy cheese. He's trying to run a business. Oh my goodness. Feeding solutions to under anyone exactly. So hang on for that one right back after this quick break. This is Jonathan cursing, and this is Audrey so and we are from the Pittsburgh technology council. Learn more about us at PG tech dot org. Fly on over to Twitter at PG h tech. Homer jesse. Hey, did you guys know that kids who play sports.

Audrey Pittsburgh Aurora Honolulu Boston Phillips PG tech Obama toys Pemba Thomas Astro WalMart Boston Nova mini Pemba arm institute Stockton Pittsburgh technology council