38 Burst results for "Noah"

Fresh update on "noah" discussed on Sudhir Breaks the Internet

Sudhir Breaks the Internet

01:12 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "noah" discussed on Sudhir Breaks the Internet

"I want to tell you a story about a friend and a colleague of mine. His name is noah feldman one afternoon. Back in twenty. Eighteen noah was taking a bike ride in the hills around palo alto california. He was visiting from the east coast. The bike ride was a little break from seeing friends. And doing is meetings. But no is not your average mountain biker. He's a constitutional law professor at harvard and one of the country's best he even helped to draft iraq's interim constitution so as no was cranking around the hills of old honda road he was thinking about a company with its headquarters nearby. Maybe you can guess. He was thinking about facebook. I happen to be staying with my friend. Sheryl sandberg who. I went to college with her. And she's the co or facebook but not for anything to do with facebook. I was just out there and it was nice to see her. No was thinking a lot about the relationship between his field constitutional law and the struggle that platforms have keeping people safe online. Think about the social media companies the more they grow the more content their users post not all the content is going to be so nice and friendly and when you get more content. You're bound to get more hateful speech as well. It's just really hard to keep all the bad stuff off the platforms. It's always an uphill battle for these social media companies and not unlike the uphill battle that noah found himself on during his bike that it was much too hard for me. And i had that you know oxygen deprivation field that you get when you're trying to climb hills too hard for you and i was sort of in my mind and one part of that was trying to figure out how the social media companies were themselves dealing with the challenges. A free speech. It's not the question of how governments were dealing with them and free speech but how they were thinking about it internally no hyperventilating about to give and sure enough it worked and i had an idea and the idea that came into my mind was that facebook.

Sheryl Sandberg Noah Feldman Eighteen Palo Alto California Facebook Noah Honda Road Harvard One Part Iraq Twenty Coast Afternoon ONE
Stories About Mothers, Featuring Trevor Noah

Fresh Air

01:58 min | 3 d ago

Stories About Mothers, Featuring Trevor Noah

"Sunday is mother's day and we're going to listen back to some great stories about mothers. we begin with. trevor noah. Host of comedy central's the daily show. He south african the son of a black mother and white father. Their relationship was legal. Under apartheid which mandated separation of the races noah grew up during the apartheid and post apartheid errors. He became famous in south africa as a comic and tv personality and spent years traveling. The world doing standup. He talked terry in two thousand sixteen. So racial identity is a big part of your comedy. When you're doing stand up. Your father is white. Your mother is black. Your father is i. Think of swiss and german ancestry. Do i have that right. And your mother sosa casa. Thank you. I don't think i can do that. And i know your mother was jailed briefly. I hope in south africa. I assume four for opposing apartheid for doing some kind of dissenting action. Yes well the sensing action was being with a white person. Who was the white person your father. The s he was jailed so no no no. no white. people didn't get jailed for that. That was Why people were warned not to do it again. But then if you're a black person called fraternizing across country boundaries. Then then you'd be arrested but my mom. My mom opposed the system as a whole so. She never let that stand in her way. You know and i. I think i pick up a lot of i. I have a lot of my mom's demeanor is that she never even even when she told me the story. She wasn't an angry she just went. It's it's a stupid thing. And so i refuse to listen to. Its but she never came at it from a place of anger. If anything should defied it and she didn't she didn't give it the credibility that it was trying to create in in the world

Trevor Noah Sosa Casa South Africa Terry
Fresh update on "noah" discussed on Orlando's Evening News

Orlando's Evening News

01:07 min | 6 hrs ago

Fresh update on "noah" discussed on Orlando's Evening News

"Welcome. Yet it may provide the movie conquistador. The All that's left genius Pier Della Promo. Saldana said this morning that Sarah cargoes, activist woman telephone Select limiter on telephone gratis, pulling a con Camilla here excluding post to the rent party in Parliament. DataPlay contrast 16 SBC drama Travertine Marble Toronto Come, Sabia Cholesterol is maybe causality miracles, a principle the more established amigos. Ramallah. Practicum Erica result in Daniel's Killer Repented point ineffectiveness part simply wrestle any particular person. She's going to feel the dealer orders many calls into the HRC will convince us, you know. Come on. Thomas. Economic Experiencing Castle, Democratic America America, The victim is a comedian. Look at this piece of gum. Actually, people accumulate Morgan Morgan so much Nothing. My granduncle. Precocious Potter. Richard controls Ponderosa is not a number. No, no, it's very much existing plus percent of Amanda. The National Council. I kept capital for killing against Paris. The city of God was going to come. Stomach is believing. I think Quatro Blaster Mana, but you seemed so simple solution to come, Abbiamo, said. Your mother, Mr Oficinas, Orlando, El Portavoz. Noah's abogado looking.

Richard Saldana Thomas Abbiamo Sarah Cargoes Noah Amanda Camilla Sabia Ponderosa Ramallah Quatro Blaster Mana Erica This Morning Oficinas Precocious Potter Toronto SBC El Portavoz Daniel's Killer
Concerts Are the Best Kind of Medical Experiments

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

02:22 min | Last week

Concerts Are the Best Kind of Medical Experiments

"Without herd immunity society is bound to start reopening so over in the uk researches trying to figure out what kind of events people can go to without causing the virus to stop spreading out of control again and the way they are trying to figure it out just maybe the greatest science experiment of all time live. Music is starting to make a comeback as a way to track krona virus progress. The english city of liverpool hosted a one off music festival yesterday to test whether such events spread the virus about five thousand people ditched face coverings and social distancing rules to attend outdoor event. And they just had to test negative for covert i and agree to follow up. Tests and five days data from the festival will be used by the governments of research program to help understand the effects of crowds on the spread of the virus. And the festival's organizers says. He hopes the project will help get outdoor events back on the calendar this year all year a concert. That's my kind of medical experiment of louis. Pasteur in bullshit with a dog. The best part of it is no one court covert but sadly one hundred people did. Come down with indian. But that's right. Thousands of people showed up to a concert and the purpose was to see see if they would catch covert which must be honest. Doesn't seem like a real idea right. That seems like some are ruled that happened. You can get it right fire and if you ask me i think an experimental concert is a great idea. Not just for covert. I mean you can test for all sorts of things you can test for the effect of constantly dropping. The beats can finally find out. Does that hurt. The beat can the be even feel pain and will the beat be able to go on. One of the most here is how many volunteers they got to submit to medical experimentation. Just because they wanted to see a concert. I mean you realize this means. They could ramp up experimental on everything just based on. Who's performing can we. Please take your kidneys. We need to test something. What no we'll give you tickets to be on say. Oh my god take them both. Toby answer their mind telling their my kidneys. Maybe she'll say about the

Herd Immunity Society Liverpool UK Louis Toby
Fresh update on "noah" discussed on Big Al and JoJo

Big Al and JoJo

00:34 min | 7 hrs ago

Fresh update on "noah" discussed on Big Al and JoJo

"Away news radio time. 3 31 Our top story in his third try. Elin Vaal Ving. The death of a state Trooper and Douglas County, A trucker has been found guilty on two of three charges. Trooper Cody Donaghy was killed while investigating an accident in 2016 Noah Gammas Ruiz was convicted of failing to pass an emergency vehicle and failing to stay in Alain Gomez Ruiz will be sentenced at the end of July. The maximum penalty 12 months in jail. After just two years to you is moving on from President Mark Kennedy. Kennedy says in a statement that a new university board makeup has led to changes in the board's focus and philosophy here. See spokesman Ken McConnell log majority on the board of Regions for the past several decades has been a Republican majority and last November That majority flips or not, said Democratic Majority. McConnell. Log says Kennedy will leave sometime this summer. Newly drafted Broncos Ricky Patzer Tan will get his wish The Broncos will allow him to wear his college jersey number, which is number two during his draft day news conference with the Broncos. Certain was wearing number two hearings, rain likely to stay with us today and then keep part of the forecast. Goes to arraign still mixed tonight through the night into the morning hours tomorrow. That's Fox 31 meteorologist Chris Tomer. Our next news updated four o'clock I'm Cathy Walker on K O a news radio 8:50 a.m. and 94 1 of them now, except on traffic..

Alain Gomez Ruiz Ken Mcconnell Cathy Walker Noah Gammas Ruiz Chris Tomer 2016 Elin Vaal Ving Ricky Patzer Tan Broncos Mcconnell 12 Months Today Kennedy Last November 8:50 A.M. TWO Tonight Four O'clock End Of July Republican
Pimp My Language

Stand Up

02:06 min | 2 weeks ago

Pimp My Language

"What americans have done with the language you guys have just while you've just done something you've put twenty twos on the english language. He's got rid of this pimp my language. That's what you've gone with. You know. I don't understand chatting to this woman downtown. Though the day she came up to me and she wanted me to see something. I don't know what though she was like. Oh my god look over ther look over. What's she's like. Oh the other. Look at that. Her and i said her she's like no har har two of them. I understand nothing. Even the small words just pronunciation small things that. Get you by for instance. I pronounce the opposites of ankle. As aren't i say my arts out here. You say my aunt which to me is an insect which made me look like an ass when my friend told me his aunt died house. Like so what. There's tons of those out there way to end the friendship. I couldn't get helped the other day when searching for a battery for my remote control. Because that's what. I say battery small form of power in america. You say battery which to me is a different form of power sponsored by chris brown. And you know what's understand. We live on different sides of the globe. So it's fine. The language will evolve. This is something. I've come it. But i hope i change one thing in your hearts forever. Just one thing. And that's is that animal in the wild. It looks like a horse. It has black and white stripes. Do me a favor from now on. It's not zebra. Okay it's zebra just like it's not deborah. It's debra structure of word plus you cannot name them because you do not have them

Chris Brown America Deborah
Wet Notes - 4-23-21

Scuba Shack Radio

06:50 min | 2 weeks ago

Wet Notes - 4-23-21

"This is wet notes for april twenty third. Two thousand twenty one here on scuba shack radio. I up just after i recorded. The last episode president biden released his two thousand and twenty two budget. Well if you're a fan of the national oceanic and atmospheric administration or noah. You'll be happy in the budget. Proposal released on april ninth. The president proposed a record budget of six point. Nine billion dollars for knowing now. How does that compare well. This year knows budget is four point. Six billion wow. that's big increase. This budget really supports taking action. On climate change protecting marine mammals the ocean great lakes and coastal communities. If you recall the previous administration has proposed cutting knows budget only to have it restored by congress. Now this is just a first step in the budget proposal. It has a long way to go to get congressional approval. But i think it's a very good first step now. Here's something that's really interesting. I read this in the cayman compass online. It's about a grand cayman. Northside family found a message in a bottle. Yeah on easter. i think it was. The family was out walking on a remote part of the island. A place called the parrot sanctuary. I think this is on the east end. Well that's where patricia dacosta her family recovered an emerald colored bottle with a handwritten message inside the note said thrown into the ocean on six december. Two thousand and seventeen somewhere between the bahamas and florida. If you find this drop us a line and let us know where it ended up. Signed by darren and shannon from evansville illinois and it gave them their email address so patricia them with the news and now darrin shannon are planning to visit grand cayman at some point as for the bottle. The dacosta family's planning to put their own note in the same bottle and send it back out to see what an incredible journey. It's here the second quarter edition of the journal of diving history magazine. It arrived in the mail just after the last show. This latest additions cover story was written by chris. Cole and it is about the divers who worked on the edgewater disaster. It was one of the worst maritime disasters in us history. I'll leave it at that and you can do some of your own research but it was a really interesting article. There's also an interview in the edition. Done by michael newdow with dick rakowski and he's dubbed. The father of nighthawks again. Some really interesting stuff. I highly recommend that you take a look at the historical diving. Society's website if you become a member you'll get the journal mail to you every quarter a pleasant surprise in your mailbox. I received an email from a friend a few weeks ago with the subject line serenity so who can't use a little serenity how about serenity now well it turns out that my friend was asked by our son to watch him cameras for a school project. These live cams were from the monterey bay aquarium so i went to the link and it took me to their landing page for nine different cameras. I'm not going to list them all right now. But you can peek. In on their penguins. Sea otters were moon jellies. There's even a camera for monterey bay itself personally. I like to observe my sealife while diving but these live cams from monterey bay aquarium can fill in and provide that little bit of serenity. Now here's something interesting. That came in from shearwater. You know the makers of the dive computers. They have a contest. It's going to be starting up. In may called the spring shopping spree and the winner will get four thousand nine hundred ninety nine dollars shopping spree at the dive shop of their choice. And here's how it works if you purchase the shearwater in april or if you buy one in may you can register for the contest with their online portal with a proof of purchase. But you don't have to buy a computer to participate. You also be able to register by completing a short fifty word essay on why you like shearwater computers. The lucky winner will be selected at the end of may. And it's another great way to support your local dive shot. Thanks your water for doing this. And finally there was a short article from patty on april twentieth about their meeting with the maldivian government to confirm the protection for sharks. There was some speculation out there that the maldivian government might be lifting the shark fishing ban in their countries waters. Well this can't be good over ten years ago. Patty along with others helped to establish this current protection so the patty staff met with the moldavian ministry of fisheries marine reserves and agriculture's lead zaha wahid. Well here's some good news here at the meeting minister while he said that they were committed to sustainable and responsible management on april twentieth the ministry released a statement that said the maldives does not intend to permit a targeted shark. Fishing in the mouth. These great job. Patty in great job maldives for protecting these critical apex predators. Well that's it for wet notes. For

Patricia Dacosta Darrin Shannon Dacosta Monterey Bay Journal Of Diving History Maga National Oceanic And Atmospher Michael Newdow Dick Rakowski Biden Northside Grand Cayman Evansville Bahamas Darren Shannon Patricia Congress Cole
Senior Engineer at Uniswap, Noah Zinsmeister, Explains Liquidity Pools

Software Engineering Daily

01:25 min | 2 weeks ago

Senior Engineer at Uniswap, Noah Zinsmeister, Explains Liquidity Pools

"No welcome to the show. Thanks for having me jeff. You're on unit. Swap yuna swap is a liquidity pool. Can you explain what that means definitely so it uses some traditional financial words by a very traditional setting so what a liquidity pool is is a smart contract which is a piece of code that lives on the therion blockchain and this smart contract dictates how people can interact with it and the rules that people have to abide by if they want to participate with it and so a liquidity pool allows users to come to the table with some assets to assets in our case in sap and they can give those assets to the smart contract the smart contract then make them available for trading so other users can come to the smart contracts in one asset in exchange for another at some price and again the pool dictates both house. The user you know the price the user is getting when they're trading asset for us at be as the rewards and the you know the potential upside for the liquidity provider. And so there you know. There's there's fees that are being collected in the assets that are being traded and so those. Those fees accrue as additional tokens at the liquidity provider and then withdraw at a later date and so ultimately a liquidity smart contract. Where on the rules of the system are dictated not by an individual or an institution but rather just by code and then participants are free to interact with it in a way that they see fit.

Jeff
Keep Breathing: Avoiding Hypoxia with the McMurray Enhanced Airway

Outcomes Rocket

02:15 min | 2 weeks ago

Keep Breathing: Avoiding Hypoxia with the McMurray Enhanced Airway

"I have to magnificent nurse leaders with us. I i've got roxanne mcmurray. She has been a nurse for thirty five years in practicing anesthesia around thirty. She is the inventor of the mcmurray enhanced airway and also the co founder of mcmurray. Medical group mcmurray is a retired. Clinical assistant professor insistent program director in the nurse anesthesia program in the graduate school of nursing at the university of minnesota mcmurray. I also have on the podcast today. Noah hendler he is a nurse practitioner healthcare technologist and strategist who helped value-based episodic care models initiating some of the nation's first bundled payment programs he served on the front lines in busy urban trauma centers lead clinical informatics work through post acute settings and helped deliver new levels of transparency for both medication. Reconciliation anna hearings. Noah's co founder of sun sale and roxanne is also very involved in the organization. And today i am just privileged to have both of you on the podcast. It's a pleasure to have you both and so nurses are at the center of everything we do. This campaign has been such an education for me and i know for the listeners. To over fifty percent of care provided to everyone is from a nurse cova shots are coming from nurses. You guys are so important and we appreciate and love and value us. I want to start by saying that. Also wanna know what is it that inspires you in this work so go ahead. Let us know what that is actually saw. I think it's important to underscore your point. That nurses really are the largest workforce healthcare and. That's something that is overlooked off and something that has definitely become central to my work. I entered healthcare as the second career after the death. Good friend that he wasn't when he died cernan. Apart of meeting meagerly. I felt address. Nothing releasing to much and i kind of drifted further away from where i begun my career working directly with people actually photographing looked at rhonda. Kids were survivors of the genocide. Hasn't success evolving software but in the wake my friends death. I just felt like i needed to contribute in a more direct

Roxanne Mcmurray Mcmurray Graduate School Of Nursing Noah Hendler Anna Hearings Noah's Co Sun Sale University Of Minnesota Roxanne Cernan Rhonda
Japan to Start Releasing Fukushima Water Into Sea in Two Years

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

00:20 sec | 3 weeks ago

Japan to Start Releasing Fukushima Water Into Sea in Two Years

"Japanese officials say in two years they will start releasing radioactive water from the crippled fukushima nuclear plant into the sea. The waters been accumulating at the site since it's meltdown in two thousand eleven after a massive earthquake and tsunami both china and south korea. Say they've got grave concerns over this move but japan insists the water is

Earthquake Tsunami South Korea China Japan
Matt Gaetz Reportedly Sent $900 to an Ally Now Accused of Sex Trafficking

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

01:06 min | Last month

Matt Gaetz Reportedly Sent $900 to an Ally Now Accused of Sex Trafficking

"Matt gaetz florida congressman and fraternity brother. Who wants to show you something in his room under fire since news broke of him being under investigation over possible sex trafficking but like a karen in boston bodyworks. He refuses to back down tonight. Florida congressman matt gates defiant. I'm built for the battle. And i'm not going anywhere. The house ethics committee. Launching a new bipartisan investigation into gates examining allegations of sexual misconduct elicit drug. Use and accusations of the congressman may have shared inappropriate and explicit images on the house floor. The justice department investigating whether gates and his associate. Joel greenberg paid women who were allegedly recruited online for sex and travel according to the daily beast gates sent. Joel greenberg nine hundred dollars in too late night then. Mo transactions in two thousand eighteen greenberg use the same app to send three young women including one who had recently turned eighteen varying sums of money that amounted to nine hundred dollars. Greenberg made the payments to the three young women with the descriptions tuition school and school.

Matt Gaetz Matt Gates Joel Greenberg House Ethics Committee Gates Florida Boston Justice Department Greenberg
Top Senate Republican slams corporate activism over Georgia law

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

01:11 min | Last month

Top Senate Republican slams corporate activism over Georgia law

"There's also big news concerning the fallout from georgia's new laws restricting voter access major league baseball announced. July's all star. Game will be played in denver following its removal from atlanta in protest of the georgia law. Today senate republican leader mitch. Mcconnell traditionally a big supporter of corporate free speech slammed companies like coca cola and delta for speaking out against the law republicans by and pla on planes and drink coca cola too. So what. I'm saying here is i think this is quite stupid to jump in the middle of a highly controversial issue particularly when it got facts. Wrong i'm not talking about political contributions. Most of them contribute to both sides. They have political action committees. That's fine it's legal to appropriate. I support that. I'm talking about taking a position on a highly incendiary and punish in a community or state. Because you don't like a particular law that. I just think it's stupid

Georgia Cola Mcconnell Mitch Baseball Denver Coca PLA Atlanta Senate Delta
The Dark Side Of Porn

Dear Sugars

01:57 min | Last month

The Dark Side Of Porn

"Most professionals in the field do not classify porn addiction as a mental disorder. And i think that. That's still in flux too. When i was doing that research. What i found is some people say well. It is like a gambling addiction or it is like this or in other people would say no no. It's a different thing. But one thing that these doctors and researchers agree on. And certainly i think you and i agree on is it. It is whether we it's an addiction or not whether it's classifiable mental disorder or not it does become a problem in a certain percentage of people's lives people who start to use it excessively. Who feel that. They are using it in some ways to distance themselves from from others or who. Who can't you know Have erotic relationships or people who are partners with somebody who's using it accessibly And that's in some way impacted their intimacy. You know. that's where we're really talking today and we're going to have some help talking about this issue because it's something frankly i don't have any first hand experience with and and it sounds like you. You know you do use pornography sometimes but it at least you know any ground way. Hasn't become a problem in life. We're going to talk to noah church who has had a problem with it in the past. He started using porn when he was nine years old. Okay that scares me. I want to ask them about that. Has its own us. That's right my daughter is about to turn eleven. my son is. He struggled with porn addiction until he quit using porn at the age of twenty four. He's the author of the book wack addicted to internet porn and he runs the website addicted to internet porn dot com and again. I'll say when we use that word porn addiction to on today's episode. We're not suggesting it's an official mental disorder. We're suggesting that porn can be a difficult experience for people who use it excessively and this is the way that we're using that terminology so no it just happens to be here in the studio with us today. Welcome to dear sugar. Radio noah. welcome. Thank you so much. It's such a pleasure to be

Noah Church
Former NFL Player Kills Doctor and His Family in Murder-Suicide

Mike Gallagher

01:45 min | Last month

Former NFL Player Kills Doctor and His Family in Murder-Suicide

"Player apparently shot and killed a well known doctor, his wife, two grandchildren and somebody working in the home in Rock Hill, South Carolina before turning the gun on himself a horrifying scene. Philip Adams was a player with the Seahawks, the 40 Niners, the Raiders and the Jets. He opened fire at the home in Rock Hill late Wednesday afternoon. Killed in the shooting. Dr Robert Leslie, who was a well known emergency room. Advocate and author and physician. His wife, Barbara, was 69 2 of their grandchildren. Nine year old Ada Leslie and five year old Noah Leslie were all killed. Ah, fifth victim 38 year old James Lewis. It was working at the home at the time was also fatally shot. Adams died by suicide. And earlier today we took a call from a listener in rock Hill listening to us on W. R H i Bobby, who said that he just lived a short proximity to the Leslie home and what Bobby has heard is that the former NFL player had been given prescription drugs by Dr Leslie Dr Leslie said. According to this caller, and we weren't we aren't able to corroborate her. Verify this with the caller said that the what he has heard is that Dr Lesley stopped prescribing the drugs, saying that the player the former player, Philip Adams, needed to seek help. That the prescription medication could no longer be prescribed. And Philip Adams allegedly in a rage slaughtered doctors, Dr Leslie And his entire family before committing suicide. A

Philip Adams Rock Hill Dr Robert Leslie Ada Leslie Noah Leslie Niners Seahawks James Lewis Raiders South Carolina Jets Bobby Dr Leslie Dr Leslie Barbara Dr Lesley Adams Leslie NFL Dr Leslie
Carbon dioxide levels highest they've been in 3.6 million years

Bloomberg Daybreak

00:34 sec | Last month

Carbon dioxide levels highest they've been in 3.6 million years

"Says carbon dioxide and methane emissions went up in 2020. Despite coronavirus lockdowns, Ryan Shook explains. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration explained the global surface average for CEO to went up by 2.6 parts per million last year. It represented the fifth highest rate of increase in Noah's 63 year record. The agency also noted CEO to levels are now higher than at any time in the past 3.6 million years. As for methane, it saw its largest annual increase recorded since systematic measurements began nearly four decades ago.

Ryan Shook National Oceanic And Atmospher Noah
Capitol Police Officer William Evans will lie in honor at US Capitol

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:33 sec | Last month

Capitol Police Officer William Evans will lie in honor at US Capitol

"The capitol police officer killed last week during an attack will be recognized for his sacrifice. Police officer william. Billy evans died. Friday after a man rammed his car into a barricade near the capital house. Speaker nancy pelosi and senate majority leader. Chuck schumer say. The eighteen year veteran of the force will lie in honor. In the capitol rotunda on april thirteenth. Do the pandemic only invited guests will be allowed inside the driver of the car. Twenty five year. Old noah green was shot on the scene and died. Investigators are focusing on his mental health. They tried to determine a motive for the

Billy Evans Capitol Police Speaker Nancy Pelosi Chuck Schumer Capitol Rotunda William Senate Noah Green
Washington DC officer to lie in Capitol  Rotunda

Red Eye Radio

00:34 sec | Last month

Washington DC officer to lie in Capitol Rotunda

"U. S. Capitol Police officer killed in the line of duty will lie in honor inside the Rotunda. Capitol Police officer William Billy Evans died Friday after man rammed his car into a barricade near the capital, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer. Say the 18 year veteran of the force will lie in honor in the Capitol Rotunda on April 13th due to the pandemic, only invited guests will be allowed inside the driver of the car. 25 year old Noah Green was shot on the scene and died. Investigators are focusing on his mental health as they try to determine a motive for the

U. S. Capitol Police William Billy Evans House Speaker Nancy Pelosi Majority Leader Chuck Schumer Capitol Police Capitol Rotunda Noah Green Senate
No indication officer in Washington, DC Capitol attack was stabbed, shot

AP 24 Hour News

00:52 sec | Last month

No indication officer in Washington, DC Capitol attack was stabbed, shot

"Motive in last Friday's attack at the U. S. Capitol, were learning more about the victim's injuries, A Capitol police official tells The Associated Press. There's no indication that slain Officer William Billy Evans was stabbed or shot when he and a fellow officer were attacked Friday by a man who rammed his car into them at a checkpoint in the chaotic aftermath. It was thought the suspect might have stabbed Evans after lunching at the officers with a knife. There was also a room More of possible friendly fire, but neither appears to be the case. According to an insider who spoke on condition of anonymity. Investigators are focusing on the mental health of 25 year old Noah Green. The suspect had been suffering from delusions, posting that he believed he was under government thought control and was being watched. He was shot and killed by police Friday. The second officer struck is recovering Jackie Quinn.

U. S. Capitol William Billy Evans Capitol Police The Associated Press Noah Green Evans Jackie Quinn
Streaming music services fighting for your ears

Morning Edition

01:47 min | Last month

Streaming music services fighting for your ears

"Has never been more important. You see in the new world of streaming If an artist can create that perfect single, their song will be streamed billions and billions of times, making them anywhere from 2 to $3. Welcome back to for my Mariana Trail that was comedian Trevor Noah, making a music streaming joke while hosting last month's Grammy Awards ceremony. This hour. We've been talking about artist compensation in the age of music streaming and in the age of the pandemic, I'm talking with Cody Fitzgerald and Josephine Shetty, both co founders of the Union of musicians and Allied Workers. And both musicians themselves. Josh can the CEO at Band Camp and not still going? Oh Sky associate editor here at KQED for KQED Arts So Trevor Noah joke on a stage like the Grammy shows that there's pop culture level awareness enough to make a joke that you know the audience will get nasty. Do you think this could be an inflection point? Culturally, where organizing efforts can maybe move the needle on artist? Compensation? Is this movement that will gain momentum? You think Radio. I think for so long music and art in general, such an individualistic pursue and then also not to mention artist kind of a lot of the time feel pressure to project this image of financial success, which makes it really hard to transparently talk about the economic realities of music. So I think just the fact that artists are building collective power and just talking about how much they make out in the open and identifying as workers is actually a big cultural shift, But I think we'll make this Conversation. Keep progressing. And Eric

Trevor Noah Mariana Trail Cody Fitzgerald Josephine Shetty Union Of Musicians And Allied Kqed Arts Grammy Awards Band Camp Grammy Josh Eric
Capitol Police union urging Congress to increase security after attack

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:55 sec | Last month

Capitol Police union urging Congress to increase security after attack

"Attack that killed a Capitol police officer and injured another. The union that represents Capitol police officers is appealing to Congress to further ramp up security immediately. The head of the union's Labor Committee says they're approaching a crisis in morale and force numbers, NBC four reports. The U. S Capitol Police Force is currently several 100 officers below its authorized force level on Friday. Suspect Noah Green, allegedly ram to Capitol police officers. Killing Officer William Evans. Jason Laforest, a good friend of Officer Evans remembered him two news for he was so proud to be, you know, on that force and to, you know, serve and protect our lawmakers in our country In a bit of good news, the officer injured in Friday's attack. Kenny Shaver was released from the hospital yesterday afternoon, the union leader says after 80 Capitol police officers were seriously hurt during the January 6th insurrection. He's asking for hundreds of new officers to be hired and For those on the force already to be retrained. Bruce

Capitol Police Union's Labor Committee U. S Capitol Police Force Noah Green Jason Laforest Officer Evans William Evans NBC Congress Kenny Shaver Bruce
Washington DC Capitol attacker Noah Green 'suffered delusions'

Radiosurgery New York

00:37 sec | Last month

Washington DC Capitol attacker Noah Green 'suffered delusions'

"Officers outside the U. S Capitol Friday, killing one of the officers, U S official tells AP. Noah Green had been suffering from delusions, paranoia and suicidal thoughts. Police shot the 25 year old after he jumped out of a car knife in hand and charged the two officers he struck. He later died at the hospital, the official tells AP. Investigators have spoken with Green's family and are focused on Mental health as they work to identify a motive. Meanwhile, the officer killed has been identified as William Evans, known as Billy. He was an 18 year veteran of the Capitol police and a member of its first responders unit. And Thomas Washington. Today is Easter

Noah Green AP U. Paranoia William Evans Green Capitol Police Billy Thomas Washington
"noah" Discussed on Deep Background with Noah Feldman

Deep Background with Noah Feldman

05:48 min | 3 months ago

"noah" Discussed on Deep Background with Noah Feldman

"Power to convict in the senate explicitly and under supreme court precedent where the constitution assigns a specific role or function to a branch of government. The courts will not step in and second guests that branch because the court see this is what's called a political question. A question specifically to one of the political branches of government in this case to congress and so the supreme court will not step in to rule on the constitutionality of this it will be left to the senate and the senate's word we'll be final as a constitutional law scholar. What are you watching for in the trial next week. What are you listening foreign in the arguments. i think there are three main defenses. That are likely to be raised. And the first is the one. We've already mentioned the idea that even if trump were guilty it doesn't matter because it's unconstitutional to put him on trial. That argument as i said i think is wrong but it's nice convenient. Excuse if you're republican senator and you want to vote to acquit the president or former president. And you don't wanna go on the record saying you think that the attack on the capital was fine and so it's a very appealing argument and so unquestionably. The second argument is an argument based on free speech on the first amendment and this argument i think is wrong. But it's an argument that does have some value to it and it goes like this it says under the criminal law if you charge someone with incitement to violence which is what. The articles of impeachment charges the president with we have a controlling case called brandenburg against ohio. States the legal standard and that legal standard says the to be convicted of incitement. Your words have to be directed at inciting imminent lawless action and have to have been likely actually to do so now. The latter part is taken care of because the president's words were followed by a criminal act or series of criminal acts in the capital. So the key is were the president's words directed to inciting violence and someone could argue under the standard if the president were criminally charged that he didn't explicitly say that the capital should be breached. Nor is it possible to definitively beyond a reasonable doubt in an ordinary criminal court that he intended to produce imminent lawless action. And if that's all true it's a lot of ifs but if that's all true then you probably couldn't convict donald trump in a criminal court of incitement you're talking about a criminal court but this is the senate so how does this work..

donald trump trump next week congress first three main defenses first amendment second argument second guests republican one senate one of the political branches ohio court
"noah" Discussed on Deep Background with Noah Feldman

Deep Background with Noah Feldman

04:20 min | 3 months ago

"noah" Discussed on Deep Background with Noah Feldman

"I've made it a daily habit. And i hope you will to lots of people have questions about the constitutionality of whether or not it's legal. And if there's any historical precedent to try former president donald trump for impeachment. Since he's no longer in office. I thought i would pose this question to axios. Today's resonant legal scholar. Harvard law. Professor noah feldman. Hi noah island is to be promoted to being a resident at axios feels good good so there is a legal precedent and for this. We have to go back to ulysses s grant secretary of war william balch nap. What did we learn from his case belknap. Who had actually been a civil war hero but was probably not so well. Suited to become secretary of war had through his wife been getting unlawful profits from somebody. He made an appointment for and that was figured out towards the end of the grant administration minutes before he was about to be impeached on the floor of the house. He ran literally. You can't make this stuff up to the white house to resign in. The hopes that he would avoid the embarrassment of being impeached but they impeached him anyway after he'd already resigned. The house impeached him and it went to a trial in the senate. A bunch of senators claimed not a majority but a big number claimed much like a bunch of republicans have already claimed in the senate that you couldn't try him because he was already office a majority said as indeed was also said with respect to trump that they could go far with the trial and ultimately belknap was not convicted by the senate with the people voting not to convict him saying that their reason was not that they thought he wasn't guilty but that they thought it shouldn't be possible to do it. So what you take away from. This is that has been impeached late and then tried in the senate. Yes was that person convicted know. Who's it up to. You guessed it. It's up to the senate the senate gets to make up. Its own mind on this question. But who in the senate like the central question here is can a private citizen. Be impeached right. Like that's the what the constitutionality coast to well. That's the way the trump people would phrase it. I think the managers will face it..

noah feldman trump donald trump Today william balch nap republicans civil war president Harvard law axios Professor noah island senate house
"noah" Discussed on Deep Background with Noah Feldman

Deep Background with Noah Feldman

05:54 min | 4 months ago

"noah" Discussed on Deep Background with Noah Feldman

"It's bad enough that. A reasonable percentage of americans. Now say tell pollsters that they don't believe that joe biden really won the election. I mean that's worrisome. Because put it shows you. Is that lots of people. Don't accept the outcome that has been independently verified by all fifty states including states that are controlled by republicans. So that's scary because you can't really run a democracy in the long run. If lots of the citizens believe that the only outcome they will trust. Is the one where they win. The most fundamental principle of democracy is. I like my candidate. You like your candidate. We vote and we count up the votes. And whoever's candidate got the most votes wins the minute we think now. I don't believe it unless it was my guy. Then the more it's difficult or in fact impossible in the long run to sustain democracy because democracy depends on the idea that the next time around will count the votes and the next time around. The person who gets the most votes will win and so when you break that norm. You can't run elections in the ordinary way that they've been run previously and it's even worse than ordinary people thinking that is elected representatives whose only validity in sitting there is that they ran in elections and got most votes are saying. Oh you can't trust those votes. Including the i should say including people who ran in this election including well which in the case of the house of representatives is one hundred percent of them right all four hundred and thirty five of them ran this election because they have to run for office every two years and so if they think that the votes are skewed and our unfair why should they even be the ones sitting there. So this is very very short. Term thinking on the part of these republicans are going to be objecting because what they're basically doing is undermining their own legitimacy in the democratic system undermining democracy as a whole all in the hopes of pleasing their own constituency and they may be thinking..

joe biden norm house of representatives
"noah" Discussed on Deep Background with Noah Feldman

Deep Background with Noah Feldman

04:34 min | 4 months ago

"noah" Discussed on Deep Background with Noah Feldman

"You for a second here anytime. Can you explain the twelfth amendment and what it says about what's supposed to happen today. What's supposed to happen. Is that all of the states. Have chosen electors. They've each only chosen one slate of electors. They send that slate in on essentially a piece of paper. Both houses of congress meet in joint session. There presided over by the quote president of the senate better known as the vice president. Mike pence mike pence is supposed to read out the votes. They're supposed to be counted. And if as is the case there's a clear majority of them for one. Joe biden joe biden is supposed to become the president and that's how the process is laid out in the constitution and has written that's pretty straightforward except in life. There's always a twist fill the twist. I think maybe we have to go back to like the electoral count act. This is like eighteen eighty seven which is now so important. Can you just sort of explain that process. And how that has. Sort of further elaborated on what we've seen in the constitution. Yeah the twist is what if you can't just so simply add up and count all of the electors who were sent in and the first since that could happen. If for example a state can't get its act together and it sends in two slates of electors one for example sent in by the state legislature. Another sent in by the governor of the state that raises a question for the person. Doing the counting. Which one do you count. And this mess actually happened in eighteen. Seventy six when they were contested. Slates of electors from a couple of different states and as a result we genuinely did not know who the president was after that happened. Congress passed this law in eighteen. Eighty seven to set up rules for what should be done by congress when they came to count the votes and those rules are actually pretty straightforward as written. They say among other things that when there's no multiple slates of electors and that's the case this year. That basically the congressman and vice president actually have to count the electoral who came in. Unless there's some evidence clear reason that they were not real slates of electors that reflect the intent of the electors that were passed or that were lawfully cast. So as written that law would not lead to any weirdness here can we are something you said though i i. Let's just talk about the fact that there are not multiple slates of electors. Every state has met. That is not in contention here correct and in no state today rogue slate of electors get proposed. All electors actually. Are the people actually chosen by the citizens of those states and that's why there are no contested slates of electors in this election but this brings us figures second point that you made..

Mike pence joe biden congress senate legislature
"noah" Discussed on Deep Background with Noah Feldman

Deep Background with Noah Feldman

01:49 min | 4 months ago

"noah" Discussed on Deep Background with Noah Feldman

"noah" Discussed on Deep Background with Noah Feldman

Deep Background with Noah Feldman

02:56 min | 5 months ago

"noah" Discussed on Deep Background with Noah Feldman

"Types of animals and species. That people are very fearful. Would be greatly disrupted by this. Is the author of the axios generate newsletter. One of the most comprehensive sights on slavery is now using technology to help millions of descendants. Learn more about their ancestors is called enslaved dot org and russell contrast xs race injustice reporter is here to tell us all about russell. How was this database different than say industry. Dot com woah answers to dot com. There's a lot of information but there a void on its history of slavery. A lot of people have discovered documents in their own personal research about their own family members. What this website is doing is encouraging people to submit these documents so they can be vetted by scholars and be included in this database. How else does it fill in these holes that are in a lot of family narratives. I took some time was looking at it. And of course you type your own name. And what was shocking is that i found to folks who had my last name who were slave traders. They came from portugal. And as i read them. I realized not only do. I have some as esters were connected to the enslavement of other people. I have connections to people who were enslaved. And so enslave dot org really brings home this legacy wrestle control. I is the race injustice reporter for axios. Thank you russell thank you. Let's end this week with a little story in nineteen eighteen in the middle of that pandemic. A baby was born on a ship carrying immigrants from italy to new york city. Her mother giving but the baby named angelina survived and she still around this year. She turned one hundred into. That's her daughter joanne. Telling her story to cnn. That's because this year angelina. Friedman conquered another pandemic the corona virus. She was admitted to a new york hospital in march where she. I tested positive months later in october. She tested positive again. She's recovered both times and her daughter thinks angelina might just be the oldest person to have survived kovic twice human super human theater and certainly seems that way. Axios today is brought to you. By axios in pushkin industries where produced by carol. Woo nria marquez. Martinez air schilling and naomi. Shaven are mixed. Engineer is alex. Su dim bobkov is executive producer. Sarah haunting goo is our executive editor and special thanks to axios co founder. Mike allen and pushkin are executive producers are tell tamalada in jacob weisberg. We love feedback. Share your thoughts by writing us at podcast at axios dot com or to directly on twitter at nine labou. Thanks for listening. Stay safe and enjoy your weekend..

russell angelina portugal kovic Woo nria marquez joanne Friedman new york city italy cnn Su dim bobkov pushkin axios co new york Martinez naomi carol jacob weisberg Mike allen
"noah" Discussed on Deep Background with Noah Feldman

Deep Background with Noah Feldman

07:50 min | 5 months ago

"noah" Discussed on Deep Background with Noah Feldman

"I wanna give a shout out to mcdonald's for the support of ronald mcdonald house which gives families a home away from home when they travel tough moments like cancer care. Each year ronald mcdonald house. Charities provides space for millions of families spend quality time together during tough moments. They can do that because of your generosity and also because of the generosity of mcdonald's because at the end of the day when you're with your loved ones your home. Mcdonald's serving here. All clad has been making cutting edge cookware for nearly fifty years. Very best of american craftsmanship at a factory and cannons berg. Answering you can find their products in the kitchens of the finest chefs in the kitchens of beginners glad makes cookware that eats evenly quickly and consistently and can withstand a lifetime of meals. Clad helps you feel confident and the elsia. You're preparing for yourself. Those your mother visit glad dot com for more information. Hello deep background. Listeners noah feldman here. I recently started making regular appearances. axios today. The daily news. Podcast from axios. I always have great conversations with hosts nyla boo and i hope i'm able to shed light on the legal issues that are making headlines. Here's my latest interview on axios today. If you like getting smarter faster you can subscribe or listen wherever you get your podcasts. I've made it a daily habit. And i hope you will to welcome to axios today. It's friday december four. Here's how we're making you smarter today. President trump wants to auction drilling rights in alaska's wildlife refuge plus. There's a new genealogy database dedicated to enslaved people in their stories. But i the task of our electoral system is today's one. Big thing on say i a. That was two weeks ago when the wayne county board of canvassers in michigan matt to certify presidential election results in both republican members refused a few hours later the republicans relented there was another vote in the certification happens. It wasn't just these republicans in michigan a republican secretary of state and georgia a republican county supervisor in arizona and republican appointed judges in pennsylvania were among the state and local officials who ended up validating. The voter's choice of joe biden over. Donald trump in the presidential election noah feldman is a constitutional law scholar at harvard and host of the deep background. Podcast from pushkin. No as we talked before the election about your concerns about the democratic process. I wonder in the end. Did it all come down to these few people. Those officials mattered a lot. But it did come down to more than just them had they ultimately gone down the trump rabbit hole. That alone would not have necessarily caused the next steps. That trump was hoping for that would have taken a lot of people but those folks were crucial because had they gone down that road. It was possible that the democratic process would genuinely have unraveled. So would you say is a constitutional law scholar. The process worked. Ultimately the process worked in the sense that we got the right outcome. It's not a process that you or i would have designed in the first place. The good news is the overwhelming majority ninety. Nine point nine percent of state bureaucratic officials actually just did their jobs in the ordinary way. And that's great news. No you and i have also talked in the past about all the unwritten rules that govern our election process. Do you feel like there's been irreparable damage because of the way president trump continues to attack. What an overwhelming majority of government and other officials say was a free and fair election. Major damage has already been done at present. I would not say. The damage is irreparable. But it's only repairable with a lot of work a lot of time and a lot of logic and reason being used against many many many arguments that are really grounded conspiracy theory and they aren't so easy to refute with facts. Work has to be done then. Some of that work can be done by making already a fairly transparent process even more transparent in this day and age. Probably there should be a video camera on every polling place. Every pile of that would help. But it's not enough. There need to be officials were trusted. Public leaders saying the process is legitimate and that starts from the top so in the end. How are you feeling about all of this. I guess what i would say is. Donald trump came close to breaking the norms of the system. In a way that shows the vulnerability of the system and in that sense we learned a lot. About how precarious our constitutional democracy is and. That's very very sobering for anyone whose job like mine is involves looking at the system and judging its strength judging how capable it is so we have a lot of serious challenges that we need to address going forward. Healthman is a constitutional law scholar at harvard. And he's also hosts of the deep background. Podcast from pushkin. Thanks for having me. We'll be back in fifteen seconds with the latest plan to drill for oil in alaska. Welcome back to axios today. The trump administration announced yesterday. It will auction off drilling rights in alaska's arctic national wildlife refuge. Those rights are sold before january twentieth. That's a big step towards drilling in what has been a decades-long battle in the region. What could president-elect. Joe biden due to reverse this once he takes office game is an energy reporter for axios. Then the drilling rents in this area have been fought over for such a long time and you just tell us what's going on here. Yeah that's right and what's happened here. Is that as a result of some. Gop led legislation twenty seventeen the arctic national refuge or the coastal plain of it. A part of it has theoretically thrown open to drilling. What's going to happen now. Is that early in january. They're going to auction these drilling rights to oil companies and that would make it much more difficult but hardly impossible. I should stress for biden to prevent drilling recurring there. So this is a significant step but the fight is hardly over so we know that biden oppose this. What could he do to stop it to some extent their hands are going to be tied. Because lisa's will already been sold but that said there's any number of different levers that the vitamin nutrient could attempt to pull either thwart or at the very least massively slow down this process and that could be anything from no longer. Defending the trump administration's position ongoing litigation over prior parts of this effort they could impose different types of permanent requirements. That would make things very difficult for the industry. That said i do think we will see some level of industry interest in the sale of simply because the resources they are believed to at least potentially be incredibly large. Just tell us about the arctic national wildlife refuge. What kind of ecosystem is it and would it be damaged by drilling yet. Certainly any type of industrial development in the ecosystem is going to have some impacts caused some level of harm now advocates have development. Think that this can be done in a way that is quite manageable and minimizes the risks opponents of its say that's essentially a fantasy that just the level of development that's going to be needed to create well pads pipelines other infrastructure will badly harm and jeopardize the region and this is a very pristine remote and ecologically sensitive place. It's home species including caribou polar bears other.

noah feldman ronald mcdonald mcdonald wayne county board of canvasse trump Donald trump alaska joe biden michigan trump administration berg harvard Mcdonald Healthman cancer matt pennsylvania
"noah" Discussed on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

02:13 min | 6 months ago

"noah" Discussed on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

"Laura <Speech_Music_Male> did. Trevor <Speech_Music_Male> noah. go to college <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> yes. <Speech_Male> Was he supposed <Speech_Male> to be there because he was <Speech_Male> enrolled. No <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> moving <Speech_Male> on. <Speech_Music_Male> What's a day <Speech_Male> behind. The scenes <Speech_Male> at the davis showed like <Speech_Male> it's <Speech_Male> just like <Speech_Male> a group of us we sit around <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> read the <Speech_Male> news and then we'll watch the <Speech_Music_Male> news and then we make <Speech_Male> jokes about the news <Speech_Male> and then we writes about <Speech_Male> those jokes and let me write <Speech_Male> the serious pox onto <Speech_Male> jokes and <Speech_Male> then we put it all together <Speech_Male> and then just <Speech_Male> like this. I speak <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> to <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> why does. Trevor noah <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> always make fun of <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> spirit airlines. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> I don't make fun of <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> spirit. Airlines <Speech_Male> spirit airlines <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> makes fun of themselves. <Speech_Male> I just tell <Speech_Male> you about it. <Speech_Male> Is the daily show <Speech_Male> reasonable way to get <Speech_Male> your political news. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> If you only dedicate <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> twenty minutes a day <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> if you <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> only dedicate twenty <Speech_Music_Male> minutes a day to <Speech_Music_Male> get any new zealand. Yes <Speech_Music_Male> the daily show is the <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> best place for you <Speech_Male> to get your news. Because i don't <Speech_Male> think there's another place you will <Speech_Male> get political <Speech_Male> news in twenty <Speech_Male> minutes <Speech_Male> America's very extreme <Speech_Male> place era. It's <Speech_Music_Male> twenty minutes <Speech_Music_Male> or twenty four <Speech_Male> hours. <Speech_Male> I will give you the short <Speech_Male> version so <Speech_Male> you choose. <Speech_Music_Female> What is in the mugs <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> on <Speech_Male> the daily show. <Speech_Male> Depends who the guest <Speech_Male> is <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> seriously. <Speech_Male> It's actually <Speech_Music_Male> me. <Speech_Music_Male> Why does trevor <Speech_Music_Male> noah host of the daily <Speech_Music_Male> show mainly <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> targets <Speech_Male> donald trump. <Speech_Male> why would the <Speech_Male> host <Speech_Male> of a satirical news <Speech_Male> show <Speech_Male> covered donald <Speech_Male> trump. <Speech_Male> That is a good <Speech_Male> question. <Speech_Music_Male> I guess the question. <Speech_Male> I would ask you is <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> why is <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> donald trump <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the president <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> of the united states. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> Tough one <SpeakerChange> to answer isn't <Speech_Male> it's <Speech_Male> no. Here's here's the <Speech_Male> here's the real answer. <Speech_Male> The daily covers <Speech_Male> the <Speech_Male> president. Or what's happening <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> in politics <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> To say that <Speech_Male> donald trump is the thing <Speech_Male> that is happening in politics <Speech_Male> on <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> anyone else happening in politics. <Speech_Music_Male> Right now <Speech_Male> no. <Speech_Male> It doesn't matter what story <Speech_Male> it is. By the way it's donald <Speech_Male> trump coronavirus <Speech_Male> donald trump trade <Speech_Male> laws donald trump <Speech_Male> travel restrictions. <Speech_Male> Donald trump <Speech_Male> the middle east donald <Speech_Male> trump wildfires <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> donald trump. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> He's involved in everything. He <Speech_Male> involves himself himself <Speech_Male> in everything. So <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> i mean <Speech_Male> the president of the united <Speech_Male> states. But you saying. I shouldn't <Speech_Male> speak about <SpeakerChange> the prisoner. <Speech_Male> The united states is that what you're saying. <Speech_Male> Wow <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> wow <Speech_Music_Male>

donald trump Trevor noah president united states davis America noah.
"noah" Discussed on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

01:56 min | 6 months ago

"noah" Discussed on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

"Imdb he is eight polyglot word. He speaks english. Hossa zulu shoot opera cons and some german. Wow that seems excessive. I understand causal. I don't speak it fluently. My mom just. I don't know she just spoke to me and i'm never learned it. That's weird. I don't really think i speak speak drawn more than i speak on pretty much the same or similar so yeah this is this is mostly true and then some german depending on how so by 'em next when he was young triple was thrown out of a minibus by his mother because she thought the driver from another tribe was trying to kill them. Who wrote this. Why would you it like this. I think it's more trevor. And his mother jumped out of a minibus to save their lives. That's what happened. There just makes like just threw me out. And then she carried on the journey and then we met afterwards. And i was like what happened mom. She's like oh. Yeah my bad as a little paranoid. It began his career in comedy when he was out at a bar in south africa with his cousin and a friend they will both drunk and began heckling a comedian. That's not true. I wasn't drunk. My cousin was on the other hand and he nickeled. the comedian. keyboarding loads was the comedian when the comedian challenge them to come on stage they sent trevor to perform. You went on stage to avoid looking like a scaredy cap and discovered that when he spoke people loft. I'm gonna scaredy. Cat was the reason. I went up to go up because the people said i wouldn't go up so i went up and i'm glad i did. Thank you again born for doing that was a wonderful guy. He told me to try. Submits is a huge fan of roller coasters. I am indeed my favorite thing to do on a roller coaster. Ride with somebody who is the opposite of me. Someone who is not a fan fan of roller coasters. I feel like that.

trevor south africa
"noah" Discussed on Deep Background with Noah Feldman

Deep Background with Noah Feldman

08:02 min | 1 year ago

"noah" Discussed on Deep Background with Noah Feldman

"I don't know that it's polymathic though I mean for me. There is a central theme. That runs through all of the books that I've written and a lot of my other work and that is constitutions. The deep question being how to human beings get together to govern themselves when they pick the structures of how they're going to govern themselves not just the day to day. Who'S UP? Who's down partisan politics? But how are they going to organize power and you know my book about Madison was about the single greatest genius in the last five hundred years in the world on that question so that was the central theme for me there and even when I was reading about the? Us and China. I wrote extensively about whether China was developing a set of constitutional norms with a new method for transitioning for government in and out that would enable it to compete globally as a governing model with the United States. So that's the theme. That's in all of the stuff that I write and I try to hope that my colleagues will recognize that. I have that theme going so they won't think that I'm to all over the place at the end by last question about your involvement in constitution making in a way. Here's this Guy Noah Feldman in Tunisia giving advice about how much sharia should influence the writing of the constitution. And I do wonder about someone of Jewish heritage in this Islamic country and dealing with this topic generally. What's it like for you and what's it like for them I know? T.j is one of many North African countries that used to have a big Jewish population doesn't anymore do they welcome you? My parents is it ninety nine percent of the time. Nobody cares if you're Jewish for the most part on an ordinary basis people don't think that religious background matters all that much your primary identity if you're there from abroad is as an American but that one percent can make a difference and where it makes a difference when things go south so a Saudi. Arabian newspaper published a completely invented fictional article. That basically made me into an international man of mystery. You know a spy for Dick Cheney and a spy for the you know Isreaeli Intelligence and attributed to me all kinds of travels and constitutional accomplishments all over the Arabic. Speaking world quitting hunters. I'd never been to and actually I got got the Saudi paper with the help of a Saudi lawyer. Friend of mine actually retract the story. Although I don't think it really made much difference and then I didn't think about it much until my very last trip to Tunisia and so I had this crazy. Experience of being in the constituent assembly watching the debates and ratification of the constitution and then hearing my name and there was a a delegate from very minor party who was just trying to make trouble for the various majority parties and she brought up my name on the floor in order to criticize the parties. I was working with and basically repeated some version of this old idea that I was a spy of some kind and I very quietly got up and walked out of the observation deck and headed for my car with my briefcase but unfortunately by the time I got out the door at the press was out there there was a gaggle and they were calling out to me and asking me if I was a spy and I stopped and told them that I wasn't the spy and you know I headed for my car and I went to my hotel and pack my bag and I moving slowly and calmly as I could went to the airport and literally bought a ticket on the very first flight out of the country. It felt that threatening it felt like it was not a good moment to be on national television being denounced as a Jewish slash Israeli obviously not Israeli slash American spy and. I'm not a spy and when I came home I showed the video which was then showed on national television to my kids and I said so. Does it look like a plausible denial. And my son. That's you crazy. Look you look like a complete spy. I realized there isn't any good way to deny being a spy. And then the the last code to it was on the evening news that night. There was a debate about was I aspire was I perfectly normal guy. Who'd been there six times helping out with the constitution and it was an intense debate and I was being defended by a really impressive woman who was a member of constituent assembly young woman who belonged to the Islamist political party. You know wearing a hit job and it got a little heated and I sent the clip to my mother who doesn't speak Arabic and she said. Oh my gosh you know like. Is that person coming after you and I said No. You've got it backwards you know. The Islamist woman is the one saying film is just a constitutional law professor. Who's been here a bunch of times help out and you know this is completely paranoid and crazy. It was the secularists who were trying to embarrass the Islamists so to me the takeaway was there in a democratic country which had become by. Then you could actually have a public debate where someone from. A major party with a political future would go on television and defend the Jewish American constitutional law professor and tell the people who are being paranoid and crazy. You're being paranoid and crazy. That could not have happened in any other Arabic speaking country in the modern period so I walked away from feeling positive. And although I haven't been back to since I would happily go back now. I mean Tunisia is a functioning democracy. It's not paradise but it is really a functioning democracy in the Middle East with good basic rights. And that's not nothing. That's an incredible accomplishment. You know we're used to hearing people say. Israel'S THE ONLY DEMOCRACY IN THE MIDDLE EAST. That's just not true you know. Tunisia is a functioning democracy and has been for some years now. And if the domino's were to start falling back the other way what would be next. I mean what's the next country where you could imagine giving some behind the scenes advice about how to have a good constitution? I wish I could say oh. I know where it'll be it'll be in Beirut or it'll be an Amman. I don't think it's as simple as that. There's a reason for that. Which is that in the end. This is the central theme of the book. It's actually up to the people in these Arabic. Speaking Countries to decide for themselves that they're ready to self-govern. It's not something which external actor can make happen you know. The United States invaded Iraq. We help them draft constitution. I participated in that. It wasn't enough. In fact we left Iraq worse off than we found it which is a terrible moral responsibility. That have in that. I feel you know my own proportionate Sharon because it wasn't chosen by them. They need to make that determination for themselves and to me. That's the ultimate takeaway. Here people will try. They may not succeed all the time. But that's also part of what makes the effort noble. You know if you know you can succeed in doing something. It's nice that you're doing it but it's not that noble try nobility is where you take a major risk in life and you try to make something work and it can fail and so to me. The fact that the Arab spring failed to achieve its goals in a lot of places is not a reason to discount the nobility of the effort it was still noble and although the results were tragic in a lot of places. There's still Tunisia to remind you that they didn't have to end in tragedy will no I just want to end by recommending the book again? It is absolutely as interesting as you are talking about it and I guess this is the point where I got to say. Thank you for joining me on your show. Thank you for joining me on my show to be me on show. I really appreciate it Jacob. Thanks back deep. Background is brought to you by Pushkin Industries. Our producer is lydia. Jean Kahn with research help from zooey win. Mastering his by Jason Gabrielle and Martina Gonzalez or showrunner Sophie mckibben. Our theme music is composed by Louis. Kara special thanks to the Pushkin Brass Malcolm glad well Jacob Weisberg and Mellow Bell. I'm Noah Feldman I also write a regular column for Bloomberg opinion which you can find at Bloomberg dot com slash feldman discover. Bloomberg's original slate of PODCASTS. Go TO BLOOMBERG DOT COM slash podcasts. You can follow me on twitter at Noah Har- fill.

Tunisia Guy Noah Feldman Bloomberg Us Middle East Iraq professor China Madison Dick Cheney Arabian newspaper Pushkin Industries twitter Pushkin Brass Malcolm Beirut Jacob Noah Har Israel Jean Kahn
"noah" Discussed on Deep Background with Noah Feldman

Deep Background with Noah Feldman

07:51 min | 1 year ago

"noah" Discussed on Deep Background with Noah Feldman

"Which they themselves would control where they would be sovereign and in which they could effect a system of government day believed in now what's sad horrifying and indeed tragic and this is one of the reasons. I call the book. The our winter tragedy is that the form of government that the Islamic state supporters wanted was not utopian although they thought it was utopian but it was dystopia. It was the opposite. You know it involved murder on a huge scale it involved rape on a huge scale for sexual slavery and for the people who were engaged. In this movement those were fulfillment and authentic manifestations of Islamic tradition. Going back to the Middle Ages. Which did exist on the books? If you read the classical Islamic legal sources from the Middle Ages. You do have taxation. You know you can do these things in wartime but they were not practiced on a comparable scale to this certainly in the Middle Ages and also. Nobody's really tried in the Muslim worlds to govern anything like this way in hundreds of years. So they were doing something. That was a throwback self conscious throwback and it was worse than it ever had in fact been in history almost certainly so it was horrifying and deeply deserves the condemnation that we've all given to. Witton the world had to take action slowly but surely to go and get rid of the Islamic state and I'm super glad that they did get at the same time. We shouldn't forget that the folks who were doing this were engaged in the process of trying to self determine they were just doing it in a way that turned out to be pretty evil. I was mystified as a lot of people. Were how this you know. Barbaric sort of cult. That theme was attracting volunteers from all over the world including from Western countries in the thousands. In you talk about it. As a Utopian Revolutionary Movement. But why was it? That young people including young women in many cases went to join the Islamic state. Completely of their own volition. I really think it was the opportunity that they perceived to build something new to build a new society to build a Utopian Society on what they saw as classically Islamic model in that sense. The Islamic state was really different from Al Qaeda. People did come from around world to join a Kaieda in much smaller numbers but to join al Qaeda basically meant you were gonNA fight and probably die in the Jihad. You weren't building something new for the most part you were just trying to break. Something namely web is imagined to be the occupation of Muslim lands by non Muslim invaders. In contrast once the Islamic state was a caliphate that it had territory that it was building a society that was a chance for people to say much the way that young people from around the world wanted to go to Cuba after the Cuban revolution or some people from around the world wanted to go to Russia after the Bolshevik revolution. You say well. Here's a new world being created and I WANNA be a part of that and so they didn't come for the spectacular violence but they also were willing to tolerate and participate in even that kind of violence which also happens after other revolutions that partake of this kind of millennial list religious revivalist reformist idea. They don't have to be religious. That could just be communism which was itself kind of religion in a certain respect. People will do unbelievably radical things that are horrifying in circumstances. Like those when they feel that they're in a revolutionary moment. All Bets are off the end times in some way are there and again. It doesn't have to be times in a religious sense. It could be that we're just creating a new society and that's why a lot of revolutions end in brutal violence or entail a lot of brutal violence in their aftermath and otherwise normal people will do abnormal things under those conditions so your book was written pre pandemic but obviously now all of these countries are having their varying experiences with Kobe. Nineteen pandemic can either bond people to their government of for government seems to respond to it well Oregon alienate people from their government. If it handles it badly. What are we seeing him? The country's you write about in the book in Egypt and Syria and Tunisia is there another Arab spring that could come out of the pandemic so far and knock on wood cove. It hasn't had the kind of transformative social impact in the former Arab spring countries that it's had in Europe or in the United States or even in some Asian countries and it's still too soon to know whether that's because there aren't that many cases or whether because the case just aren't being recorded or acknowledged or recognized so there's great worry especially in Tunisia about whether the rapid economic decline. That's GonNa hit Tunisia. Very hard solution's very dependent on tourism is going to destabilize the social fabric even further and it remains to be seen whether autocracies like those in. Egypt are robust enough to withstand social pressure around that although I think they probably are think Egyptians have really learned the lesson that they can't get out and do it again that said you know when I was just getting the book into press. There were two events in the Arabic speaking world that were weirdly like after images of the Arab spring there was a kind of Arab spring uprising in Algeria which exit Tunisia and then there was a similar one simultaneously in Sudan and in both cases they all knew about the Arab Spring. They were using somewhat similar slogans. They knew the script and the dictators also knew the script and in each case it led to some meaningful change in who was governing the country but in neither case as lead to a fundamental transformation in the form of government. They're moving in both cases more slowly. There's more give and take and a low. There are transitions in WHO's governing. There aren't fundamental societal transformations like we've seen in Tunisia and what's fascinating about. That is on the one hand it shows you that. Even though everyone's seen the Arab spring movie it still has power. People are still looking to use those principles of self determination to change their lives on the other hand. The bad guys that to you. Know the autocratic regimes if you think they're the bad guys as I tend to. They also understand that they can give a little bit and then reconsolidate power and so what that suggests to me is even though. I think we're in a winter in the Arab world where we're not gonNA see huge or substantial transitions to self-government in future years. There is always the possibility for spring. Break out again. And we've seen that in a more limited way in those countries and so that's one slightly less pessimistic conclusion you know. We're in a winter. There is an Arab winter but eventually seasons are cyclical and this winter will give rise to a new spring. Yeah so if you'll indulge me as the temporary occupant of the Noah Feldman Chair. I want to ask. Why do Noah Feldman questions the first is about the range of stuff you write about your previous book with a huge intellectual biography of James Madison? A wonderful book with seemingly very little to do with the Arabic linguistic analysis. You do in the winter your book before that was about. Us China relations. Now in the PODCAST WORLD. We welcome polymath like you. It's terrific you can talk to anybody about anything but in academia. Don't they hate people? Like you hate might be strong. I think the way that academics usually express their disdain. Is They just read your book and that's Fair.

Tunisia Middle Ages Egypt murder Noah Feldman Noah Feldman Chair Oregon rape Cuba Europe Russia Kobe China Algeria Sudan United States wood cove James Madison
"noah" Discussed on Deep Background with Noah Feldman

Deep Background with Noah Feldman

10:19 min | 1 year ago

"noah" Discussed on Deep Background with Noah Feldman

"And then they held elections and so what made that. Legitimate was in some sense. The Egyptian people as a collective were saying what they wanted and they weren't doing it through a procedure and you couldn't count them all up and figure out if they were a majority of the public which of course they weren't legitimate because it was an expression of genuine popular sentiment and then when the same number of people or maybe even more do the same thing and call for changing of the democratic system. They're not operating within the ordinary rules of democracy. But you have to believe. I think that what they're doing is just as legitimate as when people call to get rid of the dictator otherwise the first one is legitimate. I think whatever rules you apply to figure out whether the demand to get rid of it. Dictator is legitimate. Are going to give you the same result. When people do the same thing to say they WANNA get rid of a government which was democratically elected. So you know. I think the upshot of that is that we forget that democracy is something that the people choose and therefore democracy is something that people could choose not to choose. It's not inevitable. It's not necessary. It's not the only system of government that's fair legitimate but in advance of a legitimate constitutional system which lets people have votes with equal weight. You do have this problem of being back to you. Know THE GENERAL. Will I mean that's who constitutes the people and what determines which people and whose views predominate we didn't count? The People in Toronto Square. And why for that? Matter should only people in Cairo in the nation's capital who have the ability to turn out in in the biggest public square have a say in determining what the general will is? I totally agree. And you know I try to a thought experiment to get people to ask themselves with their own. Intuitions are about this. What I say is think of what it felt like to you if you were watching when you saw people in dictatorships going out into the streets in hundreds of thousands and saying you know leave or we want the end of the regime or you know we demand social justice what happened in Ukraine. Or what happened in? So many countries in eastern Europe when authoritarian governments for brought down by public protests. Exactly in all of these places. You can ask yourself. What do you feel when you see on? Tv thousands or hundreds of thousands of people making this demand. And if you feel. And I think most people do feel wow. That's great that's real. Those people are taking charge and the world should listen to them. Then you share in some way. The intuition I think that there is such a thing as a people which is capable of speaking for itself even though none those cases. Is there a formal vote is there a census district with ballots? The whole apparatus that we associate with a democracy that's up and running only exists when a democracy is up and running at that initial moment of demand. There's something about the core collective political action of the people that's motivating people and it's motivating us to think that that is legitimate and that is democratic and that is that is hard because we're so used thinking of democracy in terms of vote counts and district's but democracy is more than that it's it's bigger than that and it's also much more vulnerable than just the kind of democracy that plays by the rules. Democracy doesn't always play by the rules. We'll be back in just a moment. Hi It's no feldman host of deep background as you may have noticed everything in the world is changing very fast right now. The Corona virus pandemic has forced families into their homes and abandoned the global economy. Which is why I'm here to tell you about a new podcast to help you navigate life. During this uncertain time Bloomberg's Award Winning. Healthcare podcast prognosis has just launched new season early. It's also become a daily show Monday. Through Friday hosts Laura Carlson and Jason. Gail will spend a few minutes with you every afternoon to help you understand life in the time of Kobe. Nineteen they explained the latest developments in health and science until you what effect they're having governments economies and your life. You can subscribe to the show on Apple podcasts. Spotify or wherever you list. Thanks and stay safe. No the book seems to be very much attempt to salvage something positive from the Arab Spring and you focus a lot on this idea of these Arab countries taking political responsibility for themselves the first time after centuries of imperialism and then these autocracies that gave the people know. Say you say basically you know. At least they're taking responsibility for their own destinies and the really hopeful example. You talk about Tunisia where you mentioned. The Arab spring began. You were involved in the effort at constitution writing. They're giving some advice to the Constitutional Commission. Talk a little bit about both your experience and why Tunisia remains the one real bright spot to come out of the Arab spring. So Yeah I was very lucky. I was in Tunisia six times during the process of their constitutional negotiations and partly because it was a small country with a relatively small political elite. Probably because I kept on coming back what began as an opportunity just to show up. Learn turned into an opportunity to collaborate a little bit with people who are actually drafting the constitution. And you know I in my research associated. Who went with me made? I think a couple of hundred suggestions all of them at the request of people are on the constituent assembly and a whole bunch of them got incorporated into the constitution. I have no idea if they were incorporated because we recommended them or because they were just good ideas that everybody would have thought of any way you can never quite measure those things and that's probably a good thing it's their constitution. But Yeah I was very fortunate to be sitting there in the drafting rooms in the delegates dining rooms and I got to observe up close and personal why they're negotiation process worked when concert from didn't work in other countries and the reason was that everybody in the room knew no matter whether they liked each other or hated each other and no matter how much they distrust each other and they did distrust each other that no one was coming to. Save Them. No one really cared enough about Tunisia to intervene in a big way in their constitutional process the US wasn't coming to save them. You know the European countries were coming to save him. They were on their own. The other Arab countries weren't coming to save them and so they had to compromise and they compromise like crazy. All sides make compromises that their own political core supporters thought were terrible compromises and they made them anyway and I think that is really what got them. Ultimately through and it's why they developed a consensus that enabled them to draft and successfully ratify a constitution. And just add one more point to that. The thing that they realized is that consultation is by definition all about giving the other side more than it deserves. If you think well we've won a plurality or majority and so we're not going to give you what you want. Your concerts will fail because if enough people are unhappy with the constitutional draft then. They'll go into the streets. They'll protest they might even use violence. And then the whole constitutional deal will fall through sort of like what happened ultimately in Iraq where Sunnis were cut out of the constitutional process. They probably cut themselves out and then they just used violence not deeply undercut the constitution. So you have this one. North African Arab country that has a functioning effective seemingly sustainable constitutional democratic system. Why aren't its neighbors? And the other Arab countries looking at it. And saying yeah. That's what we wanted. We want what they have. People in some of those countries did say that initially as in Egypt but Egypt wasn't able to produce the kind of compromise and consensus that Tunisia did so the elected government the Muslim Brotherhood. Backed government did not successfully compromise with secularists on the other side. They made some initial gestures in that direction but they were paranoid not without good reason but they were paranoid that if they let in too many liberals they would undercut themselves. They were paranoid that if they let in too many of the old regime they would undercut themselves so they actually tried to do it. All without compromise and that failed they couldn't get sufficient by an and in a much more extreme way in Syria. What happened there is that we never even got to the moment of the formation of a new government because we never got the ultimate collapse of Assad's regime because aside fought back with violence and instead of the protest which began pretty peacefully leading to regime change. They actually created circumstances where the government started a civil war and wants the VAT started people in lots of countries around the Arabic. Speaking world started saying Whoa wait a minute. The structure of our countries may not be capable of surviving regime. Change once people start thinking that and looking at worst case scenarios like civil war such as we also have in Libya and such as exists now in Yemen both in the aftermath of the Arab spring that starts making people really think long and hard about whether it's worth it to try to stay in the streets and remove the regime at the other end of the spectrum from Tunisia 's liberal democratic state you have ices medieval theocratic state and you say that that too was a product of the Arab spring in a strange way why was isis part of what came out of the original protests in Tunisia in two ways the Arab spring first of all create the conditions for the civil war in Syria which created a political vacuum a power vacuum which allowed Isis to emerge. Call itself a caliphate. So that was the first immediate way that the Arab spring set the conditions for the emergence of the Slavic State but the more profound similarity between the Islamic state and the peaceful uprisings. Is that the people who founded the Islamic state were aspiring to create a new form of.

Tunisia Constitutional Commission Syria Europe Spotify Toronto Square Ukraine Cairo Assad feldman Bloomberg Gail Libya Apple Yemen Egypt US
"noah" Discussed on Deep Background with Noah Feldman

Deep Background with Noah Feldman

10:04 min | 1 year ago

"noah" Discussed on Deep Background with Noah Feldman

"It before we start this episode. I want to tell you about a pushkin show. That's been especially helpful in these stressful and troubling times the happiness lab hosted by Yale Professor. Dr Lori Santos focuses on how to lead a happier life and how understanding our own well-being has never been more important. Dr Santos Studies the latest research and shares surprising and inspiring stories. They will change the way we think about. Happiness recent episodes delve into the effects of social isolation meditation and Compassion Season Two now in full swing explores the benefits of altruism tribalism finding meeting in our work and more. Find it on apple podcasts. Spotify wherever you like to listen. Stay tuned at the end of our episode to hear a special sneak. Peek of the second season of the happiness lapped from Pushkin Industries. This is deep background. The show where we explore the stories behind the stories in the news. I'm Noah Feldman this episode is going to be a little different from what we usually do here on deep background because it's involve a switcheroo. It's going to be a conversation between me. And Jacob. Weisberg Jacob is the head of Pushkin Industries which is the podcast production company. That makes this show. He's also the person who had the idea for deep background in the first place and called me and said hey noah maybe wanna try podcast and the reason that I asked Jacob to come on the show and take my job. Is that the conversation we're going to have is about a new book that I wrote. That's being published today called the Arab winter. A tragedy for those of you who've been writing in to say that it's time for us to add some non Kovic topics alongside Cova Coverage. This one's for you. And I promise that will return to covert coverage in very next episode later this week Jacob. Thank you so much for coming to deep background We'll know thanks for inviting me to play you on your show for an episode. It's a tall order. Asa WanNa thank you for Um prompting me to read your new book Arab winter which I really enjoyed. I mean. It's a very short book. Which made it easy. But it's so packed with ideas about what happened in the Arab Spring and challenging. I guess the conventional wisdom that the Arab spring was a complete disaster. Let's go back to the beginning. What was the Arab spring? Where did it happen? Why did it happen? What was it? The Arab spring was a kind of single episode that then spread into a region-wide contagion but the contingent was at least in the first instance. A really good one. It started in Tunisia. A tiny little country barely ten million people and which is not usually thought of as hugely influential in the Middle East. In fact most the time even most people in the Arab world never think about Tunisia at all. And what set it off initially? Was that a poor frustrated fruit-seller who've been subject to abuse from government officials and whose money supply was running out killed himself in a very dramatic way. He set himself on fire. Horrible tragedy and in response to the sense that he had quite literally ignited a sense of protest. Hundreds of thousands of Tunisians ordinary Tunisians from all different social classes different backgrounds started going into the streets and protesting their government's and they developed a couple of key slogans. The most famous was the people. Want the overthrow of the regime. And they chanted it and they chanted it and remarkably in-incredibly within a couple of weeks. The regime gave way and the guy who had been the dictator of the country for almost twenty years left. The country and suddenly people were realizing that they have the opportunity to remake their political system almost entirely so that's how it started but then if they only story it would've been an incredible story it would make a huge success story of one tiny little country. But what happened is that it was contagious. And so what you got. Were what started as copycat demonstrations in much bigger and more consequential countries most famously Egypt and then in Egypt the same story played out again at least initially and people were chanting the same chance and they were watching each other on arabic-speaking satellite TV. So they knew what the other people were saying. The other countries each of these protests had some local flavor. They were substituting the name of their own dictator. But basically the script was repeated. Eh Egypt. It seemed to work to dictator left there too and then it was tried in other countries as well and so it was a kind of sweeping contagion of attempts at political self-determination in a bunch of Arabic speaking countries. So let's talk about Egypt a little bit as the place where the Arab spring seemed to turn dramatically into what you call the Arab winter. I you had this moment. Interior Square where protesters were out demanding. The end of the autocratic regime democratic replacement and they got it they got the Morsi government elected and then people turned out in square again and demanded as it were the end of democracy. Why did that happen? And what do you make of it? These two events which I call for short the Book Talk One or two were book ends to a very very intense year and three quarters in which a lot of things happen some of which seem to follow the correct way that we democratic countries imagine things should go when a dictator comes down and some of which went wildly the other way so the first thing is that it took some time. But after the army had ordered the old dictator Hosni Mubarak to leave their eventually. Were big pretty free public elections and they were machinations. Along the way there was a question of who would be allowed to run for office and could old regime people run for office in what about members of the Muslim Brotherhood which was the largest social slash political organization in the country but ultimately there was an election. It was pretty free and what happened. Is that the Brotherhood candidate won. The presidency narrowly the Brotherhood. Won a plurality. Not a majority of a plurality. In parliamentary elections and the Brotherhood won the chance to craft a new constitution and that panicked a lot of people who were afraid of what used to be called one person one vote one time people who said look if the Muslim Brotherhood rights the Constitution if they become the people who are the dominant political party. They're going to abolish democracy now to be sure that wasn't their claim. They said we're going to be democratic. We're gonNA write a concession. But that was the worry that a lot of people had and slowly but surely various things happened that left those folks more and more concerned and worried but it was a very complicated dance divvied. Just give you the most prominent example the Constitutional Court of Egypt which was made up at the time still of people from the old regime disbanded the legislature itself. The elections had been illegitimate and it disbanded the legislature that left more see who was the newly elected president in a position where he couldn't govern through the legislature. And so then. His critics start saying he's an autocrat. He's an autocratic governing autocratically of course he was governing autocratically because there was no legislature and there was a deep worry that he was going to do the same thing with the constitutional assembly and disband that too and so the Muslim Brotherhood rammed through constitution. Very very fast without listening to dissenters and Morsi himself afraid that the Constitutional Court would block that issued an edict where he said nobody can put me out of office. The Constitutional Court can't put me out of office until the constitution is in place. Now in practice I was only going to be a week or two but then his opponents said look now. He's made himself a dictator and ultimately with that led to is that opponents of the Brotherhood and opponents of the regime came back into the streets and they replicated what they had done in January and February and March of two thousand eleven and they demanded with the same slogans in the same chance but a comparable number of people in the square that the army get rid of the elected Democratic president and after some delay the army dead. And so what happened? Was that the first time they were getting rid of a dictator but the second time they were getting rid of the guy who had been elected president and that led to the army taking over again and that was the end of democracy in Egypt. So that's a real conundrum Noah and you you talk about this at the level of of democratic theory and political philosophy but can there be a democratic decision to eliminate democracy and you know if so why is a democratic decision to do that valid. I mean by making such a decision as it were democratically. You're invalidating. The idea of the democratic decision should be the ones to count. I agree with you. It's a super hard problem. And I really struggled with it and I try to show that struggle in the book and try to lay out both sides of the possible view. I mean you could take the view. I don't take but you could take the view that when the people with a capital p get together and demand democracy. That's legitimate that's Democratic. Because they're asking for democracy but when the same people get together and say we don't want democracy anymore. We want to get rid of Democratic leader. That's undemocratic and in the end. I don't buy that. And the reason I don't buy it is that what makes the choice of democracy in the first place. Legitimate isn't that. There's some fair process or fair procedure for democracy. I mean what it really amounts to is a lot of people going to the Public Square and saying get rid of the dictator Egypt. They didn't even say give us democracy. They said.

Egypt Muslim Brotherhood Brotherhood Noah Feldman Pushkin Industries army Weisberg Jacob legislature president Tunisia Spotify Dr Lori Santos social isolation Dr Santos Constitutional Court of Egypt Constitutional Court Middle East apple Yale Public Square
"noah" Discussed on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"noah" Discussed on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

"This is the daily show with Trevor Noah, here's the. Several shooting. The. I guess the night tonight. She's one of the stars on blackish and at fourteen one of the youngest movie producers in Hollywood here with her brand new movie little Marseille Martinus joining us. On tonight's show. The Trump administration is a threat to national security spring break has gone wild. And the rap song that's a little bit country. But first, let's catch up on today's headlines. Jeff Bezos, two months ago, the Amazon CEO and shaved muppet revealed that his nude photos had been leaked to the National Enquirer. That's right. They somehow got pictures of his Amazon package. And now the big surprise is how they may have gotten them this morning and explosive new claim that Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos was targeted in an alleged phone hacking scheme conducted by Saudi Arabia visas launched his own private investigation in an effort to determine who leaked the intimate text messages and racy photos published in a bombshell National Enquirer story about.

Jeff Bezos Amazon National Enquirer Trevor Noah CEO Marseille Martinus Saudi Arabia Hollywood two months
"noah" Discussed on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

04:12 min | 2 years ago

"noah" Discussed on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

"World news headquarters in New York. This is the daily show with Trevor Noah ears. Thank you. Yes. You're going to talk about his new album poison rapper and businessmen New York's very old Swiss beats everybody. And I'm really excited because I'm huff Swiss but first, let's catch up on today's headlines. If you watched President Trump's crazy press conference yesterday, I'm sorry. And you probably know by now that he got into big arguments with CNN reporter Jim Acosta, which happens all the time. Right. They like the fifty cents jar rule of politics. But what's new is that after the press conference, the White House band Jim Acosta from the pressroom because they say that he assaulted the intern who try to take his microphone away from him. Yeah. And this White House does not tolerate grabbing women by the arm. It's only only okay to grab them by the pussy like gentlemen. And the problem. The problem with the White House explanation is that everybody saw that cost. The did not assault the intern. So the White House had to get a little creative with the evidence. A White House aide tried to grab the microphone in a cost appear to brush her arm. Sarah, Huckabee Sanders tweeted out a different video one that was sent out by Infowars which is a far right conspiracy. During website that has been known to push far right extremist propaganda. And this video was edited. It was sped up and heavily manipulated to. That's right. Donald Trump used a sped up video from info wars the conspiracy website run by Alex Jones. Now, just for context they've been banned by Twitter YouTube and Spotify and every of the website, but the White House is like we got you man, we got. And yeah, the fact that Trump is now using -ducted footage to prove something that everyone knows lie is deeply disturbing. But also is just lazy. All right. If you're gonna use a fake video he's a fake video. This you go all the way do something like this. Yeah. That totally happened. Moving on. This morning. We got some disconcerting news about supreme court. Justice Ruth, beta Ginsburg, she's recovering right now in the hospital after she fell in her office and broke three ribs. Now. Of course, we want to give our best wishes to Justice Ginsburg. She seems so much throughout her life. The rise of Nazism the fight for civil rights, and that's just been the past six months. You know, the worst thing is if you'd asked me which to court Justice, I thought it would have fallen down at work. I would have picked drinking drunk over here. Not the fitness Queen. Well. Speaking of getting hurt spanking is back in the news. And it turns out it does hurt them more than it hurts you the countries leading pediatricians are speaking out against spanking. The American Academy of pediatrics is calling for a ban on corporal punishment. Doctors say spanking is ineffective and may affect a child's brain development. Instead doctors suggest parents use other methods of discipline like rewarding positive behavior and setting limits. Okay. Look, I'm not saying that their rights or wrong, but I got spanked as a child and it didn't affect my brain. But by then. But whatever I mean, maybe it's good to stop spanking. I'm just worried about the future of SM because you realize people turn their childhood punishments into their sexual fantasies. Right. That's the thing. People do. So if we stop spanking then in twenty years, what's that gonna be like you're gonna see people in the bedroom? Like, I've been so bad. You're going to have to take away. My ipad for two. All right. Let's move on main story..

White House President Trump Justice Ginsburg Jim Acosta intern New York Trevor Noah American Academy of pediatrics Justice Ruth assault CNN Twitter Alex Jones Huckabee Sanders reporter Sarah Spotify twenty years
"noah" Discussed on 103.5 KISS FM

103.5 KISS FM

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"noah" Discussed on 103.5 KISS FM

"With Noah Cyrus. Team Look, at me Jay Yeah Always be In your mouth Always what they say Appreciate Vein Onions Insane Oh.

Noah Cyrus
"noah" Discussed on Z104

Z104

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"noah" Discussed on Z104

"Noah assault no cocaine really trust body the black no show turn it off garside mom michael jewelry shall i am so go on thank you chevy's john blue would dot dot just was small jane john overnight right maybe put you nine.

assault cocaine john blue Noah chevy