20 Burst results for "Nncholas Kristof"

"nicholas kristof" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:02 min | 2 months ago

"nicholas kristof" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Now. Hi, Ben. High time you And this Nicholas Kristof piece seems to hit home for folks who have not read this piece. What exactly does he argue? Right, So Kristof's piece touches on something that many of us kind of blissfully ignore as we go about our lives online, which is that a huge portion of the Internet as we know it. Is porn. The piece looks primarily at porn hub, which, for the uninitiated is effectively the Amazon of online pornography. And I use that description because, like Amazon, you can find pretty much anything you're looking for on porn hub because the site effectively owns porn production companies carries the content of most of the companies it doesn't own. And also allows users to upload their own content. And this content makes money for porn hubs. Parent company mind geek through advertising on free videos and videos You can actually pay for Christoph in The New York Times looked closely at the content on the site that appears to include real acts of violence and assault, as well as content featuring miners and found quite a lot. So the argument here is that online pornography content isn't effectively regulated or moderated by the U. S or Canadian governments or the company itself, and the collateral damage of that black of regulation is significant. Were there a lot of underage Children being exploited on this site? How much truth is there to what Crist office claiming? So there's absolutely truth to what he's claiming, Though porn hub has argued, I think probably accurately that content moderation as a larger issue is an issue all over the Web. Some companies try to use algorithms and machines to identify content that should be taken down. But all companies also use humans to do this. I think it's fair to say any large tech company in 2020 that is allowing users to post content online probably needs to employ a heck of a lot more content moderators than they do. At all Tech companies doing this time yet have an incentive to not be too stringent. You know, the more lax they are, the more content that get uploaded the more money they can make off the content. And this is something like, not a lot of people know, But the history of mind to keep the company that owns porn hub might tell you all you need to know about whether the company is going to get serious about this kind of thing. Because it started in 2000 and four primarily is a place for Pirated content from legitimate porn production companies. It made money off of that Pirated content. Used the money to them by the porn production companies and drive down the price of the product, which gutted the industry. And you know if you were anti porn that might sound like a good thing, But really, it just drove down the price of goods, which had a knock on effect for porn industry workers. Who, even as porn content has exploded online, about a harder time making a living right, Esso. It's also worth pointing out that you know. The film industry, for instance, is really good at lobbying companies and governments on content, moderation, but People inside the sex industry, you know, have a harder time finding allies in the government and elsewhere to try to advocate for companies and others to do content moderation. Something else. I want to ask you about human moderators, according to Mother board, who first reported the story on Sunday, there were 13.5 million videos available on porn hub. Yesterday there were only 2.9 million. How did porn hub actually decide which videos to take down versus to leave up? So as we've kind of been talking about user generated content is huge, important, just like everywhere else Online and eight years ago, porn hub started verifying users in companies which had to go through a pretty simple process of Showing that they're you know, legit On Def there were single user that they're actually giving consent to their content going onto the site. I mean, this could be a simple as someone basically taking a picture of themselves with porn hub written on a piece of paper in order to verify themselves and show that the content they were uploading was their own. And that they were essentially giving consent. The site seems to have kept the verified legit stuff and pulled down all the other stuff, which happened to be close to 80% of the site's content. But I think it's important. TOC say that you know Kristof's piece. Talks about these things that really shouldn't be allowed anywhere online, right examples of of rape being taped and input online for people to see, for instance. And that's really an issue that we haven't solved for. But you know, we like to think of the Internet is a really ephemeral thing Like something where you post something today it's gone tomorrow. But that's really not the case. You know when when content gets posted online, depending on the nature of the content, even if it gets taken down. If someone has been able to download it, they can re upload it to the Internet. And I think that's Part of the larger issue here that there.

Nicholas Kristof Christoph Amazon Crist assault U. S Mother board The New York Times rape
How Much Do Your Friends Affect Your Future?

No Stupid Questions

04:03 min | 2 months ago

How Much Do Your Friends Affect Your Future?

"Stephen. I have a question that was tweeted at us by at death by four. Is the correlation of your five closest friends. A real predictor of success. And where you're going in life. Oh a lake the question. I can see why you like the question to because i know that you care about in study friendship so to me there to central questions. We need to try to answer. Their one is whether there is a strong correlation between your friend group and your future and if so whether there's something about that friend group that significantly causes your future to change or whether you choose friends who will fit the future that you're planning yes. I think that we should get to cause -ality once we get beyond correlation. That's i think the most interesting this question because there is this expression. Look at your five closest friends. That's who you are. And that's you're going to be but this is saying but i've always been very suspicious about saying have you not well if i think of my closest friends whenever by. That's all i care about eighteen. I make the top twelve year number. One always okay. My other rents okay. First of all. They're a lot like me so my friends are all practically manic there so like they're all women they're all around my age. They're all around my educational demographic. I think it's interesting to observe that are closest friends are so much like us. Okay so if that observation is accurate. Let's say in the aggregate then. I would have to think that that's a strike against the argument. In the question. I would think it's more a byproduct of the fact that you choose people to be friends who were kind of moving in the direction that you're moving in. Yeah and it's often called him. Awfully bird's feather tend to flock together. And if that's really the heart of the correlation that because we're so similar we aggregate than that does argue against your friends having a causal effect on your outcome because that's not really what's going on but there is evidence and i'm sure you're familiar with by nicholas kristof focus. Who runs the human nature lab at yale. He's the co author of a book called connect the surprising power of our social networks. And how they shape our lives. He makes an argument that our social circles influence us greatly in terms of emotions and behaviors everything from health politics etcetera and his argument. Is that really what we think of as the individual is actually much more compounded result of the people that we know and listen to. So what do you think of that. Research and argument yeah. Nick is probably the most famous researcher on this idea that our social networks are not only reflection of ourselves but actually cause changes in ourselves and he has this data from the framingham heart. Study which by the way was about as it suggests heart health and cardiovascular disease and so forth but it's also been mined by researchers just because it was a really robust set of data. yes opportunistically. Yeah i believe framingham. Is this little town in massachusetts. And i think the interesting feature of the data set is that because it was in this one geographic location. The people in the data set happen to know each other. And you can map out. Who's friends with whom who's relatives of whom who's married to whom who's tutors. Three degrees of separation et cetera and when nick analyzed this one of the famous findings was the finding that obesity is contagious. In the sense that your weight and your weight change was predicted. Not only by the people you know but the more startling finding is it's not even necessarily the there in your direct circle but maybe the outer circle. Goodbye influence you. Stephen and you happen to know someone else. And i don't even have to know them but my politics or the way. I eat or anything else could go viral as it were in the same way that actual virus goes viral.

Stephen Nicholas Kristof Yale Cardiovascular Disease Nick Framingham Massachusetts Obesity
"nicholas kristof" Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

The Nicole Sandler Show

03:45 min | 4 months ago

"nicholas kristof" Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

"Reaction he says. Dark winter at all opening up our country we've learned and studied and understand the disease which we didn't at the beginning. This brings to mind that old saying denial is just a river and is not just a river in. Egypt I'm so bad at those old things anyway Joe Biden though didn't let him off the hook. Two hundred twenty, thousand Americans dead. Hear nothing else I stayed tonight. Here, this Anyone. Who is responsible for not taking control? In fact not saying I'm I take no responsibility initially. Anyone is responsible for that many desk. Remain as president of the United States of America. We're a situation where there are thousand deaths a day now thousand today and they're over seventy thousand new cases per day. Compared to what's going on in Europe as the New England Medical Journal said they're starting from a very low rate we're starting from a very high rate expectation is we'll have another two, hundred, thousand American out today between now and the end of the year. Just wore these mass presence own adviser to told them. We could say one, hundred, thousand lives, and we're in a circumstance where the president thus far, and still has no plan no comprehensive plan no comprehensive plan at all. And what is trump say he said we're learning to live with that. Reaction over soon I say we're learning to live with it. We have no choice. We sat lock ourselves up in a basement like does he has the he has the ability to lock himself up I don't know he's obviously made a lot of money. So mice what he has this thing about living in a basement, people can't do that. Joe Biden hasn't been in his basement and a couple of months. Now he's been out on the campaign trail. This is what Donald Trump does. It's like what he does with Anthony Fauci because at the beginning he said, no, don't wear masks because there was such a shortage of. They were worried that people would take math that medical professionals. So desperately needed. And then as scientists do with more research, they changed their prescriptions they changed their recommendations but Donald Trump no, he told you not to wear a mask. Get over it already, and so the by paceman thing. Get over it already. So anyway, you heard what he said though he said we're learning to live with it your reaction to. Say, we're learning to live with it. We have all my God learning to live with it. What do you say to that Joe, Biden? He says we're or we're learning to live with it. People are learning to die with. Folks. Will have an empty chair at the kitchen table this morning that man are wife going to bed tonight reaching over to try to touch their out of habit where their wife or husband was as gone learning to live with it. Come on we're dying with it. Yeah. He's never said as you said, it's dangerous. When's the last time? Is it really dangerous? Still we dance you tell the people is dangerous. Now he wants to do about the danger and you say I, take no responsibility he did he said it at least twice. I have it in my archives but of course, Donald Trump flies. So what did he say last night I never said that but listen to. This was one of my favorite clips of the night listen carefully to Donald Trump's words he says I take full responsibility. And immediately afterwards he says. It's not my fault. Let me talk about your Tuesday to. Take full responsibility..

Donald Trump Joe Biden America president Egypt Anthony Fauci Europe United States New England Medical Journal
"nicholas kristof" Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

The Nicole Sandler Show

03:27 min | 4 months ago

"nicholas kristof" Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

"Liked the tweet so I just tweeted back to them and said I WANNA play this on my show today I'm going to risk. I'm really quiet on progressive voices. Why would that be okay All right I'll try don't try to turn it up a little bit and see if this helps. Anyway. So I. I, tweeted back to them. I. Said I WANNA play this on my show today. I'm afraid I'm going to get a copyright violation. Will you have my back? And I haven't heard back from them yet but I'm going to risk it anyway because I think they want this shared. And it's called the love and I believe and just show I'm not. Really black-eyed peas fan but you'll see why this is so good. So I'm going to risk it. Just. Keep her fingers crossed. So. All. Right. So let's do it. black-eyed peas with Jennifer, Hudson. It's called the love. Oh and it features Joe Biden to here go. gravy. Ella Baker. A giant of the Civil Rights, movement? Left us with this wisdom. Give people life. They will find the way. People like. Those are words for our time. Just a week ago yesterday. It's the third anniversary. A. Those Neil noxious. Seen those players. Coming feels. Torches. Same Course. Remember. The clash, the shoot. Those spreading. And those curb systemic against it. Remember what the president said when asked you said there were. People. who was a wakeup call for us as a country? For me. Called Action People can. People. Crying, Q. New practice what you preach. Journey. She. Loves the help buses guidance from. People. Got Me. Got Me Question. Almost people. Ain't got no mamas I think the whole world to the drama only attracted to things that bring trauma overseas. Yeah. We trying to stop terrorism, but we still got terrorists here living in the US day the K. k. k.. I can't believe this deal in blacks today because if you only have love own race day, you only base to discriminate and to discriminate generates hate and when. You're GONNA get irate. Madness in which demonstrate and that's exactly how hey works and operates made you gotTa have. A of mine and meditate let. People dying. Crying can you? What you? legit.

Joe Biden Ella Baker US president Hudson Jennifer Neil Ai
"nicholas kristof" Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

The Nicole Sandler Show

07:31 min | 4 months ago

"nicholas kristof" Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

"It's the Nicole Sandler show. And we made to a Friday barely, but we made it. It looks like for whatever reason Oh, no youtube is not starting and I don't know why I'm having all kinds of. Tech problems. So what else is new? Oh my goodness. We just got back on Youtube and it looks like. It's not gonNA to let us stream their today. So you may just may have to come over to facebook I. Honestly don't know if we're on periscope twitch. Because I'm trying something new and it seems to to not be working so. I don't know. All I can say is. Come try to find US somewhere. It looks like nothing is going on except facebook live. So we are on facebook today in terms of video everything else seems to be kind of Fu bar. I'll try to I'll try to fix it but I'll put a note in the Youtube Chat. Room. But you know we're live at five. To Pacific so I'm at the mercy of the clock. Best laid plans. You know I had a stressful day today in that I had a doctor's appointment earlier. Today I had to go see the neurosurgeon to get an MRI on my brain because of a what we believe is a meningioma. Long story but. Yeah, let me just type Youtube not work I'm typing in the Youtube Chat Room You know it's times like this. I could use a producer not working comb to facebook. Sorry All right. So Anyway, I I was kept waiting for an hour and a half and I was already I was ready to leave and then the doctor came in and it turned out I really liked her. you know such as life today is also just a weird day. It's October twenty third. We are eleven days out from election. Day tensions are high. We made it through the last debate last night we'll get into that in a moment but it was. One years ago today. That my mother. died except she wasn't she she wasn't officially died until forty one years ago tomorrow because she suffered what what what happened is she had leukemia. Making a long story very long story short, but she had leukemia and. what kilter apparently wasn't the leukemia she had. Shannon aneurysm and. She went into the hospital I guess on the twenty second I was in school in away college in Tampa and I got a call from my dad who said you know I tried you said Mom's going to the hospital everything's okay don't worry. And then the next day she fell into a coma. They said she was brain dead. We had to wait twenty four hours of where there was no brain activity before. Turning off the life support it was. Horrible and now forty one years later when October, twenty third and twenty fourth come around you better. Believe I feel it and I'm feeling it extra hard this year because there's so much death around us. There's so much That that is is It's just horrible. An now with Cova know everywhere you go I was out at this doctor's appointment this morning and I'm waiting and waiting and waiting and getting more and more stressed as that hour and a half ticked. And somebody came out of the exam room, an older man wearing a mask, but it was down around his mouth and Chin and I said. It really needs to cover your nose I know. Well, if you know then do it I'm sorry this it's no more. We can't screw around anymore it. This is dangerous. People are dying now all these hospitals in the mid West in the. West in the in the in the as Donald Trump calls them red states are all. CATA- catastrophic. The ICU unit or fill to capacity and it's you know. I don't know why people are screwing around and Donald, trump had another event at the White House today in the Oval Office with very few masks and no social distancing. Unbelievable. And yes. I watched the debate last night and I have some observations in some highlights and lowlights to share with you and our guest today. I'm keeping my fingers crossed because I see him doesn't accept my invitation on skype yet, but he's supposed to join us at the bottom of the hour. He being Nicholas Kristof who has a two time Pulitzer Prize winning journalist who has a call them in in a twice a week column in The New York Times and he and his wife last year wrote a book called Tightrope. Let me get the subtitle for you because it's a very important part of it tight rope Americans reaching for hope. So they released the book last year and on Monday, the film adaptation of it debuts on the world channel, which I don't have but also world channel. Dot Org and PBS DOT ORG and it. It's a very personal. but difficult film because it's about this disconnect in America it's about poverty and hopelessness thus tight rope Americans reaching for hope and the income gap and the wealth gap and all the other inequities in our society. And I'll tell you you know and it was not an easy film to watch but it's something we should all watch because you notice during this campaign candidates talk about and this is not unique to this campaign. It's every presidential campaign and I've noticed this for A. Number of cycles. Going back they talk about the middle class. They never talk about the people living in poverty and I believe and I don't have facts to back it up I. Don't have statistics. So I'm just saying, I, believe that those living in poverty. Make up the fastest growing segment of our population. Sadly, and with the effects of this pandemic, it's only gonNA get worse. So we'll talk to Nick Christoph about all that but. I WANNA start today with a song that I found online this morning and I know that I'm risking another copyright strike. I know. But I think this is worth it. I really do and please you know the the thing is it's it's black eyed peas with Jennifer Hudson. A video produced by will I am, WHO's The guy? Who did the big? You know the Obama Song? Twelve years ago. Yes. We can remember how powerful that was. Well, this is one of those. And the black eyed peas tweeted out this morning and said Oh my God. This is just brilliant. Everyone needs to watch this and the black eyed peas.

Youtube facebook leukemia Donald Trump Nicole Sandler US Tampa Obama Nicholas Kristof Pulitzer Prize producer PBS Jennifer Hudson coma CATA Chin skype America
"nicholas kristof" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

08:03 min | 1 year ago

"nicholas kristof" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"As a believer not Nicholas Kristof usually is not very good actually has a quite informative column over at The New York Times about the best case and worst case scenarios for coronavirus okay so what are the best case scenarios in the worst case scenario as yourself Nicholas Kristof believe or not has pretty good column at The New York Times talking about this best case scenario is the possibility that the virus mutates and actually dies out Dr Larry brilliant I hope aptly named an epidemiologist whose young daughter was part of the fight to replicate smallpox explained that only in movies viruses seem to become worse over time sars and mers both petered out that is possible here cover nineteen woman survives my hopes a doctor Josh Charles probe or a professor at Stanford medical school China is reporting that a single new case of domestic transmission other serious doubts about whether China is lying or not if ever in doubt China is line channelized W. H. L. and W. H. I believe that this is why when your prescriptions from WHL are there take some life W. H. up you should really take that with a major grain of salt with that said according to Nicholas Christoff Singapore would be the best case scenario where everything is sort of shut down for awhile then you go back to a more open society time Ingalls be expert on pandemics of Johns Hopkins Bloomberg school of public health so the fact in Singapore Hong Kong Taiwan South Korea China and some extent Japan will flatten the curve despite having initial onslaught of cases can give us some hope we can sort out what they're doing well and emulate at Washington state seems to have been stabilizing the weather may also help us because some respiratory viruses decline in summer from a combination of higher temperatures and people not being huddled together so it's possible the northern hemisphere nations enjoy a summer break before a second wave in the fall okay that is that the second wave is what I'm worried about and I think most epidemiologists are worried about is what happens when you release people from confinement even if this thing goes away during the summer if it comes back with a vengeance during the fall it can be super damaging the Spanish influenza which by the way you know how ridiculous it is that our political world somebody wanted wikipedia and just change it to nineteen eighteen flu because they wanted to forestall trump's argument that you can say Spanish Lucy can take Chinese virus anyway the the goal would be that maybe this thing dies out it loses sort of it's it's fire and its flair also the death rate I've been saying this for weeks and I've been criticized for the death rates are being put out there by the W. H. O. we're just not real in South Korea and China outside who they province about eight point eight percent of those known to be infected died that rate was point six percent on a cruise ship I talked about all this weeks ago that's not to suggest the viruses and dangerous it's very dangerous and significantly more dangerous than the flu it is to suggest that people who are suggesting that your four percent of people get are gonna die that was not true about four out of five people known to have had the virus had only mild symptoms even among those older than ninety in Italy seventy eight percent survived two thirds of those who died in Italy had pre existing medical conditions and we're elderly and ninety nine percent had pre existing conditions Smith epidemiologist again states that I'm not pessimistic I think this can work she said I'll take eight weeks of social distancing have a chance to slow the virus success will depend on people changing behaviors and hospitals not being overrun as I've been saying about increasing the medical capacity now there's the worst case scenario Dr Neil Ferguson a British epidemiologist he said he produced a sophisticated model that showed a worst case of two point two million deaths in the United States is best case scenario according to Nicholas Kristoff is one point one million deaths which is obviously frightening as all hell the the hope of the US can emulate Singapore South Korea could be a leap because south created the image of it really seriously they have tremendously effective testing it's very widespread we are still as I mentioned way behind in testing in California the governor has now announced that we are in a state of lockdown Gavin Newsom on Thursday ordered forty million residents to stay home except for essential trips extending similar restrictions statewide Barre area counties previously inactive one of the serious questions about this particularly is number one whether it's effective number two whether it is designed to achieve the goals that they say it's designed to achieve meeting how can you lock people down this long and the answer is it's gonna be very very difficult to lock people down this long stricter locked down the less time I can last it's one thing to tell people it's one thing to tell people for the foreseeable future no cookies it's another thing to tell people for the foreseeable future no food this is not something that people are going to be able to outlast for a very long time we'll see how long people abide by because you cannot tell people interminably staying home again especially as the economy dies and his job do not come back it's very easy for the government say we're going to freeze everything in place none of these jobs will die that is just not true these are major systemic place it changes taking place throughout our economy and they have significant significant ramifications Nissen said this is not a permanent state it's a moment in time okay well then we need to know how long the mom's gonna last what your estimate of the moment is going to be I was talking to panic friends who have businesses in the state of California and now those businesses simply will not run because nobody can go into the office and this order by the way from Newsome is supposed to last till April nineteenth okay a full month how long do you think this is actually going to last and did the as the this is where we're now in the Star Wars scenario as princess later says the stronger the the more you tighten your grip they are the more star systems Tarkin the more star systems will slip through your fingers right this is where we are the more the government tightens its grip it's great the more they're going to push back against all of that particularly as these losses mount we were hearing it we may lose this week over two million jobs in the American economy we are getting estimates and the economy in a contract up to twenty percent in Q. two one fifth of the American economy poof disappears at the behest of the American government says they say you wanna make the case that we ought to do that I need to hear a very strong case as to how this is going to prevent deaths it is not enough to say that we're doing it to prevent deaths I wanna see the plan for preventing the deaths I want to know how many beds are creating him ventilators are creating I want to know how you plan to stop the flow of those fighters we all go back outside after a month and one half of us don't have jobs let me in and by the way all the Republican relief efforts are democratic relief efforts are not going to fix this problem they're not the best you can do at this point is provide floating loans to banks do not call in their bridge loans to two businesses back to commercial paper window for example but at a certain point you are not in my American bonds and number two what makes everybody think this can be a V. shaped recovery the longer these businesses are out the less chance there is that these businesses ever go back in if you think your life savings to purchase a rib joints and they've been running that rib joint for ten years and government to shut down and shut down every restaurant across the country if actively do you think that's coming back anytime soon and the one thousand dollar a month check is going to survive it is not and by the way economics is real life when people say well you're choosing the economy over real life now economics is real life it is people's jobs people livelihood is how people live it is the suicidality right it is the it is the sense of community this is not to argue that we should be weighing the economy against you like this arguing that we should always take the tack it is most likely to preserve human life and that would also include human quality of life is that argument should let everybody out right now I'm not made that argument anywhere in here instead the art when I make music if you are going to risk if you were going to do the most restrictive thing any American government has ever done in the history of the United States to the American people right we're not in wartime here as a virus if you're going to do this unbelievably restrictive thank you better damn well have a plan for how we come out of this and that save lives because if you don't then Americans are not going to stand by this they're just not gonna stand by this coming up so what exactly is the government going to do to increase capacity because they don't if they don't increase capacity all of this is for not to mention their OSHA all right it's Jamie progresses employee of the month to month in a row leave a message at the hi Jamie hit me Danny I just had a new idea for our song what the name your price tool so when it's like tell us what you want to pay trombone was Bob wine you say well be fine coverage options to fit your budget then we just all the fingers now small choir goes even coming after they've come at jet yes no maybe anyway.

Nicholas Kristof The New York Times
Does closing schools slow the spread of coronavirus? Past outbreaks provide clues

Short Wave

08:22 min | 1 year ago

Does closing schools slow the spread of coronavirus? Past outbreaks provide clues

"Okay let's start this conversation by talking about the number one thing on most kids minds and definitely the number one thing on most parents minds school closings so corey. Why take the kids out of school? Well Emily we've seen in the last few days a kind of tipping point where we went from schools closing. You know here there. On a case by case basis to honestly and just really forty eight hours last week schools starting to close statewide and in most of these places when the decision was made. The didn't actually have that many infections. So you know it. It may have struck people in the moment. Like kind of weird right. Why doing now. Why close if there aren't infections in our media rain so why do that well so I spoke to this guy? Nicholas Kristof. He's at Yale and actually does a lot of really interesting work studying. How ideas spread among other things And they happen to spread kind of like diseases and so when corona virus hit the scene given the interest in this topic and given the fact that you know I'm a physician also specialized in public health and Epidemiology. It was not a stretch for me to become interested in this topic. And so Chris Dacas said. Look yes you you can close the school when there's a case and probably everyone would agree that that is a sensible thing to do and it helps so there's a study. He pointed me to of H One n One. A Flu. Epidemic was about what years ago? Yeah so the study is of Japan's reaction and showed that closing the schools when there's a case made a difference and found that reactive school closures reduce the rate of infections in the community by nearly thirty percent. That is no small number percents so that makes a lot of sense to me but like you said schools in the. Us are closing all over the place even when there aren't a lot of infections. Yeah and I think part of that is because the science around covert nineteen at least in how it spreads is still kind of unsettled. You know. We're not totally clear on how kids can spread it We don't know if say a child you know doesn't seem sick. But is still carrying the corona virus. How will that child impact the people that here she comes into contact with right right like their parents or caretakers exactly so honestly out of an abundance of caution school closures? They limit contact. They limit the possibility of kids getting sick. And of passing along Corona virus to the people they love and Corey. You have an example from history of a time when school cancellations really helped out during a viral outbreak. What was that yeah? This was an enormous flu epidemic back in nineteen eighteen and there's actually a really good research on how U. S. cities responded including What happened to the city's the closed their schools early versus those that didn't so Nicholas Kristof ca says when you look at this research. The results really speak for themselves. If you compare a you know a Saint Louis which closed the schools in advance and kept them closed for longer. Their death rate was three hundred. Fifty eight people per one hundred thousand population but Pittsburgh which waited 'til later didn't keep the schools closed as much. Their death rate was almost three times as high eight hundred. Seven people dying per one hundred thousand population. Wow that is a lot of people. Yeah it's a lot of people And what about? How will that affect families in vulnerable populations? How how will that affect them? I imagined that all this comes with a cost. Oh absolutely and I think this is something. A lot of people aren't thinking about that. You know while keeping schools open has a public health cost so does closing them especially for vulnerable low income families. You know a lot of people don't realize that twenty million kids in this country more than twenty million depend on schools for free breakfast free lunch in some cases free dinner Many of them get medical care at school not to mention the fact that there are lots of parents out there who are working. You know low wage hourly jobs. They can't take off work. They can't work from home. So what happens with these kids? I spoke with Sonia. Santa Liza's she's the CEO of Baltimore City Public Schools which are now closed. And she really summed it up. Well for me are a large number of our students the safest place for them to be actually in school so if you think about this from her point of view in. Baltimore you know. The State of Maryland has closed schools for two weeks. That's a long time for some kids to be home alone. to be coming to distribution centres to pick up what are called. Grab and go meals. But honestly emily really really complicatedness is the fact that CDC released new guidance at the end of last week that said these short-term closures like two to four weeks. They're not even long enough to actually slow the spread of this disease. They might need to go much longer and I know there are a lot of school leaders around the country who are looking at guidance and scratching their heads. Like how much longer we talking about here? Well I mean the governor of Ohio Mike DeWine said on CNN. The Sunday you know. He's closed schools there for three weeks but he said it's perfectly imaginable that this is going to go on a lot longer and it would not surprise me at all if schools did not open again this year. Wow Mollica I want to bring you in on this. Because you've been looking at the ways this can really affect families. Yeah if schools are closed it can definitely put a lot of pressure on families I spoke to Joy Osowski. She's a clinical and developmental psychologist at Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center. And here's what she said. One of the issues. Is You know a lot of parents need to work. And they cannot work remotely and even if they can work remotely. There are a lot of different kinds of things that need to be done for children. If they're not in school yet puts also much more pressure on parents because there isn't the routine of school so there are more meals at home. There's more care for children needed during the day and so they really have to establish what we would call a new normal anew routine and that way so how can parents create that routine and deal with that well You know she had a lot of different ideas but the one that struck me was that Older children can take some responsibility. I myself am the oldest of five siblings and I helped with my siblings growing up. She says that they could basically watch younger kids and help around the house doing chores and that kind of thing And she says it actually is helpful for the older children and can give them a sense of responsibility a sense that they're like actually contributing to the family in a time of crisis And I asked a soft ski weather. Older kids really do step up to the plate and she says that actually she's found after disasters like Hurricane Katrina for example. Older kids have been really helpful. They're helping younger kids out with schoolwork So parents can lean on them. This older kids do your part of the job description. When you're born you got a job description and it's look after sampling. Yeah and what about talking about the virus itself because I know a lot of families are really scared and there's a lot of anxiety around it and maybe they're not sure what to say? I mean a softy said is that parents need to be informed check the CDC website listen to NPR. And there's really really good news for families on the one end. Kids don't really seem to get very sick and emily. I JUST WANNA add a couple of things to from the episode. I just recorded with my colleague on your comments on parenting and current virus over life kit. When you're talking with kids make sure you're not making promises you can't keep so. Don't tell them. Oh no you won't get it because you don't know that and I always liked to channel Mister Rogers whenever I can which is look for the helpers trust in the helpers know that the helpers are out there our country is full of doctors and experts and professionals who are there to help take care of us when we need them and that will be a comfort to kids. This is the time for the helpers for

Emily Nicholas Kristof Corey FLU CDC Baltimore City Public Schools Corona Mister Rogers Epidemic Pittsburgh Baltimore Chris Dacas Japan Yale Maryland Louisiana State University Hea Saint Louis Ohio
"nicholas kristof" Discussed on Real Time with Bill Maher

Real Time with Bill Maher

03:08 min | 1 year ago

"nicholas kristof" Discussed on Real Time with Bill Maher

"Democrats forty-seven Fifty Nationally. He beats him in Pennsylvania by four. Look all these pundits so I hear say things like well. Bernie will lose forty-five states shut up. I don't know what the fuck talking about. Have you never know? We never know the same people who said trump wouldn't even met. You don't know what we don't know is Bernie needs a revolution Shaw. He needs people who've never voted before. Now they're not showing up in those numbers in the primary but we don't know but now since trump I think is not going to leave anyway whereas well run Bernie not. He's not and by the way when the virus get mad. He's going to declare martial law. What's God that could happen? Would Act totally. Have your point about people being dismissive about Bernie? I even tell people on on my side on the right this do we forget two thousand sixteen. You had this fractured establishment field on the right in Marco. Rubio Ted Cruz. Amer kept saying can't be Donald Trump can't donald trump and then all of a sudden it was donald trump the establishment by the way did kind of reject him for a long time up to the convention and now obviously we went from there. There are parallels with Bernie Sanders rise now and Donald Trump's rise reminds you that Republicans are saying Oh we really want to defend Bernie Sanders against this democratic establishment. And the day. After he's nominated. He is a horrible socialist who will endanger the country. They either believe one thing or the other. But I don't know if you're trying to progress. Why don't you vote for this? Something called the Damn I lost it now. the duty to report act. This is Require candidates for federal office and their campaigns to report any context with foreign governments to the FBI seems simple enough even seventy five percent of Republicans are for it Mitch. Mcconnell won't let it come to the floor why not duty to report ex campaign. Campaigns have contact with foreign governments. I mean Ford officials all the time that conversations that constantly well first of all join just says were you got to report it to the FBI. Why fight that will again. It's because there's all these contacts and we'll be a discussion about whether or not. It's an various. Campaigns talked to foreigners or the fact that trump still doesn't really admit that Russia has medaled in our elections and that they're still meddling in Russian collusion to just clarify one. First of all yes talk. Born many of what's wrong with saying they should were point that I don't see what that doesn't answer the problem. Well that doesn't talk to foreign sure but tell the FBI especially if that foreigners offering you help in your electric will mean Mitch. Mcconnell would also say that just passing this it's all meant to be from Democrat to slap in the face of trump. It's ridiculous of course anybody who is a Patriot would say hold on a second. If you're trying to get me to do something illegal election and you're a foreigner we will not do so why didn't trump or poured it never muller for. Never Mother report did happen but he shit the bed muller did a horrible job someday liberals will understand that he did a horrible.

Bernie Sanders Donald Trump FBI Mcconnell Democrats Mitch Rubio Ted Cruz Pennsylvania muller Marco Amer Ford Russia
"nicholas kristof" Discussed on Real Time with Bill Maher

Real Time with Bill Maher

02:25 min | 1 year ago

"nicholas kristof" Discussed on Real Time with Bill Maher

"We gotta stop him. Wait wait I thought you said whoever the nominee class and there's all these people that are still kind of hoping hillary she got podcast coming out that she says it is true that some parts of the democratic establishment don't like Bernie Sanders and. He makes him they. He makes them very uncomfortable. If that's true and I think it's okay that the Democratic Party is uncomfortable right now. We have a transformation that we need to do within our party. We have two wings right and you need both wings to fly. You need the progressive in the moderates. I always say you need all shades of blue and so it is clear it is clear that is Democrats for the past ten years. We've been talking about this. Rising American electorate that. It's younger that it's going to be more diverse than women are going to be more progressive. Guess what they're here and guess what they want Bernie Sanders were this. This is the first line in my book. Bless you for that. Many shades of blue is will progressives moderates feud while America Burns. And if you take the earlier part of the conversation do they really want to say that these differences between Medicare for all or a public option when they all want to cover all Americans? They get decent healthcare. Are Those so important that you're going to have a debate like that in the country sort of turns around and reelect this president. Who for all the reasons you said in the first part of the show presents a real crisis? Oh and I think there's a point related to that and I bet this will resonate in Nebraska that right now politics so polarized that there are an awful lot of Democrats. Uc every trump voter in two thousand sixteen as a racist and a Bigot. And that is not clarifying and not helpful winning those voters. This is a true by one of the reasons why they were Democrat candidates that actually started resonating early some with some Republicans people have on the right of a fondness for Tulsi Gabbard there like Andrew. Young like people that are at least willing to go. Some of the Democrats are such wins. You can't even get them to go on Fox News. President of the United States is the latest sexiest poll has Bernie losing to trump but bet closer than all the other. Democrats forty-seven Fifty Nationally. He beats him in Pennsylvania by four. Look all these pundits so I hear say things like well. Bernie will lose forty-five states shut up. I don't know what the fuck talking about. Have you never know? We never know the same people who said trump wouldn't even met. You don't know what we don't.

Bernie Sanders Democrats president Democratic Party trump hillary Tulsi Gabbard Fox News Nebraska America Burns Medicare United States Pennsylvania Andrew
"nicholas kristof" Discussed on Real Time with Bill Maher

Real Time with Bill Maher

05:40 min | 1 year ago

"nicholas kristof" Discussed on Real Time with Bill Maher

"Mean it goes way back earlier but really I mean a guy is supposed to be so smart about so many things you know. Okay so what does good drug policy look like so a good drug policy? We actually have a good comparison. The nineteen ninety s the. Us in Portugal. We were both wrestling with a heroin problem right. They both looked at what you do the. Us double down on a law enforcement toolbox and Portugal meanwhile conveyed panel and decriminalized drug possession. Even heroin cocaine but above all what they used was the public health toolbox encouraging people to providing treatment and the upshot is that the number of heroin users in Portugal has dropped by two-thirds Portugal now has the lowest drug overdose rate in western Europe and. Meanwhile we lost sixty eight thousand. Americans last year and I know I'm always the bad guy when I bring this up but I saw it in the paper yesterday. Obesity The School of one is at the Harvard Chan. School of Public Health at Harvard says in two thousand ten years not that it's not bad now half the country in twenty thirty. We'll be obese. A quarter will be severely obese. Forty thousand deaths a month a month from obesity and that is a big problem absolutely about in the areas. You're talking about Absolutely it's enormous but it's you can't just look at the moment that somebody is reaching and potato chips it's very much. A reflection of this miasma of depression that has struck much of the country. And when people lose jobs lose good well-paying jobs then they self medicate with methamphetamine self medicate with alcohol the also with soda and chips. And so there's no. There's no silver bullet but there are silver buckshot. And you can address that in part by providing better paying jobs and Supporting Education in these areas. And you know I they that helps to address many of these problems together. I heard a lot about how the farmers were. GonNa turn on trump. You must know a lot about this. Okay because of the trade war and of course we know that he wrote a lot of checks to them to cover which is thirty five billion dollars but eighty-three percent. Wow that is a lot of voters Farmers who are that they serve it pro-trump. That's a huge number. Why can't the Democrats do a little better? I'm not asking for the world but eighty three percent. You can't win more than seventy percent. Well they can if they actually started to go to these rural communities once again so rural rural voters used to be with Democrats. We used to have Democrats elected in South Dakota North Dakota Iowa Kansas etc because we used to stand with them when they were hurting so when the farm crisis happened Democrats were there. On the tractors Jesse Jackson included saying that we need to unite the features. We're going to have real economic inland justice in our country in Democrats. When was the last time you saw a democrat? We had historic flooding in Nebraska. Not a single. Democratic presidential candidate came to Nebraska or Iowa when they had flooding as well so there is real problems that us as a party completely abandoned these communities and so why should they they just. Don't show up the air in Kansas. Now has a democratic governor and it's fifty years fifty years. Basically America was engaged in this project of lowering taxes and lowering investment in human capital and finally Kansas Republicans rebelled and said raise our taxes. Because you've heard our schools tumorous. I wonder if that isn't won't be remembered to some kind of a turning point in this long era that may lead to renewed investment in American human capital in ways that would help address the problems in the M Hill and Kansas and Nebraska. And so many other places and I think that I think that's completely right and I think it goes to one of the things I write about in the book is Kansas and as an example of the radicalization of the Republican Party. Over the last twenty years where the governor said if we slash these taxes cut this spending cut the schools. The economy will boom. The economy didn't boom and a lot a middle class. Republicans who actually wanted their kids to go to good public schools. Have wait a minute. This program is terrible and so it was actually repealed in the state legislature by with by votes from all the Democrats and a bunch of Republicans. Who said we can't do this anymore. And when the Democrat won was those moderate Republicans who actually supported the many moderate but we can supported the Democrat. And you do see. Whisker is a Democrats emerging other states. Utah Idaho Past Medicaid expansion. The debates are wrong about the debates like the one. We had Tuesday or not helping no the Democrats who want to help. It's helped me with that up the ladder the end by May please. I'm just going to say in response to the Republican Party getting more radical for twenty years in the Democratic Party. I JUST RUN THE NEW YORK. Times two days ago that effectively the DNC establishment is like all right burnings actually crazy. We can't really do this. Excuse me I'm just report. What was reported the time you're right opinion? It's an interesting socialist and it's interesting the hypocrisy here I it was. Hey you Bernie Bros. You GotTa get on board this time. Whoever the nominee is now that the nominee is burning.

Democrats Kansas Portugal heroin obesity Nebraska Republican Party wrestling Us drug overdose drug possession Iowa School of Public Health Jesse Jackson Harvard Chan Republicans methamphetamine
"nicholas kristof" Discussed on Real Time with Bill Maher

Real Time with Bill Maher

02:10 min | 1 year ago

"nicholas kristof" Discussed on Real Time with Bill Maher

"Okay so listen. Let's first we'll get back to this subject but I WanNa talk about your book. I because it's fantastic book again. Ever get past this crisis and we will. We will have to contend with the fact that the same old things that have been making people die. We'll still be making people die in US zero in on what you call. I think deaths of despair in this country What what are we talking about when you say deaths of despair so we're talking about deaths from drugs alcohol and suicide which every two weeks kill more Americans than died in the entire Afghan and Iraq wars and? It's the story of my hometown. A quarter of the kids on my old school bus whereas it's Gone Hill Oregon right where valley goes into the coastal range. Of course I know it will be many visits. Summers okay. So that's and this is seeing typical of rural America. This very rural area. It's it's it's kind of a great depression that has struck parts of America but not geographically but demographically. It is a crisis that has hit working class America so these people would seem to be the ideal Bernie Sanders voters. They would seem to be more ripe for a political revolution than anybody. But when you look at the political map those areas were always read. Why why do you think? The white working class is Socially very conservative economically though they tend to be actually much more liberal and so look if they go in the voting and they were thinking about abortion guns then they will vote for Republican but Democrats have to fight for those votes and if they were thinking about raising the minimum wage if they were thinking about parental leave increasingly if they were thinking about healthcare about expanding Medicaid then there is a fighting chance to have them vote democratic so what are drug war was has been a massive failure for. It's one of the worst policy failures in a bipartisan. Absolutely an-and for Bloomberg hates pot. I.

America Gone Hill Oregon Bernie Sanders Bloomberg Iraq Summers
"nicholas kristof" Discussed on Real Time with Bill Maher

Real Time with Bill Maher

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"nicholas kristof" Discussed on Real Time with Bill Maher

"The truth about how often he plays golf or his crowd size when the pictures are right there. How can you trust what he says about this? And you need trust in the White House but the other is you wanted administration. That actually believes that sometimes experts are to be called. Ss halvard problem and Bill Cohen. The Bill Cohen. The former Republican senator and secretary defense once said government is the enemy until you need a friend and experts are nasty elitist until you need. Somebody knows what they're talking about. Help you solve problem in this administration. I show you like excellent a clip. This is John Kennedy. He is not that John Kennedy. Here's the Republican senator from Louisiana. He's a Republican and he's been a big defender of Donald Trump here. He is talking to are acting head of Homeland Security. I named now the guy's name because these temps come through the permanently surprised. It wasn't a bunk as wedding planner. Quite frankly but this is a Republican Senator. Talking to this man. Watch this about the virus jobs to keep us safe. And you can't tell us how many your models are anticipating. No senator again I I would defer to the health and human services for that so check on that we will as they had a bone land security without is it transmitted a variety of different ways center again. Human-to-human is what we've obviously you're asking me a number of medical questions asked question. Hhs Secretary of Homeland Security. And you're supposed to keep the safe..

senator John Kennedy Bill Cohen Donald Trump Hhs golf White House secretary acting head Louisiana
"nicholas kristof" Discussed on Real Time with Bill Maher

Real Time with Bill Maher

03:17 min | 1 year ago

"nicholas kristof" Discussed on Real Time with Bill Maher

"Leslie seems like a perfect storm for him. Not well you know. The disease is definitely people don't have as as successful. They don't have successful outcomes In people that are older or who have co Morbidity Bernie. Don't touch him. Well your statue. Touch Bernie Bernie is doing what everybody else should be doing right now. Which is washing your hands. But I into the crowd and touch a million people thinking survive this or she said life will chain and that's yes and that's okay and it is yeah right yeah but ultimately I would think my theory you have to be good about how you take care of yourself your best line of defense. Is it not your own immune system? Germs pathogens are ubiquitous. You can't become Howard. Hughes locked in an airtight room pissing into jars. That's the only other alternative I mean people put hand sanitizer all over their hands all day. I've had more than one. Very smart doctor told me that destroys. The skin makes it more permeable. You have to have a good immune system. Stop eating sugar. Wouldn't that be a great start? There are so many things that you can be doing in sugar can cause inflammation like so many other things. The worst thing for your immune system is sugar. There's so many things that are bad for your sugar. Be Number One. Sugar is in the in on the list of the top things that you should probably decrease but you know they're they're you know. Smoking is also bad and people should exercise more than they should eat well in run role and I think that that's really important and so I agree with you being healthy and doing everything you can to make a healthy including me. Writing less sugar would be a good thing to do. No sugar but Finally whatever it is they always end. Don't they do? Maybe whatever it is. We'll it runs. Its course and then it ends. Well I mean most of these viruses will disappear. Although there are some instances where they become endemic. Thank you Dr. I am bowing into you. Pretended always come on. All right is the New York Times bestselling author of the New Book Code Red. How how? Progressives and moderates unite to save our country E. J. Dion great to see you back there all right. Here's the Chairman Nebraska Democratic Party and author of harvest the vote how Democrats can win again in rural America. Jane Club Jane how you doing and he is a former CIA officer and is now the nationally syndicated host of the buck sexton show buck sexton back with running. So.

Bernie Bernie Leslie officer buck sexton New York Times Democratic Party E. J. Dion Hughes Howard CIA America Chairman Nebraska
"nicholas kristof" Discussed on Real Time with Bill Maher

Real Time with Bill Maher

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"nicholas kristof" Discussed on Real Time with Bill Maher

"Areas where people were using Campbell's they were as different anyway but the but you bring up a really good point. These things often happen around wet markets. These are open air markets where you have animals and so you can imagine walking into these markets that happen everywhere in the world but in particular in Asia and Africa. Where you'll have you'll have bats in a cage and then you'll have penguins in a cage above it or You know the cats in another one until you're having all of these species altogether stressed and they're spreading disease to each other. It's amazing what the human body can ingest and be okay. It's true. I mean if you ever walked through markets just in this country in certain ethnic Chinatown. I'm seeing you know. Shit on sticks and animals hanging our our digestive system is almost too strong. It can take so much that will just put any pizza chicken. Well you know. I often when I teach a class on epidemiology. I often use the example people because I work on Ebola. It's another thing that I spend a lot of time working on and that is also a diseases crossed. The species from animals to humans will often talk about well. People EAT BATS. And how could they eat bats and culturally people? Eat all sorts of things And most of the time you're not getting a disease spilling over I mean people eat meat but you know there's cow disease Yup. Well Yeah if you were the czar the Mike Pence job Would you crazy idea you with your degrees at a title? I can't even pronounce but okay. So would you stop planes from overseas from certain countries from coming in here I think? These kinds of draconian measures of stopping travel. They don't really work if the day. I mean listen the viruses already here. We know that it's here and it's already spreading and the problem is when you really stop travel and you have all these travel bans. People find ways in and then you can't track them and then you don't know what's happening and so you have to be careful when you really start putting these these rules in place that are supposed to stop people and then people who really to get in they're gonNA find another way Also it has so many problems with trade and and You know all these other dip- diplomatic issues it it. It doesn't necessarily make that much of a difference so there are better ways to be able to twice. That's a good question for this particular corona virus. We don't know there are other corona viruses where people have been able to be reinfected. But with this one we don't know yet but don't you build a in the whole point is he gets something or you get back scene for it and then you have the immunity. Why doesn't it work after one time? You know that. Just certain diseases Do not Do not provide immunity after the fact. And which is why you can keep getting them Strep throat is another example. You could get right so right now. We don't know it's very possible that you could have immunity at least for a period of time with this corona virus. But but right now so many things about this. You're very serious about it. I like that know. That's one reason I wanted to. I I learned this word once catastrophe when you make things. That are not a catastrophe into a catastrophe. And that isn't helpful and we don't really. It's not even appropriate right now. Is that correct? You have to keep everything into perspective here and right now. We are learning what's happening. We do not have transmission here in the United States. We're still trying to figure out evitable you we're probably going to have a fair amount of spread here in the United States. But we don't know how much we don't aware and it's not gonNA happen overnight either. No but what does happen if there are two? I mean we only have a certain number of hospital beds and we're not going to build one in the week like the Chinese right Not that was really a hospital. But I don't know if we could even put up a room with beds. We can't build homing for the housing for the homeless. So I don't have.

United States Strep throat Mike Pence Asia Campbell Africa
"nicholas kristof" Discussed on Real Time with Bill Maher

Real Time with Bill Maher

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"nicholas kristof" Discussed on Real Time with Bill Maher

"Happened with. I mean there's there are saying the issue of preexisting conditions. I mean Democrats won on that. That's a win. I mean across the meeting. Everyone now no one now goes for our. We gotta get rid of that right. So there are areas where the ball has been moved away that progressives liberals would want it to other would overturn obamacare. And then bring back. Pre existing verbal support is not the same as supporting policies. That actually insures it. This time your point again this radicalization of the Republican Party which has pushed almost all moderates people who would have been happily Republican thirty or forty years ago. A good example of that is our food stamps. Bob Dole and George McGovern who could not have been farther apart politically got together and said we've got a hunger problem in America and we have to do something about that. If a Republican did that kind of thing with anybody any Democrat on the other side in the Senate They might face some of the World War Two Veterans Day. Both that's right both. Remember what it was specially Bob Dole remember what it was like to come home and have the entire community take care because Bob Dole was wounded. Do you think the Democrat Party is not the furthest left than it's ever been. I mean you keep talking about the radicalize Republican Party. I'm just party. I mean we have an open. Socialist is the front runner right simple statistic of US Republicans who they are ideologically two thirds or more a conservative if you ask Democrats they're split half liberal and half either moderate or conservative voting patterns Inkata's only the front runner because they have split. We're all being the Buddha judge. A few I'm sorry right. But if if if they're close to him Paul K but if Buddha Judge Bloomberg Biden and Cluber Shar were all one person. Ooh really really rich.

Democrats Republican Party Bob Dole obamacare Democrat Party Buddha Judge Bloomberg Biden George McGovern Cluber Shar Senate America Paul K Inkata
"nicholas kristof" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

The Axe Files with David Axelrod

08:42 min | 1 year ago

"nicholas kristof" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

"The status quo is what led us down. There is definitely that attitude. I mean for instance. They'll say you say. President trump is corrupt. I mean he's actually monetize the president. Oh they all do that. They do feel that but then when it is such a large problem then they start to focus on issues that they care very much about so for instance will one person. I like my guns. I don't want I don't want anybody who really wants to take away my guns and another one said know. I don't like immigrants and so that's really contain issue that they can deal with and it's it's the issue they'll vote on and the other woman who it's very hard to explain. But she is a pastor. She's really a very down to Earth. Person upstanding person in her community but she said. I vote for trump because I think he represents family values because he he he. He's up on. Tv's got his beautiful family there. And so I think that you know He. Projects varies accessible. What projecting this image. And it's something that really strikes and he's been embraced around issues like judges abortion by evangelical community. Which is his strongest core of support? I said that you wrote also a hopeful book. Talk about the things that gave you. Hope one is that we know what works partly because these issues are ones that Germany dealt with Canada dealt with life expectancy is not falling in those countries. Portugal decriminalized drug possession including heroin cocaine and mounted a public health effort. Then you write a lot about this. About how pervasive. The drug problem is and how drug diversion programs that decriminalize drugs and use the resources to move. People into treatment programs have been very affect so much more successful. You know we get. We still deal with drugs. Basically a law enforcement toolbox when it is cheaper and infinitely more humane and successful to deal with with with the public health and the treatment toolbox. And so we've seen programs that work and we we write about in Tulsa Oklahoma a incredibly successful program that deals with women who had addictions for fifteen years on average facing prison. Instead they go into a program that provides counselling provides treatment and gives them jobs. And we've also seen that we can address some social problems when we put our mind to it. The Obama Administration in Two Thousand Ten address veteran homelessness. And this was. The country was embarrassed that there were so many veterans on the street and we put our minds to it. It became a priority and over six years veteran homelessness was reduced by have if we were similarly embarrassed by child homelessness then we could reduce child homelessness by half as well. You know. This is the age of innovation in these in these areas. I mean it's incredible. How much research has done all universities across the country trying to prove what works? And what doesn't work in terms of dressing these social problems so we? We have a plethora of examples of randomized control trials that I could show what works what doesn't work. We are funding some of them. But they're all done on sort of piecemeal basis would really need is a systematic approach. That allows you need government intervention. You just can't you know cure all of society's ills with these patchwork of philanthropic endeavors. We need much more systemic. Let's return to economics for a second. We've got historic levels of inequality you write about this. I think you wrote that. The annual bonus pool for Wall Street exceeded this popular around town exceeded the income of minimum wage. Workers in this country collectively. That's a stark statistic. Can you solve these problems without solving that problem? I Say I think you definitely can solve these problems. And it doesn't necessarily mean taking away from other people that means lifting the bottom half we need to focus on addressing the lack of opportunity and the lack of investment in human capital at the level of the fifty percent of people at the lower income level. Those people we need to lift them up. But but I mean doesn't it also require those people who've done very very well to recognize their responsibility to make those investments. And how do you we are so silo? D- I mean the the thing about this book and why so recommend everyone read? It is that there is a crisis in this country that we can't see from the apartment towers of in Chicago and San Francisco and New York a mile or two from here. We see all of these problems that you're writing about in communities in Chicago and yet they seem distant. If you live downtown how we create a national sense of interconnectedness and a national conversation about these to the point where it becomes politically tenable to do big things. I mean that's terrific and I really do think a lot of it has to do with improving. Empathy is really recognizing that we sort of lost empathy because because we live in bubbles and we don't see people outside of the bubble was very interesting is that you know people in the top twenty percent. They contribute in terms of charity less as a percentage of income than people at the bottom twenty percent. And you're thinking how could all these people who are so poor? How can they contribute? Moore's percentage of their income and it's partly because they live in neighborhoods where they see need and people who and the top twenty percent. They don't see the need so much and so when people in poor neighborhoods confront the need they give they respond and I think that if we saw that also with the top twenty percent if they saw the need they would also respond. Nick as I said you've written about some extraordinarily difficult challenges all over the world that people are facing. You've shown a light on these kinds of challenges and yet often you write that. You're optimistic in fact you wrote about what's happened around the world in your urine column. Are you optimistic right now? Yeah I and don't feel pressured I know I am. I mean for a couple of reasons one is that I think the. Us really took some fundamental missteps fifty years and that involved cutting taxes and cutting investments in human capital in safety nets as they look at the that trajectory. I wonder if Kansas under Sam Brownback mark kind of the governor who cut taxes dramatically and was ultimately ultimately. Kansas voters rebelled. And because there are schools were doing too poorly and when Kansas voters rebel and want to raise taxes that strikes me as a really interesting moment. Likewise you have red states like Idaho Utah that are expanding Medicaid so. I wonder if there isn't something of a of a mental switch. You Begin to see as a lot of white suffer from drug addiction. A change in the frame of reference is a sad commentary which is normal hypocrisy and double stand but but maybe a step toward a better policy so as Kansas goes so goes the nation. Let's hope I mean. Let's let's hope that that's the case and you do see that. People are reaching four some big ideas and new approaches as an Oregon and Oregon. We were always raise on this and a pioneer mythology. Are these Perot. Eric Ancestors you cross the country and they would never relied on benefit plan. Well it of course the whole reason that the pioneers went to the Willamette valley was because of benefit plan every benefit plan. It was the homesteads at the end. My area was transformed by these big ideas for homesteads rural electrification. Gi Bill of rights. And that is what I think can indeed again transform the opportunities for the kids on the number six bus well Nick Kristof and Sheryl Wudunn thank you so much for shining a light on.

Kansas Nick Kristof president Oregon trump Chicago Tulsa Obama Administration drug possession Portugal Willamette valley Germany Oklahoma Perot Eric Ancestors Sam Brownback Sheryl Wudunn Moore
"nicholas kristof" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

The Axe Files with David Axelrod

04:09 min | 1 year ago

"nicholas kristof" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

"Okay. Different perspectives so one of the reasons. You have such celebrity as a journalist is that you've reinvented in a way the position of the OP. Ed columnist you're not simply and I don't want to impugn any of my friends. Who are up ED columnist? But you're not sitting there everyday. Thinking great thoughts with your feet on your desk traveled all over the world and you've used that position to shine a bright light in the darkest corners of this planet places like Sudan and Darfur. Were you exposed the genocide you WanNa Pulitzer Prize around that work and human trafficking and a whole range of other issues health issues. In some cases it wasn't safe. I mean you your life at risk. Tell me how you envision your role will ending. Part of it was that we had spent many many years as reporters before I became a columnist. And when I wasn't reporter and especially a foreign foreign correspondent I learned to have a deep suspicion of columnists who participate from inside the bubble and I saw how we of course are commenting on your colleagues at the time. Not at all not at all but just important it is to get in the field and get outside the Capitol and talk to people and I think that in addition one of the things I learned after I became a columnist when I first got this real estate on the op-ed page. I thought wow. I'm going to be changing people's minds twice a week and and it turns out. That isn't the case at all that if I if I write about things that people have already thought about so if I write about the Middle East peace plan if I write about impeachment whatever then I essentially don't change anybody's mind people who start out agreeing think it was brilliant people who start. I disagree. Christoph Office rocker again. That where you've been reading your social media ware. I think a columnist and maybe any journalist really has influences not so much changing minds on issues that are on the agenda but actually helping change. What IS ON THE AGENDA PROJECT. We we have spotlights and if we can use that spotlight to project it on something and hence elevated to the agenda then that is a step toward getting it addressed and so it was interesting about my reporting on. Darfur sex trafficking was not my opinions on it. I mean they were pretty banal but it was it was making people spill their coffee as they read about what was happening in. Darfur in brothels whatever or and in our own backyard. Which is what we do right. Yes. That's what was so surprising. Is You contrast it? It really is pretty bad here too. Yeah although the less risk associated with the going nervous when he'd go off on these the Dr Four oh two yen not to talk to Darfur. Yeah no there's there's a real risk and he actually didn't tell me all the time where we was going and so it was only when he was with George Clooney that I was a rest assured because I knew that George Clooney with not go into a place I was very very very small kids and right right now absolutely got into trouble once because after a plane crash I I thought I would best tell Cheryl after I got back home you were in the play offs and the hard thing to keep it. Well I thought it'd be best to tell in person after I got back and but I had to tell the foreign desk why overhead and I wasn't where I was supposed to be and shortly afterwards. Jarrell spoke to somebody in the foreign desk. You said that was terrible and explain crash and I was completely completely blown and I learned a fruit is indeed truth is transparent..

Darfur George Clooney reporter Ed Pulitzer Prize Middle East Dr Four Sudan Jarrell Christoph Office Cheryl
"nicholas kristof" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

The Axe Files with David Axelrod

12:48 min | 1 year ago

"nicholas kristof" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

"Pulitzer Prize for Journalism in Nineteen Ninety for their coverage of the Cinnamon Square protests as China correspondent. For The New York Times Nick Kristof is of course the longtime columnist for the New York. Times he won a Pulitzer Prize for his commentary. There too but now they've turned their attention. Closer to home with a book called tight rope Americans reaching for hope and it's a really personal examination of what's happened to the middle class. In many of the small towns of America including the one in which Kristof grew kristof and Wudunn who are married came to the Institute of Politics a few weeks ago for a live recording of the X. Files to discuss their journey this book and the State of our nation Nick Kristof and Sheryl done welcome to the Institute of politics in keeping with the time. I'm going to hand my questions to the chief justice and he will ask them for you know really in this very very powerful book tight rope. You're talking about the journey of Americans in small towns and rural areas and inner cities and forgotten places all over this country. But I wanNA talk about your Stories Nick. First of all let me start with you like myself. You're the son of an immigrant from Eastern Europe. Who had his own Harrowing Journey to get here? Want you share a little fat? Yeah my my dad's family. They were Armenians who were living. It was actually kind of funny. My my dad would describe him. If you ask his origin he would say who was from Romania. His sister was hey she was Armenian and his brother would say Polish and my dad's spoke to his brother when he would call and Polish into his sister when she would call in Romanian mixed up family. Flag would change periodically overhead and then in nineteen forty the area which was at that time. Romania were seized by the Soviet Union. Family was meanwhile a busy spying for the free. Polish government part of network sending information back to London and so the family ended up. Being various people ended up getting executed by either the Nazis or the Soviets. My Dad was in prison for He he fled was in a concentration camp in Yugoslavia for a while and eventually made his way to France and decided that France was not a place that had a future for a Slavic immigrant and began to dream about coming to the US and eventually made it not speaking his name when he came over here was Vladislav Christoph bits of it all right okay. Three attempted that and he showed his name to create. Yeah he arrived and he would say his name. Whiskas DZAFO VEG. And you know people tried to spell it and that was pretty helpless shortened it to Kristof. I thought it was because he had the foresight to know that Kristof would look better in a bio byline. We'll his first purchase on arriving in the US to teach himself. English was a Sunday New York Times. There's something poetic about there is there. Is He ultimately became an academic? That's right he and your mother were both academics. That's right so my dad arrived in Oregon not speaking English and worked at a logging camp for a year or to earn a little bit of money to learn English and then went to Reed College and studied political science then applied to University of Chicago. Political Science Department and was initially told it was not accepted the HD program. His professor appealed and said this is a brilliant get and so they took him and my mom was studying here at the International House. One more marriage produced excellent and they ended up at Portland State and then they were both at Portland State. My mom teaching art history. My Dad Teaching Political Science you ended up in Yam Hill Oregon. The way you described in this book and I want to get into the details of the book untold bit later. Because we've got some other business do Cheryl about your story and how we got to this place but it didn't sound like a haven for academics. We were real. We were way beyond the normal commuting range so most people in Portland. You know lived in Portland or nearby but my parents really wanted to have a farm and so we had this farm and Yom Hill and they were pretty much the only people commuted to Portland and so it was I mean I obviously had this connection to that larger world but I was deeply embedded in the community. I was very active in future farmers of America and the school was a you know kind of very typical farm town school. You knew you want to be a journalist way back then why so when I was when I turned sixteen and got a driver's license. I the local county newspaper hired me to write and it was. I just couldn't believe that I was getting paid to go. Talk to interesting people and write stories about it. It's not the usual teenage about what you do when you get your first drivers. Go ahead but it was but it was a great way when you're sixteen. That turned out to be a great way to impress. Sixteen year old girls and it. It really was a I love. I love the writing. I love the just aesthetic pleasure from writing. I like being around interesting people and the idea of being paid for it was truly incredibly cool. I was later in danger coming law professor but I escaped that fate fortune. Yeah good for you good for you. As journalists I applaud your Judgment Cheryl. Your family had a classic immigrants story as well only one generation earlier. Tell us about that. We're actually trying to prove are working class credentials. I would say that I actually even come from the peasantry. China my grandparents were from tiny little villages In Very Agricultural Guandong province both of them escaped to Macau and then to Joe Johns and the Golden Mountain here in the US One. You say escaped escaped from well. They were playing really poverty. I mean everyone was trying to get to sort of the promised land here in the US and So because it was extremely impoverished there and so they were able to scrape their way to get to to the. Us Let me ask you both You tell these stories and they have this common element which is people who wanted to come to the promised. Land wanted to come to America. We're in this period now where we have a sign on the at the border saying refugees need not apply immigrants discouraged. Do you look at this. Current debate through the prism of your family experiences. Oh of course. Clearly the American dream still exists for the most part for people outside of the US. I think that what we actually write about in tight rope is that for many Americans. The American dream is broken but the allure and the magic of the American dream is still alive and well and the rest of the world which is why so many people want to come here. But what does it mean? If we closed down and say don't apply in today's context. My Dad were never be admitted. I mean people would see him as somebody from potential saboteur potential spy from an enemy part of the Soviet bloc and said we don't need more refugees. I mean I'm struck that when my dad was on this ship. Arriving in New York there was a woman from Boston who was on the deck watching with him and my dad's no English but she said him Welcome young man and then she corrected herself and said welcome young American and he was just so blown away that here he is. He's never set foot in America. He can't speak English. And this American woman is welcoming him as a already as a young American and that deeply moved him and he spoke about it. And it's kind of the opposite of the attitude that we're seeing your grandparents certainly would have failed the current tests now especially as established by the Supreme Court just in the last few days because they were peasants they were probably not educated for they're worth would be absolutely in fact my grandfather on my father's side had someone else's papers when he came across didn't even own papers but it's remarkable that in my my parents went to college so in that one generation You know they went from rags to really intellectual riches and so. It's still possible to do that. And it's really a shame that we don't think that people who look though they're grovelling INS and starving and can't get anywhere. We don't think that they can actually rise up when they really can. Well speak to me from the standpoint of you're steeped in business and economics speak to me. About what the impact of it is to the country beyond what it means to the people who get to come or don't get to come but what does the infusion of immigrants mean to the country. Well it's a lot of different things on different levels so of course you have technology people who are technology experts. We are homegrown. We are home growing of people who study stem but there are a lot more people in Asia who study stem much more intensely and so we are obviously the technology companies. Want more people who are intellectually. They're gonNA move towards the Canadian model. Where you're GONNA get all those people that's one thing but still there's a restriction on that but in Japan we actually when we were there because Japan also very fearful of immigrants and they started letting people in partly because they had to do the jobs that no other Japanese wanted to do The the three Ds Dangerous Dirty and disgusting and here. We have a similar phenomenon because what are the jobs that a lot of the immigrants are taking their jobs that Americans really don't want to do so in Oregon? We see that. There are huge numbers of immigrants who are incredibly productive doing jobs and actually we have an experiment on her own farm farm. There you you family farm. My mom is transformed the farm and purposed it for weather uses and we still. We still have been an orchard for a long time a cherry orchard. Now we're actually changing over to making growing grapes and apples and we kind of did an experiment and that we hired middle aged white men who we thought okay. We want to give them jobs. They're struggling so we give them jobs. But you'll also have some immigrants who are on on the farm to working and the contrast is unbelievable. I mean it's and we've had other businessmen tell us that if I'm GONNA pay a local worker an American worker thirty dollars an hour. She takes him twice as long to do anything. And if I pay a Mexican worker fifteen dollars an hour I get so much more productivity out of him it makes me. It makes absolutely no sense for me. Ever hire the local American worker. My business could not survive. The local American worker probably looks at this an entirely different way which is and. I'm hoping they don't listen to your podcast. We're trying to build audience. You guys met as competitors. You went to business school. You got a masters in business from Harvard. You went to Princeton and we're Rhode Scholar. You went to Harvard. Where Rhodes scholar and then you both became journalists. I don't have time to ask you how one goes to get an MBA to become a journalist but nonetheless there we are. You're in Los Angeles for the Wall Street Journal. You were there for the New York Times and you you met..

Nick Kristof US America New York Times Pulitzer Prize New York Oregon Portland professor China Institute of Politics Romania Portland State Eastern Europe Cinnamon Square Soviet Union Harvard
Americans on a Financial 'Tightrope'

The Book Review

07:37 min | 1 year ago

Americans on a Financial 'Tightrope'

"On January fourteenth in the first of a year long series of Book Review Live Events. My colleague Jennifer Celaya the critic here at the New York Times interviewed Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl Wudunn about their new book tightrope. The following is a little bit of an excerpt from from that event and that conversation. I wanted to start off by talking about the genesis of this book project. which you know is it's really interesting for a variety of reasons but one of the things that struck me was that this is your fifth book together and your other books have taken you across the world you've looked at AH poverty initiatives Kenya you've looked at education for girls in China? And you know this is something. That's much closer to home home. I mean literally is home for you neck. So can you tell us a bit about how you decided to write about Yam hill well. It's partly exactly that we were traveling around the world covering humanitarian crises. And then we would go back to my beloved hometown of the Am Hill. Where my mom still lives on the family farm and we saw a humanitarian crisis unfolding there and You know I my old school busses. This is kind of a network of old friends and you know we realized that about a quarter of the kids on that bus had passed passed away from consequences of Drugs Alcohol Suicide Ruckus accidents and and and related pathologies. And this was. This wasn't just one towns problem. This was a nation's problem and that there is something of a great social depression Russian happening across the country even in the Great Depression. Life expectancy didn't fall the way does. Now it's three years in a row in the US and it seemed to us is that this wasn't getting adequate attention that we could write about it and to some degree. Use My this town that I care very very deeply about as a narrative thread to tell that story nick and channel I I want to talk about the themes in this book on the subject took the spokane the issues and the questions that it raises because those are really important. The really urgent and I think it's something that everybody needs to think about and confront but I it did want to have a bit of a process question because I think there's a number of people I know maybe myself included. Who the idea of writing a book with one Spouse House seems maybe complicated and so this is your fifth book together and I just wanted to know a little bit about how that works the division vision of Labor? What happens when you disagree about something was so I write the subjects and he writes the verbs? We each right half a book but the Nice thing is that you only have to write half a book somehow magically appears to be a whole book but we we are we do have very similar views have a slightly more sort of economic business taken. He is slightly more sort of political socio economic. Take so it's actually very complimentary and we do discuss things a lot We you know the treatment of certain topics we really do discuss. We each right sections We don't necessarily know what's going to be a full chapter in the very beginning and then we mix and match and then our editor speaks up and then this chapter the two goes to chapters sixteen and sixteen goes to chapter four. And you know. There's a lot of mixing and matching and moving around when editing. Of course the voice of the book is very much in a unified voice. I mean do you end up going over each other's chapters just to make sure that we coast constantly totally editor I mean and that's because we were. I'm I'm a former report but we're both sort of journalistic experience and so we're just used to being edited fair. That's we're still married so one of the things that I noticed in the book from the from the get goes that you start off with some some really arresting analogies so you make mention of Dante's inferno you call the situation in America Today Today Twentieth Century futile them. I think you know and I think for a number of Americans. Those are really striking. Maybe startling analogies and I was wondering during what did you mean when you decided to use those those words so we talked a lot about that because they are very striking images and we used to to think that when we were traveling around the world visiting some of the places both in China and other other parts of the developing world that the poverty and the pain and the suffering that we saw their overseas was of a dimension that was just far greater than anything that one could see here here in America and then when we started learning more about what was going on in our own backyard. We started learning a lot more about how the pain and suffering that people were. Were feeling here and it really is about the human condition and it's about just the Catharsis sometimes but also the intense searing depression that that people feel and so it really is very comparable it was it was surprising surprising to us and shocking to us. And if you look back at what is happening in many towns across America. It isn't inferno for these people and for these families. I mean we were really searching for metaphors to Kinda grab people by the Lapel and high offered the metaphor. I'm going to go but great great social depression you know. At least in the Great Depression there was an enormous effort through government policy to address it and mitigated and it feels as if now there is this horrendous suffering out there and there isn't a similar government effort to address it and indeed that that suffering isn't all that even noticed by those who were doing better at in the first class deck. There's a party going on. And meanwhile the ship of state is kind of capsizing in ways that obviously affect those below decks but it ultimately affect our whole country and we were searching for ways to convey that urgency. And that's what we hope. Tight rope will will do to try to broaden the conversation from just trump's tweets of the day to this larger convulsion that the country is enduring part of the country is just feeling something far worse than the Great Depression because what is driving that decline in life expectancy is depths of despair. It's basically the debts let's That had been well documented by Angus Deaton and Anne case Very elegantly in their research. That shows that These debts are basically three of three types. Alcohol related deaths deaths from overdose related to drugs and suicides. We're at the highest rate of suicides in this in in this country since World War Two. These are stunning statistics. And somehow or other they're not yet rising to the surface

America China Editor Kenya Jennifer Celaya New York Times Nicholas Kristof United States Yam Hill Sheryl Wudunn Am Hill Angus Deaton Spokane Nick Dante Anne
"nicholas kristof" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"nicholas kristof" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Oppressed and go the real scandals which had only recently come to light and the scandal of fgm and so on but i do take arm lars point and i do think we are talking about here what my colleague nicholas kristof has talked about in his wonderful book half the sky about how guest the he would capital of one kind has been ignored an underestimated and if only women can the empowered more so much can be done particularly the most difficult parts of the world one of the things like look at his microfinancing in aid in international a really works when it goes through matriach is that at matriarch is under the cover that have made it worked i've witnessed in places like afghanistan a superb but actually for all the billions of western powers spent in afghanistan the state and the status of women in afghanistan today is an absolute scandal and it is very very worrying indeed lower the less would briefly well i thought i mean i agree with what you're saying and i think men should be allowed to speak and encouraged to speak out listen and speak out because there are many men who have wonderful feminism merit to a fantastic feminist the one thing i would pick up on and robots point is that when it should be in power but i also think men should be disempowered and i think it's the same with race i think black people should be empowered but white people will sunny to be this it's about to try and find a balance some of us have to lose and that that that's part of the problem is that men do not want to be this empower they don't want to lose the.

nicholas kristof afghanistan