17 Burst results for "Nixon Kissinger"

"nixon kissinger" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

03:54 min | Last month

"nixon kissinger" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"It's not surprising to me at all that the Chinese side is not happy about that Now. It was surprising to me that they were so public and so bold, so brazen when you talk about why that is, But on the one hand it shows that May see weakness in the United States and they're testing about is the administration. On the other hand, they may feel insecurity back at home. No, I want to point out that in chaos under heaven, it's not a Democratic book, not a Republican book. It's American book because it's about America versus China, and it's the struggle of our life and of our Children's lives in our grandchildren's lives. China has become the central dilemma of our time and the Nixon Kissinger years. Their engagement strategy repudiated by Nixon himself in 1994 in a conversation with William Safire, and most recently by Mike Pompeo at the Nixon Library remains kind of a haze and fog through which Americans watch Josh Rogan. I gather it is your attempt to clear away that fog that lead to chaos under heaven. Well, that's exactly right. I mean, as it turns out, the rise of China is a complex thing, but not something that could be relegated to the discussion of ivory Towers or just the China hands that have been mismanaging this relationship, frankly, the last 40 years and while I was writing this book, urging Americans to wake up to the challenge of a rising China and our academia on Wall Street. In Silicon Valley and Hollywood. Something amazing happened. Actually, all of these institutions of American society started to figure it out from themselves. Because China's actions that are outside of its borders all the sudden started to impact everyone from the MBA to the airline. Your local student at your local school s O. That was brought awakening that was already happening before the pandemic hit Once the pandemic it then every human and every country realized that what happens in Beijing no longer stays in Beijing. CASS under Heaven brings it all together. Beginning with the most important point of the book. There is a genocide under way with the Uighurs and other ethnic minorities and Jiujiang, and it began in 2014. It's expanded to genocide, as formally declared by then Secretary of State Mike Palm Pale and endorsed by now Secretary of state Tony Blinken. His confirmation hearing. There is no doubt about it, and everyone has to measure their complicity with it on you detail it. I've had some people refer to the 380 camps. I've had other guests on its handed at it. Described it, but you actually lay out the detail Josh Rogan, it may be the first major book that discusses the wigger genocide. Well, yeah, thanks for noting that I spent a lot of time with leaders who had survived the camps and the family members of leaders who are still in the camps, and that's almost every weaker journalist to the United States has family members in the camp. There's a reason for that is because the Chinese Communist Party has been targeting anyone with any foreign ties and literally disappearing all of their family members. In its broad campaign of atrocities and coercion. Now you know what's amazing about the weaker story is it sort of puts the lie to this idea that, you know. Oh, it's just these hawkish Americans want to start a cold war with China, which is what you'll hear. Not only coming out of the far left in America but also coming out of the Chinese Communist Party propaganda. Alice in the weaker genocide is just the most glaring, awful example of that. There's much more to my conversation with Josh Rogan Go to town. All reviewed calm for the entire interview. Coming up. Amazon Delhi. Politically incorrect book, The hardcover is gone. The paperbacks on the Kindle auditions on the Audible book Gone even used copies. They won't even allow third parties to sell You copy Brian Anderson when the town all Review returns in a moment. Christian My Gallagher, thrilled to be co hosting the stand with Israel to her again in 2021. This tour of the Holy lead will bring us face to face with one of the country's most important allies and one of the most fascinating, spiritually places on Earth. More than a vacation..

Mike Pompeo William Safire 1994 2014 2021 Brian Anderson Josh Rogan Kindle United States Amazon Earth Silicon Valley Beijing Wall Street Nixon Chinese Communist Party Mike Palm Pale Christian My Gallagher Tony Blinken Hollywood
"nixon kissinger" Discussed on The Eleventh

The Eleventh

02:33 min | 1 year ago

"nixon kissinger" Discussed on The Eleventh

"It's easy to see why people find this story. Compelling they look a foreign government with a track record of political interventions around the world and they pay maybe they intervened in our politics two and as far as spy thrillers go it really does have all the right ingredients the CIA spies high stakes involving secret defense installations and the US Australia alliance but like all the best conspiracy theories. It also has a title lack of conclusive evidence. The best we've got is the word again. And the phrase Alman Kerr and on top of that the guy at the center of. It'll Gough Whitlam. Well he doesn't buy it Ray. Martin asked him about it and I said look in on it. Believe in conspiracies put all pulled together in this and he said modern think they did it he said I don't think without guilty removed. They didn't even say well the jury's out let's see what history brings in terms of it but he said he didn't think that he'd been a victim of conspiracy sow right mountains reporting was instrumental in revealing the depth of US government and CIA suspicion of Gough Whitlam and Rye Love Good Young. He's devoted his life and his career to finding them getting people to share them and then telling them to huge public audiences but even he admits the final piece of evidence is just not. Yeah and if after nearly forty five years now unfounded yet then maybe it just doesn't exist. We don't have any proof we've got all these strains at indicate with her be angleton whether it be boys whether it be Nixon Kissinger et Cetera. We have the spiking out. All we have a strays and and it remains a wonderful novel. It reminds a fantastic feature film. And maybe that fantastic feature film is obscuring another more important story. I mean what happened with the dismissal was an Australian failure. This is something. We got wrong. Journalist Paul Kelly says that theory of Foreign. Intervention is a baseless distraction from. What's actually a problem of our making? This is something we stuffed up in terms of alleys air institutions. This is Aaron failing and the effort to try and palm it off to the Americans I on this was an American conspiracy Is it somehow pathetic? We've got to face up to our own deficiencies in our own failures..

Gough Whitlam CIA Martin US Alman Kerr Ray Nixon Kissinger Aaron Paul Kelly Australia
"nixon kissinger" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

13:44 min | 1 year ago

"nixon kissinger" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"With the Nixon administration should resisting the pressure to focus more on human rights and having pressure coming from non state actors non-governmental organizations also coming from Capitol. Hill is you've discussed. There's there's also something happening. Within the administration administration there are advisers to Nixon and Kissinger horr- actually making the case that the United States couldn't afford to ignore downplay human rights talk a little bit about the sure that was one of the most interesting discoveries for me because the way that based on reading other other people's work and some of my earlier research on the the Nixon and Ford administrations distractions. I had this sense of Nixon Kissinger as running a sort of a top down ship that would allow for no dissent and therefore if Henry Kissinger had decided that human when rights were not a priority there would be no discussion of this and what I found was that a number of his assistant secretaries particularly for East Asian Affairs and for latin-american affairs as well as the the director of his Policy Planning Staff Winston Lord that each of them in different areas of the world and on different issues were saying actually there could be real benefits to moderating moderating our approach and so. I was really interested to see that this was happening in meetings at the Secretary of state was having just with sort of chief aides in memo's. There's a whole series as of memos that I read written by Winston Lord where he's repeatedly. I think gently but very clearly suggesting that the United States would benefit from a new approach until I was I was very interested to see this and the other part that I was really interested to see was that a number of ambassadors who were certainly taking direction from Washington and extensively from Kissinger there were able to have quite a degree of latitude in the degree to which they would rescue or at least put pressure on governments to release political prisoners that they would put pressure sure on governments about the sort of lack of due process the arrests that were happening and so I found that there was actually far greater agency of these lower level actors I during the sort of Kissinger Tenure Secretary of state than I had imagined as once. I'm glad you mentioned Winston Lord. I had the pleasure of sitting down with him. The summer talking about what it was liked to work in the Nixon Administration working for Dr Kissinger in Bachelor talk a little bit about sort of some of the challenges he had navigate when he was in government but I wanNA switch to sort of the opposite side of the sort of the Nixon years which is the criticism that was coming at the Nixon administration not from Democrats but from Republicans Publican's because there were elements Republican Party that argued that the Nixon administration was mistaken with its Policies Essentially Riyal politique with the Soviet Union that the United States should elevate human rights concerns that was one of the complaints that would later become called the Reagan wing of the Party would have with the Nixon excellent ministration. How did that all play out. I think you're absolutely right. I mean I think we see this. Moose clearly in Reagan's challenge of Ford for the Republican nomination and in the the sort of element of the platform they get this sort of morality in foreign policy because that's the criticism and it's it's interesting because it's the same criticism that is coming from the Liberal Democrats but essentially what these Republicans and some conservative Democrats are saying is that you know doesn't matter if the United States gets ahead in the Cold War. If it has sort of abandoned donned its core values if it no longer stands up as a champion of democracy and the rights that are enshrined in the bill of rights then maybe everything everything has been lost in this sort of gamesmanship I mean I think that that that's sort of the criticism of Kissinger is that that he was almost too smart tacticly and ended up potentially sleep giving away some of what made the United States distinct and worth defending and preserving the list of countries that Republicans particularly in in the seventies focused on different than what Democrats focused on Republicans in their complaints most talked about Communist governments whereas Democrats would talk about authoritarian governments many of which had good relations with the United States absolutely and that's one of the reasons that in my research I looked at a range of countries because I didn't want to suggest that human rights came to be institutionalized and US foreign policy only out of a sort of Cold War ideological bent of saying these communist countries have no human rights nights but countries that were allies of the United States places like Greece where there was a lot of criticism of the continued US support for that government after the coup in nineteen sixty seven. I'm very interested in the relationship relationship with the Soviet Union but also countries that don't have as much strategic value to the United States places like southern Rhodesia that all of them get swept up in this concern about you support for human rights but you're absolutely right that even though human rights was a bipartisan issue I'm in a kind of broad sense that the the sort of details tells of it and then I would say it's not just which countries get focused on but often which rights are privileged on but that does vary based on Social Roy of different different different rights that someone like Ronald Reagan was enormously concerned about religious freedom. Whether it was the rights of Pentecostals pentecostals baptists of Jews in the Soviet Union he was also concerned with the rights to private property whereas I would say that Democrats often were more focused chryst on political imprisonment and the imprisonment say of left wing critics of right wing governments who people like Henry Kissinger would have argued were legitimate threats to the government's Liberal Democrats said even if they are we need to make sure that their rights are protected that these countries are following due process etc and you would get this when Ronald Reagan became president is ambassador the nation breaching Kerr Patrick and of course she had famously criticized Democrats for focusing on authoritarian in friendly governments and missing the mark on the importance of what was happening in Communist governments. Yes and I think that that criticism really has its roots in the congressional rational achievements of the mid nineteen seventies well because I think there was a recognition at some point the those within the United States who cared about human rights might not be able to fact act what the South Korean government was doing what the Chilean government was doing but it could make sure the US funding and US security supplies weren't being used in that repression Donald Frazier who someone who I'm very interested in it and I see a very significant character he was a democratic member of Congress from the Great State of Minnesota. Yes and I'd be happy talk about him. more because I think he's really the pivotal figure in the story but he talks about going to Greece in the wake of the nineteen sixty seven coup and seeing american-made tanks in the streets and he is really upset about the idea that these tanks are being used to combat students who are protesting against the regime and so essentially these people who are concerned about human rights and recognize they might not be able to have great influence on foreign governments said well. You know what we can do is cut off security assistance to governments that are that are repressive. No United States isn't sending security assistance to communist governments. It's only countries with whom the United States has determined that there's a strategic relationship that needs to be supported in the nineteen seventies the United States. It's targeted the government were oppressive to whom it gave security assistance economic assistance extended loans through multilateral lending associations because those were or seen as effective ways to have leverage over those governments. I understand Kirkpatrick criticism but the members of Congress that I'm interested in. I would say well. Should we do nothing should should we have let US dollars continue to fund the disappearance of people in in Chile and Argentina. If we have the means to effect a change there should we lose sight of the opportunity to make incremental change even if we can't yet and in Communism in Europe and Asia Etcetera Sir I want to take the conversation up to the present check as you look back at how human rights went from the periphery of Foreign Policy Z. to closer to center stage archly driven by non-governmental organizations and members of Congress seizing on the issue and sort of creating what you would call this institutionalised human rights apparatus. What are the lessons for today. What's interesting. I started writing this book in the summer of two thousand eight and at the time I would have told you that I felt the most significant lesson would be that the actors that I was looking at it in the nineteen. Sixties were facing very similar questions to what the George W Bush administration administration was facing how to balance American values and ideals with the need to preserve national security. I mean certainly here. I'm talking about the imprisonment of detainees in Guantanamo. Bay The use of torture etc but I would see that over time and this sort of I guess testifies to how long it takes to finish a book. I submitted the manuscript several months into the trump administration. I think the message of my research is that people outside of the government and members of Congress and members of the Foreign Service who disagree with the government policy particularly relating to a an ignoring of human rights or a downgrading of human rights have a range of tools at their disposal that they don't don't have to blindly follow the position that's coming from the White House and they have a lot of space to have an impact at the lower level. You know speaking to a foreign government and saying actually we really care about the fact that you've arrested this person or we. WanNa make sure you're not going to execute this person on but they also have the ability to pass legislation that can constrain the White House's actions and so now I see it much more as rather than you know. There's a long history of struggling with these questions that I want to highlight. I think the achievements that members of Congress listen there. There's sort of a non-governmental allies were able to make and that I don't think that for people who care deeply about human rights they have to say well. Everything is sort of lost for the length of his administration but there's actually still a lot that can be accomplished. Just do some specifics there. I will note that we often talk about the disappearance of bipartisanship partisanship in American foreign policy. I think we tend to overrate how much bipartisanship we had historically but I would even know today that if you look at issues and dealing with Russia with Saudi Arabian the murder of journalists to Shoji that you have seen this pushback from Congress is sort of institutionalized element in American foreign policy and I would say also in the the support for Saudi Arabia and Yemen. That's another place where I've seen a lot of clear congressional signaling that they're dissatisfied. Given the human rights concerns the challenge of course it runs into the basic constitutional structure in which Congress can try to pass legislation overruling the president but the president can veto that legislation and in this case the president has vetoed several pieces of legislation in Congress votes to overturn but that was the case historic..

United States Henry Kissinger Nixon administration Congress Nixon Kissinger Ronald Reagan Nixon Kissinger horr Winston Lord Soviet Union president Greece Hill George W Bush administration
"nixon kissinger" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

12:22 min | 2 years ago

"nixon kissinger" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"A little bit about Vietnam, which was not talked much about yet. We'll talk more about it. On thursday. Richard nixon. Richard Nixon was a brilliant statesmen. He really was. And he was desperate to disentangle the United States from Vietnam wanted to get America out of that war. It wasn't at all clear. How to do it in party wanted to get out of it because he wanted to pursue a very vigorous anti-soviet? Foreign policy. He was always. I mean, Nixon Nixon since he came to Washington is forty six was a anticommunist which didn't mean he couldn't play with the communist when he needed to like, for instance, when he established relations with China. Right, quite quite dramatically. But he wanted to get out of the at Phnom for all kinds of reasons. Americans didn't want to be there anymore. Either. He had an ally. His side. I'm sure you won't know who it was. It was Henry Kissinger. Also, brilliant, brilliant statesman, possibly not as brilliant as he himself thought. And thanks, but still very very effective. If you were the secretary of state, you hated him because he was the national security adviser, and he just did Enron's around the State Department whenever he wanted to whenever Kissinger thought, we should be doing something. He just did it and never told anybody and they found out later on with restorative embarrassing. If you were the secretary of state, and it was Nixon sorry with Kissinger really who are related what came to be called, the so-called Nixon doctrine. And I think it's Cincinnati and everyone has to have a doctrine Nixon really did have a doctrine Nixon Kissinger doctrine, but what it was was effectively a rejection of containment. Remember, we talked a while back about the idea of containment that we the United States could contain communism everywhere. And this is how the United States has got involved in all these little. Awards including nam, which turned out not to be a little more at all. And Nixon's the Nixon doctrine announced that although America would reward it's friends with economic aid, and even with weapons sales that it was no longer going to dedicate its own troops to combat communist growth anywhere in the world, but mainly in Asia and Africa and Latin America, so it would send money it would send weapons it might send advisers, but that was how we got into Vietnam in the first place in the fifties. So that was maybe not a good idea, but they weren't going to send American troops anymore. To fight other people's wars. He had at the same time a three pronged approach to envy at Phnom were honorably. No one wants to end the war dishonorably. So I think that pretty much everybody was on board for ending the war honorably, but this meant trying to preserve an independent pro United States government in South Vietnam. This was very difficult because the North Vietnam rationally winning the war and you'll see that they do. In fact, pretty much the minute. The United States takes its troops out of Vietnam. The north north winds, but this is still the goal. The goal is to have a pro United States government in South Vietnam and Nixon tries to accomplish this through a series of meetings in Paris between Henry Kissinger and the North Vietnamese on American history. A look that the year nineteen sixty eight university of Chicago, professor Jane daily. He also wants to do what he calls the Nazi this word. Right. Vietnam station. The war. In other words by replacing by pulling American troops out and replacing them with South Vietnamese troops trained by the Americans armed by the Americans. But in other words, trying to get our troops extricated from Vietnam itself. And by expanding the air war. And this is something you've probably seen images of or heard about it becomes extremely controversial. And the idea of to expand the air war is to force North Vietnam to compromise. To basically, we talked. We talked already and we read slaughterhouse five talking about the way that war were that's targeting civilians becomes acceptable in World War Two. And this is basically what's happening now in Vietnam. And they say usually, there's a military base or something there's a military target of some sort but in truth with they're doing is they're targeting civilians and killing a lot of them. These tactics. Don't work the bombing of North Vietnam. Does not actually and the war. Does not particularly demoralized the North Vietnamese. And as this happened as the bombing expanded you get a massive antiwar movement in the United States seven hundred and fifty thousand people participated in the November moratorium in nineteen sixty two in in Washington DC, which is still the largest antiwar demonstration in American history. It may be the largest demonstration at all still maybe not maybe last time of last year's demonstrations were bigger, but it's the largest anti war demonstration in American history. And really nothing like it has been seen in one thousand nine thousand nine hundred seventy two people weren't populating the mall of the closest thing would have been Martin Luther King's March on Washington, but that's really quite small compared to this. That's about a hundred thousand. People I think on simply on the mall, and this is three quarters of a million of American people come to Washington and March the antiwar movement at this point also split and it turned violent. So between the fall of nineteen sixty-nine and the spring of nineteen seventy so not very many months, right? Maybe six six months there were at least two hundred and fifty bombings and they were directed at ROTC buildings on college campuses at draft boards at draft centers at federal officers, and at the headquarters certain corporations that were considered to be particularly involved in the war two hundred and fifty bombings in six months is a lot of a lot of bombings. It's just think how we felt a week ago when bombs that didn't go off were sent in the mail. If bombs are going off around us every week, we would become I think very unnerved and people did and the goal of these bombings. You're asking yourself. Why where people doing this who was doing? It was young people doing it. Why were they doing it? And the goal is they put it was was called to bring the war home. They wanted to force Americans do experience the war that was being endured on a much much greater scale by the Vietnamese. In other words, they wanted to bring home some of the terror that other people the Vietnamese were experiencing why have an arg government drop bombs on them. A member of the weather underground organization, which was literally underground it was one of the organizations that split from the students for a democratic society, which is rooted in the nineteen sixties. This is the member of the weather underground explaining and she says we felt that doing nothing in a period of repressive violence is itself a form of violence. If you sit in your house live, your white life, go to your white job allow the country that you live in to murder people into commit genocide, you sit there, and you don't do anything about it. That's violence. This had very little effect on the government in nineteen sixty nine in the spring of sixty nine. Well, actually, it probably response was fall of sixty nine to the spring of nineteen seventy or the bombings. It's the spring of sixty nine that Nixon ramps up the bombing campaign against the North Vietnamese. And he does something very dangerous. He secretly in other words without informing congress which had the right to be informed. You secretly extended the bombing to the Viet Cong basis the North Vietnamese army basis and also to supply routes in neighboring Cambodia and Laos. So the vehicle was being supplied literally, by communists in Laos and in Cambodia, and it was very difficult. The American government kept trying to cut off that that lane of of supplies into North Vietnam with bombing. It was very it was unsuccessful. And so in April of nineteen seventy Nixon sent South Vietnamese and American troops across the border into Cambodia. This was in an illegal. We're not at war with Cambodia. There was no authorization from congress to go to war with Cambodia. They just sent troops across the border into Cambodia and this strategy also failed to this lodge. The North Vietnamese from Cambodia who continued to be supplied from Cambodia it did have the effect of. The intended and undesired effect of supporting local communist insurgents in Cambodia. As response to this and the resulting commu Rouge. That's the Cambodian Communist their victory in Cambodia helped by the North Koreans encouraged by the United States was catastrophic for the Cambodian people. Two million of whom fell victim to the genocide that was perpetrated by the communist as part of their what they call their rural relocation program. It's hard to do this in secret. The president got found out. It was revealed again, it's hard to it's hard to go to work as another country with no one noticing. Immediate protests in congress. Respond to this in the media and on college campuses nationwide. And this is this is when this is when college campuses explode. With with students, you know out in the quads out wherever protesting the American policies protesting the war protesting the draft. Y'all would be eligible for the draft depending on which year it was and depending on when you graduated so. Think about that one for second. It's not a good moment for young people. You can see why you're out you'd be out there too probably protesting at Kent state university in Ohio you've seen this image. I'm sure. Kent state was a public university with a largely working class white student body and students burned a copy of the constitution. And then burn down the campus ROTC building. So not not good behavior. If you're the president of the university, but that's what they did as a protest. The governor of Ohio the nounce the student says he said the worst type of people we harbor in America, and he dispatched national guard troops to quell the unrest. There were they weren't rioting. But there were a lot of people out, and this is one of the most tragic moments frankly in in the whole student movement because what you get there is you have nineteen year old national guardsmen who are unnerved by nineteen year old students throwing rocks at them, and they shoot them. And they kill the kill four students at Ohio State. They also kill another two people who had not participated in the riot at all the protests at all, but who found themselves within the two mile range of the guardsman's one bullets. So the shooting something that has a two mile range, and they managed to hit two people beyond from where they were the response to the Kent state learners fast and furious within a few days one and a half million students nationwide have walked out of class fifth of the nation's colleges and universities have closed their doors temporarily. Eleven days after this. Mississippi State troopers opened fire on a dormitory at Jackson state, which is an African American college killing killing two people and other two students..

Richard nixon United States Vietnam Cambodia North Vietnam Henry Kissinger Washington congress South Vietnam America Nixon Kissinger Vietnam station Ohio president Laos American government
"nixon kissinger" Discussed on The Beat with Ari Melber

The Beat with Ari Melber

05:16 min | 2 years ago

"nixon kissinger" Discussed on The Beat with Ari Melber

"I'm going to be the personal attorney to Mr. Trump. I'm going to remain technically in the same role for Mr. Trump for President Trump as I was when he was president of the Trump or the I assume that in that role not being a government role that you'd have attorney client privilege with President Trump. Yes, of course, Michael Cohen doesn't have that role anymore. But the man who had that role and continues to advise the president from time to time is Jay Goldberg. He joins me by phone now. Donald Trump's longtime lawyer he actually has a new book coming out called the courtroom is my theater, and he's also a former prosecutor and David corn is along for the ride. Jay, thanks for making time tonight. Good Darry, happy happy to have you. And let me ask you point blank. If true do Michael Cohen's allegations hurt Trump and could Sern you. They don't concern me because I don't know as I sit here. Neither do you. Whether the troop people testify to the government. Quote, oh blocked on the criminal Justice system. The cases are replete with government coat cooperating witnesses embellishing making up stories in two he got into we entitled. So Jay, you're not really you're not really using the key to words that I started with which is I was curious if whether you thought if true, the allegations are problematic, but in addition, as you know, being the the experienced lawyer that you are Muller didn't just take quotes or hearsay, there are emails and documentation that show that the man you long represented Donald Trump lied about all this outreach to the Kremlin. I don't think he lied with respect to was it was it deal. Option. To building in Moscow. I don't think is things reached a point where you can say it was collusion. Then a Texas the campaign to sing that troubles me is demand is going to g twenty conference in an effort to deal with president. She and all this is coming out that could serve only prejudice him. No, I know. Jay you, and I know our legal political history. That is a classic Nixon Kissinger defense that president is having his national security role interfered with we're a nation of laws, and I would think as a former prosecutor you would say everything should be investigated and subject to the rule of law. Even though the president is important job to do you say that area? And I say again, do you know, whether the allegations that Michael Kohn true. I know that there's evidence here tonight. I I'm asking you about the evidence. Let me play for you something that Donald Trump said about Michael Cohen. He hasn't talked about you. So I take. Voting. They play it. And I'll get your reaction here. It is. Is a week. I add by being week. I'd like other people that you watch. He's weak. I and what he's trying to do is get a reduced sentence these week. I am not a very spot versus. Jay final word is that any way to talk about your former lawyer, I spoke to him one in twenty four years, I represented Trump once and I found him be mocks of weekdays when you're an experienced trial. You can show is a person eat never subject himself to walking down the aisle with people. Banging measuring cups against bars. Saying you're going to be my wife. He's he is a week for is based on information. I have from. I can't go into with information from well, Mr. Goldberg in I'm going to fit in a break. I appreciate as I do. With all guests, you giving us your views. Thank you tonight. I'm going to fit in a break. Up ahead. Something very important. You might have seen another Muller witness admitting separate lives to congress on. Half of Roger stone. We're going to show you some pretty remarkable. Confessions of next. Today. Bob Muller showed he will indict lives to congress, and that may be bad news for Roger stone. Because his associated your own Coursey admitted on the beat just last night that stone lied to congress with his help. Now that interview obviously made a lot of headlines when you admit something like that those are some of the articles that came out of last night's interview. Let me show you an important point from last night. How did they react to these other defense that you made on behalf of Roger stone, which is you agreed to help Roger mislead congress about how he found out about Fidel. In fact, that was the first two rounds of this..

President Trump Jay Goldberg Michael Cohen prosecutor president Roger stone Bob Muller Michael Kohn congress Moscow David corn attorney Darry Texas Nixon Kissinger Coursey Fidel twenty four years
"nixon kissinger" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

04:56 min | 2 years ago

"nixon kissinger" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"Like you heard from one of the major Joe. United States Air Force, flew a force. Shutdown. Is co-pilot as is a co pilot ejected and was killed by Sam. Attack by villagers than two hundred. I'm sorry. Two thousand two hundred and eighty days two thousand two hundred and eighty days a POW that is just incredible. And then released February eighteenth nineteen Seventy-three NBA at Phnom joins us right now in studio, his dad was Brigadier General Glenn Sullivan in may of nineteen seventy-two. He took command of the seventeenth air division in Thailand. And that was the base for the beef fifty two's that led to operation linebacker to which happened on Christmas of nineteen seventy-two and raise here to tell his dad's story about Nixon Kissinger, the Paris, peace talks and five hundred and ninety one POW's. And again, you met one a couple of hours ago on KIRO radio, right? Thank you so much for being here. First foremost, tell us about your dad, Brigadier General Glenn Sullivan. Well, thanks very much for having me. In seventy two. My dad was the the commander of what they. They built as a super wing in power. Thailand. And. During linebacker to which was the operation where beef fifty two's went north to Hanoi and Haiphong for the first time. Again to get the POW's out was the primary mission. So my dad there were they flew out of two basis. They flew at Anderson and Guam, and they also flew out of Thailand Odepal was basically a B fifty two base. They also had tankers Casey one thirty fives. But it was a it was a short trip to Hanoi for the guys from house. So they they actually carried the bulk of the mission stirring talk about Richard Nixon because I think we're at a point in the war now where he knows that the war is over and at the same time. He's ready to sit there and hammer and hammer and hammer weather Congress's with him or not he doesn't care. In fact, I think they were all home on Christmas vacation in the most important thing to him was getting out those five hundred ninety one POW's. And if you talk to POW's today, there's a lot of them have a great love for Richard Nixon, it sometimes it's hard to fly love for Richard Nixon. The Joe krecko was here speaks very highly of him and conversations that we've had. Before those five hundred and ninety one POW's is this operation was launched. They heard the beef fifty two's coming and they knew that was the president said, hey, you know, what on Christmas day, you are not forgotten. That's exactly right. And they know that they're they're getting out. And so what happened was Christmas? Me the congress goes on on their Christmas recess and it gives Nixon an opportunity to to influence the mindset of the North Vietnamese and bring him back to the negotiating table. They had actually walked away from the table. And we just didn't care about much about the negotiation. So Nixon takes it upon himself and says we're going to we're going to do a maximum effort to get these POW's back and get us out of the out of the war. And so he orders linebacker to to happen. And. It begins on December eighteenth nineteen seventy two with the the sole purpose not the sole purpose. But the primary purpose is to get the POW's back because they're not gonna let them go. Rated your talk to your dad about on its face. This seems like a crazy mission to me. It just seems like they're they're in a heavily fortified area. They obviously would not want to give these prisoners voluntarily. It seems like a crazy mission in a way it is. Because at that time Hanoi was the most heavily defended city in the world. It was it was surrounded by Sam sites and SAM's were basically invented by the Russians to shoot down fifty two's that was their mission. So. In a way, it's a crazy mission. But everybody's on board because they understand the importance of getting these guys out we're not going to leave these guys behind. I mean that that is that's the motivation for wanna lose man going after man. No, you don't and you also don't want to lose fifty twos. You know because that's the primary. Nuclear threat. You know that the United States has you know for Russia. So, you know, it's it's kind of a big deal because you don't want to. This is this is your primary deterrent. And so to make that decision is was a big deal. Very big. Let's come back talk more about.

Richard Nixon commander Brigadier General Glenn Sulliv Hanoi Joe krecko United States Sam Thailand Nixon Kissinger Congress Russia NBA KIRO radio Thailand Odepal Casey Haiphong Anderson president Guam
"nixon kissinger" Discussed on Dan Carlin's Hardcore History Addendum

Dan Carlin's Hardcore History Addendum

04:06 min | 2 years ago

"nixon kissinger" Discussed on Dan Carlin's Hardcore History Addendum

"So in the cargo hold of this huge Achraf on down at the end of the plane. The opposite end from us was the body bag containing American Sajjan adviser who've been killed in the battle and those body bag with all these stuff around him as tall on these sound system. All these kids themselves we had. An hour harmful two hours on the plane down to Saigal looking. I was looking at this. Abbass is an his body bag and song. I thought what? Now in the situation where nobody wants to be the lost American to die in a wall, all they lost. And I think one of the things that one does bitterly reproach Nixon Kissinger for from the moment, they assumed office and sixty nine they knew there was no hope of winning the wall, but they would desperate for political reasons. Conceal from the American people about the war was lost and twenty two thousand Americans died onto the Nixon presidency, and countless Vietnamese, and it was in many ways the was period because you hope that thing you've got the army in Vietnam falling apart a huge drug problems. And so and so forth. All this. They knew all the way down the street was no way they were gonna win this. But they would just desperate to avoid of anybody. Finding out about this and to me one of the grizzlies spits, the White House tapes relatively recently released in twenty fifteen is Kissinger coming back from the secret Paris, peace tours, I October seventy two and he rushes into the Oval Office, and he says to Nixon you says Mr. pro some we have got a better deal than you have a dream. And remember, this is a month before Nixon faces George McGovern in the presidential election. And I'm kissing doesn't say this is going to bring peace is going to save countless lives. He said, this will absolutely totally screw up on the cynicism of these guys of this state, and it was all about politics, and that's a pretty it's it's it's it's hot sticks in your crawl. But actually one thing I would say which I think is important. To the sort of closing on this to me, the supreme irony of the wall. If you've got a bit nam today, if you'd said American about sixty six how would you like Saigal to look in twenty eight well, actually, we pretty much the way it looks now. And although it's still a very unpleasant totalitarian state that now they do now have license to make money. They want to be Americans. They're incredibly nice to Americans because they realize that American system is with countless more valuable, countless valid them are wretched government, but they're all completely hooked on American culture and on making money, and I've suggested in the loss shops from my book, the while United States failed in Vietnam with b fifty two spooky gunships and defoliation, but United States trial with Johnny Depp on YouTube. But what we've learned. The as the economic full ses can be at least as important if not more so than than soldiers in deciding how history plays out, my stepfather, always said just draw blue jeans, rock and roll and playboy magazine on and they'll they'll become Americans use that. That's the way Cermak's we've hardly touched upon all the good things in this book, though. And I would like to encourage anyone who would love to get an updated really interesting view, Vietnam from somebody who wasn't just there, but has had a chance to think and talk and do research about it ever since Cermak Hastings and the book is Vietnam. Cermak? Thank you so much for coming on the program. It was my place down. Thank you for having had a great time. Hey, come on the next book. Okay. All right. Take care. Wrath of the cons Punic nightmares. Apache tears, and of course, ghosts of the ost.

Nixon Kissinger Vietnam Cermak American Sajjan Saigal Cermak Hastings playboy magazine United States Abbass grizzlies Johnny Depp White House George McGovern YouTube Oval Office Paris two hours
"nixon kissinger" Discussed on Talking Politics

Talking Politics

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"nixon kissinger" Discussed on Talking Politics

"So nixon kissinger set up this really elaborate architecture that is impressive in a lot of census there's no there's no question about it but what did it actually cheever either in the short term or the longterm it brought china as nixon said back into the family of nations which i think everyone should agree as a good thing but just how much did the us actually benefit from that there's a big question mark over that i think that the issue summit is quite difficult to find some comparison with because it's very unusual some in this respect you have the you know the world's leading power with the small power that happens to have nuclear weapons a small and one of the poorest countries in the world i mean this country is baroque beyond will say i mean i think at the core of this lies the issue then of nuclear proliferation is why is it that the leader of north korea can have this kind of massively higherprofile some with the world's leading power now part of it you could argue is is because actually on the neath this is she really still about the us and china and that actually this is a a way in which the ministration washington sinuses on the trump tool is trying to deal with its china issues on the is using north korea's if putting more pressure on china saying you'll solis out otherwise we will get much more confrontational with you about trade and other matters but i think it makes it quite hard to read where this go not just for the reasons that under says none of us should predict whether this might go but there isn't really president to look upon because in some sense what north korea is go is not legitimacy along the way of thinking about it but it shows that actually if you get nuclear weapons at least you tune yourself into a regional nuclear power then you get to play on the world stage absolutely i think there is a precedent and it's not in terms of summits what struck me is that basically what trump has done and going to north korea is agreed to something that looks a lot like obama's iran deal that.

china us north korea president obama nixon kissinger cheever iran
"nixon kissinger" Discussed on MSNBC Morning Joe

MSNBC Morning Joe

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"nixon kissinger" Discussed on MSNBC Morning Joe

"And n reagan said no let's thinking about june nineteen ninetythree the first time bush forty one went back to the white house after bill clinton beat him was to appear with ford carter clinton endorsed nafta and there was a bipartisan view that are broad commitment as a country should not change with every election this is not surprising he said he was going to do all this but i think we've already seen reporting this week that suddenly he realizes maybe we need a trade agreement in asia so i think that to me that's what's you've been to these kinds of i'm sure you spend a lot of time an amusement parks there's this ride called the tilt toward where you whiz around and throw up your icy that's where we are it's his political equivalent of of of an amusement park right except that they're real world consequences okay john can check that out go ahead yeah thank you so much jon meacham kosovo of american know john the door it's for beat from me to question the wisdom of jon meacham the soul of america available in on amazon and an independent bookstores ronald reagan also turned his back on nixon kissinger ford's approach to the soviet union in detente and took a more confrontational approach there's also that option and they're also again what a lot of critics of this still brought up last night is the fact that this is this wasn't a treaty signed onto by the united states of america this was barack obama unilaterally pursuing a deal with iran as i bring up all the time and you i'm sure you remember in november starting in november december of two thousand seven obama saying.

kissinger ford iran nixon ronald reagan bush barack obama united states detente soviet union n reagan amazon america jon meacham asia nafta ford carter clinton bill clinton white house
"nixon kissinger" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

KBOI 670AM

02:57 min | 3 years ago

"nixon kissinger" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

"But but trying to used its position more to help the north koreans tend to disarm them and so what we have today is a very arrogant china and a nuked up pyongyang and let's largely because of mistakes made in the white house we welcome arthur waldron professor of international relations in the department of history university of pennsylvania arthur the two competing stories the bad acting and predation of the chinese economy politicized militarized under the president for life xi jinping and the nuclear armed and extremely dangerous dictator of kim together in one room where do you want to lay the finger of blame good evening to you arthur say where as i say reaping the whirlwind and i would go back and say well why would we sell the seeds and that comes along time ago back in nineteen in nineteen seventy one with the nixon kissinger diplomacy and i think that that set a fundamentally wrong course it was based on a on a false hope that china was going to help us against the soviet union was based on wishful thinking about how china could democratize and become our close friend and ally and that it was based on suppression of any evidence that went the other way so that all the reading that this secret group that president nixon and kissinger they established all their reading was only favoring the point of view they had already decided on and the people who are asked to speak where all already pre selected we had many many people all around the world who could have presented an accurate view of china but i think kissinger in particular deluded himself and then this policy he continued over the years with one mistake after another and is only since about nineteen ninety five or two thousand that we've recognized that instead of becoming a responsible stakeholder the world order has won a bureaucrat said that china is now gunning for us they're building a huge military and they're doing everything they can to mess us up and we have done this to ourselves by selfdelusion selfdeception and by really making available of financial wherewithal enabling china to join international organizations where she belong and even sharing secrets for instance the.

president kim china soviet union nixon kissinger pyongyang arthur waldron professor of international rel department of history universi
"nixon kissinger" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"nixon kissinger" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

"To be tense in this nuclear age with china and north korea and we're we're going to need the support of russia and putin knocked the not and not the evil eye from him obree an uh god help us if if this continues down this path well i've i've i've argued for years i mean even when the soviet union existed that the most important potential national security partner for the united states sits in the kremlin and ronald reagan came to that view uh let me give you an anomaly i don't know why trump doesn't say it the three episodes of detente that is making efforts to cooperate with russian conditions of cold war were all made by republican president dwight eisenhower correct richard nixon called nixon kissinger daytime and most grandly by gorbachev who wrote in his diary the day he left the white house i guess january nineteen eighty nine we have ended the cold war these were all republicans why doesn't trump simply say that when i said i want to cooperate with russia i am in the grand republican presidential tradition of the top why doesn't say that bbs unaware of it in a possible tell me that's not true but it but white as one of his adviser exactly because they may not be smart enough steven to do that lucky rely we're in the white house in i need it's in expert on russia at my right hand it would be you it's very funny or a friend said he hates trump horribly he said if trump called you and ask you to come and theme for half an hour and just give him your thoughts about with possible russia would you go and i said sure of course you would you you have you heavy duty to this country to the american citizen if if somebody thinks they i've got something to say it could be consequential but my friend was was absolutely a guy.

dwight eisenhower steven president kremlin united states russia gorbachev nixon kissinger richard nixon china trump ronald reagan partner soviet union putin north korea
"nixon kissinger" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

KHNR 690AM

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"nixon kissinger" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

"And he would take over the just think you're right that team and if you look you know north korea and china and and uh russia and the terrorist threat that's a lot of bad stuff going on in the world and we need is guilty and aggressive team to deal with it and you need us secretary of state when he speaks actually is understood by the world to be speaking on behalf of the president not in opposition to his policies whatever they are that is the profound difficulty with the secretary tillerson not a bad man i don't think he's prickly accomplished administrator because oil companies are not bureaucracies but it does seem to me that you've got to have very little daylight it you need a nixon kissinger's situation need a george shultz reagan situation you've got to get along with your secretary of state you know trump every presidency goes through this and trump trump starting from a lowerplaced trump's never been in politics before every presidency is gutted pleats king's together and find the people it could work with you know just think of the way churchill in lincoln went through generals until they've found that they could work with and you know there's really great thing in the bruce canton history the civil war who he describes ask phil sheridan and william sherman ulysses grant and lincoln meeting on the presidential yacht as a kind of dream team you know kind of like what you're talking about with madison kelly and cotton and pump and he said the two when those men sat down links came across the south they did yeah of course you know and why is john kelly the white house chief of staff well trump met him and trump put him in a heart job homeland security and they just got on really well and it was effect is and they were on the same wavelength and that matters and of course the president is the elected head of the.

madison kelly chief of staff white house lincoln ulysses grant phil sheridan bruce canton george shultz reagan secretary secretary of state trump john kelly north korea william sherman civil war churchill nixon kissinger oil companies administrator president russia china
"nixon kissinger" Discussed on WGTK

WGTK

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"nixon kissinger" Discussed on WGTK

"And uh russia and the terrorist threat that's a lot of bad stuff going on in the world and we need is skill and aggressive team to deal with it and you need a secretary of state who when he speaks actually is understood by the world to be speaking on behalf of the president not in opposition to his policies whatever they are that is the profound difficulty with secretary tillerson not a bad man i don't think he's prickly accomplish administrator because oil companies are not bureaucracies but it does seem to me that you've got to have very little daylight it you need a nixon kissinger situation need a george shultz reagan situation you've got to get along with your secretary of state now he know trump every presidency goes through this and trump trump starting from a lower place trump's never been in politics before every presidency he's got to put his team together and find the people it could work with you know just think of the way churchill and lincoln went through generals until they found a bunch that they could work with and you know there's really great thing and the bruce katyn history the civil war who he describes still shared and william sherman ulysses grant and lincoln meeting on the presidential yacht that's the kind of dream team you know kind of like what you're talking about madison kelly and cotton and pompilio and he said that two when those men sat down winter's across the south of course you course and why is john kelly the white house chief of staff well trump met him and trump put him in a heart job homeland security and they just got on really well and it was effect is and they were on the same wavelength and that matters and of course the president and is the elected head of the executive branch he should pick people that he keeps on with well yup i also have to bring up before we have one minute left mick mulvaney went over in took over bureaucracy which is unconstitutional the consumer financial protection board and a bureaucrat sued to get control the bureaucracy on the theory that it was a perpetual bureaucratic motion machine that was i think a inflection moment larry arnn that's when it became impossible to deny that the project is to destroy citizenship and put the.

mick mulvaney executive chief of staff white house ulysses grant william sherman lincoln george shultz reagan nixon kissinger secretary secretary of state larry arnn russia john kelly madison kelly civil war bruce katyn churchill trump oil companies administrator tillerson president one minute
"nixon kissinger" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"nixon kissinger" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"It you need a nixon kissinger's situation unita george shultz reagan situation you've got to get along with your secretary of state and he you know trump trump every presidency goes through this and trump trump's starting from a lower place trump's never been in politics before lead presidency has got to put his team together and find the people it could work with know just think of the way churchill and lincoln went through generals until they found that they work with and you know there's really great thing in the bruce katyn history the civil war who he describes a still sheridan and william sherman ulysses grant and lincoln meeting on the presidential yacht as a kind of dream team you know kind of like what you're talking about madison kelly and cotton and pump l and he said the two when those men sat down winter came across the south the journal you know did yeah of course you know and why is john kelly the white house chief of staff well trump met him and trump put him in a heart job homeland security and they just got on really well and it was effect is and they were on the same wavelength and that matters and of course the president is elected head of the executive branch should pick people that he could someone with well yup i also have to bring up before we have one minute left mick mulvaney went over in took over bureaucracy which is unconstitutional the consumer financial protection board and eight bureaucrat sued to get control the bureaucracy on the theory that it was a perpetual bureaucratic motion machine that was i think a inflection moment larry arnn that's when it became impossible to deny that the project is to destroy citizenship and put the experts in church well it here if you're making a list of who's greatest man in america mulvaney is under consideration i agree but but i hope to the show i think he should be president of hillsdale college of the host of the hugh hewitt show because he can obviously do a lot of jobs i'll be right back with dr larry arnn hillsdale dot eu you sign up all of your parents in primus and tell us christmas present absolutely free to you and they'll thank you actually subscribed something for them stay tuned.

hillsdale college hugh hewitt america executive chief of staff white house ulysses grant william sherman lincoln secretary of state george shultz reagan nixon kissinger larry arnn mick mulvaney president trump john kelly madison kelly sheridan civil war churchill one minute
"nixon kissinger" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:02 min | 4 years ago

"nixon kissinger" Discussed on KQED Radio

"United states and taiwan have finesse the difference and the differences this question of how does one deal with taiwan which a became the republic of china after the chinese civil war and we agreed in the nixon kissinger diplomacy in the socalled shanghai communique of the 70s that there would be a one china policy and the whole idea was there was one china this question of the political status of taiwan was was left in abeyance and the idea they then that the only important thing was that the status of taiwan would not be changed through intimidation of force and this has been a situation which didn't solve the question of of taiwan's longterm status uh but it allowed taiwan to flourish economically the thrive politically so now it's real democracy and the meantime it's allowed the united states in china to avoid a conflict over taiwan and go about developing a bilateral relationship with your serve both ensure both countries well i would believe we need to continue to exercise restraint in this area not violate the terms of the one china policy i think we want to show some restraint in avoiding a trade war kinda also has to show some restraint in some of the things it does and and dozen too but i would basically think that it's it's going to fundamentally different dynamic because china is integrated into the world economy i believe wants to continue to be integrated in the world because i don't think china has apart a policy of trying to overthrow the international order i think and wants to join it in some cases on in terms in some cases on reform terms so i am not a pessimist about uschina relations as a whole school of thought the believes that there is an inevitability of confrontation between the rising power china and the existing great power the united states and i would simply say that's not a novel indeed i make a larger point.

United states taiwan civil war china nixon shanghai
"nixon kissinger" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:03 min | 4 years ago

"nixon kissinger" Discussed on KQED Radio

"United states and taiwan have finesse the difference and the differences this question of how does one deal with taiwan which became the republic of china after the chinese civil war and we agreed in the nixon kissinger diplomacy in the socalled shanghai communique of the 70s that there would be a one china policy and the whole idea was there was one china this question of the political status of taiwan was was left in abeyance and the idea that again that the only important thing was that the status of taiwan would not be change through intimidation of force and this has been a situation which didn't solve the question of of taiwan's longterm status uh but it allowed taiwan to flourish economically too thrive politically so now it's real democracy and the meantime it's allowed the united states in china to avoid a conflict over taiwan and go about developing a bilateral relationship which is serve both ensure both countries well i would believe we need to continue to exercise restraint in this area not violate the terms of the one china policy i think we would want to show some restraint and avoiding a trade war china also has to show some restraint in some of the things it does and and dozen too but i would basically think that it's it's going to fundamentally different dynamic because china is integrated into the world economy i believe wants to continue to be integrated in the world the kind of i don't think china has a pot a policy of trying to overthrow the international order i think and wants to join it in some cases onyx in terms in some cases on reform turns so i am not a pessimist about uschina relations as a whole school of thought the believes that there's an inevitability of confrontation between the rising power china and the existing great power the united states and i would simply say that's not a novel indeed i make a larger point that very little.

United states taiwan civil war china nixon shanghai
"nixon kissinger" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:46 min | 4 years ago

"nixon kissinger" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Mostly but i try to stay on fairly when i think of facts this guy rattling favors look when russia had all that nucleus stuff i remember nixon we trade bogging system lithium sent them all this week you know something agricultural what we were still thinking they we aided them yeah we we were trying to do that day and that was the nixon kissinger you're philosophy of containing them we're going to intervene in china that's kind of what we're doing with korea we're trying to contain hit i don't think anybody who wants to really go in there and and bond the all your ask take them all based on override bolivia north there over but i i don't think it's our place necessarily air solve the probably because yes robbie three guys it will take probably more than three is probably thirty guys will take place in wild louis exact signed jiang year there's always some other awards jerk phoenix throughout the middle east yeah exactly law while you're greer and we should learn from those mistakes and sometimes we don't because we it it's almost like we're black and it to the fact that what is plan b so we take 'em out so what's what's the next step in if we don't have a plan b we're back we were in iraq and that was the problem with iraq we took on saddam hussein but we had no plan b fennell and we weren't willing to stay in you know i mean if said it back then i mean we had to stay we should have state said at dislike we have with been in korean someone i maybe it was paul who said it but we've been in korea on and on for seventy years we've never left korea mean we've been the head for longer after the war to an end co in japan still has conflict with our military beat faith and adenauer exile no and i get it problems.

russia china korea bolivia iraq saddam hussein paul japan nixon robbie greer seventy years