35 Burst results for "Nisha"

"nisha" Discussed on Plant Strong

Plant Strong

03:51 min | 4 months ago

"nisha" Discussed on Plant Strong

"<Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> And then you're doing <Speech_Female> like a warrior <Speech_Female> pose <SpeakerChange> and you <Speech_Female> see you're holding a <Speech_Female> lot of positions. <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> You know, <Speech_Female> for a long time and <Speech_Female> it's like <Speech_Female> it's definitely increased <Speech_Female> my flexibility <Speech_Female> and strength <SpeakerChange> <Silence> and balance. <Speech_Female> A lot. <Speech_Female> And it's <Speech_Female> a hard class. Level <Speech_Female> one is hard. Don't be <Speech_Female> fooled, or I'll do <Speech_Female> a general level. But <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> it's <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> changed my <SpeakerChange> life, just <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> in breathing everything. <Silence> <Advertisement> How many <Silence> levels are there? <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> I don't know. I <Speech_Female> think there might be <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> maybe <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> four. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> I don't know. <Silence> <Advertisement> I <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> just, I'm very <Speech_Female> happy where I am. <Speech_Female> To me, it's <Speech_Female> not like looking what <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> everyone else is doing. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Remember, I like to <Speech_Female> break rules. So I'm <Speech_Female> refusing to climb the level. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Nice. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Nice. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Nisha, <Speech_Male> this is <Speech_Male> been <Speech_Male> a lot of fun. <Speech_Male> Thank you for <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> joining me <SpeakerChange> on the plan <Speech_Male> strong podcast. <Speech_Male> Practically <Speech_Male> vegan. <Speech_Male> Woohoo. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> It's out there. <Silence> You guys <Speech_Male> get <Speech_Male> a copy. You'll <Silence> love it. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> Just <Speech_Male> remove the oil. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Easy <Speech_Male> to do. <Speech_Male> Easy to do. <Speech_Male> Nisha, <Speech_Male> any <Speech_Male> anything <Speech_Male> else <Speech_Male> that you'd like to say, <Speech_Male> how can <SpeakerChange> people <Silence> find you all that good <Speech_Female> stuff? <Speech_Female> I'm sure I <Speech_Female> have a blog, <Speech_Female> a food blog cooking <Speech_Female> for peanuts dot <Speech_Female> com, <Speech_Female> where <Speech_Female> there are a lot of <Speech_Female> different options, <Speech_Female> some oil free, gluten <Speech_Female> free, lots <Speech_Female> of ways to adapt <Speech_Female> the recipes and you can <Speech_Female> print them. <Speech_Female> And at <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> cooking for peanuts <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> on <SpeakerChange> Instagram <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Facebook <Silence> and <Speech_Female> I'm <Speech_Female> starting TikTok, but <Speech_Female> I'm not very big <Speech_Female> there yet, so. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> Those are <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the main channels. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Have you <Silence> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> bought an <Speech_Male> have you <Speech_Male> bought? <Speech_Male> Have you ridden <Speech_Male> on a bike yet <Speech_Male> this year <Speech_Male> with a basket? <Speech_Male> I know that's <SpeakerChange> one of the things <Speech_Female> you love. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Yes, and because of <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> COVID, you know, <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> I just, <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> I haven't, <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> I think I haven't <Speech_Female> fixed my tires <Speech_Female> yet. <Speech_Female> 'cause it's <Speech_Female> sat here for so <Speech_Female> long the bike, but <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> you know what? It's <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> the weather's <Speech_Female> getting good now. So <Silence> <Advertisement> that's gonna be one <Speech_Male> of my goals. <Speech_Male> For spring. <Speech_Male> Are you able <SpeakerChange> to ride <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> it to yoga class? <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> I <Speech_Female> can, 'cause they <Speech_Female> just, they just started <Speech_Female> in person. <Speech_Female> Nice. And they <Speech_Female> actually moved <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> to a smaller space, <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> but it's even nearer to <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> my house. So <Speech_Music_Female> yeah. <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> Fantastic. I'm <Speech_Music_Male> going to be going <Speech_Music_Male> worse soon. Well, <Speech_Music_Male> hey, you know what? <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> Namaste. <Speech_Female> You too. <Speech_Male> Thank you. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> Thank you. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Thank you, Nisha, <Speech_Male> for your <Speech_Male> stories, recipes, <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> real life <Speech_Music_Male> example of <Speech_Music_Male> living plan strong <Speech_Music_Male> in a <Speech_Music_Male> very busy world. <Speech_Music_Male> You can <Speech_Male> follow Nisha on Instagram <Speech_Male> at <Speech_Male> cooking for peanuts <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Music_Male> pick up her debut book, <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> practically vegan, <Speech_Music_Male> which is out <Speech_Music_Male> right <Speech_Music_Male> now. Of <Speech_Music_Male> course, we'll <Speech_Male> have all the links in the <Speech_Male> show notes. <Speech_Music_Male> We'll see you next <Speech_Music_Male> week. <SpeakerChange> And until <Speech_Music_Male> then, <Speech_Music_Male> keep <Speech_Music_Male> it playing strong. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> The plants drawn <Speech_Music_Male> podcast team includes <Speech_Music_Male> Carrie <Speech_Music_Male> Barrett. <Speech_Music_Male> Lori cordova, <Speech_Music_Male> Amy Mackie, <Speech_Music_Male> Patrick Gavin, <Speech_Music_Male> and wade <Speech_Music_Male> Clark. <Speech_Music_Male> This season is <Speech_Music_Male> dedicated <Speech_Music_Male> to all of those <Speech_Music_Male> courageous <Speech_Music_Male> true seekers <Speech_Music_Male> who weren't afraid <Speech_Music_Male> to look through <Speech_Music_Male> the lens with <Speech_Music_Male> clear vision <Speech_Music_Male> and hold <Speech_Music_Male> firm to a <Speech_Music_Male> higher truth. <Speech_Male> Most notably, <Speech_Male> my parents, <Speech_Male> doctor <Speech_Male> Kabul, the esselstyn <Speech_Male> junior, <Speech_Male> and Anne <Speech_Male> cryo esselstyn. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> Thanks <Speech_Male> for listening.

Lori cordova Amy Mackie Patrick Gavin Barrett Clark
"nisha" Discussed on Plant Strong

Plant Strong

05:55 min | 4 months ago

"nisha" Discussed on Plant Strong

"And believe me, as a father to three kids myself, if the kids don't like it, they're going to say something about it fast. In fact, several of my favorite sections in her new cookbook are the sections on pasta dinners, being in Chile dinners, curry dinners, and burger and patty's dinners. These are dinners that not only I am going to love and adore, but I know my old firefighting buddies at station two would absolutely adore them. If you are new to plant strong cooking and feel overwhelmed because you think it's complicated, expensive, or maybe even boring, I want you to think again. Please welcome Nisha malvani. Nisha, it's really great to meet you. Thank you, likewise. Yeah, yeah. And you know, I found you or somehow we found you and you've become quite a phenomenon on Instagram. So congrats on that channel that you've built since like 2017. Yeah, it's been a while, right? Yeah. Yeah, I mean, you've come a long way in a very relatively short period.

Nisha malvani patty Chile burger Nisha
"nisha" Discussed on The Curious About Cannabis Podcast

The Curious About Cannabis Podcast

02:07 min | 10 months ago

"nisha" Discussed on The Curious About Cannabis Podcast

"I know a lot now. But i learn new stuff on every episode. Because that's why. I do those topics. So i can learn. That's that's perfect. I mean and and having that lifelong learner mentality. I think is great. I mean that's something. I'm always trying to promote at regardless of whatever nisha specialized in you know a lot about. There's always so much more to learn and to maintain that curiosity keeps us humble great to associate start. You think you know everything you know. Not not only. Will you stop learning. You'll probably also start being a prick so exactly yes. Yeah some of the biggest assholes you'll meet in. The industry have a little bit of knowledge. That think they know a lot at. I think that's called whether the dunning krueger effect or something. There's actually a model for that that you can look up. There's a graph anyone listening wants to look it up. You can actually see This theory related to knowledge acquisition and confidence. And when you get a little bit knowledge often overestimate how much you know. When you have a lot of knowledge you generally under represent how much you know because you've become humbled and recognize that even the things. I think i know a lot about who knows. There's this always more rabbit holes and new new things to shine light on and everything and one thing. I wanted to make sure that we spent time on. Because i know that you're really into regenerative agriculture. Now and something we talked about before we started recording. That i've found really fascinating was that you've been trying to figure out how it might be possible to take know permaculture regenerative agriculture principles and take them from the outdoor cultivation environment and find ways to integrate them in the indoor cultivation environment Before we wrap up at definitely wanted to make sure to spend some time Speaking on that. So i i know we've talked about a little bit already off camera..

nisha
"nisha" Discussed on Desi Books

Desi Books

06:00 min | 1 year ago

"nisha" Discussed on Desi Books

"I'm sarah niche adams the author of the reading list which published in july this year. I'm really excited to be sharing my five desi faves with you today. These include slasher new and old favorites books. I've read over again and books. I know i will read over and over again in no particular order. The list includes a suitable boy by vikram. Seth china rim by sanjiv sahotra a fine balance by rohinton mistry arundhati. Roy's the god of small things. I'm born confused by tunisia. This i india festival a suitable boy by vikram. Seth will always be one of the books. I'm so glad i read. I remember when i was growing up. I had one friend. He's mom was bake rita. And i saw this book on the shelf spine out. Every time i went to visit the image of a woman in a sorry really stuck in my mind but the spine was so thick. I wondered if i'd ever read it. It my some holidays imaging my second and third year of university. I decided then was the time. I spent the whole week sitting with the book. It never left my side. I was learning so much about the characters laughter first of all. I'm her search for a suitable boy as well as all the intricacies of her family and a newly independent india its vast an escape but huge cost of characters but the writing makes everything crystal clear for a novel that over one thousand pages. Long i found. I couldn't put it down. I needed to know what was going to happen next. I needed to know how these characters stories would pan out. I really would recommend this everyone. I recently read. China rim by sanjiv sold at the point during down when it didn't feel like any book could capture my attention but china rim is written with such delicacy and tenderness. Drew me an entirely. I read all within a day if follows one woman in one thousand nine hundred ninety nine. He marries one of three brothers. I'm stops life in their family with has sister-in-law's they try to walk out. Which brother is married to. Wit sister-in-law having never spoken to them in daylight is interspersed with the present day story of a young man trying to recover from heroin addiction. He travels to remote india and to a house but his great grandmother left is beautifully written with characters. I cared for deeply. The story didn't go where. I hoped it might free to the characters. But for me that made it even more heartrending. A wanted to step in a wanted to help. I wanted to show each character the truth. But i couldn't because life isn't like that but it's a quietly intensely beautiful and moving novel. I've recommended everyone a fine balance by rohinton. Mistry is my next pick. I bought this book. When i was probably a little too young to read it. I just adored cover but the font was too small for me at the time. A few years later i read out over a long period of time. Savoring it living with the characters in the story lines for months. It's another epic story about india. During the one thousand nine hundred seventy five state of emergency a time of huge political turmoil that affected the lives of everyone in the country in various ways. Rohinton mysteries novel follows mary. Add characters with different lives. I'm backgrounds different..

sarah niche adams vikram sanjiv sahotra mistry arundhati india sanjiv tunisia china Seth rita Roy rim Drew China Mistry
"nisha" Discussed on Marketing for Consultants

Marketing for Consultants

03:32 min | 1 year ago

"nisha" Discussed on Marketing for Consultants

"That has helped me incredibly incredibly helped me him in positioning myself. Now we were in the quickly. We got four five people because we are in space. It's the space of people analytics so advanced a date analytics and in the early days that will stood housing nine ten That were like the the famous days of big data about big data in the slipstream of that way we became visible immediately. And so what. I started doing case About what be doing all the time. So my learnings failures. The challenges disturbed and of course a client case and that was the flywheel that started turning. And that's of course. Where if i look back and i talked to consultants today. That's where i kind of. Yeah go back to to help them. The effect the incredible flywheel that that event true so we were called in by a large enterprise. Asians we were pretty small. Consultancy boutique So i think Before we were taken over. I think we had like seven people so it still small but we won bitch off the edge off the bench against the big consultancy firms. And i always checked it out off Why did you choose for resin. And so while they were saying is you guys are the experts because you write about the stuff that we are interested in these. The feigns that you write about are the pains that we are suffering from and that we are challenged with and so that was of course that was also in the in the pre corona era. Where have been speaking. Probably at hundred hundred fifty conferences all over the world and of course that that i was extremely visible was the the in search of You just Your focus and specialization as a firm back then like. Did you have a vertical specialization in one industry. Or was it just focused on the your big data problem or you know any kind of horizontal row or or did you cross section those specialized where you yeah. We were extremely specialized. It has evolved over the times over the years. So i can also explain that in a minute but it will specialize in the in the early days we call it the big data in hr and of course it moved. Step-by-step into people analytics. I h on these people analytic so it was the advanced. A data analysis data signs was the new name then and rates artificial intelligence so that was a space but it was cross industry so we had in fact a horizontal positioning from an industry standpoint. Vertical deep expertise. Yeah very very nisha. Okay very very very very niche. Let me ask you because you mentioned that you were spending a lot of time. Writing thought leadership content and you. You're the principle of the farm at this point right. Yes yes you had always been principally you. You're the founder. Yeah yeah so so how much of your time like. What percentage of your time. We're you spending on leadership versus actual client.

nisha
"nisha" Discussed on The Skinny Confidential Him And Her Podcast

The Skinny Confidential Him And Her Podcast

05:53 min | 1 year ago

"nisha" Discussed on The Skinny Confidential Him And Her Podcast

"I always find this question interesting because i think the answer would differ at this point like knowing what you guys all know. Now if you were gonna try to be like an influencer today without the platform you've already built like would you take the same strategies you took in the beginning. Would you do a completely different. Because because i think people look at you guys. This look at a summer. Fridays and look at your plots and say hey. That's what i want to be. But what else try to point out is that you can't take that same strategy because you guys probably wouldn't do that strategy today ego strategy we even even with summer. Fridays and summer. Fridays is three years old versus like are influenced your backgrounds. Much older that we wouldn't do summer. Fridays the exact same way if we started today versus three years ago. Because it's just different. And i feel like now. Everything changes so fast. Like even year to year i try to evaluate both a personal and and then also on our business and of why what's working. What's resonating how do we need to change things. How are we reaching people because it just constantly changes. And that's where. I think you have to be so open to that change. I feel like as new influencers or anything or brand now nisha so important because if you go to somebody you want to go to them for a reason and if you don't have a nation have a personality because then you can only get the personality from that person. But i feel like if i'm looking for gluten free recipes if i find a gluten free blog or instagram account. I know that. I'm going to go there for this specific thing. You destroyed your skin care line. So it's like going to you. Because i know puffiness i'm going to go to you for this specific thing for right now and like nisha so important in across everything as broad as it used to.

nisha
"nisha" Discussed on Changes Big and Small

Changes Big and Small

02:45 min | 1 year ago

"nisha" Discussed on Changes Big and Small

"Push ourselves even more to be able to be on par so there's the systemic influence as well and then it becomes very very internalized when in fact we are so worthy. You know. I think it's really important for us to look at that. Shame that we have to sit with that. Shame because oftentimes shame or these like quote unquote bad feelings. Which i don't like calling things good or bad kind of what you were saying. What shame is i am bad. We are not bad or good. We just are and i think accepting ourselves is just so important when we can accept ourselves. There's literally a weight lifted off our shoulders that we're okay as we are like what. Oh i am like there's something missing for me and when we can get to that point i think it's expansive there's this idea of scarcity that there's not enough out there and i have to rush to get it as opposed to while the world is actually expansive. There's an abundance to it. And when i accept myself and also meet myself where i'm at like maybe i'm in a bad place this week or this week. I've been kind of emotional. Maybe i'm in an emotional place like okay. I'm gonna cry. Then i'm gonna cry and be okay with it. I'm going to be sad like this morning. I just kind of woke up. Sad the happens. Sometimes i was like. Why do i feel this way. I was kind of annoyed. But then i was like you know what nisha you're sad it's okay and i just put my hand over my heart and i just felt try to almost complete that feeling that cycle continue in except that feeling and when we can accept those feelings within us we can accept ourselves more. Some people. Think like oh. I'm not organized. Or i'm not focused or whatever but instead why don't you accept the beautiful things that happen when maybe you are unfocused like for me. I also have a trouble with focus. But i'm able to do so many things and come up with so many ideas because of that so however we faulting ourselves or shaming are solves for where we are at instead of letting that be part of our journey in expecting ourselves to be.

nisha
"nisha" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

03:41 min | 1 year ago

"nisha" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"Rid of movie theater. How great so nice back. I know what i what incredible feat i mean. What a beautiful film so moving and so visually stunning and disgusting face. But i'm smiling any applause. Thank you. I had the pleasure of seeing it. Last night at the tribeca film festival on a big screen and battery park outside. The sound is excellent. Elry battery park a movie and a musical. Gosh fanta everybody was smiling and laughing out loud and so those are first movie experience together since the pandemic started and it was you know people were just smiling the whole way home. It was really a beautiful way to just open new york city and welcome everybody. Everyone felt so much joy as every frame of your film is just overflowing with joy. Thank you thank you i. Yeah i'm so glad. I didn't wanna know how it was a better burke getting nor and so let's to it worked there so because we are directors guild in normally. You would all be asking questions. I'm just going to hope that. I asked the ones that you hope that. But one of my favorite questions is as directors. We all have those scenes that were really really hard to pull off but nobody would ever know it from. You're watching it. What was the scene that you were so proud of that. You're like wow you know what that doesn't even look like amazing but this is how hard it was. So i mean every time we finished a sequence we'd be like yes we got and then we'd see the next one big. Oh no we have that one coming. Everything was was so much. But i mean i think the opening i feel really proud of because it took us the whole shoot to get. I mean there's so many pieces in the community chorus. There are people from the neighborhood. That are actually. Do those jobs that we got to be in our movie. There's lots of like. Easter eggs of luis salgado. Who's in the original broadway cast. He was in my first movie. Step up to the streets. And he's the one who brought me to see in the heights of in two thousand nine and and we'd he wasn't supposed to be in that section. I hadn't seen him for a while. But the night. Before i went to a show on broadway and in the subway and he was standing next to me. I was like louise john. I'm doing the the movie. Like i know i'm like were shooting the this thing to what you need to be in it. He's like okay. I'm down and so he's like he's like In in the truck making the food in the beginning and so there's weird things like that that happened throughout the movie but that was you know. We're introducing everyone of our characters. It has to have like a pace in a beat to it. We have to get into building the audience up to understand that. This is a musical but we're going to try. Keep it as real as possible but we still the manhole cover can still spin turntable. And we're not going to go thou far yet but we'll give you a little hint and and we get back to that later and a lot of late relationship plots stuff we had to get through but the ultimate thing was that it was showing community painting this community of take care of each other. That were hard that i grew up in a chinese restaurant in northern california. Not from washington heights. I'm not latino. And but what i recognize in the neighborhood what i recognize inlands peace and kiara piece. Onstage was what i liked to grow up in a with immigrant family I came from a big family and everyone took care of each other My cloudy it was my.

northern california new york city washington Last night louise john one tribeca film festival two thousand nine luis salgado first movie chinese burke eggs of latino many Easter
D.C. Residents React to Chauvin Verdict

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

D.C. Residents React to Chauvin Verdict

"Gathering in our area last night following the conviction of former Minneapolis police officer Derrick Show Vin and the killing of George Floyd. And there was joy and relief on the streets at 14th and you Northwest. Well, there were no triumphant displays along the popular use. Street corner. People acknowledge the momentous verdict is definitely a big moment. You can't kill people and think you can get away with person That does long has to go and do his time because that was one verse simple. What happened in the whole world Saw that well, Nisha's sucking of District tight stop to say Justice has finally been served. It's a step forward for America. Yeah, to start holding people accountable for killing black and brown people, So that's a good step, but we got some more steps to go. So let's not forget it. Let's not get too happy in Northwest D C, particularly on O. W. T O P

Derrick Show Vin George Floyd Minneapolis Northwest Nisha America
The battle over the Line 3 oil pipeline expansion in Minnesota

Native America Calling

01:50 min | 1 year ago

The battle over the Line 3 oil pipeline expansion in Minnesota

"One of president biden's first moves office was to counsel the keystone. Xl pipeline indigenous. Environmental groups are calling on him to do the same for line. Three in northern minnesota lindsey weber reports. Tanya abed is a member of the mill x band of ojibway from east lake minnesota. When i spoke with her recently she was on day. Twenty one of thirty eight day hunger strike. She's protesting against the line. Three pipeline replacement project after years of undergoing minnesota's environmental review process. The canadian energy corporation and bridge began construction on the project. In december and bridge received its final permit from the minnesota pollution. Control agency at the end of twenty twenty. The pipeline replacement project will pass through two hundred lakes and streams seventy eight miles of wetlands and land belonging to the minnesota nisha knob people according to an eighteen fifty five treaty op says. She's protesting to uphold that law. Embryos has not has not received a permit from doj boy warrior society. They are lacking that and this right here right now. That's one on isn't illegal illegal. Construction the movement against line three ramped up as bridge started constructing the pipeline last year since then anti pipeline activists known as water protectors have held regular demonstrations. They've also been regularly arrested. Rbm been at a few incidents where people have been arrested. That's winona la duke. She's an indigenous activist from the white earth band of ojibway. She's also a founder of the environmental organization. Honor the earth. She's facing six separate charges for participating in direct actions and protests. Over one hundred and seventy water protectors have been arrested. The duke says it's unjust.

Minnesota President Biden Lindsey Weber Tanya Abed East Lake Doj Boy Warrior Society White Earth Band Of Ojibway Environmental Organization
Boeing Moved to Fix 777 Engine Covers Before Failures

No Agenda

00:31 sec | 1 year ago

Boeing Moved to Fix 777 Engine Covers Before Failures

"To federal aviation administration's grounded dozens of boeing seven seven seven passenger jets after an engine failure united airlines flight. Saturday nearly lead to disaster. The national transportation safety board says a preliminary investigation found the engine manufactured by pratt and whitney showed signs of metal fatigue. This follows two. Fatal crashes of boeing seven thirty-seven. Max jets ethiopian nisha. That killed all three hundred. Forty six people on for

Federal Aviation Administratio Boeing United Airlines National Transportation Safety Pratt Whitney Max Jets Nisha
"nisha" Discussed on Behind The Wheel Podcast

Behind The Wheel Podcast

08:13 min | 1 year ago

"nisha" Discussed on Behind The Wheel Podcast

"Magnus. Because someone already has been schmidt they don't even use it was bad. That's another story myself I post on monday. Wednesdays and fridays workouts and the workouts are or are very short spurts. not because i'm trying to be lazy by you wanna make it in a way. That is doable for anyone and also to say that for people who don't have the time you can make time i'll give you a prime example My job. I work four days a week. I worked as as a friend of mine says nurses hours. So i work for days a week and i get three days off but that means i were from like eight thirty to like seven seven thirty at night so today we have or tonight. We have our our lovely interviews to that together. But i still need to do workout so i did my workout. My workout sixteen minutes and it's literally to this week is all about four exercises. We rounds one minute each and is trying to fit it in. Like if i had to do a four hour workout. It wouldn't happen today. It when it happened at all wasn't happening this morning. either. Because i was tired so i have to figure out life and i'm trying to make it in a way that it is still inspirational people but dual on. I really have gotten a lot of great responses to that. So i've been really putting a lot of intention in getting those exercises up as well as trying to the podcast. So i'll be posting a podcast. Hopefully this week and really getting kind of talking about some other things to some fun stuff because we just need to kind of keep it kind of happy. I think this is. Podcast is going to be about wine. Because i've had a i've been asked about a whole entire podcast by because that's also my other love wine. Shonda rhines yeah. Oh so what were you always like that. You can be the hall off my hair so this started when i was too when me twenty one not twenty one and the reason was because my here was but leach blonde than i had it pink so all my had mad here have straight hair was the last and was pink so i was like. Yeah go ahead and divac lack. I'm done with this as our does. You can't die your hair. That is now pink that black. I have to shave it off as a what she said. No you can't shave off my hair. My hair that grows out of my head and she said that there's no way to get you back to black was out shaving it off so we shaved it off and we realized that my head is very fortunate and i look very good ball so i go. These days is where i will shave. World shave row I find here to be. I tell people all the time is just hair so i'll experiment with their color length. The only thing. I won't do as a leave because at craft inches and i like my edges. The most part i'll i'll experiment with i think mostly because i'm very active This is really actually the most convenient. It just go. I remember sitting the interview. And if i if. I didn't no. Oh yes the pact. Thank suit as you know. I'm trying to be a she. Don't chas birmingham don't do it again lose because i'm gonna lose my by people and i can't. I won't do that but this is this is also we think about fitness. Your black man. So you don't have to deal with this but as a black female. I hear all the time i can't run. I can't work out i. We'll see the gym. I can't take a workouts fast because of the while you'll be you'll be surprised i get it because especially when i look as being a black woman and working in the corporate world i have worked in the corporate world i am. I'm thankful that. I'm still in a corporation but i shouldn't be blonde. I'm or i can be balled. It doesn't matter for the company. I work for when they are females. Have have to go to work and have to have in a long straighten. Even they're here. They hit has to be straight. They have to have on a wig. And that's because of the persona that they have to give off in that corporation that they can't come in with their natural here they can't come in with their bald. Cool beautiful head if they wanted to. Because of this bears in the looks or the conversations that they may have to happen. I feel for them and that also leads into the fact that a lot of them because they have to deal with other that they also don't want to deal with maintaining it when they have to work out and that's bad that we have to have a double edged sword especially as black women when we're trying to do the best power south and you can't do it the way that you want to and you have been happy that i've been working at places that has allowed me to be a little bit more of me per se with this But that is something that you hear from a lot of black men when they wanna work out because they're fearful sweating out their hair or messing up. The hair antics that nature and our understand of why the seems to be like a a inner activists inside of you slightly I'm not wanna protest. That's a lie. Because i have been to protest but i'm also very wholesome oppose the recently weapons of each sign and the weapon. That was undermined is a gun. Which is very true. Because i had one. I'm shooting with no answers with no actions of just as i don't own one because i know me very well So i've tried not to put myself in situations where from a protest point raphael bat. I can be in harm's way or that. Something's gonna pop off. Because i'm going off but i do like to be involved in ways that i can by informing people educating donating to the 'cause you know the cause needs money. So don't let anyone your. Would you donate the 'cause needs money to move 'cause you gotta give cash So that's ways that i do. I vote all the time. And i make sure that i'm properly informed about whoever or So i think that's really important Especially how we have to be. Because i think times are changing and i think it's going to be really orient of this could be a big thing like twenty twenty could be a huge shift in change for us as black people. This is going to be dependent on how we shift end. J.j. i'm along with it. I see a lot of a lot of a lot of chains coming. I don't know what is happening while she's just she's going to the word on the tip of my tongue was rebel. I wouldn't say you. You're not a rebel. Sometimes when our all the time but this is this comedic end of you lose. I'm not taking anymore. You can't you have to. Sometimes you just have to. You have to stand up for what's right and you also you also have the understand. You can't do it alone so you'd have to partner where you can and when you can't do how what are you good at. I'm a good person coach Writer you know. Goals of the things that i choose to remind lane have participated bike protests. In some you know things like that but that's not my lane by lane is where i'm good at in using my talents for do not. Do you think you larry cure. Hilarie are no south laugh. All the time on stand up comedy absorbs nearly now bahar.

Magnus tonight today sixteen minutes one minute four hour Wednesdays monday this week three days fridays twenty one this morning four exercises Shonda rhines one each sign raphael bahar larry
"nisha" Discussed on Behind The Wheel Podcast

Behind The Wheel Podcast

08:30 min | 1 year ago

"nisha" Discussed on Behind The Wheel Podcast

"Army fatigue as ones. Those are real fire so when as one was really like hot i got the original ones that came with the bag. So you know you got the real ones when they came out. Because you've got the tokyo. And then i got the other. Sf that was really hard to get. They don't all camouflaged so like the desert campbell. So i have those and then my favorite sneakers that i have in my collection which i do love are the The jiangxi air max. Ninety seven ninety seven on my favorite you were in runner's world magazine. Yes i was with them. And then he put me on on On channel seven because of it so shocking he was shocked. Is i'm a girl from brooklyn who lost week you know. I'm not saying that it's a lot of weight. Don't get me wrong But when you think about it is just doing something. That's good for me And i as i've ever. I've seen over the years. It has become inspirational to others. So i get it but for me at that time i was just like okay you. I've been a matter of fact. Checkable was going hard to recruit someone to For opposition to something a comedy. Inspiring folks. I would i would have given you a call. I don't think i have given you call me should. Oh you need to do this this presence there you know ethic that's inspiring funnies down earth personable and now is taken on like this of watch the evolution my momma said. I'm a good time. i think it's you have to understand that i think is important. We have to be as racial this all this. It's me it's you is other people that we know when the runners in the running community especially in the especially in the black running community we have to find a way to make his original As possible so we can bring people. We have to find a way that people can see that. This is fun. And it's not something out of misery that they can find enjoyment of out of it and if you look like one of these miserable people no shot no shade. There's some people that are very elitist. For what. I don't know. I'm not one of those. I'm not a fast. Not a super fast runner or anything like that. You have to make it fun because the end goal is to get our people our shade. Our people to be better and i'm not talking about better. Be the fastest fastest runners because we already have their. Okay shut after all. I've lovely kenyans and yobe ends that do that for us to be better health wise especially in this country. We have to find a way to make inspirational motivational but fun. If we make it look so dreary and unhappy pulled on wanna do that. Who's gonna wanna run cycle strength train. Who's gonna take you know. Gladis class any of that. If there's no joy in it to let you keep on doing it and i think it's important that when we are using ourselves as that grant for it is important that we show that to really find mutually these days cycling. You wanna see my baby. Let me show you my joe that you tell me you did you named mike. Why would they my bike. Everybody chooses name a all mode of transportation. You belong to me in your mode of transportation you get name might be. What is the name of the of the bike as we show you her first. That's her she's really pretty sexy so she is attract checkpoint celtics and her name is rating. 'cause she's all matted black like her mama briefing okay. She got a last night or raven bike. That's a cheer to like one so yes. Cycling brings me joy right soon. You on this bike and got the shoes to put on. I'm going to try to click in. I quit i clip in. I bust my head open. But i have you forward yet at fallen three times once inside the house because that was practicing within it was very comical. No one lives with me. So no one gets the commodore. The of befalling amount living room on the two times i fell on i was tipped in prospect. Park So i i got a little bloody atma big cut on my knee. My wrist is a little janke like a little swollen. Still here but i still clip in once in slow motion. Probably there's little. There's a little dark here as it. And i knew it was going down going up the hills. Okay i think i was going to fall on forward. Yeah about as you were moving. I was going. I was going up the hill. And another i think i just. I probably wouldn't even to be riding. The bike was tentatively tracks do attract workout. Figured i'd warm on the bike and yeah so slow again. Now i fell stopped i stopped. I clipped by shifting. My weight to the right upholster get my foot. Down is shifting to the left. 'cause i always my left foot so i saw you twice while so then should over into podcasts. Yes witness schmitz. Fitness has about only about fitness. It's about this glass thank you. I just bought these for Home sense the actually plastic. Because i was having like a dinner at my house. And i didn't want to use my glass. You sound like a true caribbean person. My glasses. I don't let her body sits on my colts got plastic accounts. Or you know. Okay it's twenty two s twenty twenty. Anyone plastic on a couch is a problem fast. Quick my sister rea denver choose and will free sisters. One of them is like. Did you put plastic on the shares. I could imagine getting up now step to your house. Thank you know thankfully but my podcast is really about kind of intersecting back to what we were talking about. motivating people letting them know what the journey is about that. It's not a hard journey in some of the things do even from the standpoint we just as we still are in this pandemic A couple of my podcast over the past couple of weeks have been about. How do you exist in this normal because your mental health is as important as physical health. If not even more so you know my last episode was really talking about. How do you find your peace within your piece of peace and it was really talking about how i've been finding my peace with cycling in banking baking has become a thing that i picked up during kolden. Cycling is something that i've picked up during kobe and it provided me a nice normal sense of zen on. I think it's important that we not only about the physical on. How do you work out. How do you do this. How that but how do you find your your happiness here. That's really important because once you start here and figure out the little triggers here you'll figure out the rest of the triggers down below and the other kind of thing that i do with it on my g page. Which is bitch.

brooklyn kenyans mike two times three times twice first One air max. witness schmitz one channel seven twenty caribbean runner's world magazine past couple of weeks once seven last night Ninety
The art of SEO with Stephan Spencer

SEO 101

09:17 min | 1 year ago

The art of SEO with Stephan Spencer

"Tell us a little bit about how much things have changed. It's been quite a journey. Free has been a journey for all of us but Alan on this wild ride. That wasn't just an internet business journey. It was a personal transformation. Johnny to i'll. I'll get to that in a minute but from an internet marketing perspective. Yeah things have changed a lot. I remember using web position. Gold and thinking. Wow this is really having to make a separate version for every one of these search engines of the same content just feels really nikki to me and and wasteful and stupid and. I just did not like doing that. And didn't do much of it because they hated it so much and thankfully that was something that just got became irrelevant when google came along when Actually when backrub came line which became google. Can you believe that was the name of of kids to their dorm room looking to name things. Funny thing names you know so. I just fell in love with google and wanted to figure out how to reverse engineer it and at the time we were building ecommerce websites as the primary business but baking. Seo into those websites became a fiction of ours and and for me in particular and then i realized that there are a lot of other kinds of websites out there and bigger businesses who would never hire a small agency to build an ecommerce site for them. Because maybe it's a huge brand like target dot com or something so we wanted to offer audits and standalone seo consultancy services beyond just making it into an ecommerce website build and That was back in two thousand or so two thousand two thousand and one and We've been cash. it's been It's been a long road and there've been a lot of google updates and it's not about chasing after the latest update. It's like driving a car using only the rear view mirror. If that's the case and my thet ford to the future of future proofing year Your business and Online business your website and so that would involve things like a and Scalable strategies things of course need to be pearly white hat not just pretty white hat and is to be you know super super white and stuff that you're comfortable sharing with google engineers and saying here's what i'm doing if there's anything you're at all not comfortable with you should reevaluate something. You are happy to to show off to google engineer or Be happy for your competitor. Discover when they're reverse engineering what you're up to in terms of seo than yeah you should reevaluate it. You've said you've mentioned reverse engineering a lot in the first couple minutes of this help take part of reverse of your career has reverse engineering big. Sounds like it's a big. Yeah so i figured out at pretty early stage in in my business career that i could not just reverse engineer google's algorithm but kind of Put a middleware layer between my clients website and the greater internet and thus i could Kind of search and replace real time things that were not search engine optimized on the core website but i would like to search engine optimize it and serve it up to and needed a proxy kind of middleware layer in order to do that. Because if i were to do that on the Let's say blue martini. If you remember that platform install it would take many minds. And maybe a million dollars to implement the changes that i wanted to see on the live site and so i invented a proxy reverse proxy technology Back in two thousand and three called gravity stream and that actually became the majority revenue producing component or part of the agency and a. It was a big reason why i was able to sell the agency in two thousand and ten because that was Like majority of the revenue was performance based pricing. We had client for example. zappa's We charge seven figures in Pay for performance Spend in a year's time because we were generating that much value for them. We charged on a cost per click basis. Fifteen cents a click so everybody wanted to sign up because folks who doesn't want pay for performance if you don't get the performance you don't get the value you don't pay for it so we bring that back down to kind of our core audience which is really people that are just learning about see. Oh just trying to understand how to get better at seo. What can they do at their level. What kind of things would make sense for them to try to reverse engineer without these big multi million dollar tools. Is there something they can do as as new people to really help them totally leverage yeah totally just off the cuff. Some examples here just doing a simple. Google search can help you to reverse engineer. Let's say what buzzfeed is doing in order to get so many links and and so much Click through nee click throughs. It's the the hook and the headline. That's kind of their secret sauce. They have the pick really good Images and they write the articles. Well and you know come up with great quizzes and all that as well but really it starts with the hook and then the headline and if you want to reverse engineer what they're doing as inspiration to raise your own viral content link worthy of viral content. So that you can get like they get. You might put in your topic. Plus site colin buzzfeed dot com in as a google search. And see what comes up as The articles and and the headlines if you want to get a little fancier with it you could do in title colon and then the topic. There's no space after the coal by the way so entitled colon plumbing for example if you're plumber and then site colon buzzfeed dot com. It's so simple. And yet you're aren being essentially ripping off in duplicating But i like. I said with using it as inspiration not copy and paste so. Let's actually do that. Site colon buzzfeed dot com and then in title colon plumbing or vice versa. Doesn't matter the order can do entitled i or cyclone i seven expert plumbing tips to keep in mind. This thanksgiving The race is on for plumbing at the push of a button. What was thanksgiving interesting. Yeah i was going to blow in me to wait a minute plumbing. I'm worried about his thanksgiving is the aftermath. But that's besides okay so anyways you you get the idea that you can find what for whatever topic it is. Unless it's super super nisha. Could let's say you want to write about hurricanes entitled colin hurricane or entitled colin hurricanes and then say cohen buzzfeed dot com buzzfeed dot com. I is my favorite kind of goto a place to reverse engineer. What they're doing in terms of their their hooks and headlines but there's also viral nova distract defy board panda up worthy a lot of these viral sites that get tons and tons of traffic and you just are looking for

Google Nikki Johnny Alan Ford Zappa Colin Buzzfeed Colin Hurricane Colin Hurricanes Goto
Leave Out Porridge for Belligerent Elves on Christmas Eve

Kottke Ride Home

03:41 min | 1 year ago

Leave Out Porridge for Belligerent Elves on Christmas Eve

"More trip to europe before christmas to explore some interesting traditions. This time in denmark as kids in america may be getting ready to leave out cookies for santa on friday and don't worry after his scientifically dubious assertions about old saint nick having magical immunity to covid nineteen. Dr fauci has since clarified that. He took a trip to the north pole to vaccinate santa claus himself. Anyways wall here in the us. It's cookies for santa. in denmark. Children leave out porridge for mischievous lives as bribe to make sure they behave the elves. Not the kids. The idea of needing to keep these elms or nisa. Happy goes back to at least the middle ages when farmers explained various bad luck and the hardships of a long winter on the nisa farm. If you kept the nissan happy your livestock would survive the winter in all else would go. Well if you disrespected or upset the nida you may find horrors in the morning like your cow. Having dropped dead to stay on your nieces good side families began offering him a bowl of porridge. On christmas eve. Poor inge was a common staple at the time but the one for the nissan would be special made of rice instead of oats or barley boiled in milk and topped with butter. atlas obscure shares. One account of someone not leaving out the proper offering quote in one story a milkmaid designed to play a trick on her farms. Nissa hiding the butter beneath the porridge. Seen his offering on garnished the niece of flies into a rage and kills the families. Cow finishes his meal and realizes his mistake. He solves the problem by stealing a neighbor's cow and delivering it to his family's farm and quotes. So you really didn't want to get on their bad side. There are many artworks depicting the nisa as almost demonic looking elves throughout the fifteen and sixteen hundreds but by the century they had started taking on more of a happy christmas elf. Kind of look quoting again. A child sized bearded man and appointee red cap traditional garb for farmhands and quotes and met martin anderson curator at the national museum of denmark. Chalks this change up to industrialization and urbanization saying that quote. The nisa was away for rural farmers to explain seemingly random events like illnesses among livestock. They had these thoughts because they couldn't explain bacteria or things like that. She says as people gained a better understanding of agricultural science denisa didn't need to serve the role of scary scapegoats anymore and quotes nowadays. The nsa or even more jolly and innocence. They may still play pranks like stealing. One sock or families may nominate someone to play the role of the nsa and play small pranks on other family members throughout the month of december. But you no longer have to worry about your house's nisha killing you war your animals but people still leave the sweet porridge out for him on christmas eve although now they usually enjoy some of it themselves as well and i will say that. There are other similar kinds of nieces folklore and traditions throughout the other nations in scandinavia in some places. He's called the toyota. Sometimes he brings presence sometimes he can shape shift. There's a number of variations. Suggest know that this one danish tradition is not all there is to know about the more the topa

Dr Fauci Denmark Santa Saint Nick Nissan Nissa Santa Claus Martin Anderson America National Museum Of Denmark Inge Europe Nisa NSA Denisa Nisha Scandinavia Toyota
Interview With Micah Larsen, Hilarious University Marketing Professor and Mom

Fancy Free Podcast

05:21 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Micah Larsen, Hilarious University Marketing Professor and Mom

"Thank you so much for being with me today. Thank you for having me joanne. Absolutely fill in the blanks. What did i miss about who you are and what you do. Oh boy. I am a montana toddler. Mama which means that. I spent my time outside. Four seasons of the year chasing my one year old around right now league us. My background is in social science. So i'm actually a trained social scientists in published research on persuasion so that was kind of made. I love if you will. I married my husband. Eric works medicine. And so this has been a very interesting time Yes australian co bed. I'm sure you can imagine for all of time spent apart. We have a one year old wilder. Tell me about how you came to be part time professor. Yes i went into academia. Because i love people in their brains since i came out of the womb. My parents would say that. I asked why about everything. Why why would you now. I understand as a mom myself. So i found that social science was the key to why people do what they do and i fell in love with the idea of studying people's brains and how we form relationships in dot world of communication research. There's as little tiny nisha research called social influence or persuasion. And so it's basically the science of how we get people to say yes to things and within that i researched health communication so basically how we get people to say yes to wear seatbelts or donate their organs or in my case have safe sex so like use a condom and that was a really interesting topic to study. Oh my gosh. that's so fascinating. Yeah i think. I missed my calling. I listened to several podcasts. That are along this line hidden. Brain and invisibly leah and i like revisionist history with malcolm. Glad well even. Though i know that he's more of an observer at he's not as much of a scientist but i just find anybody who thinks about humans and what they do and how their brains work in a different way or a unique and new way. I'm so fascinated with i. I just can't even get enough of it. So i love eating this. Yeah you hit. The nail on the had hidden brain is exactly my realm of study. I love it. And i actually wrote a blog post about one of his episodes about tunnel vision. I almost felt like it unlocked. A part of my understanding about other people that was missing about how people can make such terrible decisions because they're under duress and there's a whole episode. I think actually unsafe sex. And you're rational decision making in your thought process when you're sitting in your office chair. Drinking a cup of coffee talking to a girl felt like well. Of course. I would never put myself in harm's way but then when you're under the influence of infatuation and the moment somehow suddenly our brains make different types of decisions but that that episode about tunnel vision. There's so much more there. I think he just kind of grays. The tip of the iceberg on why people make unexpected unpredicted decisions and why people kinda dig themselves into a deeper when all of the outside observers are going wait. Why don't you just stop doing this and start doing this. But because they're already in that whole they just can't you know yacht. We get super married to our convictions. In so our brains are really uncomfortable with information that goes against our beliefs so we end up seeking out and believing information that even if it's not really good information as long as support previously held beliefs. We just roll with it. I haven't heard the tunnel vision episode but that sounds exactly like the type of research that was doing which kind of explains like people who believe that cohen is a really scary disease will contain to believe that more and more staunchly. Yeah they will reject data to the contrary they will collect data to the consistent. Exactly that is exactly the same thing we do with politics and so many things all right. Well let's do rapid fire questions. If you had to describe yourself in one word. What would it be bold awesome. What is your number. I'm in achiever. Which i think is a three with an individualist swing so achiever in midwest yes okay. So three wing four. Fold your baby. I love it. What is something unexpected. That has changed about you in the past few years so i became a mother which wasn't unexpected. Because i didn't know if. I wanted to have children but i became a mother in a very unexpected way which i'm sure we'll talk about. Yeah gosh. I can't wait to hear more about that. Wow becoming a mother is like the earth shattering and paradigm shifting. I opening and exhausting. What's the scariest thing you've ever done for fun moved to africa. Wow you did it for fun. And when was that twelve years ago. I was in college. Amazing and africa is a continent. Where were you in africa. Yes i was in ghana which is like no armpit carnival area of the west coast. So we're kind of curves.

Nisha Joanne Wilder Montana Eric Malcolm Cohen Midwest Africa Ghana West Coast
Team Secret Cleans Up At Esports Awards

We Say Things - an esports and Dota podcast with SUNSfan & syndereN

05:14 min | 1 year ago

Team Secret Cleans Up At Esports Awards

"Team secret for the e sports awards that i did not watch at all They one team of the year. They won player of the year which was nisha and coach of the year. Which is hain. is that all correct syndrome. Correct what do you think of that. So teamster again no. Ti this year and other other games have had the kind of their big tournaments some of them at least league for example but secret essentially winning the last. If you wanna take out the last few weeks has been seven plus money. I wanna say eight events in a row. Yeah seven months. They want everything just winning. Literally everything would you. I mean obviously our daughter bubble. So we're gonna agree right. The doda words everything. i would agree with. I don't know if i would put nietzsche's player of the year. I think it's hard to pick one. Yeah but he would definitely be one other candidates right. So i mean as it always is with these multi game award shows right. It's easy for us to say that these are great choices because we don't follow the other games that are part of it nearly as much to be honest with you. I don't even know which games are eligible to win in the sports category. If it's dodo leagues he has go rainbows. Six call of duty. Like i don't know what games are included in this is. It's hard to imagine another team in any game being as dominant the secret where this year. I think that's fair to say like you need to basically when everything right and not only that but the competition needs to be tougher which is unlikely once again because of corona because you know arguably secret even had a really tough region to play and while this was happening wasn't like it was just free easy wins because the region was week or something still tons of teams so it's super impressive I'm happy coaches got a bit more recognition so gretz to heen as well. I think he's really elevated this team to the next level they just started owning after he joined. I feel like it made a pretty big difference at least down the stretch Ceo good stuff. The thing about these awards shows though is. I don't know how much stock to put in the general. It's always cool for the teams to get recognition like this But i wish maybe it was a little bit more transparent a little more defiant. How we're going to segue into this next kind of mini topic of what do you think of award shows for e. sports in general because from my perspective i'm used to watching the oscars. I don't really watch a lot of other award shows at all but the oscars. I watch every single year. It's an event you know it's fun to watch. Even if i hate all of the movies which is sometimes the case that they just pick like the criteria just doesn't make sense to me sometimes like these artsy fartsy like movies will sometimes win for no reason. According to me but again like what criteria are they using. I don't know maybe you just don't have any taste. No that's definitely. I love in bruges. It's a great movie. Don't try to get out obligation. But what do you think from east perspective because when you look at the movies just as you know. Let's just do a one to one here. It's pretty clear. Even without knowing the exact criteria it's movies of this category but for east. There's just it feels like it's not as black and white. There's just so many different games. What is even considered an e sport. Technically speaking like. I don't even know the answer that question. That's the thing i mean. I guess the analogy of the comparison is really good though because in movies. There's also like it's super subjective. Right like what do you consider. A good movie is very different. From one person to the next head would be considered true. I suppose what it's defined as an eastport is a game that yeah but how many how big of a following doesn't need to have how significant to the price does need to be if i host a tournament in prague for one hundred bucks on eastport best escort because then then a lot of things could have won but now i i don't know what the criteria is and i think that's what we're probably agreeing on right now is that Maybe maybe are transparent about it. I just haven't seen it. I'm not saying that's not the case But yeah. I don't even know what sport is because like you said if it's just money than short that's anything could be in eastport if it needs to be x. amount of player base and have tournaments consistently running like whatever the case may be but either way. I like the idea of it. The fact that this is. I believe the fifth year in a row that their continued to do it is cool people show up to the event. There were ranked tuxes. They're trying to make it. That's where i don't like it. Actually they're trying to make it to. I don't know if mainstream is the right word but they're just trying too hard to copy everybody else like just let people show up in fucking sweatpants like were gamers man. Nobody wants to wear a goddamn suit. Unless you're a fucking psychopath syndrome okay. Being honest a lot of people do like dressing up on occasion. I think they don't like having to wear a uniform. It's like that all the time but for special occasions i think people like to do something extra like but honestly now that you it. I think it would be super cool if our award shows had people show up and team jerseys of their favorite team instead of in tuxes right. I think it'd be cool

Gretz Nisha Oscars Nietzsche Eastport Bruges Prague
Galaxy Z Fold 2 or Note 20 Ultra?

Pocketnow Weekly Podcast

06:46 min | 2 years ago

Galaxy Z Fold 2 or Note 20 Ultra?

"Nick. Thank you for being on this week's episode. You've been on plenty of them this past twenty twenty. So thank you for being on the pilot episode of Cuny. A thanks for having me it's always a pleasure. Yeah. All right. So great question for you Someone as let me scroll all the way back. If I can get all the way back there because I g TV can be a little bit hard when it comes to this stuff, somebody asked about the galaxy full to own Brandon Brandon asked, are you going to get accustomed galaxy full to and? The here's where I landed on the fold to once I tested it, and did my reviews for for jv in particular My main question going into using a foldable device on the daily was. His this phone going to provide more for me than just a more fun and bigger smartphone experience. If the question if the answer to that question was no, then I did not feel right mending two grand on it that ultimately became the case I. Love The fold too. I think it's a great device. I enjoyed my time with ED call of duty mobile and Rochman X. Dive on that big screen is. Literally experience you can have anywhere else unless you are willing to play on a tablet by. Yeah. I just. It's a fun device and that's all it ended up being and that's why ultimately said no, it's not for me. So you got your hands on it. You've been doing cameras enough do do you have any thoughts? So. I'm kind of with you on you know seeing if affordable device is the right device for me, my my previous experience with foldable devices got the test out the fold last year just for a couple of days not a full review. But then I got the Z. Flip and I actually really liked that device. But with the fold to my review approach is not me just reviewing the advice it's more of is doing already a blog style review seeing if. A week with this device can convince me that foldable displays are the future and this is where we should be going with smartphone technology. So I'm on day three of that As you said, I've tested out the cameras so far I've been using the phone as my main device. There are some benefits to having that larger screen. I. Honestly think that you know having that cross device between a phone and tablet. Can Be useful for some people But then you mentioned things like gaming and I I saw a lot of people doing this playing call of duty duty mobile on the fold, and you have a much bigger experience but actually I had to put it down after fifteen twenty minutes because of a different couple factors. The the weight of this thing is incredible. It is heavier than a tablet like this thing this thing is just as heavy as what an eight. INCH or nine inch tablet is just because of the metal building the glass on the back it's extremely heavy. So it's not really comfortable for playing for a long period of time but then also the aspect ratio while it does lend itself for what seems to be a more immersive experience. It's actually a cropped in experience. So you don't get any of your peripheral vision that you would get on a sixteen by nine display. It's it's literally cut off so if you have. Especially for first person shooters, you're literally cut off from about twenty to thirty percent of the screen that you would get on a regular smartphone but. That's left to right though right because it's taught top and bottom. You get more on the same about them you get the scene. More on the top and bottom no, you get you get the same view. It's so it's like yours. It's like you're on a smartphone. If you're you're here and then they're just cutting off this and you get that wider or taller aspect ratio by it's it's the same. So I had to quit after I don't know fifteen minutes and the other reason I quit was because it's you're feeling the plastic on the screen and so scrolling your fingers with onscreen controls isn't that smooth as A. Little bit more friction there and especially when it's a larger display unless I hadn't calibrated my controls on spring controls yet to make them a little bit smaller so that there and more responsive. So the ONSCREEN. Controls for call of duty mobile were driving me crazy after after fifteen minutes and I was like, no, I'm going back to my won't plus a pro. Just because it's a much, much better experience for me at least but as far as like it felt bigger and it's because like because the screen is bigger, it does feel more immersive. You're in the game more but I don't think it gives you a competitive advantage with with that feeling because of the other detractors that it, you know it's it's heavier the screens not as smooth. So your your finger scrolling on the screen aren't as quick and responsive, and then for me at least I felt like I was L-. I lost my peripheral vision. In it so But, I I. I think for for call of duty the whole peripheral vision thing. Maybe that is great but I can tell you sir on a platform like Rochman X. Dive it definitely rendered more of the top and bottom because there was more of that. They're so on a regular phone if there was a platform underneath me that I would not see until I fell off the current one I could see it on the full to scum that was literally there. Yeah. So it was literally showed up there. In the same vein of the fold to question someone did ask, would you pick a no twenty all tre or the full to and I think that's an interesting question because these are two very. Niche devices, Nisha lines that Samsung have created for themselves. So it's has pen or fold as penfold. How for me? I. Would Go with the note twenty ultra For for a couple different reasons, one of them being the cameras, the cameras on the no twenty tra- better cameras. that being said, I have been enjoying taking selfies with the fold since you can use the main cameras on the back. So if you're in the SELFIES, the full would be the better option there you can use the altar wide or the standard especially in low light conditions you to see a huge improvement But as far as overall usability of the device I would say the note twenty trump from me personally would be a better fit for my my use cases.

Selfies Brandon Brandon Cuny Nick. Samsung Penfold ED Nisha
Cyber Power Index highlighting Australian Governments gaps in cyber capability

Cyber Security Weekly Podcast

06:22 min | 2 years ago

Cyber Power Index highlighting Australian Governments gaps in cyber capability

"Like any INFO Technology Sector security has plenty of indexes flooding around or get. Indexes collided by vendors and people trying to sell things to us I thought this for Senate index was. Useful because it doesn't come from I accompany product. It say independent academic attempt to benchmark Com, sub security capability and intent from nation sites It appealed to make per couple of reasons may not have had A to do with Bill Center in the past spend a little bit of Thanh. Talking to their academics in previous roles and particularly locked the way that This report sets metrics that up designed to objectively major subsidy maturity in nations So it says what are the kind of things that we could judge the intent of a nation in the obscurity spice and one of the kind of things that we could use to objectively major capability. And it tells an interesting story in Australia Australia's categorized in the higher intent, low capability quadrant and the reason for that is because when the the objective metrics this reporter applied to the statements made by by government ministers by government departments, entities about what our intent is. Assab security spice. Where about the most ambitious nation in the world for ask security attend? But. Then when you look at what our actual capabilities against that intent on again measured in a series of objective metrics. We fold anti sixteenth in that space. So, FA May that told a pretty familiar story because this over promising on delivering stories. One that I think is familiar to a lot of. People in the Strand security sector. In the context of these trying government's actions since the twenty six, Day sub, security strategy. A lot of announcement to be my bet when you follow up way those announcements. In the years after that have been made you say less deleted then was announced to the media. Will what's on the industry? Kodak in the two thousand, sixteen strategy that was undefended at least out of the Prime Minister's office. This one is looking out at a ten years. The two thousand twenty strategy is looking at at the ten year timeframe. And proposing one point six, billion, dollar funding. Backdrop, but a lot of that is going into law enforcement and as you say might be into that capability. What's your take on the strategy itself? Overall as you say, it's it's another announcement is on the strategy whether it's not as another thing but certainly yet your thoughts on the strategy itself and where maybe else we could have been in twenty twenty from the twenty six danes strategies. Have you have you seen that the two thousand twenty strategy's building on the twenty, sixteen or? Taking a completely new direction. While the that, you can certainly say the why the two thousand twenty strategy is reaction to experience the twenty six strategy That the twenty sixteen subsequently strategy had a very large number of of objectives and Nisha announced under it. I think the government found the experience of trying to implement those very large number projected initiatives again, adopted under outcome Tambo's prime ministership around the breathing bruising exercise because the twenty twenty strategy dramatically rationalize is temptation I'm say that the broad spread of of initiatives and objectives under the strategy a kind of a toddler. Your decide that the Gospel confessed about ninety percent of the funding. Associated with these twenty twenty strategy he's allocated to security agencies So it goes into building. Capabilities with particularly the is day but also other security agencies on. Enforcement agencies like the the I pay, and that's well and good We have I think outstanding internationally recognized capabilities within is. and this is the conduct that you have to keep investing in order to. Maintain those capabilities in my time that that international ranking. Suppose big Criticism that that libraries had is one that we've been exploring for at the loss twelve months and that's really When you look at security policy to strike the problem is the ability to project those capabilities out of the silos of how defense and security agencies. To the problems in Australia Com in terms of lifting a bench, mock the baseline up security security. Brazil and Sada resilience across the Australian government trying economy You know there's a lot of examples of that. Wall is day is absolutely world standard. Saab resiliency combined entities is as at the government's own description reminding at relatively low levels. you know the is days top full became mandatory in the. Seventies ago now. had a slew of a straight national ordered office inquiry since then. when you type them all up on like twenty nine percent of Kamal entities compliant with all the top four. Seven years after theoretically became mandatory say interesting. Is Connect between very high capability. Inside Is Day lower levels of saga resilience and more broadly throughout government not to sign story that we see in the corporate sector unites now at banks and Al. Telcos, absolately will class intends to their sub security posture. But you only have to sort of take one stiff through the down. In the I six navy top fifty. And you start seeing. Very, different levels of resilience.

Info Technology Sector Senate Bill Center Australia Australia Kodak Australia Prime Minister Saab Tambo AL Nisha Absolately Reporter Brazil
"nisha" Discussed on Jannah Firdaus Mediapro Podcast

Jannah Firdaus Mediapro Podcast

05:08 min | 2 years ago

"nisha" Discussed on Jannah Firdaus Mediapro Podcast

"Wound. Up on the Gerald. Own, and why should I not worship e who created me into whom you will be returned? Daffy. Doing He. Can Real only on Nisha to whom Shea. You. Should I take other than him for a day at he's while if the most merciful intense for me some adversity, their intercession will not avail me at all nor can they save me.

Nisha Shea
Washington, DC parade celebrates fathers and freedom

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:54 sec | 2 years ago

Washington, DC parade celebrates fathers and freedom

"In southeast DC dads are being celebrated a group of drivers honk their way through several southeast neighborhoods to recognize fathers for all that they do and just a heads up you're about to hear that honking in this report from WTOP's Michelle Basch signs posted on the sides of about a dozen cars that took part in the parade carried positive messages one read you are a great father your children are lucky to have you is there a week and is there a day you know to Nisha Murden is with a network of formerly incarcerated women called the wire one of the event's organizers also helping out giovane Davis's group the love more movement I want to get involved in these type of investor relations you know Preciado said Amanda fathers in our community the caravan got a great response people we shouted and holds back is attached in southeast Michelle bass WTOP news

Wtop Michelle Basch Nisha Murden Preciado Amanda Fathers Giovane Davis Michelle Bass
The stigma around COVID can be as dangerous as the virus

Second Opinion

03:20 min | 2 years ago

The stigma around COVID can be as dangerous as the virus

"Every country in the world is grappling with the covert epidemic. Some much better than others. In many of those countries stigma around the disease plays a very important role in India. Stigma is directed at Muslims in Haiti at orphanages in Spain at Italians and in the US at asian-americans stigma related to disease his not new and in the US. It goes back hundreds of years. Those who are infected are considered to be part of an outside group and they have been blamed ostracized and often brutally attacked for simply getting sick. Geneva is in North Africa compared to other North African or African countries. We have one of the oldest population with a population of twelve million. To Nisha has one of the best healthcare systems in Africa with well trained health providers but few hospital beds and very few intensive care units so public health and testing need to play a large role in controlling the spread of Kovic. My name is Gibert BELKA KOREA. Young Damien continues. Yeah working For the Institute Jaber is concerned that the public response to co VID has turned into a blame game. We have fighting a virus year. We non fighting people what we seeing right now. The message about Kobe is more about foreign train. People that have the disease as bad people highlighting gators and saying hey the virus or the diseases coming from these neighborhoods. When people are scared it is human nature to want to blame others and create a narrative of outside bad people causing the problem. It is their fault. My family or my community would never have caused this problem by being portrayed as bad people are scared. That basically makes him hide. And we've seen that with other diseases that has to beg colossus or or HIV. Basically people don't WanNa get tested or portrayed as cubby positives in in their communities or in the neighborhoods but when people don't get tested it's hard to control the disease and we can't know about hot spots and we can't do contact racing and individual suffer as well. Jaber told me about one example. He found particularly upsetting burying. Gubbay positives agents or Ned evil. Some communities refuse to have burials in noticing. Theories scored It's it's it's human rights. I mean if it's done properly. It knows no risk. Stigma itself is like a virus. The fear that drives it is contagious. It's absolutely gear driven by giving the correct information. We can remove that fear. Remove that stigma and no the movie This virus from the comed- once we find a way to manage Kovic nineteen and we will. It would be too bad if we eliminate the virus but are left with the plague of stigma.

Institute Jaber Kobe United States Kovic North Africa Korea India Haiti Comed North African Damien Spain HIV Geneva NED
Washington, DC police chief: New US attorney will be ‘aggressive’ in stopping repeat gun offenders

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:47 sec | 2 years ago

Washington, DC police chief: New US attorney will be ‘aggressive’ in stopping repeat gun offenders

"A crackdown on repeat gun offenders in DC the police chief telling the DC council there's a new effort to bring more of those cases to court testifying in front of the Judiciary Committee during an oversight hearing of DC police chief Peter Newsham says he's met with the new US attorney for DC Tim Shea three times and they discussed gun violence he has agreed to take even more of those cases over to federal court Nisha says people who've been convicted of gun crimes before were responsible for more than twenty percent of the killings in twenty eight teams I think he appreciates the fact that our felons who subsequently go out and pick up an illegal firearm pose a significant danger since February last year when the U. S. attorney's office took on city gun cases police data shows of a hundred and thirty one cases fifty eight people were found

DC Judiciary Committee Peter Newsham Us Attorney Tim Shea Nisha Attorney
"nisha" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"nisha" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Having the money to Nisha and her godmother were given financial assistance by one of Florida's scholarship programs which is run by step up for students and this program is set up where donations come from either companies or individuals themselves they're able to get a tax credit for give a charitable contribution to a scholarship granting organizations in these scholarship granting organizations then in turn it's a step up for students give scholarships to students so they can attend a private school so it's just a fantastic way where individuals are really donating to find students to go to great schools all across Florida but despite getting into the school the nation was still bar behind but this time would be much different the summer before I started at my school take a academic tests to see what level I was on a very low needless to say and one of my teachers she agreed to meet I was not just blow in reading I was slowing math I don't know my times tables and she met with me one on one I will go to her house during the summer I would stay after school when she was setting up for the school year it was very different I knew this lady because she she went to the church to serve I knew I was comfortable with her in some way and I was I thought it was just going to be as much fun and games to be on is going to go to her house but she really you know what I don't know but we study and I learn my times tables I was reading she did not let up she was a student at Jacksonville university in our remembers going with her to her classes too and so she pretty much every day during the summer would pick me up or I get dropped off and I would trail her wherever she went and that's that was my life during the summer but although I was still kind.

Nisha Florida Jacksonville university
Future of Work - Part 2

Stories Behind the Grind

06:12 min | 2 years ago

Future of Work - Part 2

"Ted Tim Damian. Thanks so much for coming on the stories behind on cost. It's great to have you on. Thank you lovely to be here thanks. I mean you're the head of sales of SOD Kika. Which is Australia and New Zealand's largest online shopping platform and you're employing over ten thousand prescreened. Saad kicks in Sake and you're currently on a mission to give people the powder ridge potential. Tim thanks against on two of the series Tim. Yeo The founder of Ben Tron which allows organizations to smooth out the demands of the business cycle and maximize employee productivity to have some big heavyweights in this industry. Thank you know about every wife doing our best right. Thank you lovely a little. Thank you a war is a bit more background about yourself. And what attracted you pod? Kika love to yes so I look up any recruitment variety by his hands on recruiter than spend a considerable chunk of my time what he gets said so when I started sakes are was basically prospecting customers who had ads in the newspaper trying to convince them that online mafia better alternative Full themselves. How does that is. That was the role that myself. Much engage many years at sage that our family on its own must like have a bigger voice in the small business and I'm saying his got lots of investments and one of them was in a comical sidekick up and I met with the fans that saw Kiko really locked while doing really wanted to be a part of. I guess it was something different to be out of that disruption again and I really wanted to gain in Wahine. You can cope. Would it be on a cult? The GIG ECONOMY. The contingent sort of marketplace are really wanting to play pop. Exile could say. Oh my mom. It's that's not everyone but it's certainly. A portion of the industry was Directions are you had really good appeals to me and then also working for a business once doing so double digit growth. Every year is exciting and challenging Tom Yet double digit growth is is defining challenge for for a lot of businesses out there. But you're not to be part of the company that is doing. It must be really exciting time for you in that role absolutely in our way. Look with GONNA plan. We do give it Saturday. We're attacking you markets are. Jim would fondness as Wellington's we spent a lot of Thomson of evangelizing As well in gems of some customers ready for new Welton some people really happy with. All worlds are are easy. He's one of those ones way. You 'cause you directing you also have pretty fee skating's hymns of Alvin with encouraging over a lot of noise but in terms of so much like it's not forever. It's just now so in terms of that. Adults gives me extreme comfort and confidence around. You know what we're building these new world. How do you? How do you navigate that difference between new welding all thinking especially I guess Laka powerful mud sidekick away you'll sort of often interacting with the new polls coming in but also more established organizations highest hotcakes? How do you navigate that up at different question in terms of we haven't now that sort of all the time but I'm we're lucky enough to have the businesses bank to seven years? So we're lucky. Enough to have sort of seventies seventies of John to understand what the market's doing what the markets for incident is. A lot of. It is just hit. A lot of it is just a getting a salon at literally. Lots of teaching Matsen conversation lots of necessarily networking but two slots to Jewish enough win only pretty good at sort of finding out who has inch And then who may be interested and a lot of it comes down to customer Yet do you not someone that does not generally jobs agency they quite interested in how technology according platform that likes the against that lock the disability Who'S GOING TO BE TUNING UP BEFORE? They before they get their WanNa have control either whom they are even for not Wake or two months summit. I Really WanNa know what they've done with. It worked out platform for ball's middle that information star way. Do have to do a bit of prospecting by the I guess. The good news is as we continue to grab us as it before that awareness pace isn't quite what it was when John Sake in Australia. Explain the I'm what year. Why NOT US at Man? Obey abyss investments of rhythm going round. The must be some similar strands of them. Compensation between what you've experienced in the positive been able to then now use of todd in terms of educating inspiring and sharing. You know where the future of works going yet. Absolutely to the honest you'll series. Gigs folks businesses empty different. Peaches do Truth Lots of parallels between by a small business. That's really focused. That also is really clear on what we do will do. And I think that's what really helps sip rideout good businesses from gripe businesses. Sometimes it's really hard to side Knowledge there's potential Alliances really exactly. You'll call but in terms of another one thing I have learned from Thomas. They consuming it so I keep. Your is having focused Tom. Tom Sinai with sometimes sticking to the core of what we do. Helps you certainly Pasta? And so much more. Clark was wife so they definitely lots of parallels between Donkey diamond to tell me. If you agree with this particularly in the talent who would talk about future work there is so much nuance between the different styles and taught said a lot of people just overlook like Bay throw everything into recruitment or everything into Gig Echo like. They just like to put things in buckets. The more things come out there sorry much more nuance and much more. Nisha I guess at least different capabilities that are coming out that the hottest is educating people on why that's different

Ted Tim Damian Tom Sinai John Sake Australia Sod Kika Head Of Sales Saad New Zealand Kiko YEO Matsen United States Ben Tron Alvin Clark BAY Founder Rideout Peaches
Cobra Collective offers support to hospitality industry

Monocle 24: The Menu

09:59 min | 2 years ago

Cobra Collective offers support to hospitality industry

"The collective is an exciting body. And it's exciting. Because I wish it when I was starting my business. There Wall such a thing in existence. Where a group of restrictors on people in the food and beverage industry who are telling our story in a way. That's going to inspire that whole scene of entrepreneurs to be courageous enough to have a go within this industry. You look at the industry and you hear. There's lots of doom and gloom at the moment for various reasons but certainly with hospitality. You know that the rate is always being ninety cents restaurants failing in the first year. So I think it's really important to have a variety of role models who speak positively about how it can be otherwise and how to build a business in a way that's going to have legs and stamina and scalable and that's what the. Cobra collective is about his group of normal people like US telling those out there who are wondering how it can be. It can be very sunny place to be. Let's talk about your own story dozen interesting one so I know you worked as a barrister for twin two years before you took that leap into hospitalizing. It's an unusual route. Isn't it sized child? Protection burst of twenty s and that's very typical of many Indian immigrants. My parents were doctors and I was born in this country and I was raised to be a professional. Because that's the only thing that you can be otherwise you fall off the face of England in their view so I was raised to be a doctor or lawyer and I became a lawyer. So it's very good girl and I absolutely loved my job and my job was about meeting people at the lowest point of their life and giving them hope in some ways that this was child abuse and this was about children being removed etc and business and particularly hospitality was something that I thought was probably quite reprehensible because you look at media and you look at the way that restaurateurs and restaurants portrayed unless seen as these hotbeds of testosterone driven aggression that you have to be brutalized anti brutal to succeed in hospitality and so for me as a woman as a woman who was in my forties. When I started the restaurant it was not something that was in any way beckoning but I had a passion for food. A real burning passion to show liberal. Show my city. How Indians actually eat in their own homes? In a way that hasn't really been shown on the High Street and this is entrepreneurism. It starts to come alive. The idea comes alive and I had a brilliant job in brilliant salary and great prospects that this creature came alive in the shape of moberly and it would keep me awake at night until I gave birth to it. And that's when I started my best restaurant only five years ago now. What kind of support would you have needed back in the day when you look at? That's rather stressful period. Five six years ago when you were about to launch a restaurant. What kind of support would you have needed? Well you know I. It's not a small alt-right thing to say that role models are extremely important. Because for me as I said you look at the industry and you can't see people that look like me. That are the stage of life that are doing it with their own money. I had no financial backing at all. This was all of my savings. Was the roof over my head. We're going to have to sell the house and moving to my Auntie's bungalow. It was so risky and unwilling to take those risks by goodness. It would have helped if I could have seen people that have done it. That were talking about Watson all sharing their journey so I knew what to expect and it must inevitably be the end of home. Life must inevitably be that you are one of those ninety percent of the fail. And that's what I could have really done with. The other thing is banks are not that willing to lend to a forty year old woman whose career and comes to them with an entrepreneurial idea and that is the truth you are seen as somebody's having a midlife crisis and so- financial backing would have been great. I was given in the end enough to buy one grill by bank. I'm not with them anymore. And that's all. Yeah so Nisha. You're giving your most gloss later this month. What kind of lessons I got to be sharing their must all about how to build a scalable business. This is about building a business and having the ambition to think it might go beyond one small high street store and so the lessons are how to take that product and craft it in a way that you can replicate it with complete consistency. One of the most important lessons is to understand why you're doing this you know. Why are you building this business? Why are you risking everything and then articulating? That reason. Why right the way through Your Business? Former you know for me. I build me to enrich lives primarily of my stuff because if my chefs happy. The food is amazing. Give my stuff a happy. The the environment is joy filled and so it really is important to in some. Why is you get out of bed every morning and have that permeate through your business model said that every one of your employees Hsieh's zeal? I think it's interesting. How you mention how important is to keep your stuff happy. So what do you actually do in practical terms to make sure? They aren't content with where they work. Well many things. She's priority in my job. So for instance I have a wellbeing officer that is dedicated solely to going around. And I've got five hundred members of staff going around speaking to every member stuff and find out how they are doing. How is it to work for Moseley to enrich their lives? Are we doing that? We do things like you know the first day of school for the children they have. They have their birthdays off. I fly forty members of my team every year to India to work in villages on female entrepreneurs projects on lund management projects. We pay them to do that. I need that life to be punctuated by things that just lift their head out of the mire and make them think about why they're working and so that if it's your passion and it's my passion. Lubi an eternal source of stimulation as it is for me sauce. Amazing how do you see the British sociologists out the moment it seems that we are living turbulent times that I don't know what your take is being based in Liverpool how big of an effect thus brexit have already. It's interesting because I think brexit is not the reason that we see so many heads rolling at the moment. Honestly I think maybe a small factor is the kind of factor that would push you over the edge if you're a business though struggling anyway. What's really rather marvelous is not marvelous. But one picks over the bones of what's happened with these businesses that have gone down and one actually thinks was. The last time I ate there will took the ones I loved to go and eat there. The answer would probably be not for many many months and that is key. It is your product. The day I eat in my restaurant twice a week on my day off me in the family go neat in my restaurant. The day I stopped doing that. And it's not good enough for me as the daily need to get off the high street. So that's one of the factors is constantly looking product thinking you'll food addictive is it priced reasonably and you can do all of those things when your rents are not killing you so it's really important as a CEO to take sites that are not going to punish you and your guests because of how expensive it is so you've got to be moderate in that way and that's why. I'm not in London yet. An outcome to London when I find a cheaper that site but right now I've got thirteen restaurants all of them outside London. I took Ed Maria today. Which is a couple of Scotland? And I'm not in my own capital yet and I just need those prices to come down because what I never want to do is to have to put my prices up the my clients because that is the beginning of the end now the concern of Brexit. Is that a London. Bubble thing do think impacts is strong obviously many restaurants in London in particular. I have a lot of European staff. How do you feel about this? What does the what looked like when you're outside of London? When your asset of Lyndon Free Staff Statistic is twenty three percent European staff twenty-three as opposed to ninety percent inland? And so you can see that in terms of stopping is very different. The pressures are different in fact sorry. Let's just brave enough to say. The pressures are much reduced. If you're outside of London in terms of the supply chain. Who knows who knows what's going to happen. We've got a year to negotiate something. That should really take three years negotiate. So that's a conversation to have perhaps next December but in terms of personnel it hasn't affected it in the way that may affect other businesses. That London centric so as I mentioned already. You're giving a master class later this month. I'm wondering having been a very successful Batali. See Orange but What are the things? You'd still like to learn what I would still like to learn as you look at these brands that have stood the test of time. You look at the non. Does the Pizza Express is the Waga Mama's these giants of industry that had legs to last fifteen twenty years? And it's that it is. What is the secret? Where does that confidence come from? One of the things that I've realized is you don't need to keep changing your menu today. Non Does Change. Think it's their lyman. Something chicken to a mango and passion fruit. It was the headline in the Liverpool Echo. This morning that the clients are absolutely destroyed. Not going to numbers anymore because it changed one dish. And it's little things like that. Where does the confidence come from? Do you need to constantly change them and you you know? I am the Sea of Muggy in the founder of Morgan will be for the foreseeable medium term future when the next CEO comes in because there will be some point in the future which reigns in my hunting ever want. Must I look to in the next person to make sure that the culture remains the same and the way I learned that by fraternizing with those that are far better than me. And that's what's great about the hospitality. Industry is Great. Sorority of people share their secrets. Share their journey so that I can learn from the giants upon whose shoulders I stand in the beginning of this interview. You mentioned that coming from an Indian background. You felt the pressure of actually going. For example to become very students of thinking of force battalions extra as an option and. I think it's not only your background. I think it's a wider thing in this country and internationally that hospitality sector jobs are not as appreciated us. They should what do you think should be done to actually raise the profile of talented jobs and make people understand that they can be for the whole life not to something to as a student. You are absolutely right in. This is my passion and I think it's telling stories like this. That will let I gave up a fantastic career. A professional career as a barrister. I was taking the exams to become a judge and I gave that up for hospitality to run food on the floor and to me. It is one of the most dignified professions that there is to serve is the best that we can do is leaders. It really

London Brexit Liverpool United States CEO Testosterone England Watson Hsieh Moseley Officer India Ed Maria Lyndon Free Scotland Sea Of Muggy Morgan Founder
Amazon Product Differentiation with Jon Tilley of ZonGuru

Amazing FBA

07:48 min | 2 years ago

Amazon Product Differentiation with Jon Tilley of ZonGuru

"We must come into the question of differentiates Because as you said half of as the data side I guess this is more human side. I'd a kind of POL division mud pop. Because obviously he shows up in convention percent- wonderful looking at different from the house. But tell maybe about differentiation. How would you start again particularly from the newcomers perspective as you're looking the markets are against one of the decisions which is the focus of this episodes in learn how to go into a particular market to the data and you've got some kind of school for the listing optimization? Couldn't placement of the main key was use of images videos is in hospital contents. ABC So how do you consider the differentiation pieces prophet market decision and the topic specifically. I think we could talk for days on our on differentiation. I think it's going back points of what I said. which is it's fifty percents? Data's fifty take the decision. The other fifty percents that creative entrepreneurial focused around. Hey can I actually differentiate this product talking not connect with my customer. I can do this bit in the competition in. This is a bunch of ways to tackle. Let's I think that's the first points on that. Is that anybody. Here's launching. A product on Amazon has to differentiate their product in some way whether that's the simple ways through through images in visually or through your brand and through How you communicate that product to customers or obviously final differentiation? We actually changing the product. Whatever whatever range of things that you look at you have to differentiate in in in some way because It's it's not how you can beat your competition. But it's time to the elder in light of you can get Click and then get a high conversion Amazon is GonNa see you as making money for them. They're going to send you more traffic and you're GONNA do better rights you've got to differentiates in some way. I would say even before you looking. Well I guess once you've looked at the data and looking at parts idea. I think it's really going back to and a standing and doing a lot of work around your Avatar so Amazon so much a targeted audience. The more you can understand who you'll talk audiences. What the what the needs? Aw what are they once. What what what are they hate? What do they share and ready breaking it down doing some research Knitting that down your. You've got much more inputs to to how you're going to French. Agile product so that you can connect that that customer note for you on on an emotional level and a functional level which which is really important side though. Those are the kinds of things we I would. I would say anybody. Anybody who's going into Amazon wants the data office question would be how old you know you'll you'll you'll target audience and how much work done around best and if the roof is done then the second point is how do you differentiate but the trigger on differentiation is not to commercialize its commercial. But it's you ride it's a Yukon Yukon overcapitalize on your differentiations. You don't have any nick margin when you saw the product and that's a really tricky thing that a lot of people get wrong in the space they think. Okay Great. I had twenty dollars Kong's product and I'm going to go and spend ten dollars on my packaging because I think it's GonNa make that. He's GonNa stand up so much better than everything else. But you've just. I would capitalize on your products. You've got absolutely no money to to it with unit margin so those Entrepreneurs ones we actually find a product. Yeah they can charge a bunch and differentiated in a way which doesn't ads your your your your colleagues in a mess. Voice important piece just to get right. Absolutely interested in China eliminate Ola three reckonings at coke's cost of goods sold on the full one. Yes I absolutely agree in a non. I'm very glad you brought that up. Because a lot of people obsess. There are two things I want to reflect by. I think is so critical for my experience in working with a lot of new space. Many of whom DVD really well well Of How people do over million dollars on the back of some of what we've done on many do nothing as a lot of people never get around to actually selling but as you do as you said that the massive temptations to it's better in a general way on as you say the destroys the profit margin if you're not careful so about the first thing to say and the second thing you've just understand understand your customer Avatar. I guess putting those two pieces together if you understand exactly what some of the needs of a particular person you can provide that service for that particular person that does exactly the jump. They need but doesn't try and be singing dancing. Netflix Maki net margin him. And not taking for what. You've just been saying Satochi of that Can we take a bit further into that. How would how do you indeed differentiate something for a particular type of customer and keep your net margin is is the sixty eighty four thousand dollar question in my experience so I think the the the first thing there is to get information from your appetite so we actually have a unique tool called the love? Hate tool funny enough which is essentially what it does is for any given category Nisha looking at equal would cowed. How'd or the phrases around positive reviews and negative reviews force specific category And Star in a couple of minutes. You'll you'll have this word cod with with common phrases. What people have what people hate which is an important piece of information input into how he differentiated products bakery you can see all the common themes all trains and unique things that you can solve for the products that are space on not solving full? So that is again going back to commercial viability and and and how you defend your product. You have to start with with with the research. The information and that's the really critical way of getting into in terms of how I differentiate my products. I like to I think about those two to keep things which is one and if I could function differentiated how would I do that. And then to if I could visually differentiated based on aesthetic or or likes that stuff. How would would I do that? And I would lean towards the full obviously because if you can functionally differentiates that. That's an important thing but the second question on functional differentiation Hawkins talking to do that without a massive cost without. It's completely changing molds. Were things like that so again. That comes to radio understanding what your Avatar needs. It's rights and and it might be can't one the other day and it might be the way the doesn't have this additional said of ZIP ties. That are coming up with something that could be something very simple on on that on that level so those are things that I look at and then and I think that you'll brandon and your images is the first thing you should be doing and even today give doing a much better job with that but you can do so much and I still come across people well here in just a few dollars Going onto five at to get images win win win this the one of the most critical things to to businesses. Really shitty things in the right way and going off of Amazon and looking at the top brands any product launch. I'll take my brand literally. Put it in a in a in a image sit did with the top five world will brands for that products and say hey can I sipped with these with these. Brands does not does not product stack up against these top brands in space and I. I think everyone should do that as an exercise. which you look at? How does your brand with the top brands in the world because we have all the tools that we can compete with these days? So you've you've got you've got to really put some evidence that

What the Streaming Wars Mean for the Future of Advertising

Digiday Podcast

05:53 min | 2 years ago

What the Streaming Wars Mean for the Future of Advertising

"Right. So we're heading twenty twenty You've been doing an amazing job In a biased way. Say This uncovering the rise of volley streaming platforms and what we sort of think of the future of TV. I want to look forward to to twenty twenty but I like what what do you think. Twenty nine thousand nine was the year of if you will is your growth like there was a lot of growth of everyone obviously talks about the growth. A lot of people were moving industry mean and and I think that kind of sets up twenty two thousand for that's when the growing pains are going to start but like what's Gimme specifics. Well so in the upfront this year with advertisers and the TV now works digital played a bigger part in getting those budgets because in the past digital had been an add on for the networks and the also the prices had been higher then especially when it comes to like the cable networks. Their digital inventory was priced a lot higher than their linear inventory and so that had been a pain point but now with linear viewership decline Kline in they had to lower the prices for the digital inventory in order to get the bigger volume commitments. So it seems like when we're talking about the streaming wars and a a lot of people talk about distributors. We're actually talking about a bunch of different worse right. This is like what is it the thirteen years war. I don't remember but there. There's a lot of different people fighting writing. So how do you group them. What I'm thinking about is like I'm thinking net flicks is going up against Disney and interest and that is like this Inter Galactic Battle But then there are other battles going on. Yeah because then you have like the Nisha Suad Services and s fat come on subscription streamers But then then there's the free ad supported streaming TV services like the Pluto. TV's Zuma's Samsung TV plus roku channel. I N BTV and that's becoming more of of a war because right now there they all look the same. They all have the same old programming the same like movies that you would normally watch on like yeah Sunday afternoon on cable. TV So when you're looking at twenty twenty. Are we looking at a typical middle market crunch. I mean we're seeing this across pretty much every area we cover in in cross glossy with fashion and beauty and in Monterey retail with retail. I mean we're seeing the middle get crunched everywhere and that's going to happen and folks folks are concerned about it like BEEN MEETING WITH TV network executives and also you know digital entertainment executives and they're concerned about it because they they recognize that that's going to be the case that with connected TV. It's like mobile all over again for publishers where it doesn't really make sense for a lot of these companies to have their own connected. TV CBS because people aren't gonNA use them. They're going to stick with like a Netflix at Disney Youtube Pluto the aggregate. There's right and so there. It's the bundle all over again cowboy What about on the advertiser's side I think we've been doing a lot of coverage around you know some very core basic issues when it comes to connected. TV advertising. Like why the hell do I see the same ad repeatedly and why can And I thought you got into like a lot of the good details but why that what's happening. What what kind of growing pains you expect to see for the industry In Two thousand twenty when it comes to to connected. TV advertising a think the growth is still an issue there when it comes to getting more dollars because there was Someone Outta Holding Agency. I was talking to saying that you don't have to spend and is much when it comes to connected TV because you can be more targeted and because the ad loads are lighter to there just isn't as much inventory to be buy in so for anyone who's expecting gene TV dollars to shift entirely into digital. That's not gonNA happen because they don't have to shift entirely. You actually save money. If you're not retired Sir I mean as a a too simplistic to say that I mean there's so much of this viewing is going on That you there's no advertising involved everyone wants subscriptions right Yeah who has a different model but Scott Galloway talks about advertising becoming a tax on the poor I are we. We seen this actually play out Where there just isn't places for this TV advertising to move to because so much of the streaming viewing is an Anon- at environment? Well you have. I mean who the interesting thing with them is. They're limited commercials. Subscriptions since here is their most popular beer and with like their sprint and their spotify deals they've been doing a lot to push subscribers specifically for that here and so that that serves as something of a model but again then it's an aggregate or thing where people can sign up for Hulu because they'll get a bunch of different shows and movies that they can watch for someone WHO's smaller publisher. I don't know if people are going to be as tolerant of that okay so final thing Working on all these bold calls Going into two thousand twenty predictions right but Give us Keeps winning bowl calls. I think this martine manufacturers will band together and try to negotiate harder carriage deals when it comes to connected. TV with the different media companies. Okay so give me an example of that Well well it's already the case in the cable market where you have like the regional cable providers who they negotiate together as a group and I think the SMART ATV manufacturers are going to start doing that because you have Samsung already selling ads on its smart TV platform Now starting to same and I think more and more of them are seeing. There's an opportunity there because people don't buy. TV's they buy TV's like once every seven years or so and so these smart TV manufacturers have to figure out okay where can we get revenue in between. Ah People buy new. TV's okay cool. Thanks Tom Thank you.

Samsung Disney Twenty Twenty CBS Nisha Suad Services Monterey Zuma Netflix Spotify Martine Manufacturers Scott Galloway Hulu TOM Anon Publisher
"nisha" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"nisha" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Congress which is our Nisha response to that document request we'll obviously do all the things are required to do by law I was a member of Congress wants article one has a certain set of powers in article two as an obligation to make sure that we protect officials at the state department and bodies who for homeless men were found in Manhattan early this morning police believe they were killed while they slept the bodies were found in at least three locations police say they arrested a twenty four year old homeless man who they believe used a metal object in the attacks another man was found injured he is in critical condition it's another weekend of protests in Hong Kong many of the pro democracy protesters are wearing face masks today in defiance of the police ban on them in a televised address aired today the Chinese territory's embattled leader Carrie lam said everyone is worried and scared she said she would not allow quote the small minority of rioters to destroyed lives in freedom. I'm Christopher Cruz. right now when you come in and switch to T. mobile you get the amazing iPhone eleven pro on us iPhone tennis traded. aren't these mountains majestic Joe are you even looking I'm posting these amazing pics I took with my iPhone Levin pro it has three cameras whoa those picks are amazing and you have service to T. mobile their new single goes farther than ever before then you can look up whether these are bear tracks right where we could just run. to.

Carrie lam Congress Hong Kong Manhattan Christopher Cruz. tennis Joe twenty four year
"nisha" Discussed on The Savvy Creative

The Savvy Creative

02:45 min | 3 years ago

"nisha" Discussed on The Savvy Creative

"I think like allowing ourselves set freedom is really important as well but yeah i really do think you know just looking in different communities and i think it's a lot easier now with things like social media to find different types of people and reach out to them <hes> and you know seek them out as a mentor whether it's formally or informally so what's your best advice to the young woman struggling out there. Oh gosh i think my my advice would definitely be to take a breath <hes>. I think it's really kind of going back to idea of pleasure. I think it's really important for us to allow ourselves. Space not feel like we have to constantly currently answer to people constantly have to react to things we can take a breath and take our time and you know i think what breathing literally and figuratively actively does is it makes space you know and i think that's one thing i've seen through meditation. Just bring us right back is that it allows me that space to just like observe myself and not judge myself and instead of being reactionary to something to maybe respond to it or like have more compassion for myself or for others and i really really think that taking that space for ourselves is is just really important <hes> and it kind of it. Encourage us encourages us to have that worth. You know like if i'm taking the space for myself. I haven't worked for myself to say. I deserve this. You know i think that idea of deserving something can be really really hard for for women out there <hes> so i really think just taking a breath and but at the same time just keep going you know keep up with those habits you know so who's around you and howard they helping you. You know see how someone is making you butter and i think that that's really helpful too and if someone's not making you better summa's amazon making you better than i think that you could say no you know you can take space and realize that this person you know isn't the best for for your vision and <hes> create those boundaries which i think are really important all right well. Thank you so much for everything you've shared and thank you for <hes> you definitely want to check got her blog and you can read nisha blogs at medium dot com slash at nisha mody and i highly recommend her blogs as they are like i said before they're deep if they're powerful and they're very thoughtful. You'll be hooked instantly and you can also follow her at instagram underscore nisha mody underscore underscore and then twitter nisha mody and then of course medium dot com. That's offered today creative minds and thank you for joining us. We will see you on the next.

nisha mody twitter howard
"nisha" Discussed on The Savvy Creative

The Savvy Creative

03:27 min | 3 years ago

"nisha" Discussed on The Savvy Creative

"To develop and things change and then there's there's other aspects and other thing yeah i've thought about writing about is as you've listed on my careers is just this idea i mean. I definitely thought that you know like i said in college. Okay gotta find a man but the other one that i wanted to find career like i will find my passion and all along. It was basically writing but i had but like i said it wasn't legitimate enough to me you know at that time so <hes> also i think an interesting lens for me to explore so i've also thought about maybe writing about finding the one in terms of career. <hes> another reason i think that would be good is because i'm on a few view memoir writing groups for women and <hes> someone had mentioned wants to there's not many <hes> memoirs written by women that are about career sure it's usually maybe about disease or abuse which are all completely relevant and important but <hes> i did think interesting that <hes> a lot of people that are you know. Authors have published authors. That couldn't really name too many memoirs about career well if you look at them about career. It's like celebrity career like it's like a movie star. <hes> star or i mean the only one that i think of that was that would probably be similar would be like arianna huffington. Yeah talks about burnout either sure but she's he's like very more specific on on burnout itself as a whole yeah being but that would probably be it but no one's yeah north really touched on. It's not so much being this all it woman. I think it's also like the path that gets you there. You gotta work your shitty job. You gotta work as an intern. You gotta you gotta deal with a bad boss. You've gotta say no. We've gotta get fired. I think everybody needs to get fired. That's okay well. It hasn't happened to me my bucket list. Oh it's great. I've been fired fired three times. Uh-huh honestly goes back to a people pleasing. I'm like oh my god even right on my god if i was ever fired but yeah we'll see maybe one day. I know the first time i was fired. <hes> it was of blessing but it was so humiliating because it was a friend of a friend who referred me to the job and this woman it was are my job and the after after hours were crossing too much and like i remember sitting on because we worked out of her home. You're drinking wine and i was to buzz to go pick up the kids from school. Uh-huh after and i was like i can't do this and there were times where like it was just it was starting to get depressing because she was like an older fifty year old woman who was still single and she's kind of depressed the chew still single at at the time and i was like ooh this is like not healthy and so i'm really glad that it all ended up that way and i couldn't i couldn't imagine working for and then of course the the <hes> and then i got let go of a sales job that i didn't like either and it was because the guy short change me with paying with how he paid me and then the third time was when i got laid off with beach body body so all of those things were good things that happened but if i hadn't been fired the first time i don't think i could have handled <hes> the second sure to where it was like. Oh my god god-like wrote. This is affecting me so i think people need to know that like your career is just gonna go in all these different loopholes directions and it's okay. Yes you can walk away from a bad job. It's you're not it's not the end of the world you know and that's it's not anything on you either like you need. I need to go and develop another skill somewhere you know yeah. I have definitely shamed myself for having lots of different careers because i feel like it's just a testament to like how i'm confused. I don't know what to do with my life. <hes> especially you know i went to.

arianna huffington intern fifty year one day
"nisha" Discussed on The Savvy Creative

The Savvy Creative

03:19 min | 3 years ago

"nisha" Discussed on The Savvy Creative

"Something. I'm trying to like advertise too much because i don't want to promote this idea of the before after picture as if a before is terrible you know this is where i was and there were a lot of reasons that those things happen and you know a lot of reasons that i have actually gotten bigger had to do with the fact that i'm happy in certain relationships so maybe i quote unquote like let myself go but hey i was happy. Why should i feel bad about that so those pictures i think kind of engender idea of like before was terrible and now is great it. I also know people that have lost a lot of weight because they're trying to use it as a control because they're in a bad situation so i think judging our bodies is a huge huge barry societally conditioned. Oh my god yes yeah no when i was with beach body. That was the thing it was before. You had to get a really good before shot. They would even try to and and fitness in general <hes> they would try to ask you to wear something tight and not flattering to make it look like the results were so different and i love what you said before is bad <hes>. I actually think that when i was probably at my lightest weight that i wasn't treated well oh by men that i dated. I felt like i was more in object but when i'm a little thicker i am happier. I think i'm happier with the way i feel i feel better so i don't think it's like letting yourself go. I like you said you're loving life. Yeah definitely <hes> that's that's a really observation <hes> in terms of being objectified versus like like maybe just more appreciated for who you are for sure yeah well what other <hes> jasmine sorry. I cut you off there but what other time judging our bodies i. I think we judge your body's. I think <hes> we judge ourselves if we aren't doing what women are you know supposed to do like getting married or have kids not that anything is wrong with either of those decisions but that those decisions being seen as the norm and as if you are lacking i think sometimes sometimes we judge ourselves. Even if we know deep down like i know deep down that i probably don't want kids and i probably don't ever get married again. We'll those things happen. Maybe but i don't think that my life is lacking great things to not having those things just as there are great things to having them in there all choices and i think that we judge ourselves for making one choice or another because once again it's a societal conditioning though we ended up having to deal with about what we're supposed to be doing which has always been fascinating to me because it's as if every woman born on the earth is supposed to be married and have children and which basically means that you know this whole you know gender or sex like has to do the same thing which is ridiculous us to me. None of us have to do the same thing if anything the world is better if we don't in my opinion that everyone needs different lives <hes> so but i but regardless list of that we still judge ourselves for it anyways. <hes> you know in that can come out especially if someone asks us. You know like oh if you're dating someone like oh. Do you think you guys will get married soon. Things like that <hes> where i really don't think that i don't i no longer..

barry societally
"nisha" Discussed on The Savvy Creative

The Savvy Creative

03:43 min | 3 years ago

"nisha" Discussed on The Savvy Creative

"Creative minds and welcome to the savvy creative podcast today. My guest is a chicago transplant here in l. A. that that rights memoir and essays she currently works as a medical librarian and has also worked as a speech therapist voiceover artists i._t. Consultant and recruiter beyond but also including writing her work aims to advocate for black indigenous and people of color as well as other marginalized identities. Welcome nisha mody. Thank you so much christine on so so happy to be here. Thank you for coming and tell me how is your meditation challenge going this. I fear instances stories every day and you are so consistent and i used to you every morning. It's like i'm so used to seeing you every doing it. That's wonderful. It's really really great. I only met a meditate for about five eight minutes every morning but it now now has become i like weaker so i was doing it this whole month so <hes> the first week or so i would have to set a reminder for myself but but now i just wake up and it's just like one of the first things i think about it. It's almost like brushing my teeth where i just i'm like oh i got to meditate. You know it is going really well and i'm pretty sure i'll just keep doing doing it because like i said it's like brushing my teeth so it just feels very natural to me so yeah. So what does it done for the writing. <hes> that's a good question. I think what it does was it what it does for me is that route removes judgment for my thoughts. I mean that does not mean that. I have not judged myself. Since this has happened i totally have but i think it it has helped me to remove myself from like my thoughts themselves just to observe them so i think it helps me be critical of my own writing as well <hes> or when i'm editing something i don't. I'm not like asking myself like what why did they even right that part or whatever you know or even if sometime having writer's block. I am not as critical against a critical of myself as well. I think more like okay well. Maybe i should just go take a walk or that means. I should do something else. Something will come to me. I kind of have that confidence that that it will happen because i know it's something i love yeah. Do you feel like it's helped you take more risks with your writing. <hes> maybe a little. I haven't even i thought about that. Perhaps i think that that's definitely a possibility. I can't say that i've had a lot more creative ideas. In terms <music> of different essays i can write and i've had a lot more guts to send pictures out to people so. I guess something has happened so thank you for identifying uh-huh. I've only seen it because i first off. I got to say i love your medium blog. It is so thoughtful it's very it has these moments where it's very bold and that's why i've noticed that level of boldness has kind of stepped up more and more and i'm like oh what is happening so yeah maybe that that could definitely maybe the case but yeah thank you so much. I appreciate people reading my blogs and commenting so thank you well for me like i know the the blogs on <hes> divorce and <hes> the ones about <hes> like the facade of having it all like they were really powerful for me and it wasn't necessarily the relationship it was also <hes> you know feeling like sometimes i felt guilty that i didn't have it all but then i realized that having it all really is a facade and it was especially for this new time in my life. It was really strong so tell us about that like these blogs about healing yourself like how did they come about as you started medium sure <hes> i mean a lot of what i write about does stem from <hes> like big changes in my life. That happened about almost seven years ago now. <hes> my father passed passed away. <hes> i was basically on the brink of getting a divorce <hes> at hadn't happened yet..

chicago Consultant christine l. A. writer five eight minutes seven years
Emma Thompson talks new movie and

The Frame

09:45 min | 3 years ago

Emma Thompson talks new movie and

"Thomson she's in a movie called late night. It opens this weekend. She also took on a Hollywood titan who has fired for sexual harassment and then quickly got another job and late night. Thompson plays opposite Mindy Kaeling. She also wrote the movie Mindy Kaeling script was one of those strange things immediately, good upon first reading just great. She had a good idea. And she really knew how to bring in for you. That's a. Plus, she said, I wrote it for you. So of course, you haul things, anything God is going to be bad going to be bad, because it's not going away anytime soon being earnest and kind so luckily, I wasn't I was in a blazer with looked back here being incredibly mean most of the time journal, just had our second baby Taylor adorable. She takes to you. Thanks, so there's just a lot of expenses at home right now and I think it's time for a race. I see. This is actually very exciting to be really great because what you're describing is the most clear out example of the classic sexist argument for the advancement of men in the workplace you're asking for raise not because of any work related contribution. You've made but simply because you have a family, and that's why in the nineteen fifties family men were promoted over the women. They worked with never encountered is in such a clean teachable way. How would you describe Catharine Newbury? She is a late night host. She is successful. But maybe the future doesn't look as bright. Well, she's someone who was so driven right from a very early age. We did shoot a little bit of heart doing stand up in London. And when she was very young. And actually, we used my stand up from tally, the I did in nineteen forty five. I remember when forty six can't come on and. I remember so clearly that feeling of whenever I did stand up in my twenty s of being one of certainty. If not the only woman, then one of two amongst great load of men, who were often quite standoffish didn't clearly, expect anything view, so. Spoke to me on every level, we took that piece out because it just didn't help with the story actually in the end. But Mindy understands that, she understands what it's like to be the one who's different not only because of being a woman, but also being a person of color in a fuel the only one you're going to feel different, and that's not comfortable, a lot of the time, it just simply isn't comfortable, and we're not very honest about not. I don't think and she's only about it. She was a diversity higher. She's written about someone who was a diversity. I if that hadn't happened, maybe we wouldn't have this movie. So go, diversity reactively talked to the director of the film Nisha Ghana Tra and she talked about Catherine, as one of those women who came up in the entertainment business. When women were made to believe that other women were their adversaries, not their allies. They were sold this idea that there's only room at the table for one. And if you're here, then you better make sure nobody threatens your position here. And any other women coming up may have been seen as a threat to that position rather than adding to the workforce. And so I think what I love about this movie. Is it sort of breaks up myth? Yeah. I wonder if just women who had, I don't think of men is being enormously generous and warm, too young men, who coming up and might take their position. I think that it might be not only women but just the nature of the power structures that we have created. Do you know what I mean? Like I didn't think of, of blogs coming into writing room and everyone going. Hey, your great. You're a young thrusting blood, a guy like me. I can't wait to give you some extra airtime. I didn't think that happens with mine, iza. And I think that's a problem of power. Right. But I think there's something more to what Nisha sane. And that is that if you're a woman coming up that you are so aware of how limited the opportunities are obsolete that you start to see other women not as your peers. But as your. Arrivals, and that becomes an inch hawk sake. Talk sake. Absolutely. The, the conditions of power do not make it possible, especially for people who find it difficult to get into that position in the first place to be generous will be welcoming will be mentoring or want to help. Movie that you chose not to make. And this is the animated film luck that was at sky dance, which is David Ellison's company animation comedy, paramount and you decided not to make it because guy dance had hired John Lasseter has been fired from Pixar for the way that he treated women. And you wrote a letter that I have described on the air as the Magna Carta of the metoo movement, is one of the most beautiful eloquent, and well argued letters about this whole notion of the way women are treated the way men are forgiven that I found profound, and I hope you would share these two paragraphs with with us right now too. If a man has been touching women inappropriately for decades. Why would a woman want to work for him? If the only reason he's not touching them inappropriately now is that it says in his contract that he must behave professionally. If a man has made women his companies feel undivided and disrespected for decades. Why should the women at his new company think that any respect he shows them is anything other than an act that he's required to perform by his coach his therapist and his employment agreement. The message seems to be I am learning to feel respect for women. So please be patient, while I work on it. It's not easy. What motivated you to write it? What gave you the ability to write it. Very good questions. When I left the production, and then I wrote to Lindsey Durand about it, and in these one of the most brilliant, women, I know, said, Phil, can you talk to some women about this? I'd really be interested to know what's going on. And in fact, that letter is the work of many voices is not just my voice because those questions, very much came from those women. So the dots what's wonderful about it is that it is a collective voice, and I sent it to sky downs and didn't receive a reply, and because I showed it was quite a lot of people because of the issue, being very pressing, a lot of just as you go to publish it, and that was quite a big decision because it's just a public, but the. Vision turned out to be the right one because. Those with the questions that needed to be oft and to this date of not been onset in any way. I've had no response public or personal back from sky don's an dots very disappointing. Because they only way we're going to get anywhere with this own going issue is by talking to each other. It's not just a public thing to do its thing that potentially, and this is what has happened over the last couple of decades, that has kept women silent is they fear that they will be punished that they will be blackballed. They won't get parts that people will rise. They're absolutely really. Why were you able to I'm sixty on thought too old not to woke my own talk time is very much marching on. And because I had spoke to not before when the Weinstein thing blew up, and I've always spoken about this. I was young woman. I'm there was up -solutely, no choice really. And what was interesting to me in very touching was responses. I got from so many people male and female, who had done the same thing who would walk away and who don't have. Perhaps, don't feel as stoppage does I feel you know, I couldn't do other things. It's not going to kill my career even if sky don'ts, says, we're never going to work with you again, and we're going to tell every other animation, but I don't think that that would be possible now because the do feel that with the metoo time's up moving. There is a tipping point. But we do have to keep on, and on one of the ways in which I think we're going to have to do that. We got to talk to people before during, and after film shoots the thing, the clever thing about anybody who's going to bully. Is that they'll do it, not in front of someone who's going to say you can't do that? They'll do it in secret or in quiet or in private. And it's very difficult, for instance, for someone who's a runner, and who can be replaced in five minutes to say anything, bad about someone who will cost a lot of money to replace an all of these things. They have implications for everyone.

Mindy Kaeling Nisha Ghana Tra Thomson Harassment Taylor Hollywood Thompson Catharine Newbury Sky Downs Sky Dance Pixar London Director John Lasseter David Ellison Lindsey Durand Catherine Weinstein Phil
New Solutions For International Wildlife Trafficking

A Moment of Science

02:00 min | 3 years ago

New Solutions For International Wildlife Trafficking

"He'll have you seen that man. Bicycling around town with his colorful parrot is so cool. I think I want what e-e-e-e-no dime that bird may originally have been a victim of wildlife trafficking every year. Millions of birds are taken from places like Brazil to sell around the world, and it is devastating tropical bird populations. Asli? That's terrible. We should release them back into the wild that would be ideal. But it's not that easy. It's important. Reintroduced birds to their original force niece because if we don't put them back where they came from. They may not survive or they could potentially cause harm to other animals since this is such delicate issue Brazil, even has laws that require a bird seized from wildlife. Traffickers be released exactly where it was captured or not be released at all. Some researchers are taking no knowledge of birds Nisha. And combining it with bioacoustics to determine where birds were seized from based on their dialects. So they're essentially using the birds language and other known factors about the birds ideal habitat to figure out what part of the forest they came from the approach isn't entirely affective, so far, but the results are still promising. Some birds have distinct dialects, and it's likely they can be successfully reintroduced in the right areas. Other birds learn new dialects in captivity. So it's difficult to figure out where they're from. But if birds can learn new dialects that potentially means they can adapt to new areas sounds amazing. But instead of by your parrot, just adopt something at the local animal shelter. This moment of science comes from Indiana University on the web at a moment of science dot org. I'm Don glass, and I'm Yahya Cassandra.

Brazil Yahya Cassandra Don Glass Indiana University