35 Burst results for "Ninety Percent"

Places to Fly Fish

Travel with Rick Steves

03:51 min | 1 d ago

Places to Fly Fish

"Desportivo fly-fishing has become a favorite way for many urbanites to decompress. And that's how Chris Santillo started his fifty places recreation guides. He now also writes about places to paddle bicycle golf end snowboard, but his number one passion is fly fishing Chris thanks for joining US great to be here, Rick. Thanks what is it about fly fishing that those who know it and love it or so passionate about I've thought about this a lot oftentimes when I'm out on the river and I think that people come at it from a lot of different directions I. I think there's the chance to be out in nature in a quiet and beautiful place. There's an old saying that's trout don't live in ugly places and neither do bone Fisher Tarp in Atlantic Salmon. So you're usually in pretty pristine places that can support these fish species. About especially, if you're river fishing about being in the water, I don't mean to sound cliche but there is something about the oneness of being with the river in that sense of flow I drive a lot over mountains and past beautiful rivers in Europe and the United States and I see a lot of people with hip Bhutan standing deepen in the river and there is something. Special about that I would imagine you have there is a feeling of being. In the moment and in the flow of life of the rivers as a metaphor for flow of life and time passing, and it's never the same water that you're standing in and I think there is something profound rap subliminal about that that has an appeal There is an analytic. A fly fishing I think it has appealed to people the whole idea of trying to determine what the Fisher eating at a given time, and then trying to either look in your fly box and find the the right fly that seems to match the kind of bugs at the trout might eating or I know some friends will bring a fly tying vice in some feathers and hair and hooks to the side of a stream, and if they don't have what the right bug is at the time or the right fly, they will go and tie it. Up on the spot and hope that they're going to make that match matching the hatches, the term that writer named Ernie Schreiber came up with years ago the hatch being the kind of insect that is occurring on the river at that time but just having the arsenal and matching the flame with the others that are being eaten that's probably integral to being successful fly, Fisher and very important, and you'll find some anglers that are you know better equipped than others I've been out with some friends who will have literally five hundred or a thousand flies. I usually have one or two boxes and and hope that what I have. Oh, cover things ninety percent of the time, but there's always ten percent that doesn't work and one blanket work. Great. This morning in another flight would work great in the same hole this afternoon exactly because what happens on many river systems as you will have different sorts of insects emerging coming out of river or settling down upon the river at different times of the day you might have may flies that are. Popping up from the bottom of the river as Nymphs, and then turning into adult bugs and being on the surface in the morning, and that might be a white insect, the size of your Pinky Nail, and then in the afternoon as it gets warmer, the grasshoppers might become active and the wind may be him into the river and they are green and yellow, and they're the size of your thumb. It's sort of a a battle going on what are the it is it's man versus nature. Chris and Taylor has written a dozen best selling books about outdoor adventures in his fifty places series. One of his titles collects the thoughts of Passionate Anglers Y. I, fly fish and their favorite fishing places are covered in fifty more places to fly fish before you die you'll also see Chris's byline and major sport fishing publications.

Chris Santillo United States Desportivo Atlantic Salmon Europe Ernie Schreiber Bhutan Fisher Writer Rick Taylor
America's next top chamber, modelled: the Senate battle

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:05 min | 4 d ago

America's next top chamber, modelled: the Senate battle

"In, America's elections just six weeks away. The most important thing to be decided is who will win the presidency. Time before. has there been a clear choice between two parties to visions to philosophies and two agendas for the future. There's never been a vision like this. Sleepy. Joe Jeff from. What pundits had been talking a lot less about is which party will end up with control of the Senate, the legislature's upper house. Attention and donations have focused on Senate races. This week is a fierce battle begins over the replacement of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader. GINSBURG. The president plans to use the power the voters gave him to make a nomination. Senators will use the power the vote gave us. Either provide or withhold consent. As we say, fifth. Republican senators are keen to get a nomination through before the elections. Earlier. In the year, the party seemed set to keep its majority but President Donald. Trump's handling the pandemic and racial justice protests have opened the possibility the Democrats could take it. In America's rigid two party system control of the Senate is a big determinant of what any government can actually get done. But forecasting which party will win control is more complex than it might seem. Predicting Races for Congress is a bit more complicated than predicting the race for the presidency. There are thirty five different races fought in different states between different candidates over different issues and often using different rules. Then Rosenheck is the economists data editor. I have spent the past few months building a statistical model that seeks to predict the results of this November's congressional elections for the House of Representatives, and the Senate in the United States and so how. Do you get past those complexities to t to model it then? So our model makes use of a few broad types of information. It first looks at the state of the race nationally using generic ballot polling as well as the president's approval rating, and if you other predictors to say, okay, we think this is going to be a good year for the Democrats a good year for the Republicans overall. Then it drills down to the state level and. says. Okay. What did we know about this Senate race before we saw our first poll of that race? Well, we know how it voted in past elections. We know if there's an incumbent or not. We know the candidates fundraising totals. If there's an incumbent, we know how they voted in Congress. We know how much experience in politics candidates have, and then the final step is to blend those prior expectations with whatever the actual polls of the race. Say, and so it synthesizes all of that information in two and overall prediction by exploring three hundred fifty thousand different scenarios for the Senate and four point thirty, five, million for the house every single day. So it conservative explore every possible universe. We can think of that this election might take and see which scenarios are most probable but the universe that we're having these elections in is one that contains what the historical data don't, which is a pandemic. That is a very good point and it is definitely a weakness. We don't know whether one party or the other will benefit from that. But I think what we can say is that it would needs some pretty large effects that would need to be consistent and systematic across states to drive the results far outside the confidence intervals that we would expect based on decades and decades of data on past elections. With those caveats behind this then what does the model currently predict for? November. The model shows that the Democrats are a clear but narrow favorite to win back the Senate and currently shows that they have a sixty seven percent or two in three chance of winning the upper chamber, and it's kind of an interesting path of how they get there because assuming that they lose Doug Jones seat in Alabama, which is very conservative state they need to flip four Republican held seats and they only lead in four states and they would need to win all four that would be something of a tall order and what are those four states what are the issues there So the Democrats have pretty clear leads in Colorado and in Arizona in Colorado Democrats have nominated John Hickenlooper is a moderate former governor. He is currently leading in the polls against the Republican incumbent Cory Gardner. The picture in Arizona is similar you have a Republican incumbent and is now facing an extremely strong Democratic nominee in Mark Kelly. WHO's an astronaut? He's raised an enormous amount of money are model certainly thinks those two are not short flip the Democrats but eighty ninety percent that range then. There are two more states in North Carolina. You have a rather unloved Republican incumbent clue has been running consistently behind, and then finally there is main where Susan Collins, the most moderate Republican in the Senate. Now faces a very tough challenge from the speaker of the State House of Representatives who is up by maybe five six points on average. So you're got a headline prediction of the Democrat chances. Here is based on those four races being cinched up I mean is that really so certain? So. The reason why the model is so bullish on the Democrats is what we're calling the long tail, the donkey's long tail. There is a surprisingly extensive list of sort of Second Tier Senate races in which Democratic candidates are underdogs, but have a realistic credible shock to come from behind and win. So that's I Alwa- that's Kansas. That's both the seats that are up for election in Georgia, Montana Alaska and South Carolina, and even Texas so in every one. Of these races, Armato thinks it is more likely than not that the Republican will win however the odds of the Republicans win all of them in the Democrats win none are not so great and if Democrats even score one or two upsets from this very wide list of targets states, their position gets a lot

Senate House Of Representatives Congress America President Trump Justice Ruth Bader United States Joe Jeff Arizona Supreme Court President Donald Ginsburg Cory Gardner Donald Trump Armato North Carolina Susan Collins Rosenheck Kansas John Hickenlooper
Dr. Richard A. Van Etten: Cancer

Living Healthy Podcast

09:05 min | 6 d ago

Dr. Richard A. Van Etten: Cancer

"Please welcome to the show Dr Rick van how you doing. Thank you very much Andrew and Brittany I greatly appreciate the opportunity to be able to come and talk to your talk your listeners today. Yeah. Well, thank you for taking the time out of your busy schedule to talk to us. So we're GONNA be talking about obviously cancer and how you can prevent cancer do your best to prevent it. But as I mentioned in the Intro, most likely someone knows someone who's had cancer or they've had cancer themselves even it's pretty it seems like it's touches a lot of people but can you kind of tell me how many people does cancer impact on a yearly basis? Well. Thank you for the question Andrew. The lifetime risk of getting cancer is approaching thirty eight or thirty, nine percent. So more than one in three Americans will get cancer during their lifetime. So that explains what you said that basically almost everybody is either been personally. Involved with cancer knows a close family member or a loved one that's been stricken by cancer. So some of the statistics nationwide in the United States, there's about one point seven million people diagnosed each year with cancer. And they'll be about unfortunately six hundred thousand Americans will die every year of cancer. Here in Orange County it's interesting that cancer has overtaken cart diseases, the number one killer, and as soon gonNA happen nationwide. So a very very. Prevalent disease what kind of has led to what's led to that trajectory? Why is that happening? Well, actually the the the death rate from cancer has been falling and it's been falling significantly over the past fifteen or twenty years, which is a success basically for the research that's gone into it through the National Cancer Institute and other mechanisms. But the fact that cancer is now the number one killer has actually also reflected progress in cardiovascular disease. So doing which used to be the number one killer. So we're doing a better job at preventing. Heart disease through the things that you know about treatment of the risk factors like high lipids, blood pressure, diabetes et CETERA. Right? Interesting. Okay. All right. So we got some work to do on the cancer and Kinda catch up. And, that generally, like I mentioned usually happens through education funding, which we'll talk about in a little bit What types of cancers are the most prevalent today? I know that you specialize are a believe in like blood cancers by what are the most prevalent that people run into so we can talk both about incidents, which is the new diagnosis that we have each year and prevalence, which is the number of people living with the disease at any given time. But the top four in both categories are pretty similar. So there's breast cancer which obviously predominantly affects women but also can affect men. Then there's lung cancer there's prostate cancer which obviously is a male cancer and the last one is colorectal cancer. Those are the big four. Close on their heels are diseases like skin cancer and melanoma that's particularly relevant for Orange County where we have two hundred and eight, hundred, ninety days per year rate. And after that come some blood cancers that I specialize in, which is mainly things like leukemia lymphoma and Myeloma Okay. What kind of leads to these types of cancers occurring out of those top four that you mentioned, what? What's the biggest contributor to people getting? Is it? Is it just genetics you got bad genes or something in your lifestyle or in your the world around you I guess causing it. So they're. Probably, equal contributions both from genetics and from lifestyle. Okay. When I say genetics I mean the cancer is principally in the opinion of a lot of primarily a genetic disease in the cancer cells have acquired mutations that contribute to their malignant or cancerous phenotype, their ability to grow and attack the body. Most of those mutations are acquired in other words they happened just within the cancer cell and they're not inherited. So you don't get them from your mother or your father. Now there are exceptions there are well defined cancer susceptibility syndromes the most the one that may be most familiar to your listeners is the bracket jeans Brca which segregating families particularly people, of Ashkenazi, Jewish descent that are inherited either from your mother or your father, and greatly increase your risk for developing breast cancer or ovarian cancer so that the risk for women who doesn't ever bracken gene mutation is about one about eleven percent or one in nine during your lifetime. If you inherit one of these genes, it's virtually almost everybody will get breast cancer ninety percent risk over your lifetime. So, this cancer susceptibility syndromes are very important the need. For instance when there's a new cancer diagnosis, you need to take a careful family history and in some cases be referred to a genetic counselor to determine whether testing family members is indicated. Yeah. Well, that's interesting that you bring that up because my wife actually we went through that process, and so she was found her mother had breast cancer and through that process they found out, she had the bracket gene Brac to and then and so my wife decided because they kind of give you choice like do you want to get screened? Do you not like you kind of have? Do you want to know more or or like not and stay naive to it I guess and so what I've discovered, we went through it and is interesting out of the split my wife got it and her sister didn't so the fifty, fifty there and. It. Seems like. It's I think my opinion is it's good to know because now they're just more aggressively screening her and is that typically the case when you find out about something like that, you're more your screened even more regularly than the average person should be. That's right. A change basically changes the surveillance. In it not to make it more complicated. But there are some genes like the broncos where the penetrates which means that the chance of actually getting breast cancer. If you have the have, the mutation is very high I think there it's pretty straightforward to decide whether to get screened. Right. There are other mutations that can be inherited that don't increase the risk that much increase it above the background, but it's not nearly as high and there it's more complicated to try to decide what to do about that. But. My advice to your listeners is to seek the advice of a NCI cancer center in a a qualified genetic counselor. Those are the people best qualified to help guide you through that decision making process right? Right. When you're going through like you said they ramp up the screening process if you had the genetic mutation but how does how did we get to discovering these genetic mutations I? It sounds like you kind of have somewhat of a background like you discovered or help discover this protein that was causing leukemia right and. How does that process even work? How do we make these discoveries? How do you make these? Discovery I was involved in is one of these acquired mutations not inherited, but it came about from studies done many many years ago actually nineteen sixty that showed that patients with this particular type of leukemia had an abnormal chromosome in their blood cells. And when to make a very long story short when that was tracked down, it was shown that the chromosome was actually an a Barrett. That was acquired in these cancer cells that lead to the expression of this abnormal protein. And that protein. Hasn't is an enzyme which means that it has a ability to catalyze chemical reactions. Okay and that particular reaction stimulated the growth of those blood cancer cells. So. That led a drug company, which is today is no artis to develop us a drug a small molecule inhibited the action of that protein. And that That drug which has the trade name GLIVEC revolutionized the treatment of that leukemia so that in the past everybody died of this leukemia, unless you had a bone marrow or stem cell transplant. Today everybody takes a drug likely. And most people go into remission and when they do, they have normal age adjusted life expectancy. That's example would that's Therapy likely that can do to cancer right? So does this all come from these discoveries? Does it come from just? Tons of data over decades like this one you're saying, it came from research started in the sixties and this didn't have until the early nineties. Is that right or wealth the the The structure of the protein was discovered. I'm saying Circa Nineteen, eighty-four which I got involved. The drug development efforts took place shortly thereafter I'm and the was FDA approved in two thousand one. So it's been on the market now for almost nineteen years I and there are many many other efforts in other cancers that are parallel parallel that. The thing that's happened today is because of our new technology and the genomics and the ability to determine, for instance, the genome sequence very quickly that's accelerated the progress that we can make. So what took forty years from sixty two to the drug being approved now can be done in a couple of years. Wow. Everything's happening much much faster. That's awesome. That's great news for those of US living right now.

Cancer Breast Cancer Lung Cancer National Cancer Institute Orange County Leukemia Andrew Dr Rick Van Heart Disease United States Broncos FDA Myeloma NCI Lymphoma
One Priceless Lesson We Often Forget About Love and Life

Optimal Living Daily

05:14 min | Last week

One Priceless Lesson We Often Forget About Love and Life

"One priceless lesson we often forget about love and life by Mark Chernoff mark and Angel Dot Com. Everything, we need. Jose's wife Maria was born in a one bedroom stand alone home on the outskirts of Playa del Carmen Mexico. was a fine little home, but her father Oscar wanted a real house. So he worked two jobs a sixty hour week factory job, and then another twenty hours or so a week as carpenter. Oscar say fifty percent of his income for over a decade to build his family of four bedroom house like the ones in the better parts of town he put half his family savings and a low community bank and he talked the other half away in a safe he kept hidden on their property. On the morning Oscar plan to break ground on his family's new house, the local community bank shuttered stores just hours after law enforcement declared the bank was running an illegal and uninsured Ponzi scheme ninety percent of the deposits Oscar made were lost. Then the very next day. The little home was robbed at gun point in exchange for his family's safety Oscar for the rest of the money he had hidden in safe. In the short window of thirty six hours, the family lost a vast majority of their savings from years of hard work the night for the first time as Mother Olga watched Oscar cry. She approached Oscar with their infant daughter cradled and rocking in her arms and said, it's just money minister just a house. We've so much more than that. We have a truly loving home. Oscar looked at Olga, dried his eyes and nodded his head in agreement. He spent the rest of the night with his baby daughter holding her tight to his chest reminding himself that he might not be able to give his family, the house he dreamed of, but he can continue to give them a truly loving home. And for the nine years that followed Maria grew up in that small loving one bedroom home. After the first year, a sister Andrea joined her after the third year brother Roberto showing to the memories share of that time are truly heartwarming for example, everyday. Of Maria Early Grade School years she remembers her father coming home from work just before dinner giving her and her siblings, individual hugs and kisses, and then asking them to questions. More you loved. Do you have love in your heart? All three shoulder would nod their head smiling then he'd gather them all up in a big group. Hug and call out Metoo we are blessed. We have everything we need. With that house. Even. Though Oscar sincerely believed what he said to his children. He was still pursuing his dream of building a larger and more comfortable house for his family and nine years after losing all of their savings Oscar. Once again, saved enough money to begin building that new house twenty feet behind their little one bedroom home he started with framing out the foundation of the kitchen them Ria's mother had always quietly dreamed of. One Cement Block at a time paycheck by paycheck. Slowly, but steadily built a house he'd come. So close to building nearly a decade beforehand I a kitchen, a large family room and two bathrooms than a master bedroom bedrooms for each of the children and a nice covered front patio. In two thousand, two, win Jose Maria and start falling in love with her Oscar was still building that house. Soon. Thereafter, he put the last few finishing touches on it. The, entire family celebrated for weeks on end and Nowadays Oscar Olga still celebrate holidays and special occasions at the House with all three of their children and their children's families several times a year. But, the stories prizes lesson has nothing to do with that house. Just, a bonus the first day Jose met Marie his family. He noticed how sincerely loving and happy the whole family was. He praised Oscar for the beautiful family. He had asked him what the secret was. Oscar. Spent hours sharing interesting heartfelt stories about why his family was the luckiest one in the world. Never, shared all the details about how their house was built. In fact, after years of knowing Maria and her family traveling with them and even living with them for a short time, no one ever thought to tell Jose about how their family's house came to be. They ask questions about the construction few occasions and he received replies about the construction it until after Jose Maria got married and close on their own first house in Miami. Florida that Oscar took Jose for a long walk. He s does a about the details and Jose excitedly shared information about their new neighborhood in the House Oscar listened intently smiled and then finally he shared the story you've just heard. My daughter does not need a house Oscar concluded she needs a truly loving home and when you fill that home with children, your children will need exactly the same. If you that no matter how big or small your actual houses, your children will WanNa come home to you. The rest is just bonus. I know all of this because Jose ms one of my best friends and just this morning over coffee. He asked me where I was going to write about today. When I told him I hadn't yet decided. He smirked said Mama story for you, and then he proceeded to tell me the story I just told you.

Oscar Jose Maria Mother Olga Maria Early Grade School Mark Chernoff Carpenter Ponzi Scheme Playa Del Carmen Mexico. Metoo Andrea Roberto Florida Miami Marie
US outlines sweeping plan to provide free COVID-19 vaccines

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | Last week

US outlines sweeping plan to provide free COVID-19 vaccines

"The trump administration has released complex plans for making covert nineteen vaccines available to all Americans once vaccines are established as safe and effective the government's laid out a sweeping plan for vaccination campaign starting first with healthcare workers and others and eventually ramping up to reach everybody who wants one the shots will be free and people will need two doses of most vaccines three to four weeks apart states and cities will be responsible for distributing the vaccines and have a month to submit detailed plans but the whole operation faces public skepticism experts say up to ninety percent of Americans must either be vaccinated or have their own immunity to effectively protect the nation from the corona virus in AP poll in may showed only half of Americans said they'd get vaccinated amid worries about safety Sager mag ani Washington

Ani Washington
US outlines sweeping plan to provide free COVID-19 vaccines

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | Last week

US outlines sweeping plan to provide free COVID-19 vaccines

"The trump administration has released complex plans for making covert nineteen vaccines available to all Americans once vaccines are established as safe and effective the government's laid out a sweeping plan for vaccination campaign starting first with healthcare workers and others and eventually ramping up to reach everybody who wants one the shots will be free and people will need two doses of most vaccines three to four weeks apart states and cities will be responsible for distributing the vaccines and have a month to submit detailed plans but the whole operation faces public skepticism experts say up to ninety percent of Americans must either be vaccinated or have their own immunity to effectively protect the nation from the corona virus in AP poll in may showed only half of Americans said they'd get vaccinated amid worries about safety Sager mag ani Washington

Ani Washington
Cyber Power Index highlighting Australian Governments gaps in cyber capability

Cyber Security Weekly Podcast

06:22 min | Last week

Cyber Power Index highlighting Australian Governments gaps in cyber capability

"Like any INFO Technology Sector security has plenty of indexes flooding around or get. Indexes collided by vendors and people trying to sell things to us I thought this for Senate index was. Useful because it doesn't come from I accompany product. It say independent academic attempt to benchmark Com, sub security capability and intent from nation sites It appealed to make per couple of reasons may not have had A to do with Bill Center in the past spend a little bit of Thanh. Talking to their academics in previous roles and particularly locked the way that This report sets metrics that up designed to objectively major subsidy maturity in nations So it says what are the kind of things that we could judge the intent of a nation in the obscurity spice and one of the kind of things that we could use to objectively major capability. And it tells an interesting story in Australia Australia's categorized in the higher intent, low capability quadrant and the reason for that is because when the the objective metrics this reporter applied to the statements made by by government ministers by government departments, entities about what our intent is. Assab security spice. Where about the most ambitious nation in the world for ask security attend? But. Then when you look at what our actual capabilities against that intent on again measured in a series of objective metrics. We fold anti sixteenth in that space. So, FA May that told a pretty familiar story because this over promising on delivering stories. One that I think is familiar to a lot of. People in the Strand security sector. In the context of these trying government's actions since the twenty six, Day sub, security strategy. A lot of announcement to be my bet when you follow up way those announcements. In the years after that have been made you say less deleted then was announced to the media. Will what's on the industry? Kodak in the two thousand, sixteen strategy that was undefended at least out of the Prime Minister's office. This one is looking out at a ten years. The two thousand twenty strategy is looking at at the ten year timeframe. And proposing one point six, billion, dollar funding. Backdrop, but a lot of that is going into law enforcement and as you say might be into that capability. What's your take on the strategy itself? Overall as you say, it's it's another announcement is on the strategy whether it's not as another thing but certainly yet your thoughts on the strategy itself and where maybe else we could have been in twenty twenty from the twenty six danes strategies. Have you have you seen that the two thousand twenty strategy's building on the twenty, sixteen or? Taking a completely new direction. While the that, you can certainly say the why the two thousand twenty strategy is reaction to experience the twenty six strategy That the twenty sixteen subsequently strategy had a very large number of of objectives and Nisha announced under it. I think the government found the experience of trying to implement those very large number projected initiatives again, adopted under outcome Tambo's prime ministership around the breathing bruising exercise because the twenty twenty strategy dramatically rationalize is temptation I'm say that the broad spread of of initiatives and objectives under the strategy a kind of a toddler. Your decide that the Gospel confessed about ninety percent of the funding. Associated with these twenty twenty strategy he's allocated to security agencies So it goes into building. Capabilities with particularly the is day but also other security agencies on. Enforcement agencies like the the I pay, and that's well and good We have I think outstanding internationally recognized capabilities within is. and this is the conduct that you have to keep investing in order to. Maintain those capabilities in my time that that international ranking. Suppose big Criticism that that libraries had is one that we've been exploring for at the loss twelve months and that's really When you look at security policy to strike the problem is the ability to project those capabilities out of the silos of how defense and security agencies. To the problems in Australia Com in terms of lifting a bench, mock the baseline up security security. Brazil and Sada resilience across the Australian government trying economy You know there's a lot of examples of that. Wall is day is absolutely world standard. Saab resiliency combined entities is as at the government's own description reminding at relatively low levels. you know the is days top full became mandatory in the. Seventies ago now. had a slew of a straight national ordered office inquiry since then. when you type them all up on like twenty nine percent of Kamal entities compliant with all the top four. Seven years after theoretically became mandatory say interesting. Is Connect between very high capability. Inside Is Day lower levels of saga resilience and more broadly throughout government not to sign story that we see in the corporate sector unites now at banks and Al. Telcos, absolately will class intends to their sub security posture. But you only have to sort of take one stiff through the down. In the I six navy top fifty. And you start seeing. Very, different levels of resilience.

Info Technology Sector Senate Bill Center Australia Australia Kodak Australia Prime Minister Saab Tambo AL Nisha Absolately Reporter Brazil
The Dignity of Work

Accelerate Your Business Growth

04:57 min | Last week

The Dignity of Work

"Guest today is Audie pen audience the principal owner of Audie Penn Consulting. He's been working in consulting for thirty years providing different services to several fortune fifty companies in diverse industries and organizations. Is Approach is a lean transformation by applying coaching. Training and project facilitation with local teams securing solid. Foundation. Audie has been most notable as a global consultant where he combines tactical leadership skills with pro processed focused improvements. Some of his clients are Caterpillar John. Deere. Martin Marietta and Han thanks so much for joining me today Audie. Thanks for having me Diane I'm looking forward to our conversation today. I am as well and we're GONNA be talking about culture in in business you know the impact that it has in. Most likely. Spending some significant amount of time talking about the current situation we were in an I had said in the introduction These episodes are evergreen and they are I think no matter when people listen to them. They're gonNA valuable information and We are recording this. I would love to say like toward the end but I'm not quite sure where we are with the whole covid nineteen pandemic and. So while there are things that leaders are going through and employees are going through therefore, companies right now I'm pretty confident that we're going to be talking about. Translates. No matter what the environment is that company finds itself. Absolutely Yep. Okay. So to start if we could. With you providing us with. A description of. Talking about the impact of organizational culture on business performance. The idea that comes to mind there is is a recent discovery of my own and I'll. I'll frame it in this language often I find. Organizations. Are Struggling with their lean or operational excellence deployments and there's a statistic that gets kicked around quite often that seventy to ninety percent of operational excellence. ORLEAN deployments end up in failure. and. My initial response to that was well, they're doing it incorrectly I need to understand why they're doing it incorrectly but I think, I've I've actually adjusted that language to not incorrectly but incompletely in, there's the connection to your question. And for me, the connection is we can do process improvement very well. But. If the rest of the organization is disconnected, the sponsors of the leadership level or the management level of process owners, then we can't sustain or continue to find ways to improve those processes in it seemed like we just continue to solve the same problems over and over again. That is so interesting. Okay. So, if I inherit you right. company decided they want to go through process improvement some area of the business, but they don't necessarily have. Complete buy in from everyone involved. So they go through the process and then everyone walks away. They go back to the way things were. Yes. Okay. So that feels to me like. The in has to start at the very top and then has to be pushed down is that A fair assessment. I would say, yes, there's there's one word though that mutiny short that is pushed because. When those sponsors and it's language that I use to refer to leaders when when leaders actually show up? and. They're clear what their organizations about what's important It's easy for organizations to align to that and questions that I ask often is how many of you came to work today to fail And no one answers the question. Yes. So I always say, well, if that's true of us, don't you think that's true of everyone in our organization we fail them by not being clear about talking about what's important.

Audie Audie Penn Consulting Deere Principal Martin Marietta Consultant Diane HAN
How the Apple Podcasts Analytics help you understand your audience

Podcasting Q&A

04:20 min | Last week

How the Apple Podcasts Analytics help you understand your audience

"Welcome to podcasting where you learned the best tips and strategies to launch growing monetize your show. This week's question comes from Dan is Dan sky pilot faith quest podcast, and I have some questions about the apple podcast analytics. I love the buzz sprout analytics, use them all the time and find them very helpful. And I go to the apple podcast analytics and I find them really confusing. Sometimes, there's information about a particular podcast that is lacking on the screen. It seems inconsistent within its own podcast analytics as well as compared to what you all offer. Tell me what I should be looking out there. Should I even be using them? Is they're helpful information there. What are your recommendations thank you so much for your question. Dan So apple podcasts analytics offers some. Additional data points that they don't necessarily share with podcast hosting sites such as but sprout, and while having more information is usually really good thing. You kinda need to know what you're looking for and what you're looking at when you're an apple podcasts connect. So on this episode, we're GonNa, tell you in explain a little bit about why the data points might look a little bit different and then how to get the most out of apple podcast analytics. Let's talk about why you might see some download discrepancy between your hosting site and apple podcasts connect. So with a hosting site, they're going to show you across the board. How many listens in episode is getting Apple podcasts is not set up that way apple podcast connect is going to only show you information from listeners that meet specific set of criteria. The first is that the listener has to be using the most current version of the apple. PODCASTS at the second is that user also has given permission for their diagnostic information in their usage data to be on top of that, there is a seventy two hour lag time. So if someone listened to an episode that you posted on Monday, you're not gonna see that reflected in your stats until Thursday on top of that, if you get less than five people that meet that criteria, apple is going to register zero data for that episode so. The key here is if you want to find out information about how many listens and episodes getting, you're going to want to check in with your hosting site like bus browse going to show you how many listens to you over the course of all time as well as where maybe your audience listening from. You're not gonNA, get an accurate reflection of your download information from podcast connect. What is it good for? Actually there are three really good data points that podcast connect can offer you. The first is average consumption by episode when you land on the dashboard for your podcast scroll down until you see recent episodes, once you're there look at the stat in the far right column. The percentage you see here is the average amount of time your audience listening to each episode. For example, if you have a twenty minute episode with a seventy, five percent average consumption rating that means that people are listening to about the first fifteen minutes of that episode. For the next data point, you can see in podcasts connect episode listen duration click through to one of your episodes to see a graph showing you the percentage of listeners that are still tuned in at any point in your episode. If you're doing everything right, you should see a gradual taper from the beginning to the end of the episode. If you see a sharp drop in listeners, click on the portion of the episode and listen to it to figure out why so many listeners bailed at the same time. For example, there was an episode entitled finding the Best Podcasting. Microphone we noticed that people stopped listening around. The, nineteen minute mark when we went back and looked at that, we noticed that that was where we kind identified that podcasting microphone, and so people didn't really have a reason to keep listening. So what you WanNa do is really think about why people would drop off really explore that if that's that you've given them an answer and they don't need to listen anymore if it's more of a click bait kind title if you had an ad run in the middle reverse engineer, why everyone might disconnected at that point so that you can create more content that has people stay on for the duration of the episode. The last thing that you can learn from podcast connect is how many new listeners subscribed after listening to a particular episode blow the Listener Duration Graph for each episode, you'll see a role of additional statistics on the far right. You'll notice a percentage called devices, subscribed devices subscribed as the percentage of unique devices that subscribed and listening to the episode. For example, if you have an episode that has a twenty percent subscribe rate versus an episode that has a ninety percent subscribed rate, you're GonNa WanNa look at what you did to get ninety percent subscription because if you can do more of that, it will result in more podcast listeners. It's GonNa help you grow your podcast tremendously.

Apple DAN Engineer
Airline Workers Brace As Federal Aid Runs Out This Month

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:29 min | 2 weeks ago

Airline Workers Brace As Federal Aid Runs Out This Month

"Employees at the nation's airlines are getting nervous many pilots flight attendants mechanics in customer service agents have been kept on the payroll since March only with the help of federal aid that funding runs out at the end of this month, and if it's not extended tens of thousands of them could be out of work on October first from Chicago. NPR's David Schaper reports. Several dozen flight attendants, pilots, and other airline employees masked up as they chanted and marched around the Federal Plaza Downtown Chicago Wednesday to draw attention to what they say is a dire situation. So I'm I'm coming up on four decades of service and I have to tell you I have never seen anything like this in my career with United Airlines United Flight Attendant Jeff Highs says he's not just talking about the calamitous drop in the number of people flying because of the pandemic lot. The impending mass layoffs year and his co workers are facing. Unless twelve thousand of our members are at risk for involuntary furlough and that's just one group of employees at one airline. Industry Wide Cub October. First layoffs could top forty thousand, and that's in addition to the tens of thousands have already taken early retirement or other incentives to leave their airline jobs voluntarily. The initial corona virus relieffactor past March Congress and the trump administration included twenty five billion dollars in grants to airlines to keep paying employees for six months. But now that time is almost up Democrats some Republicans and the president of all said, they favor an extension of the payroll support program but the airline aid was left of the latest relief package proposed this week by Senate, Republicans and the uncertainty weighs. Heavily on airline employees, we're in this limbo right now other holding is a Chicago based flight attendant for American Airlines. Are we going back to work in October? Are Do we have to figure out and find another job? You know we're kind of time crunch right now what our backup plans going to be airline employee unions held a similar rally outside the Capitol in Washington DC to put pressure on Congress. While their bosses at the airlines fret to right now we're fighting for survival make no bones about it. Kallio. Heads a group airlines for America. He says after a brief uptick air travel this summer that peaked over the Labor Day weekend demand is already slumping again is more profitable business travel bookings remain down close to ninety percent is going to be a different world people are to see you're already seen. Fewer flights come October. First, you're going to see a further reduction in the number fledge that are operating Kellyanne other. Say it may take four to five years for the airline industry to fully recover if it ever does wouldn't another round of payroll support funding for the airlines just delay the inevitable of mass layoffs warmer airline Executive Robert. Man Who is now an industry consultant argues the jobs are worth saving. Job in the airline is probably support somewhere between seven and eleven jobs. Elsewhere, the economy is hospitality in these support technologies in other transportation boats in man warns in a couple of airlines may not survive the pandemic without more federal aid. To Gut check question how much of an economy? Do you want going forward congressional and White House to go shooters? We'll have to try to answer that question this campaign season in which the two parties agree on almost nothing. David Schaper, NPR News Chicago.

American Airlines Chicago United Airlines David Schaper Congress Federal Plaza NPR Republicans America Jeff Highs White House Senate Consultant President Trump Executive
The Stages Of Relationships With Mistakes

Developer Tea

09:54 min | 3 weeks ago

The Stages Of Relationships With Mistakes

"Here's the thing about mistakes. It is invoke and. It is certainly popular. To accept that mistakes are going to happen. So I don't want you to check out too quickly because you've kind of jumped on that bandwagon this is something that. Has Been discussed a lot in. An podcast like this it certainly has been discussed in plenty of books. We talk a lot about the importance of psychological safety. In today's episode, we're GONNA take. Another step further. And not just talk about acceptance of mistakes. There's more to this discussion there's more to how we should behave or how we can behave. To deal with mistakes better to have a better relationship with them. So hopefully. You'll stick around. As we go through this scale and there's five kind of categories, five points on this scale that you can find yourself on almost certainly, you'll find yourself somewhere on this on this scale. Now, of course, we're going to talk about it in terms of very discrete points on the scale. But this is a continuum. You'RE NOT GONNA act only one way you're not going to fall entirely into one point on the scale but I encourage you to consider how you might react or how you might behave to move to a new point on this scale if you don't like where you're at. All right. So this this podcast, this episode is not intended to. Make you feel bad about where you are on the scale but instead to. Try to provide a clear picture of the full-scale. Altogether. So the is to zoom out of your own circumstance. and Try to imagine what other circumstances. May allow. At one thing that will note in advance before we get into the scale is that there's no point on the scale where you have escaped the relationship with mistakes. In other words, you always have mistakes. There's no point on the scale where you will be able to break away and stop making mistakes so. That should not be a goal as much as we wanted to be a goal, it shouldn't be a goal. And part of the reason for that is because. If. We don't have mistakes than we are probably not learning. We're not pushing past our previous. Barriers not just individually, but as teams, and we're not helping others grow. Okay. Let's get into the five stages of your relationship with mistakes we're going to start at the. least healthy relationship with mistakes. That is the stage one this willful ignorance willful ignorance. You've seen this done before you probably have done it at some point and perhaps he regretted it. But the idea here is that you just ignore the mistake. Whether that's a bug in code or some other mistake, some other faults. You are willfully choosing to ignore it. This isn't because you're not aware of it right It's possible that you're not aware of a lot of mistakes. which this kind of scale you can't really have a relationship with something that you're unaware of. So we kind of ignore that for the sake of this episode but. If you're willfully. Choosing. To avoid any kind of contact with the mistake in other words you're not investigating it. You're not. Trying to change it in any way. You're not trying to understand it in any way. You're just ignore you're going about it. You're going about your job, you're. Writing Your Code is if that bug doesn't doesn't exist at all. You might ship that bug into production knowing it's there. Now why is this important state to bring up? Because this is something that we do more often than we realize most likely we are choosing to. To. Prioritize one thing over another understanding that there's a mistake. That we're not rectifying. and. In some ways, this is actually functional. This is important to be able to do with the right kinds of mistakes but. The part that breaks down and what's unhealthy about this stage is the idea that we're choosing to kind of stick our head in the sand where willfully ignorant. It's a little bit different to be cognizant of the mistake to understand it and to be able to categorize it into a category that says, oh, this is a low priority mistake, right? But that's not what the stages the stage one is willfully ignorant. So you don't know what the priority is because you're choosing not to inspect any further. Now, you can be on the opposite end of the scale and we'll talk about the opposite end of the scale shortly, but you could be on the opposite end of the scale and still choose to ship known bugs into production because they're low priority Maybe you found work around or whatever the case is, but you're not being ignorant on that end of the scale right? We're GONNA. Talk about that in the scale but understand this will ignorance is the idea that somehow you expect the universe or heard some other force To manage the mistakes for you. What's strange is that sometimes that actually happens right sometimes, we ship a bug into production. And then we write code we rip out some Old Code Not even knowing that that co contain the bug that we shipped to production and that bug of course, because it's been replaced with new code and bug goes away so. This accidentally works right. Is Not by design, we're not dealing with our mistakes by design we're dealing with them haphazardly or by chance. Okay let's move on to stage number two. and. This is still not a very healthy stage but at the very least, we're not willfully ignorant. This stage is treating mistakes as anomalies treating mistakes as anomalies. The idea here is when a mistake occurs, we consider it to be. An exception. We considered to be out of the norm. And so we don't plan for mistakes. If we're in the states, right we ended up having to work extra overtime because we expect that we can work at, let's say eighty or ninety percent utilization of our time. and. We'll be fine because we don't make mistakes regularly, and so why would we build in time to deal with them? And this is where we find our problem. Right? Because anytime a mistake occurs not only do we immediately jump into kind of an urgent state. But we also don't plan ahead for them because if mistakes are anomalies than. At on average, we're not going to have them. On the average day, we shouldn't spend extra time preparing for those mistakes. Because, they don't happen often enough to prepare for them. Of course in that stressful state when we've made a mistake. And we're already at our limit. We're having to fix our mistake above our limit. This is a critically important thing for managers especially understand if you push your team to their limit. When it comes to a critical moment. Mike for Example if you ship a bad bug into production. But you're already at your limit your already pushing people to the point that they can't really give any more tired or they're. Mentally burned out. Then you're in a really bad scenario to deal with that mistake. And even though you're not willfully ignoring it. This is still a bad scenario to be in. This is still a bad relationship with mistakes. Because you're already at the limit, you're probably going to make another mistake. And you can see where this goes right as we continue to snowball our mistakes on top of each other rather than slowing down and having the head space to deal with them. Those mistakes continue to compound. Right so this leads to really bad kosher and of course, treating mistakes as anomalies. Makes People feel horrible. It makes people feel bad and not only bad. But also scared they're afraid to make mistakes and we know from plenty of research and we already kind of alluded to this at the beginning. That the opportunity to make mistakes is critical to success. It's critical to having an innovative in healthy team. in in this is something that has been shown in study after study, right this is not novel if we have people who are afraid because they think they're going to make a mistake and it's going to push everybody past their limit because mistakes are supposed to be anomalies. That's a really bad situation to be in both individually and does teams.

Mike
Work Management App Asana Files for IPO as Productivity Tools Soar

Business Wars Daily

04:10 min | 3 weeks ago

Work Management App Asana Files for IPO as Productivity Tools Soar

"If ever. There was a word that became a cliche overnight. It's the word unprecedented for a second allow me to stop bullying. Swamp when it comes to work life we're in unprecedented times there we have it. Millions of us are still working from home making managing projects and teams more challenging than ever before we can't just pop in Dave's cubicle and say, Hey, you finish that code yet. Even. Before the pandemic productivity in project management tools were on the rise because nineteen is caused some tools particularly those intended for teams to skyrocket. Soaring sales prompted at least one such business san-francisco-based Asana to file for an initial public offering. Asana is a work collaboration APP in a world filled with productivity tools designed to help overwork professionals hold chaos at bay. It was founded in two thousand eight by Justin Moskovitz, the much lesser known multi-billionaire co founder of facebook while at Facebook Moskovitz, and his co founder Justin Rosenstein were struck by how much time people spent doing what they call work about work. That's the mind numbing minutiae of organizing how things get done keeping track of work communicating about it an answering email about who's doing what when Asana claims that knowledge workers spend a full sixty percent of their time performing work about work rather than actually getting things done. It's an Rosenstein started. Asana. With the intention to fix that nagging problem by the way Rosensteins name sounds familiar. He's known as the guy who invented facebook's like button. Today is used by more than a million people worldwide at more than seventy five thousand companies. High profile customers include a t and t google and NASA according to Forbes Asana has been focused on growth. It took in one hundred and forty million dollars in sales last year up ninety percent over two thousand, eighteen from this February through April revenue shot even higher in its most recent fundraiser. The company was valued at one and a half billion dollars and yet. Asana is still losing money last year it lost one hundred and twenty million dollars. Those losses continue to mount as Asana plows money into growing sales. Still a little thing like earnings isn't holding it back from the stock market last week. Asana. Filed Paperwork with the SEC for an IPO in the New York Stock Exchange according to Forbes Moskovitz who has pledged to give his wealth away is taking the company. Public in order to reward employees. Asana, named for the yoga term is famous for the Mindful Corporate Culture Moskovitz is said to have built. If the CEO seems unfazed by Losses Moskovitz is also not letting competition hold him back from going Public Asana faces rivals wherever it turns there's the three billion dollar start up Monday dot COM two, billion dollar company notion and smart sheet recently valued at almost six billion dollars. Last week while the introverted Moskovitz was fending off interview requests about the IPO smart sheet was making news of its own the Bellevue Washington company made a one hundred, fifty, five, million dollar deal to acquire brand folder a Denver start up that manages digital assets in other words content like photos, videos, and graphics because a big part of producing content his guess what about work tackling content management is a way for smart sheet to grow. It's already large footprint. SMART sheets deal signals. What could be ahead for any work collaboration company that is they won't be satisfied with only helping US plan our way out of a paper bag like smart sheets, they could begin to acquire businesses that also store move and find all that content that no matter how hard some of his tribe gets lost anyway. As the culture continues to shift at lightning speed and we all continue to figure out how best to be productive from home. Our ways of working are almost certain to evolve work management. APPS. Like Asana will surely evolve within amidst all this uncertainty. One thing is certain. There will be a lot of money made by companies helping us all figure out how to get things done.

Justin Rosenstein Justin Moskovitz Facebook Facebook Moskovitz Co Founder Losses Moskovitz Forbes Moskovitz Google Dave United States SEC Forbes Nasa CEO New York Denver Bellevue Washington
The Latest Pandemic Shortage: Dumbbells

Business Wars Daily

04:22 min | 3 weeks ago

The Latest Pandemic Shortage: Dumbbells

"Perhaps, you've spent the summer exercising outdoors, and now you're starting to wonder whether you'll be able to keep that up when winter hits after all even though gyms may have reopened where you are many of us are skittish about exercising indoors with a lot of other sweaty hard breathing people a set of weights for home gym or garage or basement more likely seems like a great solution. Yeah. How often do you have a great idea only to realize everybody else's having the same great idea that's what's happening here folks since the early days of the pandemic stationary bikes, treadmills and streaming workouts have been hot commodities demand for one item in particular has driven scarcity dumbbells just try and buy a set the goods a newsletter published by Vox, says, we're in the midst of the great American dumbbell shortage. All right. So it's not like we're talking about a shortage of life saving drugs but if staying fit means not just health but sanity to to you, a dumbbell shortage could be a very serious thing. We feel your pain. Here's what happened according to the fitness fanatics experts at box think way back in your memory on March fourteenth the president declared the pandemic, a national emergency that was A. Friday the very next day ushered in the weekend that America changed. Colleen. Logan. Of icon health and fitness told Box Logan is vice president of marketing for the company which owns nordictrack other fitness brands that weekend they started seeing what she called crazy crazy sales every day in March sales doubled compared to March twenty nineteen. They quadrupled in April and were up six hundred percent higher in May Logan said. Rival bowflex was also inundated like Nordic track. bowflex sells weights along with bigger, more expensive equipment like bikes and treadmills less well known businesses that specialize in strength training are also struggling to meet demand. Visit S PRI site and you'll see sold out labels on Dumbbell after Dumbbell try to buy kettle bell iron balls with handles, and in many cases retailer rogue fitness won't even give you a ship date instead up POPs vague. Notify me button. The level of demand is unheard of as inside Hook writer Tanner Garrity noted people don't even buy this many dumbbells in the middle of winter when they're cooped up and drafting fitness resolutions. The result of these shortages predictable prices are high according to vox a pair of fifteen pound rogue dumbbells that usually costs forty dollars is currently listed on Ebay for one hundred, sixty, nine dollars. The shortages point to a much bigger issue in the American economy before the pandemic, the vast majority of Kettlebells dumbbells and other free weights were made guess where China? That's right China closed factories and highways from January to April when the sudden unexpected surge of interest occurred here. America's existing supply of weights went fast due to closures in China. Well, no new ones could be made much less ship to America. Now, Chinese factories are open again, but they can't keep up with the outsized desire a few companies including. Rogue. Have turned to small American iron foundries to make them here. But few of those foundries are interested in making consumer products like kettlebells. It's expensive and difficult for them to gear up and they fear retailers will give the business right back to China. Once the global economy is fully open again in the meantime experts say the boom and at home. Workouts is no flash in the PAN ninety percent of Americans who work out say they'll continue exercising at home according to a survey by Wakefield research for some those at home workouts will continue to replace the gym. Others will simply add Jim visits to their routine. Regardless that means booming sales and continuing supply chain headaches for Nordic track bowflex and the light. For the lowly exerciser waiting and waiting for that adjustable weights set to arrive it can also mean getting creative. What else can you pump besides iron weights? Well you could try the technique. One robust dad showed off a photo featured by vox lying on the floor. He's balancing his two little girls on a piece of plywood and he's holding over his body. Just, be very careful with those willing little subjects. Okay.

Box Logan China America VOX Bowflex Ebay Vice President Of Marketing President Trump Colleen Nordic Tanner Garrity Writer JIM Wakefield Research
Measuring & Managing Community Orgs, Developer Relations and Beyond

a16z

03:18 min | 3 weeks ago

Measuring & Managing Community Orgs, Developer Relations and Beyond

"Okay so wide Deverell. Going to be quite controversial here. Don't do it's. We are engineers that talk to other engineers and convinced them and help them to do stuff. Right. So if you're a star up, you need to choose between someone who developer relations and an engineer that is a hard trait, right? That is not easy and you only need to do it if you have to. So if you don't have to if this is a nice to have. Yes. And, we'll have a set of P is or maybe developers will help us then I really strongly recommend not doing any develop relations, develop relations expensive. It creates a lot of maintenance. It's a one way door. It's a decision that you can go back from. So if you open an API and then close it, developers will never ever trust you again. So remember it is a hard decision but. It's very empowering if it really drives your business so I would stipulate that more than ninety percents of startups do not require developer relations. It is required when you are building a platform when developers actually are the creators of the value of your up when they're your users at slack, we started without a develop relations and then we started building and develop relations, and the key here is that. We found out that the platform is the number one NPS net promoter score for using slack people were always super happy about the integrations when we asked him, what is the most important thing? They said they integrations when it wasn't number one, it was in the top three all the time. So the developers were driving a lot of value to our core audience which are paying customers. So how'd You have advocate C., which is the one too many. These are the people like me who speak on stages and say praise the Lord here's our API or here's our token in your case, and here's the use case, and here's the value. These are people who create scalable content they create the articles and all these other things that are super important to inspire developers. Then you have partnership engineering, that's the people who work with one. To one relationship, these are the people that you send to the top clients, the top developers and the first year I actually invested most of my money in partnership engineering I vetted most of my time in people who know how to do these type of relationship with top developers. Then you have enterprise architects. This is if you're doing an enterprise use case, these are people who go and do post sales support and make the usage wider. And then concentrator super important. These are people who write the docs for your developers. It is super critical to right the right docks I measured that's team by meantime to hello world. How fast is it for developer landing on the developers sites to reach success? Right. So that's I think the most important part of that team's job. The also are the voice of the developers develop relations. This is what you do. You Inspire developers you tell them what you've built and why this is important for them. So now they are inspired, then

Developer Engineer
Midnight Moment 5 - Social Media - burst 1

The Midnight Patriots

06:38 min | Last month

Midnight Moment 5 - Social Media - burst 1

"Greetings citations my fellow patriots. Welcome to the moment host by meetings. Something that is that notorious have been around for a very long time social media. It's no longer really social. We actually sat and looked at everything objectively of course what does it really become nothing more than ads base Mr and Mrs you who bragging about how good their is even though the snow that it's not a political sounding board for ninety percent of the world to bent their frustrations, their angst, their disdain for whichever party platform, they choose not to mention the actual ability for people to speak to each other. Now relies more on a personal device. Versus actually using your voice that said what the Hell's going to happen when y'all break both your hands can't use. Thumbs y'all going be Butte can't talk to anybody the art of speaking is obviously a dead form of communication. Everybody's got to be on their phone tablet computer email whatever you wanna call it or thumbs are what they used to speak with rather disappointing. Actually those of us in the generation X. Whatever you WANNA call still know how to write cursive still know how to pick up the phone. And call somebody still can write a letter. It's ship it off in the US. PS they're not against different story. The point that I'm really trying to get to is social media has no longer become been a social thing. It's one thing or another. It's nothing more than just a giant bent platform for everybody out there. God knows if you've got to sell something, put it up there online you can't reach people on television because quite frankly people are tired of watching three minutes of programming and fifteen minutes of. Sorry. Now. I can remember way back when watch program you got eight and a half minutes program three commercials that was it, and then back to your program, they filled up with entire thirty minutes spot with the program. But Hey, last time I tried to watch anything on television and had been neutered and chop down to the point that I felt like I was watching a spam program of nothing but ads By this, go get this. You need this you're a loser you don't own twelve of these. nope not happening folks. We've got another segment coming up right after this brief break. Stay tuned. Midnight Patriot nations spartan here with a shameless plug for our new gear shop shop. Dot Midnight Patriots Dot Com. T shirts, hats, hoodies, mugs, phone cases just about everything else in between we got you covered whether you're looking to embrace your insomnia, show your patriotism or make a liberal head explode. Really, Shop Dot Midnight Patriots Dot Com for a limited time. You can save fifteen percent on your order starting now. and. Now back to the show. So where we dive further and further into the rabbit hole, we would understand that social media is not social in. So much of the actual definition of social you want to keep up with friends see what they post on facebook want to find. Love and all the wrong places plenty of hidden acquitted places to go there too. It's disheartening to be for somebody that grew up. Knowing how to write a letter to express feeling in a written word versus here let me throw this in an email and hope that you understand it. Sorry. His plane as a text on the screen. But it has no heart it has no feeling has no. Guts real rather. Harder related is now saying that you know we need to go back to stone tablets and you'll sign A. Bloody fingerprint but it's nice to actually be able to read something that was written by someone who took the time to lay out a nice. He's paper, grab a pen and actually right not. Doctors Chicken scratch. Let me throw this on here and making notation. Well, there you go. Doesn't work folks honestly I'd rather go back to media has manipulated and destroyed the ability for people to social. Unfortunately. As we've seen as of late. The politics involved across every social media platform is enough to make anybody puke. It's not a this is what we're doing to try and better the country were trying to implement this. We're looking to get this. We're going to abolish this. It's now this is my opponent and they're ugly and if I tell it to you enough times, you'll believe it to sorry guys but. Not going to be manipulated like that truly, and unfortunately, social media has now become a narcissist tool remedy relation as much as I am. Having to research topics for our broadcasts and our mid, I've always and saw and so forth individual conversations accordingly it's disgusting that every time you turn around, it's one thing or another being degraded demoralized dehumanized smeared from one side of the other. It's depressing truly what all that said I, leave it up to you folks to research find out for your own stuff. See what goes on. We think I'm blind. Love me no. I'm always available for discussion whether it be through some form of social. Media. Funny I say that or when the time is, right we'll open up all lines and have you give us a call and we'll talk then until that point in time this is phoenix signing off everybody. Joy Your evening. Thanks for joining us for another edition midnight moment. Be sure to join us for the main podcast every Monday night and every Thursday night for more midnight moments. If you like what you hear poor. What we do about subscribing. Go to listen dot midnight. Patriots Dot Com. Support and subscribe. Be Pick up some merchant or gear store shop that midnight Patriots Dot Com. From the Mile High Command Center ABLE TO PHRASES DOT COM studio. This is sport reminding you of the Constitution. Is Not just a suggestion

MRS United States Facebook Mile High Command Center
With Milk Sales Up, Dairy Industry Revives Iconic Got Milk Campaign

Business Wars Daily

04:28 min | Last month

With Milk Sales Up, Dairy Industry Revives Iconic Got Milk Campaign

"From, wondering I'm David Brown and this is business wars daily on this Thursday August twenty seventh something strange happened over the last few months we started drinking milk again think it might have had anything to do with pandemic for the last several years. It's felt like the dairy industry been singing swan songs milk sales fell thirteen percent from twenty ten to twenty eighteen according to CNN I one dairy. Then another collapsed under the weight of competition from plant based drinks soy almond, coconut, banana, Oat flax all. Those plants were out to get poor daisy the cow the dairy industry was so freaked out that it launched a pilot lawsuits against makers of those plant based drinks trying to forbid them from using the very word milk. You can't squeeze milk out of another grain they said but for the moment, at least dairy farmers are experiencing a bit of relief with. So many of us eating more meals at home, we're guzzling the white stuff again, it's long been true that milk drinkers tend to drink milk. Not at restaurants. So lockdowns have in fact, helped the dairy business cow's milk sales rose about twelve percent over last year for the twenty weeks ending. July eighteenth CNN reported your kid and mind mindlessly grabbing a swig from the carton added up to four and a half billion dollars in sales this spring, and that has spurred the dairy industry to revive an iconic ad campaign. Remember got milk. Vast company called it one of the most famous ad campaigns in history that campaign was launched in Nineteen ninety-three, its message, whatever you do don't run out of milk over time three hundred celebrities including Britney Spears Dennis Rodman Bill Clinton, and the simpsons all appeared sporting those milk mustaches. The ads became enormously popular by the end of the campaigns run in two thousand, fourteen, ninety percent of all adults were familiar with got milk to Huffington Post Contributor Gene Delvecchio but there was one a little problem. The ads didn't actually work over that same time milk sales declined steadily soda consumption bubbled over guess what those Soda Lovers used to drink you got it delvecchio a former AD industry executive argues the got milk ads were like bringing peace shooters to a gunfight, the gunfight being Pepsi and Coke Monster Marketing Budgets while the to soda makers battled each other milk lost but the dairy industry apparently believes their campaign was effective embracing Estonia the industry's marketing arm milk. PAP has revived the got milk campaign today's ads bear little resemblance to the Owens though. Sure there's still some celebrities Olympic gold medal swimmer Katie decades, viral tiktok video showing her perfectly balanced a glass of milk on her head while swimming a lap. That's certainly a turned heads but the bulk of today's campaign features, regular folks and a ton of user generated content milk drinkers were urged to do silly things with milk and boy did they respond people open gallons of milk with their toes jumped into kiddie pools filled with milk and cereal according to the trade paper? Agra. News will this generation's got milk ads do anything to keep the cow's milk train going if the wildly popular ad campaign of your didn't work well. Be Hard pressed to say that this one is a better peashooter. The dairy industry itself is making predictions. They say they're simply celebrating the quarantine induced sales boost. What is true however is that the competition from those plant based rivals is only getting. Over the same twenty weeks that saw a twelve percent rise in dairy milk sales oat milk sales went through the roof up two, hundred, fifty percent. Of course, oat milk sales are still tiny compared to cow's milk. They totalled only one, hundred, thirty, five, million dollars, but other signs point to the continued aggressive challenge from those gentle plant based alternatives. Oatley the. Leading oat milk maker recently attracted two hundred million dollars in investment funding from blackstone and Oprah it hopes to go public next year according to Forbes, and on Monday good Karma, a maker of flax milk bought itself back from bankrupt dean. Foods investors are Thurston lapping up all of these cream alternatives and no matter how beloved the Got Milk Gad's once were. All this competition puts a whole lot of pressure on twenty twenties version of the same campaign.

CNN Katie Decades David Brown Thurston Gene Delvecchio Gold Medal Huffington Post Britney Spears Agra PAP Dennis Rodman Bill Clinton Executive Blackstone Estonia Oprah Forbes Owens Pepsi
Hope for Herpes Cure

The Naked Scientists

05:24 min | Last month

Hope for Herpes Cure

"Nearly two thirds of us are infected with herpes simplex virus. So viruses, this week isn't an herpes causes cold sores causes genital disease, and it can also even occasionally caused Brian Infections. The virus is real headache to treat because the infection is lifelong. This is because it hides existing just as a piece of DNA inside nerve cells, it periodically reawakens to produce painful infectious skin blisters, nola drugs that can. Control these flare ups when they happen they can't remove the viral DNA. So the problem keeps on coming back now researchers in the US developed a pair of selective molecular scissors the contract down the rogue viral. DNA inside nerve cells and chop it up destroying the virus. So at least in experimental mice, it doesn't come back. Keith Jerem herpes is really sneaky that it actually established as a form of itself. That essentially goes into cells and then falls asleep and that virus lives in the neurons nerve cells in your body, and they can come once a year once a month once a week and cause lesions ulcers than anything else and all those strikes. We him don't do anything about that sleeping form of the virus. So effectively under the immune Radovan all the time it's dormant inside cells like that the immune system can't see it. So it just gets ignored. That's exactly right. The immune system controls at once it wakes up and starts making more copies of itself and they take care of those new copies but they even the noon system doesn't do anything about that long-term sleeping form of the virus said, what can you do about it? Well we've been using this really cool technology that's been around for over a decade. Now called gene editing despite has made a DNA just like our body is and that sleeping form is actually a little tiny circle of this DNA that lives in the nerve cells and what gene editing allows us to do is basically use I think of molecular scissors that can go into a cell and they can look through all. The DNA. In that cell and look for a very specific little stretch of the letters, and if they find those letters, they make a little cut and so what we do is designed very special scissors that ignore all of our own DNA, all the human DNA but they look really hard for herpes and if they find it, then it to little cuts and so it basically falls apart and makes it go away. And this works does it you can actually demonstrate that serve you chop up the virus then canola comeback yeah, exactly. So the study that we did was in mice mice get this sleeping form of the herpes just like we do and then we can go in and we use a a something. We call a vector, a different virus that carries these scissors to those same neurons and when it does that it starts cutting up the virus and then we can measure after. Our therapy how much of that sleeping form is actually left in the mice treated and what we saw as we eliminated well over ninety percent of that virus, and if we could translate that into human beings is likely to prevent lesions in Alzheimer's disease transmission to other people and all the things that we actually worry about how did you get the virus that was the Trojan horse that carried in the molecular scissors? How did you get that into the nerve cells in these animals? Well. That was a really important part of our study is understanding the best way to get the scissors where they need to be. We used another virus added. Associated Virus. Almost, all have it never causes any disease. We basically changed that to carry these scissors for us just injected into the bloodstream, and once it's in the blood, it actually goes in and actually find those nerve cells and introduces the scissors. It sounds like the woman who swallowed a fly and then swallowed spider to eat the flying, and we all know how that story ends because you're basically giving someone a virus to treat viruses this safe. This particular virus specter that was used called ADN. Associated Virus is probably the leading factor that's being used for many many types of gene therapy now, and there's several approved products out there in the EU and the United States that use adn associated virus or av to deliver different types of gene therapy, and so we're taking something that's quite proven to be safe modifying it slightly for our needs and then using it to try to cure an infection where we've simply not had any hope for cure in the past. You've been looking at herpes simplex virus. This causes cold sores and it also causes genital disease. But this is one member of a big family viruses that'll will work in a similar sort of way things like visa, the Vars, chickenpox and shingles in people unlucky enough to have that. Do you think you could prevent a person from succumbing to shingles by the same technique? The shingles virus actually goes into very similar nerve cells and acts a lot like herpes simplex, and so we can actually think about using the same therapy for that viruses. Well, we're also very actively looking at viruses that are similar but not herpes viruses in particular hepatitis B., and we have some really exciting results there where we can do very similar things. We're likely to see success there and maybe another viruses as well.

Herpes Genital Disease United States Brian Infections Keith Jerem Alzheimer's Disease EU Vars
Mandy Shintani, OT & Gerontologist- Urban Poling

Moving2Live

05:20 min | Last month

Mandy Shintani, OT & Gerontologist- Urban Poling

"Welcome back to another edition of moving to live podcast. As you heard in the Intro, we are a podcast where we try to break down knowledge silos our ethos along with our sister podcast lab Pittsburgh is to spread the word that movement should be treated as a lifestyle not just in activity. Some of our best guests often come from recommendations or introductions from other guests and a big. Thank you to fred go PT Helper who connected me with today's guest. Fred was the sponsor or cosponsor with P T helper of a virtual clinic that was held with a company called urban polling. When I saw urban polling, I'm like I'm not exactly sure what that is. I looked it up I found out and I was fortunate enough the defender of the company Manish Shantanu who is a gerontologist occupational therapist. Was Willing to speak to me. So Mandy, thanks for taking time to talk to moving to live. Oh. Thank you so much for having me. Ben In I. Agree Sometimes, the name is a bit misleading in terms of. Away represents I know my first question I always liked to start out with with moving to live is what your elevator spiel and you get on the elevator someplace in your either carrying an urban pulling tote bag. You have an urban pulling sure people say, what do you do? Who Are you? What do you tell them? On okay, in two minutes well. Generally I'll say to them is that. Bourbon polling is based on Nordic walking which is. Security that. Is Very popular over in Scandinavia. Have the healthiest people into world. And basically, your upper body is doing something that looks like cross country skiing at your body you're just walking in urban settings so Sidewalks. Roads. Parks trails. For Friday other different ways. But that's usually my elevator pitch on the on the topic. and. I know we'll get into that more detail in the second half of the interview. Out of curiosity, just for the listeners, how does this differ from maybe somebody who's a hiker or a trail runner who uses polls on rough terrain? Oh, we're great question Whitmer gave asked that a lot. Well, basically onion I'm a big hiker myself and the different is died. It's one as the design of the poll and second round it's the technique. So when you're hiking usually you're you know you're elbows are banned in, you're using it to offload the weight off your hip Sidney used to give it more stability. Whereas this activity, your arms are straight more like cross country skiing not sure every volunteer this user familiar across cross scene, and it's about changing your walking into brisk walking or an athletic walk. You're using the pool and has got allege. That's designed. Did you press down that legislative move your arm back and you get insert you work like seventy five to ninety percent of your muscles. So it's all about getting like a high intensity cardio and including resistance training there as well. So just say different benefits, different pools and in different technique. So. It's almost like it's the exact opposite when the trail runners using the hikers are using it as you said, to offload the body or to offload the worker, decrease the work. In the case of polling, you're trying to increase the workload or make it more of a workout that is an accurate representation. Yeah. Absolutely. That's a great description however just to. Add to the confusion we. Developed in in different ways, what we did was we took the generic activity ignored walking and we looked at I'm as as an occupational therapist I I look at the research and then I was like Haney, how could we doubt this so that we can actually use this fitness activity for habilitation that case it's more like hiking. You Know Allen Allenstein posture offloading like hearing candidates since it's the best practices to use it for pre and post beneath surgery for those exact reasons. So on the one hand. You do all those use it for that reason for Rehab but on the other hand it, you wanted to use it for losing weight or you know increasing your intensity exercises. So for example. Here in Canada people with diabetes people recovering from cardiac heart surgery, a people who are beasts will action use the urban pollinger fitness technique whereas Parkinson's stroke pre abusive new surgery on you. Other neurological conditions they will actually use our activator which provides more balance instability and

Fred Mandy BEN Pittsburgh Manish Shantanu Allen Allenstein Haney Whitmer Scandinavia Sidney Canada Parkinson
"ninety percent" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

02:43 min | 11 months ago

"ninety percent" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Ninety percent of my guys of strain guys would be a guy one on one and I think that's what the thing is done with put him in a position where you know to maybe have a direct angle with if you can at apart and then say Hey we want to try to get you matched up one on one and we believe if we can do that we got a great opportunity and Ethan has taken advantage of because of his F. because of his attitude and his belief in that what a blocked punt can do is change the momentum of the game if and when he gets credit for the one he had it easy you he'll be number one in the country in that category we got back at basketball coming up tonight at seven against Alabama a and M. football team is on the road at U. S. F. this Saturday night at seven and you'll hear those games on newsradio seven hundred WLW reason and I C. B. T. S. one seven hundred WLW the home of the Bearcats traffic and weather news radio seven hundred W. L. Cincinnati school shooting in southern California with the twelve o'clock afford a bright combs breaking now police are at Saugus high school in Santa Clarita right now massive complex in northern LA Callie's being cleared after shooter entered one of the buildings there earlier this morning at this point there's word to three people have been hurt the latest now from ABC news a search continues for a suspect after a shooting at a California high school today it happened at Saugus high school in Santa Clarita in Los Angeles county authorities now say at least one person was shot and at least three others injured ABC's Alex stone on scene the copters are circling they don't know where they suspect there they've got another ambulance now coming out they got all the walk through all of the hills around here rounded by police they're looking for the suspect right now ABC's Alex stone schools in the district about an hour north west of Los Angeles remained on lockdown and student sheltering in place Los Angeles deputy Eric Ortiz a lock down we stand that results in responding now I can confirm how many people or how many victims we have down at this moment medic crews are on scene at that high school campus barricades have been set up police are also also asking parents and the public to remain clear of that area I'm Michelle Franzen ABC news latest traffic and weather together from the you see how traffic center you see health our clinical research and scientific discoveries allow us to offer new treatments for epilepsy patients learn more you see health dot com slash epilepsy highways are in pretty good shape right now I'm not seen any major problems or delays the heaviest as north bound seventy one heading towards Red Bank in the construction barrels crews are working with the wreck on.

seven hundred W Ninety percent
"ninety percent" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

03:44 min | 1 year ago

"ninety percent" Discussed on 790 KABC

"State is paying ninety percent the taxes is that how that works at at it to be but think about this used to be that let's set it in a sense it is a black were relatively affordable in California luxuries were expensive the necessities of life in this station it is state are now becoming unaffordable for so many when you add fuel that's a Buck and a half more than the cross the state line when you are told to use less water but you're gonna pay a whole lot more for it when you don't use electricity we're gonna make time a day so you can't use your electricity at four o'clock five six o'clock when you get home you need to get ready for the next day and put our food this is a state that I hope is beginning to wake up your listings and people up and down the state of California need to ask themselves are we in a good place and then ask what what who did this to us and might I submit its one party dictatorial rule and I keep saying to folks look give folks like me got me comments it it it folks like you others cut common sense individuals who want to look out to the people of California and and do the right thing give others a chance to govern and if we mess it up the way that the the the the the way that the Democrats have been thrown out but folks are in California Ellen they got it got it take back they really must take back their state or for that if you imagine how what it is today if this park continues another decade or longer I hi we're we're just I hope that that that people begin to recognize it and ask I don't see I don't see how they can get around it and slid because only ends we spent on the high speed rail you know about that every every is reminded every time they pull into a gas station everyone is reminded every time they drive out on to the disk decaying the functional roads every time they ask us for more one is reminded when they look to the right or the left and see the the the humanitarian catastrophe on the streets I mean this is all failed policy doctor do I I got this I I want to make sure I'm clear about this and that but there are symptoms of what one party political rule looks like and the decade that that it brings and you can point to Venezuela as of the example I'm not suggesting California's heading that way although there are symptoms here that if we pay attention to it number one eight eight eight eight a protected elite ruling class that does things to others but those things don't happen to them a a a have and have not decided he a high poverty rate for way too many a a a declining opportunity economy and what have flight I mean people are leaving California they're crossing borders to get out I would do I would do anything to get out here yeah I would if I could I would immediately but I'm certain that trencher but Jim where if you wanna hang out we go across the break here I got a call and the last week whatever you want to do whatever you want to Jim Patterson is here with us eight hundred two two two five two two two is a fun every apology I'm at Jim Patterson five five nine on Twitter it's midday live hymns of ninety KABC KBC dependable traffic.

ninety percent
"ninety percent" Discussed on News Talk KOKC 1520

News Talk KOKC 1520

03:01 min | 1 year ago

"ninety percent" Discussed on News Talk KOKC 1520

"Ninety percent ninety percent did not show up caress. Okay. Well, well, now it's almost like Trump had a point. Of course, people you give people summons you give people papers to say, okay. Come back and we'll process your claim. And of course, they wouldn't show back up with you. No. If you if you really had risked, what you risked to get into this country. And you knew that you could say, I'm gonna claim asylum, and they would say, okay, we'll go on your way. Go live in America, come back at a later date to face a judge, if you're already willing to take the risk that you've taken, why in the world. Would you put yourself in danger of being deported later, of course, you know, and for anyone that says, well, it's breaking the law? Okay. If you're going five mile an hour over the speed limit what happens more times than not nothing. Yeah. Because, you know you five is fine. But man, if all of a sudden you started getting pulled over for one two mile an hour over you'd like gosh, dang, are you kidding me? You're pulled me over for that, when you let the gopher so long. I mean they're kids had soccer game scheduled on those days. They were supposed to show. Okay. You got to be a good dad. You know, that's true. Not show up, of course. I mean you're going to get away with whatever you can get away with is the point. Yes. Yes. Well, sure but and, and the longer this is allowed to go on the more you're going to have people showing up the more death. You're going to have at the southern border, the more problems, you're going to have because the resources are overwhelmed right now and nobody seems to be wanting to do anything. But if you're a political party say, yes, but it's also the more voters we will have for the future bra. Then what are you gonna do? Absolutely freak enough. And yes, yes, of course, if I hear one more person say, that's not who we are to. I'm going to put my face in a fan. I don't know who we are. What does that mean? I don't even know what his open borders. It's not who we are. We're not. Really? That's not who we are. Okay. So what we have the stats. Right. This is from the last year and a half or so. Yeah. It's been over eighteen months. Since administration ask for the legislative fixes. It would have prevented the current crisis in forty days since we asked for the emergency funding necessary to manage it in the last forty days, sixty thousand children, have entered into custody unaccompanied as part of family in its last month, as you noted, Mr Chairman, win Kennard a modern record of one hundred forty four thousand border crossers. It record day of over five thousand eight hundred mortar trough things in a single twenty four hour period in the largest single group, ever apprehended, our border, one thousand thirty six individuals. Though, k congress. And once again, thank you for failure. That's great..

Trump Mr Chairman America Kennard forty days twenty four hour eighteen months Ninety percent ninety percent
"ninety percent" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"ninety percent" Discussed on WLAC

"Eighty to ninety percent of that joint. How does that sound to you year from now without surgery and without crazy medications, you could be thriving and running and regarding joint tissue back to its original condition, and it's phenomenal. As if you have more questions on this. I'm doing to workshops on this in my office this month because I know you're going to have some questions here. This is not for everybody either. So if even if you have remote questions, I encourage you to come okay, we're doing two of these. So we're gonna do one Saturday November tenth at eleven thirty AM. And then we're going to do one Tuesday afternoon, November thirteen. Eighteenth at six thirty PM. So we've got one over lunchtime on Saturday and one in the evenings on Tuesday night. Okay. So this should be able to encompass almost everybody and get somebody at some point. You should be able to fit into one of those two classes an hour long each. There is absolutely zero cost for this. Okay. We're going to cater this. We're going to do food for you. You will be fad. You will not be hungry. I'm a pretty exciting guy. I love what I do. I'm high energy. This is not boring. I will answer your questions, and what it is. Everybody's got questions about it. Because this is I knew subject, and it's exciting, and it's exhilarating and it works. So well that nobody you sometimes you just go no way, doc. But remember this is here for you. I got so call us up. Now, if you want to take it to either one of these events so that is six one five four four five seven seven zero one that is four four or five seven seven zero one. So that is a free ticket. Tell him I wanna free tickets, and then you can tell them you want Saturday November tenth at eleven thirty AM or do you want to stay November thirteen at six thirty pm. And we're going to call you back..

ninety percent
"ninety percent" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"ninety percent" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"The world wants to see us get along we are the two great nuclear power ninety percent of the nuclear not a good thing it's a bad thing and i think we hopefully can do something about that because it's not a positive force the negative forest so we'll be talking about that a moment but and with that the world awaits and i look forward to our personal discussion which i think's gonna meet our whole you have quite a few representatives we all have a lot of questions and hopefully will come up with answers great to be with you i bet you heard it president trump and russia's president vladimir putin sitting down for the first time here the they're just exchanging pleasantries at this point and talking through translators and talking to the media in then just moments here they're going to be whisked away we're told and the two world leaders with only their translators so each each of them will have their own translator shaking hands right now and they're getting ready for their one on one meeting that'll be behind closed doors no cameras no recording no transcriptions no nothing we conceivably won't get a readout their meetings together but you can rest assured that the reporters will be asking them about what happened behind those closed doors during dare live joint news briefing which is coming up this this morning at nine fifty am you will hear that live here on news ninety six point five wdbo the reporters are now being shoved out of the room they're being asked to leave and then they'll have their.

trump russia vladimir putin president ninety percent
"ninety percent" Discussed on Rooster Teeth Podcast

Rooster Teeth Podcast

03:27 min | 2 years ago

"ninety percent" Discussed on Rooster Teeth Podcast

"Person the room for the ninety percent of them yeah my pup i'm amazed every everyone else who didn't raise their hand can't fucking i'm curious if you did not raise your hand can you raise your hand now right but you can still right everyone can it's a waste of time in the end if you think about it you end up having more time if you type quickly over the course of your life because you get through your typing a lot more quickly if you didn't take a class though are you can you definitely can definitely talk more quickly if you're taking a class all right teach me something from you'll typing class something i don't know about typing it's out that practice and repetition in on that i was on your website when i was fourteen but i'm sure i can still type faster than you can have a type off i will destroy you are we going to type before or after the office suck on which we have yet to you've heard me on them mechanical keyboard before you know i can tear it up well congratulations gus i'm over here trying to think of something that would be more boring than typing contest and i literally can't think of it five hundred episodes will still listening also i hate looking over and seeing you in that metal i don't know why feels like we just had a spelling bee or something math camp everything you do you took a class not everything have it's a normal thing to learn to type did you did you learn how to write how'd you do that learn learn language and stuff so i was told that so you've already passed the first day of typing class where the teacher the letter you're you're way ahead do you know the numbers too because that's a day to coming from the guy who doesn't wanna use twenty four hours because it's too hot to do max at twelve number i just want to use it because i'm american and this our way superior that's it country i was just talking about taking the trip over for london go into over london in london and we are talking about how it's handdrive but somebody who went from ireland to northern ireland and the only way they knew that they had changed countries they were expecting like a checkpoint or something like that but the only way they knew they hitching countries was they went from alama tres in ireland two miles and miles per hour in the uk so you guys just choose whatever you want basically you guys these miles per hour is in the uk i didn't know that either yeah i thought they would have been kilometers yeah it's a mess over that choose from so let's break brexit is not going to happen right it's definitely happening is it who's just resigned resigned because breakfasts political portion of the podcast theresa may's brexit outline was not hard enough she's aiming for a soft brexit and not a hard brexit so three ministers have resigned in protest over that how do you let your brexit brexit over easy i like.

twenty four hours ninety percent
"ninety percent" Discussed on Very Bad Wizards

Very Bad Wizards

04:41 min | 2 years ago

"ninety percent" Discussed on Very Bad Wizards

"Suicide rate with the state with the lowest rate what do you think nobly mass now massachusetts is low i i would say southern state with heavy black population so ninety percent of suicides in the us are going to white people right because you know it's a weird fighting the buzzer a big racial effect new jersey new york had lowest suicide rate the highest rates are out in you know western states not california so nevada while you'll be and so on what we think of that has to do with at least in part population density that new jersey is new york very densely populated as you go out west people are more spread out and so perhaps more socially isolated we also did not yet published so don't share this but i i don't think any wasn't says podcast noble data from new smartphone study where we look at people's calls and texts going in and out and we see that you know the less people are are getting sending texts the more likely they are thinking about suicides have more severe there seems to be something across multiple levels of this connectedness being protective against suicidal thinking this is there's a huge always this like very weird discomfort in talking about people who attempt suicides and some people really want to say it wasn't serious you know the whole cry for help thing but from what i read in the literature that you reviewed it seems as if suicide attempts you are pretty strong predictors of future suicide attempts there's obviously you never want to not take somebody's suicide attempt seriously i guess that's that's right right yeah so i would say you know anytime a person says they're suicidal should take it seriously any type person makes it suicide attempt you should think seriously but we don't have a good understanding when someone says there are suicidal which of those people are going to die by suicide and which ones aren't when sewing makes the suicide attempts which of those is going to be lethal which one isn't twothirds of people who die by suicide told someone added time they were thinking about suicide so you take it seriously eighty percent of people who die by suicide explicitly denied suicidal intention in their last communication before time which is contra rights most telling others they're going to kill themselves but most people are also saying i'm not gonna come itself it's hard to know which cases were in which instance should be really concerned and in which instance might be still concerned but less oh and the same suicide attempts so we didn't know a lot of the biggest effects that are out there like for for gender for age for race they've been there for years and years and we just don't have been standing of of wider there so you don't there's no good hypothesis for why the rates are much lower among black people their hypotheses are they good as african is among african american right it's not even among like i don't know what the rates are in africa but is it's african americans in the us a much lower suicide rate and i thought sees people tend to to offer our will his greater social connectedness grabby more tied into community and so so perceive more social support the suicide rate is high as among white men it really skyrockets older white men and the idea you mentioned tamla earlier isolation than i bought this is older white men and not be as naked and they retire from their jobs and you know they lost their social network another on their own longer providing and so you know perceive that they have no leading in life their verdict to others and so are more likely to die suicide do you work in terms of suicidal suicide prevention with individual people i know if are you still in clinical psychology are you working with patients i'm a licensed clinical psychologist so i i have the ability to see patients i haven't seen patient from purely clinical purposes in over ten years about a lot of the work that we do is in hospitals and with patient so we have studies running in local emergency rooms in psychiatric inpatient units where we are trying to the one way.

massachusetts eighty percent ninety percent ten years
"ninety percent" Discussed on AM 590 The Answer

AM 590 The Answer

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"ninety percent" Discussed on AM 590 The Answer

"And ninety percent i agree with you but when i read zachariah fourteen versus sixteen and on we not talk about the holidays that jesus cats and pull kept after jesus why is it that you don't why i don't believe in keeping the jewish state's yes yes because you know jesus kept it is kept the sabbath you just kept the holidays and poor kept it and roll artless let me just run out of time i want to try and give you some answer just because jesus did something does not mean it's a law for all christians jesus was also very jesus was also circumcised and there's nothing wrong if someone wants to be but the bible's pretty clear that it's not required for a christian to be circumcised paul you read pulses circumcision is nothing uncircumcised is nothing keeping the commandments is what matters so we believe that the ceremonial laws they were nailed to the cross and you read about that in colossians chapter to the bible tells us in second corinthians crisis are passover which is offered for us and so to keep the old testament feasts the whole different category than the ten commandments and i you know if someone wants to their fine but they shouldn't mandated for others they all pointed to jesus jesus came by bracing jesus it's much more than the feast we don't sacrifice lambs anymore all friends we're out of time if we didn't get your question tonight i apologize give us another chance god willing we're going to be back again next week.

paul zachariah ninety percent
"ninety percent" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

The No Film School Podcast

02:20 min | 2 years ago

"ninety percent" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

"Groman hanke wits and roman i apologize if that's not how you pronounce your last name there's a bunch of seasons ease and they are so i think it's a great guest romans awesome and we go in there to do the color grade at harbor i don't know how many days we had a pretty tight schedule again there's a lot in this movie and there's sort of like the the first feature template for how many days you have in the in the sound mix and the color and i was always fighting for more time because it's not again you have always different looks and you have always seen there's one hundred scenes in the movie and there's action and there's high speed in slow motion in multi format i should mention in addition to sony f fifty five which is ninety percent of the movie there is phantom flex four k and then a lot of the social media stuff or the mix tape stuff was either shot on an iphone with the film acc pro app or my samsung note for i think it was at the time and some cannon consumer camcorder and just webcam stuff in the film there's panasonic h vx mix tape footage in there there's a whole lot of different formats in their takes more time in the grade not to mention visual facts take more time in the grade too because you're being given elements that are right there's a look up table for what you shot in the movie and in that has to be applied in match on what you're being given from the visual effects plates that go on top of the screen because of one if the if the surrounding world isn't one color space and then the cell phone screen isn't another color space now you're having issues and there's a matt around it to make sure that works the law in the film to deal with and we were definitely rushing through the color great but the the best part about the color great is the sort of creative side and this was finally in our our opportunity to say not only to be shoot all the basketball with panavision primo primes and all the off the court stuff with much less precise panavision ultra speeds but we want to grade these things differently and then we want to transition between this two looks so we.

basketball samsung panavision ninety percent four k
"ninety percent" Discussed on The Chalene Show

The Chalene Show

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"ninety percent" Discussed on The Chalene Show

"Whatever that is in maybe you're addicted to food then you know that it's not always about hunger it's about this feeling and it becomes more mental than physical right like where you like i just don't feel like i can rest or that i'm going to be happy until i get my drug whatever that is so if you think about an addiction or craving in terms of an addiction and what we know about the brain is that it has neuro transmitters did you know though that fifty percent of your body's dopamine and you know it dopamine is it's that feeling that high that so many of us can become addicted to well okay now get this you know that dopamine and serotonin produced naturally in your body they should be produced naturally in your body they are responsible for regulating a lot of things like mood and happiness right like if you get too much dopamine or not enough dopamine you're going to experience mood swings the same is true of serotonin and most people think of these things happening in the brain but did you know that more than fifty percent of your body's dopamine is actually produced in your gut and ninety yeah ninety percent of your body's serotonin is produced in your gut and both dopamine and serotonin are known to have a direct correlation on regulating behaviors specifically behaviors that make us happy or behaviors that sued an addiction behaviors like eating in other words dopamine and serotonin when out of balance can create intense cravings food cravings and it all starts in your gut all of this is going to help you curb your own cravings i promise you this is all going to come together before the end of this podcast i give you my word.

dopamine fifty percent ninety percent
"ninety percent" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

TalkRadio 630 KHOW

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"ninety percent" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

"A lot easier we have a modest seasoned homebuyers and home sellers listening to the burien larry's show we know that from the attendance at the boot camps and we love that this wonderful it's good it's fitting so some of them have bought a home in exile monitor years tuesday qualify for down payment assistance of course say deal well i say of course i we know about but what i thought most of us associate those programmes with first time homebuyer it's not that at all anymore is no you don't have to be a first time home buyer tu utilize ninety percent of the programs that are out there so like ninety percent of what these loan a payment assistance broken down payment assistance programs zeal for instance chaffeur csak mma unlike larry always point so who or they are cousins or who who i am a consumer i have no idea what a cheque is is that what is i do i buy that at target or there is a very actually government assistance programs that give you the money or burien she the money give you a second mortgage there are so many aspects to downpayment assistance that it's important that you sit in you talk with your lender and you say this is where i can afford this is what i can do this is what i need this is what i have what you just demonstrated jodie with no rehearsal at all well i thank you for putting up with me is i have these questions as consumers have and let's see what did we just here mm answers there were pertinent to our questions that's who jobe years she is with finance of america you wanna give.

larry jodie burien ninety percent
"ninety percent" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"ninety percent" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"The blood flowing it's great to maintain a healthy heart rhythm fish oil is now being shown to have an incredible role in cognitive functioning we're talking about memory mood brain ageing infant development cell the cell communication focus fish oils will enhance or increase performance in the brain actually been shown to increase gray matter and it goes to work and only minutes when taken as a supplement new study showing immediate benefits studies showing longterm cognitive benefits they're looking at fish oil oil in just about every area of health joint health weight management prostate health skin health the list goes on and on the big issue for the average person out there in fact 9 out of ten of you out there right now are clinically deficient in e f azf as or called essential fatty acids and the two most essential fatty acids are the two that are found in fish oil dha and epa that's the business and the fish oil purity's fish oil products have three times more concentration of these two key fatty acids than standard fish oils these are called pharmaceutical grade fish oils meaning they're manufactured in one of only a handful of pharmaceutically licensed facilities right out in norway they make the best fish oil in the world ninety percent concentrations completely pure no mercury issues no fish taste no fish odors nothing like that just the incredible concentrated delivery system of dha and epa and if you're deficient in those two key fatty acids there's a a long list of symptoms that you could suffer from fatigue poor memory poor immunity certainly poor skin health dry skin obviously your cardiovascular health might be impaired you will potentially have mood issues very clear correlations now between mood problems and low blood levels of epa and dha circulatory concerns all of these things are associated with low omega three blood level most of us don't eat enough fish fish is really the only great source of these two compounds fish oil supplementation has now become the biggest category in the vitamin business because of all the benefits all the clinically proven benefits of epa and dha purity's really taken a leading role because we feel we have the.

norway dry skin epa ninety percent
"ninety percent" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

02:41 min | 2 years ago

"ninety percent" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"The memo potentially is what you could point out too a some kind of law in the end the fis accord or in that in the petitioning of those warrants you brought up something early ninety percent of those warrants bohm their stamped and they they move on they okay is that because they're backed up by something or is it because there has been a level of integrity that's automatically assigned to certain positions and the intelligence community or in any administration if this guy brings us this stuff it's legit exactly which we asked earlier uh we probably asked for the first time sometime last year and and that's the you know the idea that somebody that it wasn't the content of the dossier that was presented to the fis accord that convinced the fis accord that a warrant should be issued it was the person it was the pro the it was the petitioner whether it's based on the actual individual and their own integrity or just their position and it within that apartment all of these questions have to be answered about the process and then of course we can then go on to the motivation behind what was presented uh who presented it who presented it knowingly how it was all brought about i mean we note there are so many things that we know already without warrant you talked about earlier about army without the memo what we learned uh from the when would circa news unveiled some of those those documents the concerns of the visor court and how far they go back and what the previous administration did on october twenty six 2016 oh yeah uh yeah we uh we know that you told us this years ago but we are uh sorry are bad uh we didn't do that but uh yeah we're almost on here so that's this again this arrogance or that behavior continued after being a reprimanded by the fis courts or now we still don't doubt or is one of the specifics it it rise possibly to any kind of criminal behaviour or did it rise between 2011 in 2016 to criminal behaviour this is what we don't now this is why the.

fis courts fis ninety percent
"ninety percent" Discussed on The Ken Coleman Show

The Ken Coleman Show

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"ninety percent" Discussed on The Ken Coleman Show

"You can baby step your way into hiring some people think oh i need help therefore i have to hire a fulltime teammember well maybe or maybe you don't and there are so many baby steps between where you are today doing it yourself and having a fulltime team member a contract employ is an example that a temporary employee is an example that parttime and poet ploy and seasonal employ now these are all ways to gradually baby step your way into make sure you really do justify needing the help that they are going to create the roy for you in your business and making more than they cost you and then you can always increase the commitment you can increase the position to say hey you work contract but this is worked out really well i'd like to renegotiate and bringing on fulltime or parttimers taiwan um but i would say it really depends on your goals in your position so if you have the demand where you are maxed out you can't work a minute more you have the money the margin in your business finances to pay and other person and here's the kicker you'll love the surmonter leadership can you want to lead someone just because you're maxed out and even if you have the money doesn't mean you have the desire to lead another person and you can actually still grow your business and make more money through sources of passive income and you never hire another team member everyone doesn't want only people i don't know if you know this but ninety percent of women on businesses don't have team members many of them make that choice because they don't want to lead the team and that's okay but you need to think through because i think there's a myth out there to think okay if a higher people they're going to take all this responsibility off my plate yes and they add a layer of responsibility to it you're now responsible for paying in leading and training and hold accountable other people and that was a big thing so it really depends on her goals and she has the option to hire a contract person to kind of dipper toe in the water of leadership validate that she has the demand and our business and then could always increase that to fulltime that would be would our record.

ninety percent
"ninety percent" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"ninety percent" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"You know paying attention to what's going on paying attention to what comes in the mail especially as it relates to a lawsuit is of critical importance because it you know at this point and and it's not many placed turn we know she was obviously in a panic in the thought of losing a quarter your paycheck a something that was you know never even yours to begin with is is very important obviously getting that stopped it you know at this point as it was job one and now you know unfortunately the collection agency is going to end up getting sued because they broke the law the sued her on a debt that wasn't hers they knew that it wasn't her notified then that it wasn't she disputed it in that same way from the credit report it came off of the credit report they removed it it's just you know it's a little bit of a cluster as they would say but but over now paying attention to what comes in the mail as a result of these things is of critical importance and collection agencies it you know do soup people we know that and and one of the problems with this and i've mentioned this in the past with a collection agency lawsuits about ninety percent of the lawsuits that are filed or lost by consumers in court not because they show up and they fight and they lose but because they don't show up at all in it's a default judgement it's you know the equivalent of you know you played little league when you were a kid you know and and one team gets you know nine kids to show up into the team has five well you know the the team that has five they forfeit its it's the fault right they made they made put some players from the other team on inside out shirts and let everyone played for the sake of plan but this is what happens in in the real world and the adult world when you get sued and you don't show yep the other side wins doesn't matter feel sites wrong doesn't matter of if that debt which was the case in this case was a debt that never belong to me my question to our client is what happened with that lawsuit right when you were served what did you do that pay that that would have been the.

ninety percent
"ninety percent" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"ninety percent" Discussed on WCPT 820

"Ninety percent of what i want but because it's only ninety percent of what i want i'm vetoing the bill and because it gives the city chicago to some money which he defer called too much money uh which he called a bail out right which it simply was not in fact if you'll look you'll see the city chicago poor student is getting less than a lot of areas and illinois that are in republican areas he vetoed the bill out let me ask you just poses rhetorical question to you and to the listeners who gets ninety percent of what they wanted lie and who gets ninety percent of what they want in springfield nobody nobody gets ninety percent and yet when he vetoed the bill did he get involved in any discussions or any compromises earning to go she asians no and he threatened the very opening of schools now it turns out every cool in illinois every public school analyze going to open thank goodness but every public school in illinois particularly those in areas that rely on taxpayer dollars uh public dollars not property textile dollars but state dollars to stay open some of them were to close in a month to three all whole bunch of them would not have made it through the school year and we have a responsibility under the constitution of illinois to fund schools by try as we may to find that any republican votes to override the governor's veto we could not and so we embarked on what was necessary which was a compromise to make sure schools stayed open and i'm happy to talk to you about their criminal let me let me back up a little bit though clothes there were school superintendents across the state republican and democratic areas who didn't care about governor rounders feelings you didn't care about the politics they were ready for this legislature to override that veto because the need was for the children of elon knowing and and i and i and i in this fight this guy played down state against chicago divisive politics in the state of illinois let me even go farther there's not a single school superintendent that came forward who was not for the override of the.

chicago springfield illinois elon superintendent ninety percent Ninety percent
"ninety percent" Discussed on KELO

KELO

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"ninety percent" Discussed on KELO

"To ninety percent but i still still some white scratches in there and i'm just water to fight i stay come on the goal overly doing i'm again but i was sick i would yeah fighting don't be for the fourth that eighty career that could have been i mean it's it's certainly able to get all those scratches how and i was just thinking when you're doing i can't remember the the great that's but when i had been involved in refinished we did three grips almost like a would floor i'm and and i can't remember oh's an eighty you're a fifty were what we started with but yeah if you still have i'd i'm sure you don't remember but are those small scratches since scratches up pretty much where the deep ones or don't know yeah that it's hard to tell because there are so many on you know just over the years and just kind of you know ben i guess center improved the eighty ninety percent numb one or are discord again i should maybe they can be for what the eighty and then just what i worry down and even gone the a lighter and no one fifty maybe go top or honor yeah i would say on all the above this away i would address it okay i would look at it and and you can you have a hard time looking at this one i think because you just it all this work but look at it as this is now the scout our top that you have that now has some scratch isn't it okay and i think amigo de koreans website it'll have a progression of grit you should use because i'd be guessing and followed that process i would say you know you're going to have i'm i'm going to be pretty certain that they have a three step process so it's eighty one eighty three sixty or whatever but there's going to be a process and you don't you'll get about the pair you'll get a matter i can go deep aside that there's with that after that's sticking up for like i'm not gonna you're not where it out with the a's course the more the more grit you haven't the more you take off the more you know you run the risk of having a not real smooth yeah you know me.

eighty ninety percent ninety percent