35 Burst results for "Ninety Percent"

S6 E5 - How do I maximize my VA disability benefits? - burst 1

Courage to Fight Again

34:04 min | 11 hrs ago

S6 E5 - How do I maximize my VA disability benefits? - burst 1

"Hey just a quick before we get things kicked off here. I do want to let you know that. There is some strong language throughout this episode so listener discretion is advised. If there's five step process but there's indefinite general over overarching rules that she must consider but it is very procedural. It's they're not looking at compeer in the wall and analyzing while i'm analyzing the case law even the references to it. They're not opening pay. Everyone welcome to season six episode. Five of we served now. What it on this podcast. I do my very best to answer the questions. That veterans and their families are all ready asking my name is aaron perkins on the host of this show and the founder of courage to fight again an hour parent organization. I'm also the author of resolve. Which is a step by. Step guide for q the veteran to help you rediscover purpose meaning and passion and your post military life. Today's topic when the show is via a disability. What you need to do to submit it and not just what to do with. How do it bright outta appeal it. Should you appeal that well. That work all those things and more in today's show. I had a chance to sit down with a couple of really great guys who have done their homework on this. They do this kind of thing. Every single day. Greg colton and will simmons and we set down and chat or mojos that hour and a half i had to cut out unfortunately a lot of that conversation but the week to that full interview can click on the link in the show notes. And that'll take you to a form review request access to that whole uncut interview. And you could watch that in its entirety video interviewed. Please please take advantage of that. But for now i'm going to get out of the way. Make this intro as short and sweet as possible and let you hear the part of the show. The part of our conversation that i was able to stick into this episode here fleas. Enjoy my conversation with greg. Colton and wilson's check it out. Well i am here today with two honestly powerhouses in this field talking about increasing eight disability benefits. I'm here with gregg golden easy. Us navy veteran. This guy has twenty five twenty five years of sea level experience in financial technology compliance security investigation. All these things he's worked with numerous law firms used his own experience with the va to build something really cool. And i know he's gonna wanna talk about that more on this show but it's very good to have you on the show today greg. I'm also here with will simmons. He's a us army veteran former va founder. And managing attorney at simmons law. And i gotta tell you. I could not have asked for a more knowledgeable. Duo to answer veterans questions about va a disability benefits. So i want to just say to both you guys. Welcome to we serve now. What oh thank you very much Very happy to be here with you. you know my own experience of five years in the navy and thinking i came out and was was everything was great. You know always young. And i was happy in that aitken painted matter a whole lot. You know then. I got my late forties and early fifties and realized yeah does kind of hurt a little. Bit so yeah. I'm happy to be here with you and Look forward to the conversation. Will everybody will simmons Absolutely happy to talk to you today. About incentive Something near and dear to my heart. china passion play for me Having gone from ten percent disabled the a lump sum of less than eight hundred bucks and a holy shit. Now what am i gonna digress. My life to one hundred percent permanent total my law degree and my mba so There are programs out there to better your life and puts you in a position to dramatically. Change your life for the better and happy to talk about that too. That awesome awesome. Well let's start our conversation today guys with the transition out of the military. Maybe greg we can start with you. Tell me a bit more about your own transition story what you did right what you wish. You would have known things like that sure. Well you know when. I got out of those one clive in the military. I went through paramedic school in my last year in the military. So i was busy guy for you know. Fourteen sixteen months in the last days in the military. I was also going to civilian paramedic school. So i didn't sleep in as i got out. I worked as a paramedic and did fine. And then i realized that really didn't make a whole heck of a lot of money for all of the responsibilities that i had and that i wanted to do more but i wasn't quite sure how to do. And if i if. I known then what i know now. I would have in fact on to law school however i was a single parent of a two year old and a five year old and i did that for more than fifteen years and i can assure you that. There's nothing fun about going full time college and also trying to get You know to be a good parent and to provide the income necessary and i had that entrepreneurial spirit and i wanted to grow in in and have a big business that that was bringing the wealth i wanted and building it from my retirement and it just There wasn't a lot of of a maps out there. Do this do this do this do this. And through twenty five years of experience. I figured it out and and we've done well and i'm in. I'm thrilled with my past. The navy taught me so much about responsibility and accountability and and those are certainly tenants to be an entrepreneur. No question about it but there was no road map. There was no getting out of the military. Didn't here's your step plans being successful on your own It was it was really hard. So i'm glad to be your health. Talk about that in the journey Will tell us about you and your journey. It was definitely a different Yeah absolutely so i was. How do i even begin this When i joined the military. I joined in forty days. Forty five days before nine. Eleven and I was an architecture student at the time. Indiana national guard kind of do a my weekend. Warriors thing and In after nine. Eleven i i just couldn't physically sit there and design buildings that we're gonna be used to blow people and caused devastation. I wanted to change that. And so i went active duty and went to school and in sadly my entire time in the military was was spent in school one school to the next and in one of those schools. I got banged up. Injured prior to going getting acceptance to west point from enlisted to the academy so i went to west point for two years while i was there. Got my injury that i sustained during active duty. The kid exacerbated to the point that i could no longer sir and unceremoniously. I went home with a ten percent disability. Seven seven hundred eighty bucks or something like that. Night came from west point to sit on my parents. Couch i legitimately want to move. I didn't even know your podcast existed until last week but eyesight. Now what what the heck am i gonna do the rest of my life. I had zero idea. I went from the premier leadership institute in the world to not knowing. I didn't know what the heck did so I decided that applied at schools Just just keep the ball moving and Quickly went to indiana university. Got into the business. School in really just fell in love with entrepreneurship and i let that passion takeover You know my healing process from you. Know both physical and emotional fiercely all of it. I needed to mend myself after coming out of the military. And it's a hell of a won't talk to make that work but Anyway yeah i mean. The transition was man. I don i even describe the transition with it was so unbelievably difficult. It shouldn't need to in needed to be a conversation with a counselor commonality military that said you know. What do you want. do the rest of your life. This is the direction you go and go. Do it can i. It was a lot of soul searching to find. It ought to be honest. But now i've been imagined doing anything else. Couldn't imagine sitting my day any other way when i do and holy shit i get paid for it. I mean oh my god. That's the best. The best thing in the world i completely agree with you will on on that. Come out and you're just in this hot this this song in this hayes in your you have so little direction and even if you had a career counselor to try to talk to you. I don't know if it's just you don't know what you're doing in life because you're so mean you don't stand different concepts yet but man you're just lost wandering out there in and Yeah i grabbed me by accident eck and smack me up a little bit. I do right by sagar i absolutely. I think if there's one thing that i absolutely did right was i I jumped head head on into school and education and building might tool set. Because i wasn't relying solely on the things that i learned in the military to to be jumping off point. I realized i had a heck of a lot of catching up to do. And and that's where the education started for me And obviously i didn't quit. And in fact i found a way to make sure that i didn't have to pay for which was really you know that was. The true transition story was okay. Hang on a second Your bettering yourself. And you're getting somebody else. Pay the bill. This this is something should write a book about Because a lot of that cedeno that hidden. I mean that was one of my biggest struggles was coming out and being twenty five seven a two year old and a five year old that i was literally racing by myself and i was taking eighteen credit hours Getting my degree in biochemistry with minor in english lit. And i you know eighteen credit hours trying to take care to five hundred worked at the same time you know you can get loans and all the rest of it but if you don't have a good nation in what's possible. I had no idea. I was eligible for vote. Rehab you know. When i went i had gi bill and believe it or not. The college never applied the gi bill. I paid for everything out of my own. And even though i was eligible for the gi. Bill is all the time it's really sad is what it comes down to that. We have the capability had had. I recognized what was was there army. And i recognize these benefits. Were there than i could have slowed down and cast in my kids. Now's a roof over their head and not had trying to kill myself to get through it in a short period of time And it would have changed the trajectory of my life. I you know. I watched medical school. Go out the door. Because i couldn't do an internship and be a single parent and i couldn't do medical school and be a single parent. Too young kids had. I had those benefits and recognized that they were available to me. I could have done more. I could've figure things out that's not bad. I mean i. I love where i'm at today but it could have been so much easier. Had i known about all the benefits that are out there. Not just disability. But is as you're talking about. Well the both rehab and the gi bill and things don't get taken advantage of profitable now. I was just gonna say we. We actually just talked about that. I think it was in the last episode about gi bill and how you can leverage it with the Volk rehab well. Vr program now but Leverage that you know those two you know really great benefits to you get further education. Everything i know when i got out You know. I'm sitting in the end of the transition not unit but are transitioning out processing briefings. Right and they're telling us about the va. I knew zero about the. Va except that veterans. Go to the. Va that's really all. I knew about it and they and they told us like. Hey go to the hospital like on post go hospital get your medical records and take him upstairs. Because i had a v. Va office fort hood. They had a. Va office up. Like start for a said okay. Cool and so. I took them and they said okay. Cool we got your medical records like okay to me. It was just another task. I had. I literally had no idea that i was submitting my va. Disability claim audios. Like somebody told me to give you these. I guess this is how i get officially into the va and become a veteran so to speak at someone like your most crucial claim and there you are getting pushed by the system through their said that you're not on purpose fan. That was done on purpose for years and years. And call me a conspiracy theorist or whatever but the truth of the matter is this is mon mon Insurance company pan out benefits and they've got an minimize this as much as far as sharing and you know the the the the hard part was to that by the time i did my first what do you call that first. Compensation exam with the with the doctor or the nurse practitioner. Whatever she was I'm still in tough guy mode. I'm still like yeah. Her s- i'm good. I can you know. I'm sure i can just suck it up for a little while. I didn't realize it's supposed to go there and just be blatantly. Honest like holy crap. This hurts this hurts. This hurts and i can't do this anymore. And i just went. I was like no. This is fine. Do you have anything no. i'm fine. no i'm good. I had no. I d like there was no. There's no plan there's no. There's no one at that point in the transition to to really tell me. Hey this is what you should be doing. This is the level of scrutiny. That they're going to look at your. Va claim with and this is the level of of intensity you need to put to it when you submit it so we can talk about that a little bit like what. What was your guys. Experience with The va disability claims program. I i know with mine drag. Mom i was cormon and i and i was I was one of the supervisors of the ambulance service in and they will. Hospital orlando in the training center training center there and when i sat down out processing with personnel. I still to this day. Remember sitting down at that gray metal desk. And here's somebody that's not much older than me on the other side of the desk in. They're typing out my dvd fourteen. And they're asking me different questions on a checklist and you know how many problems not have any problems you know. Got both of my legs. I got both my arms You know i can hear you talking fine which goes exactly to the point. You're making aaron. And i don't think it was bravado on my side is much as not understanding to transition process and the purpose of the questions being asked as they apply to me in my future not to mention. Let's let's young. Were coming from the military where it's shut the hell up in suck it up. Well it's not only that pervasiveness in the military will absolutely but there's a pervasiveness in the medical side on top of that of we don't go to call unless we are on death's doorstep i had owns and you know i'm i'm urinating blood. I went to the er. I was terrified. I didn't know anything about kidney. Stones about point. I tell you when you look down. Ten o'clock at night and the toilet bowl is you're ready to go to bed. You see bright red blood. You're going to the er right now when they didn't ask me about that as i al processed. I didn't recognize that. The jimmy stones that my kidneys continued to put out than started in the military. Were something that should have been taking care of for in evaluating before on the disability side. And so you know as as a cormon. My knees hurt my back. Hurt dr a are you know my gird. hey dot. Can you write me. Something for this. Ensures tagamet for this there was never any documentation. It was me and my buddy. The doctor who wrote something if i wanted it or b who went to the cabinet and opened up and took out the a hundred older motrin. It took it myself just like i told my fellow shipmates to do or the. You know the marine corps guys that i worked with to do so i mean there was a pervasiveness medicine on top of. What will we say about. The pervasiveness of we have a missions. Do the military. Our mission is to get the dadgum job done. Every single time is not to be standing in sakala. Whine about how this hurts. Don't it well. i'm sorry. I didn't mean now. You know. i think it's for me. I was you know i dealt with something that i deal with. Almost every with almost every veteran client that deal with. It's it's it's a pervasive problem. That every better needs to know you're going to be under compensated for some of your disabilities and you're gonna be overcompensated for some disabilities and when you're coming out of service and you get med boarded for something you know for me. I was hellbent on getting my chest fix chest and backs back rated properly in even though chefs in particular the maximum benefit. I could ever get no matter how hard i tried and no matter what i did was ten percent no matter what so yourself the net absolutely ruined my military career. That is only gonna ever pay me ten percent. I'm sitting. you're banging my head against the wall for at least five years fighting that fight when there was literally nothing i could do. I had to learn the system the right way you gotta do end arounds and connect everything possible to this in order to make sure that your stated appropriately for the actual shit that you're dealing against off that took years to figure out when you don't have somebody holding your hand through the through the that's really true. I mean in my case. I knew the was there that can provides healthcare benefits. But i had a job. I had healthcare benefits. I didn't mean to be a and i correctly and incorrectly depending on how you look at it. I wanted that benefit to be more available my fellow brethren who actually needed it and couldn't make it private healthcare good private healthcare because the. Va does a as much as they get. Beaten up in the news over. they do. Try very hard. You've healthcare Chewed the veterans other. They can't do better but it's not because they're trying to do that. And so i wanted that that benefit of healthcare to be availed more available. My brother and i never looked into. It wasn't until we want to buy a house and property. You're in texas the realtor said. So what's your your disability rating. And which i giggled including talking about and she goes well with your own. You won't have a fun in fee in taxes. You will either of your property taxes reduced or abated completely if you have disability and i said i don't have any disability. I have both my legs and lower. Did she said idiot. I've known you long time. And i know your kidney stone started in service. I know you're back. Problems started from when you were. Emc girl medic in the military in the military. How can you not have this ability rating. And i wasn't out looking for the money. I was making okay money so i never went searching for those benefits and you know that makes that much more difficult woken. Tell you when you're now twenty. Five years ho service. And the g jared processes are really starting to kick in that began in the military to then through this this connection. It would be much easier on him and i if we get the veteran. Who's diagnosed in service with my backers a bit. You know. I have a strain. I have whatever that turns into severe Disabling degenerative disk disease or herniation in those sorts of things. It'd be so much easier if those that are ins new on the way out. I need a copy of my medical records. I need diagnosis in the military. I need imaging. Studies are is cat. Scans whatever to show this. Something started in the military. Because we can tie that together much more easily absolutely and i think with the be. Dd program the benefits Direct delivery program that the provides This new system. I'm helping quite a bit of Servicemembers transition out of the military the contact meteorology and they want help going through their initial claim. You know it's something that You know you can't charge for it's a you know it's a. It's a pro bono thing but the end of the day were taken bets. Soldiers vets who are transitioning out on their first you know their initial claim walking out of the room with a ninety percent. Walk on service. Now we're sitting here fighting on. You know that most important ten percent on the backside to get you to the hundred percent but we're a heck of a lot closer than that thirty percent of the twenty percent that you're getting when you're walking out of there like a hero like you and i are all of us did back at our generation you know there's various services connection is an art. It is not a science. It is an art all day long you. There are ways to stack disabilities on top of each other to maximize your coins. And if you do not know what you are doing you are doing it wrong here. What it takes strength or something. We said to will as a process that that is like everything else that all veterans doing the military. There's a procedure. Here's your procedure. One five and the average veteran doesn't understand it is a legal process. There are statutes. The congress is there are regulations that implement those statues that the va is put out is a legal process and it involves medicine so it's a combination of the legal side in the medical side and the average joe out there doesn't understand the law at that level and doesn't understand medicine at that level to connect all of this stuff together both legally and medically right and so let's dive into the details a little bit of that initial. Va disparity claim you know. Will you talk about it. Being an art and greg you talked about it being a legal proceeding. Is there even a three step. Five step nine step seventeen step process. That veterans can look at and say. Okay here's what i need to do. And here's how. I need to submit that claim. I don't know if there's a five step process but there's definite general over overarching rules that you must consider and And i think most important if i could say This is your kids Number one takeaway take notes Holy shit do. Not shotgun approach your. Va clays do not claim. Every single fingernail do not claim every single to- fungus. It's not gonna get you paid number one and number two. It's going to paint you in a corner so bad no attorney can get you out of just because you have dirty your file. You're talking about non attorneys who are adjudicating legal cases. These people do not practice law. They are practicing what they feel in. Our job is to show what disability looks like as plainly as possible so that we can either capitalize on that person's Motive to assist the veteran or To somehow paint over bad in a file because you absolutely are are leaving a trail of tears when you are claiming a shotgun approach to your to your veterans claims Number step is only claimed things that you are legally entitled to claim so it's going to require a little bit of research on your part to know what you're entitled to but that's that's my claim to everybody number one only clean things that you're entitled Because once you start claiming things that you're not entitled to the most important thing that you can not lose that you just gave away is your a benefit of the doubt that fifty percent and when it's as least as likely as not it's you're full of shit and you're claiming everything under the sun You just lost your fifty percent when it comes to the thing that's going to get you hundred percent. Yeah i think all take off on that in a little bit of of education. The vast majority of raiders as will can tell you are veterans. They want to help their fellow veterans. That's why they get that job. However the vast majority are not attorneys and just like we were talking about procedures few minutes ago. That's what they do. They have a manual called the young twenty one one and it is a procedure manual. They claim they step through the procedures. Won- jews hyperlink year like there for five six hyperlink there is. I wish it was. It's not to say there isn't some feeling in it. I mean there there is they are the trier of fact they get to be the arbitrator in adjudicate the claim but they do get that interpretation on their side in trying to decide. What's right and what's wrong is disconnected is not but it is very procedural. It's they're not looking at line compeer in the law analyzing walleye analyzing the case law even the references to it. They're not opening. No they are now providing a claim. You know it's transitioning to the other point. He made a providing claims that are not shotgun that you're entitled to. What does that mean rethinks. You have a current diagnosis. You have continuity of your condition meaning you. didn't you know. Get a bruise in boot camp. In your thirty years later. Trying to to say i have a problem. You have to be able to document the progression so he is a little bit different than degenerative disk disease that you may have had back pain and service but it didn't really degenerate until a certain point but then it kept getting worse and worse document how it kept getting worse and worse documented in a law whether it's a blood pressure log a headache log of that in law document the continuity of that condition and the third component of that is the next service. How did that. How did service relate to your claim. It didn't have to 'cause it. You could had a car accident while you were stationed florida. That caused an injury service. Puts you in florida. Therefore that disability the you weren't combat got shot and you got that disability but it's still considered service connected because the military had you stationed there so it's not causation. Its relation to. But if you don't have continuity veterans lose every time is you know. Oh i had this. Bigger hangnail. And i had this. This shotgun approach. Yes but that's not a chronic condition. It's a one time edition. Thank you so much will and greg and has been so great heavy on the show. This has been absolutely amazing. we will share some next steps with our audience in the show notes as we don't have time to cover today but this has been so so great guys. I cannot wait to publish this here in just a few days once we get through the very long process. Now because we've been on here for almost an hour and a half. Oh man what get through this very low process of you know post producing this but This has been really great. I know i've learned a lot. No doubt our listeners have learned a lot. Thank you guys so much for coming on the show really really enjoyed having you absolutely are i would not try and in a motor selves doll. But there's more information both in blogs articles that are on our websites on the im l. a. r. dot com their blogs articles about all his unstuffy also webinars that the media von normal basis. That has a lot of money on and join this martin. I'm ask questions where you're to help end. Try and elton's many veterans hand and your minds and you'll get them guys. Make yourselves better absolutely. I wish i wish. I got a website to promote them in the middle of fixing it right now so Sadly i've got a lotta latin or the we're working on that Were growing like crazy. This last year and a half. It's been unbelievable in worth To do a little self promotion where we're entirely. We're all veteran. were were all disabled vets. For all young where he's All worked on the inside. Su know how all the systems work so there we'd and accurately communicate with the that's how we run a different off practice than everybody else who's We what these guys who they're fighting against and there's a alive easier way that i hope you've enjoyed this segment of the interview. Now to listen to the full interview click on the lincoln the show notes fill out that form and we will email that link directly to you again until next time. Thanks for listening. We served now. What is a production of courage to fight again.

VA Greg Aaron Perkins Navy Greg Colton Will Simmons Gregg Golden Simmons Law Simmons Indiana National Guard Premier Leadership Institute Aitken Colton Us Army Sakala Cedeno
S6 E5 - How do I maximize my VA disability benefits? - burst 1

Courage to Fight Again

34:04 min | 11 hrs ago

S6 E5 - How do I maximize my VA disability benefits? - burst 1

"Hey just a quick before we get things kicked off here. I do want to let you know that. There is some strong language throughout this episode so listener discretion is advised. If there's five step process but there's indefinite general over overarching rules that she must consider but it is very procedural. It's they're not looking at compeer in the wall and analyzing while i'm analyzing the case law even the references to it. They're not opening pay. Everyone welcome to season six episode. Five of we served now. What it on this podcast. I do my very best to answer the questions. That veterans and their families are all ready asking my name is aaron perkins on the host of this show and the founder of courage to fight again an hour parent organization. I'm also the author of resolve. Which is a step by. Step guide for q the veteran to help you rediscover purpose meaning and passion and your post military life. Today's topic when the show is via a disability. What you need to do to submit it and not just what to do with. How do it bright outta appeal it. Should you appeal that well. That work all those things and more in today's show. I had a chance to sit down with a couple of really great guys who have done their homework on this. They do this kind of thing. Every single day. Greg colton and will simmons and we set down and chat or mojos that hour and a half i had to cut out unfortunately a lot of that conversation but the week to that full interview can click on the link in the show notes. And that'll take you to a form review request access to that whole uncut interview. And you could watch that in its entirety video interviewed. Please please take advantage of that. But for now i'm going to get out of the way. Make this intro as short and sweet as possible and let you hear the part of the show. The part of our conversation that i was able to stick into this episode here fleas. Enjoy my conversation with greg. Colton and wilson's check it out. Well i am here today with two honestly powerhouses in this field talking about increasing eight disability benefits. I'm here with gregg golden easy. Us navy veteran. This guy has twenty five twenty five years of sea level experience in financial technology compliance security investigation. All these things he's worked with numerous law firms used his own experience with the va to build something really cool. And i know he's gonna wanna talk about that more on this show but it's very good to have you on the show today greg. I'm also here with will simmons. He's a us army veteran former va founder. And managing attorney at simmons law. And i gotta tell you. I could not have asked for a more knowledgeable. Duo to answer veterans questions about va a disability benefits. So i want to just say to both you guys. Welcome to we serve now. What oh thank you very much Very happy to be here with you. you know my own experience of five years in the navy and thinking i came out and was was everything was great. You know always young. And i was happy in that aitken painted matter a whole lot. You know then. I got my late forties and early fifties and realized yeah does kind of hurt a little. Bit so yeah. I'm happy to be here with you and Look forward to the conversation. Will everybody will simmons Absolutely happy to talk to you today. About incentive Something near and dear to my heart. china passion play for me Having gone from ten percent disabled the a lump sum of less than eight hundred bucks and a holy shit. Now what am i gonna digress. My life to one hundred percent permanent total my law degree and my mba so There are programs out there to better your life and puts you in a position to dramatically. Change your life for the better and happy to talk about that too. That awesome awesome. Well let's start our conversation today guys with the transition out of the military. Maybe greg we can start with you. Tell me a bit more about your own transition story what you did right what you wish. You would have known things like that sure. Well you know when. I got out of those one clive in the military. I went through paramedic school in my last year in the military. So i was busy guy for you know. Fourteen sixteen months in the last days in the military. I was also going to civilian paramedic school. So i didn't sleep in as i got out. I worked as a paramedic and did fine. And then i realized that really didn't make a whole heck of a lot of money for all of the responsibilities that i had and that i wanted to do more but i wasn't quite sure how to do. And if i if. I known then what i know now. I would have in fact on to law school however i was a single parent of a two year old and a five year old and i did that for more than fifteen years and i can assure you that. There's nothing fun about going full time college and also trying to get You know to be a good parent and to provide the income necessary and i had that entrepreneurial spirit and i wanted to grow in in and have a big business that that was bringing the wealth i wanted and building it from my retirement and it just There wasn't a lot of of a maps out there. Do this do this do this do this. And through twenty five years of experience. I figured it out and and we've done well and i'm in. I'm thrilled with my past. The navy taught me so much about responsibility and accountability and and those are certainly tenants to be an entrepreneur. No question about it but there was no road map. There was no getting out of the military. Didn't here's your step plans being successful on your own It was it was really hard. So i'm glad to be your health. Talk about that in the journey Will tell us about you and your journey. It was definitely a different Yeah absolutely so i was. How do i even begin this When i joined the military. I joined in forty days. Forty five days before nine. Eleven and I was an architecture student at the time. Indiana national guard kind of do a my weekend. Warriors thing and In after nine. Eleven i i just couldn't physically sit there and design buildings that we're gonna be used to blow people and caused devastation. I wanted to change that. And so i went active duty and went to school and in sadly my entire time in the military was was spent in school one school to the next and in one of those schools. I got banged up. Injured prior to going getting acceptance to west point from enlisted to the academy so i went to west point for two years while i was there. Got my injury that i sustained during active duty. The kid exacerbated to the point that i could no longer sir and unceremoniously. I went home with a ten percent disability. Seven seven hundred eighty bucks or something like that. Night came from west point to sit on my parents. Couch i legitimately want to move. I didn't even know your podcast existed until last week but eyesight. Now what what the heck am i gonna do the rest of my life. I had zero idea. I went from the premier leadership institute in the world to not knowing. I didn't know what the heck did so I decided that applied at schools Just just keep the ball moving and Quickly went to indiana university. Got into the business. School in really just fell in love with entrepreneurship and i let that passion takeover You know my healing process from you. Know both physical and emotional fiercely all of it. I needed to mend myself after coming out of the military. And it's a hell of a won't talk to make that work but Anyway yeah i mean. The transition was man. I don i even describe the transition with it was so unbelievably difficult. It shouldn't need to in needed to be a conversation with a counselor commonality military that said you know. What do you want. do the rest of your life. This is the direction you go and go. Do it can i. It was a lot of soul searching to find. It ought to be honest. But now i've been imagined doing anything else. Couldn't imagine sitting my day any other way when i do and holy shit i get paid for it. I mean oh my god. That's the best. The best thing in the world i completely agree with you will on on that. Come out and you're just in this hot this this song in this hayes in your you have so little direction and even if you had a career counselor to try to talk to you. I don't know if it's just you don't know what you're doing in life because you're so mean you don't stand different concepts yet but man you're just lost wandering out there in and Yeah i grabbed me by accident eck and smack me up a little bit. I do right by sagar i absolutely. I think if there's one thing that i absolutely did right was i I jumped head head on into school and education and building might tool set. Because i wasn't relying solely on the things that i learned in the military to to be jumping off point. I realized i had a heck of a lot of catching up to do. And and that's where the education started for me And obviously i didn't quit. And in fact i found a way to make sure that i didn't have to pay for which was really you know that was. The true transition story was okay. Hang on a second Your bettering yourself. And you're getting somebody else. Pay the bill. This this is something should write a book about Because a lot of that cedeno that hidden. I mean that was one of my biggest struggles was coming out and being twenty five seven a two year old and a five year old that i was literally racing by myself and i was taking eighteen credit hours Getting my degree in biochemistry with minor in english lit. And i you know eighteen credit hours trying to take care to five hundred worked at the same time you know you can get loans and all the rest of it but if you don't have a good nation in what's possible. I had no idea. I was eligible for vote. Rehab you know. When i went i had gi bill and believe it or not. The college never applied the gi bill. I paid for everything out of my own. And even though i was eligible for the gi. Bill is all the time it's really sad is what it comes down to that. We have the capability had had. I recognized what was was there army. And i recognize these benefits. Were there than i could have slowed down and cast in my kids. Now's a roof over their head and not had trying to kill myself to get through it in a short period of time And it would have changed the trajectory of my life. I you know. I watched medical school. Go out the door. Because i couldn't do an internship and be a single parent and i couldn't do medical school and be a single parent. Too young kids had. I had those benefits and recognized that they were available to me. I could have done more. I could've figure things out that's not bad. I mean i. I love where i'm at today but it could have been so much easier. Had i known about all the benefits that are out there. Not just disability. But is as you're talking about. Well the both rehab and the gi bill and things don't get taken advantage of profitable now. I was just gonna say we. We actually just talked about that. I think it was in the last episode about gi bill and how you can leverage it with the Volk rehab well. Vr program now but Leverage that you know those two you know really great benefits to you get further education. Everything i know when i got out You know. I'm sitting in the end of the transition not unit but are transitioning out processing briefings. Right and they're telling us about the va. I knew zero about the. Va except that veterans. Go to the. Va that's really all. I knew about it and they and they told us like. Hey go to the hospital like on post go hospital get your medical records and take him upstairs. Because i had a v. Va office fort hood. They had a. Va office up. Like start for a said okay. Cool and so. I took them and they said okay. Cool we got your medical records like okay to me. It was just another task. I had. I literally had no idea that i was submitting my va. Disability claim audios. Like somebody told me to give you these. I guess this is how i get officially into the va and become a veteran so to speak at someone like your most crucial claim and there you are getting pushed by the system through their said that you're not on purpose fan. That was done on purpose for years and years. And call me a conspiracy theorist or whatever but the truth of the matter is this is mon mon Insurance company pan out benefits and they've got an minimize this as much as far as sharing and you know the the the the hard part was to that by the time i did my first what do you call that first. Compensation exam with the with the doctor or the nurse practitioner. Whatever she was I'm still in tough guy mode. I'm still like yeah. Her s- i'm good. I can you know. I'm sure i can just suck it up for a little while. I didn't realize it's supposed to go there and just be blatantly. Honest like holy crap. This hurts this hurts. This hurts and i can't do this anymore. And i just went. I was like no. This is fine. Do you have anything no. i'm fine. no i'm good. I had no. I d like there was no. There's no plan there's no. There's no one at that point in the transition to to really tell me. Hey this is what you should be doing. This is the level of scrutiny. That they're going to look at your. Va claim with and this is the level of of intensity you need to put to it when you submit it so we can talk about that a little bit like what. What was your guys. Experience with The va disability claims program. I i know with mine drag. Mom i was cormon and i and i was I was one of the supervisors of the ambulance service in and they will. Hospital orlando in the training center training center there and when i sat down out processing with personnel. I still to this day. Remember sitting down at that gray metal desk. And here's somebody that's not much older than me on the other side of the desk in. They're typing out my dvd fourteen. And they're asking me different questions on a checklist and you know how many problems not have any problems you know. Got both of my legs. I got both my arms You know i can hear you talking fine which goes exactly to the point. You're making aaron. And i don't think it was bravado on my side is much as not understanding to transition process and the purpose of the questions being asked as they apply to me in my future not to mention. Let's let's young. Were coming from the military where it's shut the hell up in suck it up. Well it's not only that pervasiveness in the military will absolutely but there's a pervasiveness in the medical side on top of that of we don't go to call unless we are on death's doorstep i had owns and you know i'm i'm urinating blood. I went to the er. I was terrified. I didn't know anything about kidney. Stones about point. I tell you when you look down. Ten o'clock at night and the toilet bowl is you're ready to go to bed. You see bright red blood. You're going to the er right now when they didn't ask me about that as i al processed. I didn't recognize that. The jimmy stones that my kidneys continued to put out than started in the military. Were something that should have been taking care of for in evaluating before on the disability side. And so you know as as a cormon. My knees hurt my back. Hurt dr a are you know my gird. hey dot. Can you write me. Something for this. Ensures tagamet for this there was never any documentation. It was me and my buddy. The doctor who wrote something if i wanted it or b who went to the cabinet and opened up and took out the a hundred older motrin. It took it myself just like i told my fellow shipmates to do or the. You know the marine corps guys that i worked with to do so i mean there was a pervasiveness medicine on top of. What will we say about. The pervasiveness of we have a missions. Do the military. Our mission is to get the dadgum job done. Every single time is not to be standing in sakala. Whine about how this hurts. Don't it well. i'm sorry. I didn't mean now. You know. i think it's for me. I was you know i dealt with something that i deal with. Almost every with almost every veteran client that deal with. It's it's it's a pervasive problem. That every better needs to know you're going to be under compensated for some of your disabilities and you're gonna be overcompensated for some disabilities and when you're coming out of service and you get med boarded for something you know for me. I was hellbent on getting my chest fix chest and backs back rated properly in even though chefs in particular the maximum benefit. I could ever get no matter how hard i tried and no matter what i did was ten percent no matter what so yourself the net absolutely ruined my military career. That is only gonna ever pay me ten percent. I'm sitting. you're banging my head against the wall for at least five years fighting that fight when there was literally nothing i could do. I had to learn the system the right way you gotta do end arounds and connect everything possible to this in order to make sure that your stated appropriately for the actual shit that you're dealing against off that took years to figure out when you don't have somebody holding your hand through the through the that's really true. I mean in my case. I knew the was there that can provides healthcare benefits. But i had a job. I had healthcare benefits. I didn't mean to be a and i correctly and incorrectly depending on how you look at it. I wanted that benefit to be more available my fellow brethren who actually needed it and couldn't make it private healthcare good private healthcare because the. Va does a as much as they get. Beaten up in the news over. they do. Try very hard. You've healthcare Chewed the veterans other. They can't do better but it's not because they're trying to do that. And so i wanted that that benefit of healthcare to be availed more available. My brother and i never looked into. It wasn't until we want to buy a house and property. You're in texas the realtor said. So what's your your disability rating. And which i giggled including talking about and she goes well with your own. You won't have a fun in fee in taxes. You will either of your property taxes reduced or abated completely if you have disability and i said i don't have any disability. I have both my legs and lower. Did she said idiot. I've known you long time. And i know your kidney stone started in service. I know you're back. Problems started from when you were. Emc girl medic in the military in the military. How can you not have this ability rating. And i wasn't out looking for the money. I was making okay money so i never went searching for those benefits and you know that makes that much more difficult woken. Tell you when you're now twenty. Five years ho service. And the g jared processes are really starting to kick in that began in the military to then through this this connection. It would be much easier on him and i if we get the veteran. Who's diagnosed in service with my backers a bit. You know. I have a strain. I have whatever that turns into severe Disabling degenerative disk disease or herniation in those sorts of things. It'd be so much easier if those that are ins new on the way out. I need a copy of my medical records. I need diagnosis in the military. I need imaging. Studies are is cat. Scans whatever to show this. Something started in the military. Because we can tie that together much more easily absolutely and i think with the be. Dd program the benefits Direct delivery program that the provides This new system. I'm helping quite a bit of Servicemembers transition out of the military the contact meteorology and they want help going through their initial claim. You know it's something that You know you can't charge for it's a you know it's a. It's a pro bono thing but the end of the day were taken bets. Soldiers vets who are transitioning out on their first you know their initial claim walking out of the room with a ninety percent. Walk on service. Now we're sitting here fighting on. You know that most important ten percent on the backside to get you to the hundred percent but we're a heck of a lot closer than that thirty percent of the twenty percent that you're getting when you're walking out of there like a hero like you and i are all of us did back at our generation you know there's various services connection is an art. It is not a science. It is an art all day long you. There are ways to stack disabilities on top of each other to maximize your coins. And if you do not know what you are doing you are doing it wrong here. What it takes strength or something. We said to will as a process that that is like everything else that all veterans doing the military. There's a procedure. Here's your procedure. One five and the average veteran doesn't understand it is a legal process. There are statutes. The congress is there are regulations that implement those statues that the va is put out is a legal process and it involves medicine so it's a combination of the legal side in the medical side and the average joe out there doesn't understand the law at that level and doesn't understand medicine at that level to connect all of this stuff together both legally and medically right and so let's dive into the details a little bit of that initial. Va disparity claim you know. Will you talk about it. Being an art and greg you talked about it being a legal proceeding. Is there even a three step. Five step nine step seventeen step process. That veterans can look at and say. Okay here's what i need to do. And here's how. I need to submit that claim. I don't know if there's a five step process but there's definite general over overarching rules that you must consider and And i think most important if i could say This is your kids Number one takeaway take notes Holy shit do. Not shotgun approach your. Va clays do not claim. Every single fingernail do not claim every single to- fungus. It's not gonna get you paid number one and number two. It's going to paint you in a corner so bad no attorney can get you out of just because you have dirty your file. You're talking about non attorneys who are adjudicating legal cases. These people do not practice law. They are practicing what they feel in. Our job is to show what disability looks like as plainly as possible so that we can either capitalize on that person's Motive to assist the veteran or To somehow paint over bad in a file because you absolutely are are leaving a trail of tears when you are claiming a shotgun approach to your to your veterans claims Number step is only claimed things that you are legally entitled to claim so it's going to require a little bit of research on your part to know what you're entitled to but that's that's my claim to everybody number one only clean things that you're entitled Because once you start claiming things that you're not entitled to the most important thing that you can not lose that you just gave away is your a benefit of the doubt that fifty percent and when it's as least as likely as not it's you're full of shit and you're claiming everything under the sun You just lost your fifty percent when it comes to the thing that's going to get you hundred percent. Yeah i think all take off on that in a little bit of of education. The vast majority of raiders as will can tell you are veterans. They want to help their fellow veterans. That's why they get that job. However the vast majority are not attorneys and just like we were talking about procedures few minutes ago. That's what they do. They have a manual called the young twenty one one and it is a procedure manual. They claim they step through the procedures. Won- jews hyperlink year like there for five six hyperlink there is. I wish it was. It's not to say there isn't some feeling in it. I mean there there is they are the trier of fact they get to be the arbitrator in adjudicate the claim but they do get that interpretation on their side in trying to decide. What's right and what's wrong is disconnected is not but it is very procedural. It's they're not looking at line compeer in the law analyzing walleye analyzing the case law even the references to it. They're not opening. No they are now providing a claim. You know it's transitioning to the other point. He made a providing claims that are not shotgun that you're entitled to. What does that mean rethinks. You have a current diagnosis. You have continuity of your condition meaning you. didn't you know. Get a bruise in boot camp. In your thirty years later. Trying to to say i have a problem. You have to be able to document the progression so he is a little bit different than degenerative disk disease that you may have had back pain and service but it didn't really degenerate until a certain point but then it kept getting worse and worse document how it kept getting worse and worse documented in a law whether it's a blood pressure log a headache log of that in law document the continuity of that condition and the third component of that is the next service. How did that. How did service relate to your claim. It didn't have to 'cause it. You could had a car accident while you were stationed florida. That caused an injury service. Puts you in florida. Therefore that disability the you weren't combat got shot and you got that disability but it's still considered service connected because the military had you stationed there so it's not causation. Its relation to. But if you don't have continuity veterans lose every time is you know. Oh i had this. Bigger hangnail. And i had this. This shotgun approach. Yes but that's not a chronic condition. It's a one time edition. Thank you so much will and greg and has been so great heavy on the show. This has been absolutely amazing. we will share some next steps with our audience in the show notes as we don't have time to cover today but this has been so so great guys. I cannot wait to publish this here in just a few days once we get through the very long process. Now because we've been on here for almost an hour and a half. Oh man what get through this very low process of you know post producing this but This has been really great. I know i've learned a lot. No doubt our listeners have learned a lot. Thank you guys so much for coming on the show really really enjoyed having you absolutely are i would not try and in a motor selves doll. But there's more information both in blogs articles that are on our websites on the im l. a. r. dot com their blogs articles about all his unstuffy also webinars that the media von normal basis. That has a lot of money on and join this martin. I'm ask questions where you're to help end. Try and elton's many veterans hand and your minds and you'll get them guys. Make yourselves better absolutely. I wish i wish. I got a website to promote them in the middle of fixing it right now so Sadly i've got a lotta latin or the we're working on that Were growing like crazy. This last year and a half. It's been unbelievable in worth To do a little self promotion where we're entirely. We're all veteran. were were all disabled vets. For all young where he's All worked on the inside. Su know how all the systems work so there we'd and accurately communicate with the that's how we run a different off practice than everybody else who's We what these guys who they're fighting against and there's a alive easier way that i hope you've enjoyed this segment of the interview. Now to listen to the full interview click on the lincoln the show notes fill out that form and we will email that link directly to you again until next time. Thanks for listening. We served now. What is a production of courage to fight again.

VA Greg Aaron Perkins Navy Greg Colton Will Simmons Gregg Golden Simmons Law Simmons Indiana National Guard Premier Leadership Institute Aitken Colton Us Army Sakala Cedeno
Johnson & Johnson's one-shot COVID vaccine approved by FDA

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:56 sec | 2 d ago

Johnson & Johnson's one-shot COVID vaccine approved by FDA

"Another vaccine is on the way. I'm mary core city fox news. The fda has just approved johnson and johnson's vaccine the first one that can be taken and only one dose. Johnson and johnson is expected to hit the ground quickly with its new covid nineteen vaccine by monday and the days following as many as four million doses could be shipped out to states putting a vaccine in the mix in the fight against covid nineteen clinical trial data shows. Johnson and johnson vaccine is about seventy two percents effective in the us and eighty six percent effective against severe cases of covid nineteen and the state. The vaccine doesn't quite offer as much protection as pfizer's turner's Which are both more than ninety percents effective but unlike its competitors j. and j. candidate only requires one shot and can be stored at much warmer temperatures. That's fox charles

Johnson Fox News FDA Pfizer Turner United States Fox Charles
Disney Plus Launches Star, A Streaming Outlet With More Grown-Up Fare

Android Central Podcast

07:36 min | 4 d ago

Disney Plus Launches Star, A Streaming Outlet With More Grown-Up Fare

"Knew that star was launching february twenty third which recording this yesterday. I am in canada. So i have access to it along with australia. New zealand parts of europe in singapore. So a few countries have this new section on their disney plus app. And it's a big deal. It's a big deal for me. Because we get all the wes anderson movies. It's a big deal for some other people because they get like twenty four and richard devine from window. Central is tweeting about how much she loves. Twenty four and jack bowers back baby and all that so. I just wanted to talk about where we are in terms of streaming. I know disney or marvel disney made a big bunch of big announcement this morning On when the next set of mcu in star wars shows will be released on disney plus. And then there's all the other services right. There's hbo max there's peacock there's discovery plus there's Paramount plus. I guess if you want to call that new and all this leads to confusion for people who just want to find the show to watch. So let's start with disney. They now have ninety five million subscribers. They are doing really really well. In terms of expansion into new countries. This new star lodge is a big deal so give us the t. l. Dr if you will of why star launched now and why. It's a big deal for people outside the us lawyers. It's always the lawyers. Yeah i say why did it launch now because this is when they could finally agree on. Okay here's where the contracts in so we can pick things up. Yeah the the. The really oversimplified version is this in the united states. We have hulu and hulu has basically everything. That's not under the five pillars of disney plus in those disney star. Wars marvel pixar in national geographic. Anything outside of that. you what. You're forgetting well. I was gonna say you're forgetting the pillar of twentieth century fox and twentieth century fox which is on hulu so so virtually anything outside of those five pillars in the. Us will find on hulu yes. They're exceptions the problem is hulu is not anywhere in the rest of the world. It's a decidedly american phenomenon and so disney needed a way to get all this content to everybody else in pay by the way they get to charge a little more for it too and that became star the way they first announced it they do it. What other earnings calls last year It was a little like just weird. I didn't even fully understand it at the time and it took a little while to sink in and then the developer not developer days there investor days into simmer november december whenever that was explained. It a little better really. It's just that simple if it's if it's content you can probably find on hulu here in the us it's going to be on star everywhere else. So given that disney twentieth century fox. They bought a. They bought that from fox which was previously a shareholder in hulu disney is now the majority shareholder of hulu. Why can't they just bring hulu to the rest of the world. What is that. I mean i don't know the brand well who owns. Who is the issue there although disney now entirely owns who if i correct right they finish tying their last pieces of hulu like two years ago for for all intents and purposes and there might be somebody with a little sliver but it it's a disney joint partially owned by comcast but they're buying it slowly over the next few years right. Yeah that was an agreement that was made a couple of years ago but But that's why comcast is okay. All of our stuff is leaving hulu at this date because we will no longer have a share in it and it's all going to peacock But yeah the reason that who didn't exist in all these other countries was media streaming lauzon like entertainment and streaming laws vary by country by country. It takes a lot of money to get the rights to a decent amount of shows in places other than the us so it was a matter of hulu. Didn't really have the time or the or the money to spend on investing in trying to build up a catalog and other countries the only other country that hulu is in outside of the united states is japan. And i'm not sure how much longer is going to be there since they're probably going to roll it into star but it's disney had the clout to roll around the disney also already had rights to a lot of these things or the released they in contracts and have the rights back right so it's just easier to bring a new sub domain umbrella underneath disney plus put all the twentieth century fox content in there called star and make it a separate kind of expansion for everybody who already has disney plus. All star is disney. Plus for grownups. It's harder to always you know proper phones not anymore. But that's a. That's a good analogy. Yeah all right. So we we have star. It's got all the twentieth century fox stuff. I think it's got more than that. That's also where a lot of like. Abc television stuff ended up. It's also where a bunch of other like indie stuff that disney and fox had bought up over the years. Anything fox searchlight his ended up in there. That's why it's it's a huge a collection of content. I'm amazed that they were able to get the international rights for those together quickly. Enough for star for the international launches. So the question. I have is is disney. Plus going to host new content in star is that is this where they're going to compete with netflix and hbo for adult viewership or are they still kind of not really aiming at that audience. No actually. I think you've got that right in. It's going to get a little weird because contents can vary by country but you can see that a little bit in the in the Release lists you get you get stuff that is decidedly more adult in there and and part of that is just from the content. That's coming out of those houses in the first place. If you look at specifically fx stuff here it's called fx. Hulu it is it is. I don't know that. I'd go so far as to say it's r rated but it's pretty damn close. Fx is yeah fx is definitely not child-friendly content like ninety percent of it like isn't fx. Were archer lives yeah. Fx is is archer archer archers ethics original sort of But yeah we look at the. The new exclusive stuff like fx on hulu like depths. Was one. I loved last year. I thought it was excellent right up until the end and it went. A little off the rails. Mrs america was on there as well. I mean there's stuff that the you wouldn't even otherwise necessarily see on cable but that they're streaming in that fashion. lets them. do you know just a little more than they. otherwise would have And it's not something that you would see on disney plus so this gives them another conduit for that stuff as well. Yeah and the brand new original content is also going. It's going to vary by the audience category. 'cause like anything that's marvel or star wars is not going to be listed under the star brand period. If it belongs to one of those temples it's still going to be disney plus branded and everything starts going to have the both labels at the bottom whenever they're advertising it but it's a matter of if we're going to do original series if it's pg or if it's pg thirteen below it'll probably be disney plus branded and if it's not pg thirteen disney and pg thirteen and up will probably be star

Hulu Disney Richard Devine Jack Bowers Marvel Disney Wars Marvel Pixar United States Disney Twentieth Century Fox Wes Anderson HBO Comcast Paramount Singapore New Zealand Confusion FOX Australia Europe Canada Abc Television
How to Fill a Few Seats At The Cinema? Rent Them to Gamers

Business Wars Daily

04:03 min | 5 d ago

How to Fill a Few Seats At The Cinema? Rent Them to Gamers

"March in the early throes of the coronavirus pandemic. We brought you a story about how a devastated movie theater industry found a glimmer of hope by turning to that old american classic the drive in movie theater that hope was short. Lived though as many drive ins were forced to close because of stay at home orders in some cities and cold weather and others. But now there's another small light at the end of the tunnel for an industry. That's been gutted by the pandemic this time. The story starts in south korea with movie theaters around the country closed or operating at a limited capacity and film releases largely on hold due to covid south korea's largest cinema chain. Cg v had a bright idea. the company started renting out. It's largely empty theaters to folks who might enjoy the use of a big screen and surround sound. You know video gamers gamers. Pay up to a hundred and thirty five. Us dollars to rent out a theater. Video games consoles and controllers not included and renters. Told the bbc that gaming in theaters pretty cool the sound quality is top notch and the graphics are almost lifelike turns out a. Us theater chain was already on the gaming in the theater trend after a gutting year for the cinema industry most us movie theaters shut down in march early on in the covid. Nineteen pandemic and while some chains opted to carefully reopen some locations. Last summer those were shuttered again. In the fall when cases spite put simply putting up two hundred people in a room while they sit on coke munch on popcorn at the screen. Well you know. It's just not safe so malka theaters which operates thirty-six cinemas in the southern. Us rolled out. Its malko select gaming at several locations. Last november up to twenty gamers can book a theater for one hundred and fifty dollars in play until they drop or until three hours is up. Whichever comes first. i'm thinking it might be. The latter malko also allows customers to book private film screenings for up to twenty people and sells food and beverage packages alongside the reynolds malkhaz twenty twenty revenue down ninety percent from twenty nineteen thanks to the covid nineteen pandemic and while renting out theaters to gamers film. Buffs is one way to avoid closing down completely. It's not making the chain much money. Karen melton malkhaz vice president and director of marketing told the bbc quote. It's gaining traction and becoming popular but nothing is adding to our profitability at this point on quote and that's the harsh reality for many theater chains. Amc theaters has spent much of the pandemic on the edge of bankruptcy after revenue fell ninety one percent. The chain managed to raise over nine hundred million in new equity and debt capital rap reported. The injection allows the chain defend off bankruptcy for now. Amc started renting private theatres last fall at around ninety nine dollars a pop for screenings though not for gaming although for an extra hundred bucks you can score a microphone to welcome your guests. Meanwhile screen rental from rival cinemark costs around one hundred dollars another chain. Alamo draft house offers private screening starting at three hundred dollars which includes tickets and food when you think of the average pre virus movie screening with around two hundred customers paying an average of a little over nine dollars for a ticket. That's eighteen hundred dollars that the theater brings end before even popping a single popcorn kernel at the often pricey concession stand private screenings and video game parties just can't cut into all that red still on the horizon for cinemas is. Well what is that. Hope as a million americans received the covid nineteen vaccination each day some theater chains are cautiously reopening at diminished capacity. Of course most amc theater locations are open in accordance with state and local guidelines and malka reopened several theaters in late january and earlier. This month of course strict guidelines are in place for one you can say goodbye to endless soda and popcorn refills and in theater service but still after the year that the cinema industry has had anything is better than nothing. Even if at anything involves a little. Mario kart

South Korea Reynolds Malkhaz Karen Melton Malkhaz BBC United States AMC Coke Alamo Draft House Cinemark Amc Theater Malka Mario Kart
I'm a feminist but... I might be a gay man trapped in a woman's body

The Guilty Feminist

01:01 min | Last week

I'm a feminist but... I might be a gay man trapped in a woman's body

"I'm a feminist. Bont in reality. I do think i am a gay man trapped inside a system i am i am. I am ninety percent game on on. I think it's probably somewhat genetic somewhat circumstantial. Because i had some years and occult and got shunned and things like that. So i was philip akin with the shunning that a lot of queer people have certainly had in that era. But i think for various reasons. I've ended up pretty much a gay man in assists woman's body and i'm hit my best friends are gay men often so i love you. Feminism and obviously. I wouldn't wish upon myself the oppression and marginalization and the horror of the eighties aids gay men of course however the joyful parts of being a gay man man man. I'd love to be a really handsome. gay sometimes. just go just give me a year and handsome. Gay man's body

Bont Philip Akin Aids
Jeremiah Owyang - Social Audio Analytics and Constituent Groups - Voicebot Podcast 195 - burst 07

The Voicebot Podcast

03:36 min | Last week

Jeremiah Owyang - Social Audio Analytics and Constituent Groups - Voicebot Podcast 195 - burst 07

"I want to come back to this idea social audio analytics and maybe the social audio management system this is going to be near and dear to the heart to a lot of the people who listen to this podcast because their space is accustomed to taking raw audio content transforming taxed analyzing it Actually putting it against other services and potentially returning information. So i wanted to explore that with you. A little bit we. We haven't seen that publicly yet and any of these social audio spaces you expect. People are actually doing it today. How do you think that that's going to play out. Do you expect this to be predominantly the platforms are going to try to control it and use this as a feature and trying to block other people or do you think it's mostly going to be third parties coming in and somehow getting the feed whether through direct. Api or from a rogue angle and then being able to provide that data to people who are interested in it. Yes so. I think there's maybe four constituent groups to think about here. Let's try to break this down. And i don't have all the answers here. I'm speculating so there are the platforms themselves twitter spaces and clubhouse and facebook. I think they are so twitter. Spaces already has real time voice to text translation into english which is on the lower third for some speakers. It's a three second delay about ninety percent accuracy. Ucla right yes okay. The second group would be the Government agencies and spies They're probably already doing it. But we'll never know. Group will be the traditional social media Analytics companies like salesforce and adobe salesforce acquired radian six In two thousand eleven ten years ago For three hundred million and their job was to grab all of the text based social media content. That was being produced at a rapid pace and make insights out of it and sell to brands for seven. Figure deals annually on what is being set in their market and give them analysis on share voice sentiment byproduct by region by country by network by individual by they produce. I was involved heavily with that industry now. The fourth group the fourth group i think is the one that will deploy so i. I don't think salesforce. And adobe wanna risk breaking the terms of service against twitter and risk that access that they already have in their. Api I don't think they wanna be scraping that content and also risk privacy concerns especially when a democratic administration is very concerned about privacy when it comes to social media as well as on the right hand side of the government as well they're even more concerned about suppression of so i don't think those big giant tech companies Adobe salesforce and oracle to do an ibm want to do that. So i think it's gonna be the fourth category which will be roguish punkish startups that are going to rip the content off with botts at a recording. The information then conduct voice to text analysis. And then do the other things that i already mentioned with sentiment in mining and influence analysis network. So i think it's going to be done under the covers of darkness fair enough and do you believe that the botts will be listed as users and basically some sort of fake user or are they going to be attached to a real users use. The system could be both. I mean there are. People are reporting data out of social audio by using. You know i rig systems and connecting to their ipod to other systems as well and just you know exporting that data. That's already happening.

Salesforce Twitter Adobe Radian Ucla Facebook Government Botts Oracle IBM
Oil spill from passing ship blackens Israel's Mediterranean shoreline

NPR News Now

00:51 sec | Last week

Oil spill from passing ship blackens Israel's Mediterranean shoreline

"Caused massive damages to israel's shoreline and a search is on for the ship responsible for the spill which began last week in a winter storm. Npr's daniel estrin has more. The israeli national parks authority says. It's the biggest ecological disaster. Israel has seen in recent years with long lasting effects for years to come officials say nearly ninety percent of israel's beaches have suffered various levels of damage from israel's northern border with lebanon. All the way south close to the gaza strip sea turtles were covered in black tar. Israeli and european authorities are investigating what happened officials. Believe ships spilled tens or hundreds of tons of oil beyond israel's territorial waters israeli soldiers and hundreds of volunteers from the public are helping with cleanup efforts. Daniel estrin npr news jerusalem. Five years after then

Israel Daniel Estrin Israeli National Parks Authori Gaza Strip Sea NPR Lebanon Jerusalem
When NOT To Perform a Psychic Reading

Learn Astrology with Mary English

03:39 min | Last week

When NOT To Perform a Psychic Reading

"To talk about strategy. Why would a tool to you about this week is when not to read for someone so during the metro met greater. Everything was comes up. I've had two incidences over this back to grade. And i want to talk to you about them. As their classic examples of when note to read for someone or even went of a refund so incident number one lady are no not for a long time normally meet in the flesh. leaves long distance away from where i live and now i'm working on she book to session. She phoned to book as it's great book trade and and she put Which includes histology and it was a ninety percent last reading psychic readers. This occupation so i wouldn Or she i think she had gold ashtray. Was that called off moins. Working did this particular lady have cau- yes she did. So it's a sark region and i'm vessel a. I decided to give some extra time because of what was going on and and it cut me show is particularly is husband had died just before christmas amorini february two months ago and she was also concerned about her elderly mother who she was now caring for so kante too much because obviously patient confidentiality but just an outline and it became evident in the reading that she wasn't enjoying the waiting and be. I could tell that she was too stressed to make sense of anything. I was telling her and she was repeating what i had told her. The last time. I'd seen which was a few years ago about what was happening for the moment. And what happened. And so i said you know. I feel a little than this marshall. Westerville little impotent. Hither everything that. I'm telling you isn't resonating for you. I'm going to refund you. We're going to stop right now. Just consult rating. I'm going to refund you. And i want you to come back when you feel a bit better and so i just stopped recording deleted. Coding went to my app Cancel the stuck. Cancelled left the session in refunded omar candidate one or the other but i definitely reform deter straightaway. So the money. She'd paid for the session just refunded it now. The reason i did that is because when somebody is in the bigger emotional state of any description mental emotional state then not going to hear what you say. And they're going to selectively here. What you said. And i realized at i was region for i was getting into dangerous territory because the nature of the things move talking about. It wasn't anything anything other than the husband died and that her mother was unwell. And i can tell while we were talking because this is a phone reading. It wasn't on skype so there was no telephone megyn to somebody that doesn't happen that And i could tell the. Dvd wasn't benefits in her and what she actually need

Kante Westerville Marshall Omar Megyn Skype
Associate Editor at Game Informer Magazine, Kyle Hilliard, on The State Of VR Right Now

Techmeme Ride Home

05:12 min | Last week

Associate Editor at Game Informer Magazine, Kyle Hilliard, on The State Of VR Right Now

"What is the gaming industry and by that. I mostly mean developers. What what does the industry think about developing and just the market is it clearly a sliver compared to other things. But do they think like. It's maybe on the cusp of being something. That is interesting. Yeah so. I don't. I don't have numbers obviously but like so to get into my background and just in case your listeners. Don't really know me. I wrote for game informer magazine for eight years as there for a long time until i was we had like right when right when the oculus rift came out like we had an issue like vr issue. Right and we. I remember getting test kits into the office and playing early games and stuff like that and at that time we kind of went in with the mindset of like okay. Well this is like a new. This dobie xbox. They'll be nintendo and they'll be oculus that's kind of how we felt about it like it would just be this other competitive corner of video gaming and now all this time later which is a. We're going to maybe like four or five. Six years later feel like it has found its spot and like you said like beat sabre. Which is the fantastic i played. I almost literally played every day. I love beat sabre Has sold gangbusters There's like i think facebook released a blog that said something like thought they had five other. Vr titles at it sold a million copies which was cool. And so where we're at now is it's interesting because it's not what i thought it would be. Where would be like just as competitive as like the switch. You know what i mean. It would just be another platform that you know hardcore gamers like me would have in their home but it's increasingly kind of become this like weird separate thing that even non gamers are kind of getting into like i've i'm like i've heard of people have met people who aren't really big video gamers but they do have a headset. And they like vr because it does have kind of like what you were talking about earlier. It has practical applications beyond video games. You know you can kind of around the world and see things. I use it to work out like. That's my main exercise purpose lately as i tried to play oculus like at least once a day for thirty minutes played exercise games and beat because they're very movement centered so it's it's closer to like the mobile market. I feel like we're there's a lot of disparate things floating around that are trying to find their niche as opposed to like someone like me. Who's like i have an xbox series s x. I have a playstation five and i got my oculus rift like that's not super common. It's almost treated as like you know gamers like it but it's not like it's not it's more than a video game machine you know. It's like ninety percent of video game machine but like that ten percent is really lifting it up and people are finding that way. Well so this is gets into my sort of disappointment with what i what is out there. Obviously this would have been one of the times where. Vr should have had its breakthrough moment like a lot of things including video conferencing of had The pandemic times now. There are apps on their from companies. That are clearly the eight even says. It's like we'll use this to remote work with your teams and you can all meet in a space and you know whiteboard together and you know. Even you know sketch things and and in a three d. environment especially frano architects and things like that. I can see that but none of it's very good that i've sampled like i would think there'd be more of that. There's also there's also a handful of things that are like we'll watch a movie with your friends and you go into a virtual Sort of movie theater and by the way. All of the like netflix and and prime video they all have apps that essentially you can watch anything you want on a virtual big screen which is very nice for lying down in bed and stuff. But i'm wondering if like they missed a trick like there is nothing that was like a breakthrough during pandemic times for just being virtually with other people. Yeah right when the pandemic started. I remember i think it was fun. Mation was selling tickets to go. Watch a cure with an audience in oculus and i love cura is like one of my favorite movies and i like we are but even i was like i look at that mike. I want to do that like yeah. The resolution on the headset just isn't there like it's basically like shoving a like a switch. Well let me take them. It's better than a switch screen. It's like it's a higher resolution switch green but like it. Just can't look as good as your desktop for work or your four k tv in your living room. It's just it's like you have to accept that limitation in order to participate like i saw this Which i had never seen until today. Maybe because you are emailing me about vr. Google is like oh let's send this guy. vr ads but it was like it was like. Yeah what will like. Let's let's have a workspace. You can have as many monitors as you want and you can have a virtual keyboard. Obviously it'll be but there'll be a virtual keyboard and it's like that's a really interesting idea. But i'm not gonna take that resolution downgrade in visuals. I'm not going to be able to see that. Virtual computer monitor. As well as i can't if i'm just looking at my standard computer monitor and it's not worth that dive and

Nintendo Facebook Netflix Cura Mike Google
January 2021 Income Report For Entrepreneurs on Fire

Entrepreneur on FIRE

00:43 sec | Last week

January 2021 Income Report For Entrepreneurs on Fire

"J. l. d. here with the january twenty twenty one income report for entrepreneurs on fire. Our gross income for january was a hundred and ninety eight thousand six hundred fifty seven dollars our toll expenses. Were just a hair over. Twenty one k for total net profits in january of one hundred seventy seven thousand five hundred and ninety nine dollars for a crazy close difference between january and december of negative one thousand and twelve dollars in giving us a percentage of net profit over gross revenue of eighty nine percent. We almost that magical in almost unhittable ninety percent plus mark which we've only done twice in eight years

150 Deals at Age 22 by Putting Relationships Over Profit with Cole Ruud-Johnson

BiggerPockets Real Estate Podcast

04:42 min | Last week

150 Deals at Age 22 by Putting Relationships Over Profit with Cole Ruud-Johnson

"Goal. Welcome to the bigger pockets. Podcast man good to have you in the shed. Thanks for having me on. Manus good to be in person how to marry. Yeah so tell us a little bit about how you got into the wide world of investing. Actually before you do that. how old are you. i'm two and three quarters coming. Twenty-three in okay. So that's that's a very young age and and give us a quick before you got how how you got into real estate. Give us a quick look under standing. What do you do. what's your thing. I like sesame. I want to set the table comparable to know like like what you have right now. Can what your business looks like. And then we'll go into how you got into that. So how in depth. You'll get your just give us a broad overview of your current business so broad overview right now we have an off market direct sell the company and renton washington's way of an office two thousand square feet tales managers guys a whole team and right. Now we're doing ninety percent wholesale so to sell on those deals other investors in ten percent flips. We have three flipped going on right now bound so transitioning into that slowly but still primarily also okay and then tell approximately like much volume in a year. Do you do like the last year. Like what have you. What have you done like what kind of like red zone in the past year We do about six to eight transactions a month in the seattle area so before that we were in four different states that number was higher but right now back down six to eight and just comfy and of the three main counties around seattle so whatever that comes out to seventy eighty deals year. Wow okay. that's crazy. I did like i think three wholesales once in a in a five year period and that was i was impressed with myself. I'm still. let's go into how you got started. How'd you get in your young guy with that. Most people be jealous. Jealous of unwind. Yes oh growing up Grew up in real estate family. So my my great grandma started a brokerage called rude realty which one of the first broken all the seattle are. You d you d okay. Sounds yeah okay. are you d. that was abroad. No i've been practicing your name wrong. The rude we've hung out a number of times we've poker together. Yeah exactly and i called you root rud time just let it slide. Tell people the next time it's back to rhodes. He pronounces a lot of words wrong. But don't feel bad rough instead a roof magazine and stop produce anything on accident so she was kind of the she much my whole family in real estate so then my grandparents they did a lot of commercial stuff in seattle. They own a bunch of buildings. She was an agent and then my mom got in the business. She became an agent In my brother followed her growing up Anytime i wanted to make money or be involved at all. I was you know going with her to open houses but he signs out for the open houses and i was a staging she got a staging company on the side. So i was moving furniture around so it's always around the business in some way so transitioning to when i actually wanted to make make money nationally going real estate license at eighteen nineteen left school after semester and i absolutely hated hated hated or being a residential real estate and switch brokerages three times. Of course it was the brokers those a problem of course. I showed up to every sales meeting that with everyone else. That was not my fault shift. Have you still. I sat on facebook a couple of hours a day. Scrolled through few post. How they cold called my sphere which eighteen or nineteen. Yeah they tell you to cocoa your spirits. You're graduating high school soon. How's that how's that looking. You wanna buy a house yeah so it was brutal It was a was making like a couple hundred bucks a month. Just doing like showings rather agents. And then the third brokerage. I moved to was an off market company where they were doing every tuesday night. They'd bring a bunch of investors and and they they would show them what was going to be coming to auction that week and they'd pretty much done go to auction That's what they're running their company so i learned stats out of the business and how they are creating their own inventory at unlike. That seems like something. I can get behind because people don't care what my ages then eighteen nineteen twenty rather than seattle. Sono miller house. Yeah someone's going on here. Sorry and then couple nights later. Like i've learned about wholesaling. Buddy ra- applebee's semi origin story appetizers. We shared how good there's wings it was until i survived college. Right there and We're on instagram. And this desire to young guys in the area had posted this forty thousand dollar check on her instagram. And so i was like. What are these guys doing of they can do. We can do it kind of thing to the next day. He came to my My parents house is living our parents at the time and Up and they're pretty much. Attic started cold calling end for the next three months before we got a deal. We're just sitting up in that room cocoa every single day.

Seattle Rude Realty Manus Washington Sono Miller Buddy Ra Facebook Applebee
VP Kamala Harris believes teachers must be prioritized for COVID-19 vaccinations

NBC Nightly News

03:01 min | Last week

VP Kamala Harris believes teachers must be prioritized for COVID-19 vaccinations

"We're back now with vice president. Khama harris on the battle to reopen schools. Does she agree with the. Cdc's plan and do teachers need to be vaccinated. I she spoke one on one with savannah. Guthrie let's talk about schools at. We got a lot of parents watching right now. The cdc few days ago finally put out some long awaited guidance on how schools could safely reopen. But here's the thing. They tied it directly to the rate of infection in any given community. And i'm gonna put a map up because if schools were to follow that right now. Ninety percent of the county's ninety percent of the schools would not be able to the cdc's own metric. Was it a mistake for the cdc to connect school reopening to how much infection. There isn't a community. Well let's i say this that in the last four weeks schools are opening every week more schools are opening and it is because we are supplementing. What needs to happen around the vaccinations getting into two states. But also because folks are. We're seeing progress. But what about that. Cdc guidance then that's that's the question. Well so here's the thing. What the cdc. What they have recommended are exactly that recommendations about how to reopen safely if they've been closed how to stay open if they'd been opened and so the recommendations. What again needs to happen. Around social distancing handwashing mask wearing but the point is that we all want our kids to get back to school as quickly as possible and safely as possible. The cdc has said it is not a prerequisite for teachers to be vaccinated for them to go back to school but many teachers are of going back to school. Can you reassure teachers. Who are listening right now that it is safe for them to go back to school even if they are not vaccinated if these public health measures like distancing and masks are being implemented so first of all let me just say this and the president has said it and we're all really clear. Teachers should be priority. Teachers should be a priority. I believe that twenty two states. I believe have prioritized but each is in terms of stating 'cause it's safe for them well. I think that we have to decide if we can put in place safe measures. This is why it's so important. We pass the american rescue plan. It's going to be safe for schools to reopen when we can get our schools. The infrastructure needs like helping them with their ventilation systems helping them create social distancing with with barriers. The things that are necessary to get them back opening a safe way so savannah after that interview. I understand late today. The white house clarified. That's right it's spokesperson. Said the vice president and the president agree. Vaccinations are not a requirement for teachers to return. It is the white preference that teachers get priority but that lester is up to the

CDC Khama Harris Guthrie Savannah White House Lester
Could more women-led tech companies make the internet less awful?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:09 min | Last week

Could more women-led tech companies make the internet less awful?

"The dating app. Fumbles wiped right on. Its ipo last week. Making it ceo whitney wolfe heard the youngest female ceo take a public. Not only that. But eight of the company's eleven board members also identify as women and that has more than just symbolic power bumble has styled itself as a women first dating app. The platform encourages them to send the first message. It also moderates the photos that are on profiles and the ones sent through direct messages so users won't get any revealing content. They didn't ask for sarah. Kunst is the managing director of cleo capital and she advised about on its venture capital arm. I asked her if all that translates into more women on the app then men. No you know it's funny. They're more men. Because it turns out that when you empower women and when you give people dignity and equity in the relationships that it helps everybody. It's not just women. And how much of that do you think is because of the type of content moderation. It does not allowing photos of shirtless men are worse. I think that's a huge part of it right when you think. Oh maybe maybe. I'll go meet the love of my life today on a dating app and instead you see something that you really did not want to see. It's disappointing and and it makes you less excited to do it and so bumble hs done a ton of work in making sure that you know people are who they say. They are with things like photo verification to that. They're not doing creepy mean rude things and if they do than than the the companies taking a really firm stance that it's really kind of one strike and you're out with everything from people who want to body shame to people who are sending lewd images that's not okay and certainly the legislation that they've been able to work on and push through in the state of texas to make sending a picture that exposes yourself illegal. It makes so much sense. Those are the kinds of things that are so obvious. In retrospect but but nobody in the dating app world and the online dating world had taken that stand yet. And i think it's pretty clear from the market debut. There's a lot of success in helping people. Just treat each other better given that success. Do you think you'll see more companies kind of taking that same path of moderation. I mean i think this is happening right. I really kinda everywhere right now in our world online when you look at everything from twitter's tussles with the last president to the facebook review board. They're starting to be this understanding that you can't be the wild west right you build roads in the real world but then you put up speed limit. I think we're seeing that happen. A lot. Right now in the digital world and i think companies like bumble. That had the vision that had the real kind of character to stand up and say. This isn't okay. we're not doing it. I think that really really matters. And so that. I think is something that we're going to see more of less of and it certainly hasn't escaped my notice that it seems like women led companies in particular are really leaning that way. Now this good news for bumble comes on the heels of what looks like bad news. For other women lead tech companies with so many facets of life the pandemic seems to have exacerbated inequities including with venture funding the share venture capital dollars for companies founded by women declined last year to point three percent according to crunch base. So what happened. And what do you think needs to happen at change. That i mean the good news is it is a frustrating problem with very simple solution. The solution is now fund more women and fund more more women. Because you either fundamentally believe that somehow men are just so much naturally better at running companies and raising money that they take ninety percent plus of all venture funding. Or you think that there is some inequity and there's a problem to be solved there and you know the reason to solve. It isn't the the social mission. It's because if you are leaving that much money on the table by not funding women. Then you're not gonna make as much money as you should and you know it is your job as a investor as a venture capital investor to make money and so by only looking at a sliver of the population. You know that's a lot of money you're not making and that's not good. So that's the solution. Why is it a problem. I mean the reason for this problem is always the same. The reasons never change. it's always. it's always sexism. It's always biased. It's always you know the concept of hama awfully of sane. Every human is generally drawn to people who remind them of themselves. And when you don't have enough diversity on the investing side of the table. You're very unlikely to see that diversity take place on the founder side you know. Bumble obviously had a really successful. Ipo do you think that will make a difference. You know in all of the stuff that you're talking about you know the success of stumbles ipo. And and being the youngest woman take a company. Public reminds me of this excessive katrina lake in such fix a few years back. And it's it is certainly helping to move that needle right if if you can't be what you can't see shortly after fumbles. Ipo came to marquette allison from from the ceo of our modern help. You know a company. That recently became a a unicorn. You have said openly that that she looks at that is is a real inspiration to think about you. Know how do we. How do we get an even younger woman to show her company next now. They're looking at that. I think that that deeply matter is built on the founder side and on the investor side. Because when you start to see that it becomes a lot easier of the next time a woman walks in your office building a company that you might not one hundred percent understand because it's not fixing a personal pain point for you and say well i mean if there's been all this success in the market and this person seems interesting incredible. Why wouldn't they be next. And so i think it's incredibly incredibly important.

Whitney Wolfe Cleo Capital Kunst Sarah Texas Twitter Facebook Katrina Lake Marquette Allison Bumble
Astra approved! But do we have a boomer problem?

Coronacast

03:45 min | 2 weeks ago

Astra approved! But do we have a boomer problem?

"We finally got the therapeutic goods administration approval of the oxford university astrazeneca vaccine in australia. Which was something that was hinted that was coming soon last week. By paul kelly Yesterday it happened. Norman fine print. Well i'll give you a big print. I look at the big print is this is a really good decision. Untrustworthy decision on the part of the therapeutic goods administration. It creates a political problem for the government. But it's it's it's a sound decision based on the evidence so they've they've maintained an independent position so it's really quite impressive so the first thing is that they have said and i think we've presaged this on corona cast. They've said that the ideal dozy jr is twelve weeks. Apart at standard does of the astro vaccine twelve weeks apart now the evidence is from the clinical trials and presumably they got more since they published trial in december. Is that if you give the vaccine three months apart. Then you get ninety percent. Efficacy in terms of preventing symptoms mild to severe symptoms of covid nineteen and it gives one hundred percent protection against severe disease so in fact the dosage reaching recommended brings it up to the performance of the pfizer vaccine. When you say a standard dice is that the original standardise that was always being used or is that the half dose that was used in one of the parts of the trial that we were talking about las g. no martin standing is to standard doses according to the trial not the accidental. Half does that was given as part of the british trial so it's two standard doses three months apart. And if we're able to do that there's a problem with that. By the way is that you can get variance coming in as a long time to wait in new things can happen with the virus but it does give you that high degree of efficacy which is great news. The detail here is that they had a problem with their trial is that they were late. In recruiting people over sixty five and the trials do not have a large number of people aged over sixty five who actually got infected so they can't actually give you a number for the efficacy of the vaccine in the over sixty five they can give you the average but not offer the over sixty five themselves now. What they say is that in the an. It's true in the laboratory testing over sixty-five very strong antibody response. Which makes you think that you will get efficacy in new over sixty five. But they've got no proof of it in trials yet that will emerge as time goes on and there in lies the problem for the government because in the light of that they probably you know and they're going to go with the evidence people over sixty five shoud get the pfizer vaccine to be absolutely sure. It's highly likely astra one will work in over sixty five. It'll certainly prevent severe disease. You would imagine. But there's no solid evidence of that. At this time you'd be going on the antibodies on the on the flip side of that just so too negative about all this. Is that when you bring on a new vaccine into the market like influenza vaccines or others which is already being tested. Randomized trials you do tend to go on whether or not the having effective antibody response and rely on that so it's not unusual to rely on an antibody response. It's just that the moment we'd like to know that it does prevent disease. So that's the story what we'd be. What's been approved. As a ninety percent effective vaccine and therefore it will prevent severe disease and be really good at malta mortar disease and maybe prevent transmission because one of the few vaccines to be tested for transmission.

Dozy Jr Paul Kelly Oxford University Pfizer Norman Australia Martin Astra Influenza Malta
How To Improve Your Landings

Stuck Mic AvCast – An Aviation Podcast About Learning to Fly, Living to Fly, & Loving to Fly

05:41 min | 2 weeks ago

How To Improve Your Landings

"I have with me shawn moody bill. English tom freak in victoria neuvelle and also as a bonus. We're going to discuss suggestions and techniques for our flight. Instructors use while teaching landings guys. Welcome back to the show especially victoria. It's been a little while. I know you've been incredibly busy. So i want to say a special. Welcome back to you. Thank you excited to be back. Yeah you've been working so hard on. I guess people are busy buying airplanes. From what i've heard. Yeah it's actually an interesting time for aviation. I know a lot of us are not as lucky in not flying as much. But there's a quite a few people that i think find themselves working at home and actually have the time to complete a lifelong dream of learning to fly adding another rating. Or thank. You know this is a great time to buy an aircraft since not. Many people are flying the airlines. So it's definitely been interesting in busy. It's a great way to social distance. Buying your own airplane. We highly recommend it A matter of fact. I was lucky enough to go out with Bill english to do some landings Too long ago and had a blast going over the things that We talk about when we're teaching landings and that's kind of what the whole topic is here. Tonight we had a wonderful wonderful time but Anyway so let's move right into it as far as talking about the landings and some techniques and how to improve your landings at. Let's talk a little bit about why landings are important and i love to use this quote. It's in the airplane. Flying handbook which i think is really cool. And if you get a chance to get a copy for yourself. I have a hard copy. And also downloadable a. dot gov for free but in the flying handbook. They actually mentioned that over. Forty five percent of all general aviation accidents occur during approach and landing phases of flight. Over ninety percent of those cases were pilot related. Loss of control was also contributing factor. In thirty three percent of those cases so ninety percent of the causes of those actions were actually piloting related and loss of control is thirty three percent of those cases. So we're gonna talk a little bit about your lands improving your landings and i talk about approaches and landings because we're gonna kinda back up and and realize that a lot of that Landing has to do with how you set up for the approach. So let's talk first about learning how to land I again. I feel that one of the most important things and get some input from the other folks to is. It's important to go to some of the publications and read a little bit about it but you actually have to go out there and do it. We have to actually practice. But when we're when we're actually starting out. I do feel that one of the best sources is the faa publications. We're gonna get into some other things but there's some wonderful things out there learning how to land. There's many different ways on how to land in. These suggestions are going to be as you know talking to instructors etc but one of the things i likened it to and some other folks feedback as you know when you're learning how to land. It's it's a lot. Like i found when i was learning how to drive and anticipating turns and how to write as you're driving faster and a highway. Where do you actually place your is and how. How do you view that highway in front you. In our case it's going to be the runway. It really is like that well again. Like i said joining me today as tom. Tom i know we actually got a chance to go out there and do some landings. It really is something. That i think is very important is starting off your career in your aviation. Life is learning how to land And so one of the things. I'd like tom if you could comment a little. Because i know you do a lot of flight. Instructing is you know basically what do you see. As far as the best ways to learn how to land as far as as the students that you see that progress the quickest and are is there one thing i don't know if there's any one given thing but you know i mean learning how to land the plane. Is you know when when the first time i walked into a flight school. There was a sign that was on. The wall would said the second the most exhilarating or the second most exhilarating data in a guy's life is Flying an airplane. The first is when he lands. You know so i mean it's it's one of those things that you know. It's the hardest learn flying the airplane. That's the easy part putting it back on the ground. That's the hard part. And that's what we learn. We take students out and we learn the maneuvers. I we learn how to do slow flight. We learn how to do power off stalls. Power on installs. You know how to do. S turns how to do turns around and point out of those things are to teach us how to control that airplane when we get in the pattern and get ready to put that plane back on the ground again. How it's gonna feel what it's gonna do. We take it to its extremes. You know and that's what we're trying to learn. You know so. The people that i see that. Learn how to land the plane. The quickest or the ones that learn all of those basic rudimentary maneuvers. The quickest you know somebody who understands the The vanessa what it is to control that airplane. They're the ones that are most likely to put it on the ground. The best you know and and you're right you know A good landing starts in the pattern. I mean it's going to start long before you even make it to that airport. It's it's setting the thing up and getting completely set up so that you are in the best place possible to put it on the ground and you know one of the things i teach. All the time is that landings should be a surprise. You know that at any given time you're ready to go full throttle and go around and keep that airplane flying until you can put yourself back in that perfect position again to put that plane back on the ground.

Shawn Moody Tom Freak Victoria TOM FAA Bill Vanessa
New antitrust legislation would check the power of tech giants

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

02:43 min | 2 weeks ago

New antitrust legislation would check the power of tech giants

"Arguably the biggest problem with big tech. Is you know the bigness. A few giant companies gobble up their competition owned the digital advertising and web hosting markets control the information ecosystem and sometimes control the distribution of their own competition so far though these worries haven't led to regulation now democratic senator amy klobuchar who leads the senate subcommittee on antitrust introduced a bill intended to check the power of tech. Giant's it focuses mostly on acquisitions to prevent huge companies from buying potential competitors and it would force companies that control more fifty percent of a single market to prove that an acquisition would not reduce competition. Here's senator club shar. We all know that misinformation has been rampant on social media and it is greatly. Set us back. But there's another much more insidious problem and that is that any company that was starting to come and do cool things got bought and i think maybe you could look at this legislation as basically a reply to mark zuckerberg's email when he said about they're looking at what's happened instagram. These businesses are nascent but the networks established. The brands are already meaningful. And get this. And if they grow to a large scale they could be very disruptive to us. Google has ninety percent market share. Right now they are literally taking on a government of a major country in australia when the prime minister says hey we're gonna start making you guys pay for content and they say back. No you're not we're going to withdraw from your market and you'll have no search engine and a big part of this. It sounds like is funding these agencies right making sure that the ftc which is charged with a lot of this actually has some teeth exactly and of a numbers can't lie the ftc in nineteen eighty at one thousand seven hundred nineteen employees by twenty eighteen down to one thousand one hundred two. You cannot take on the biggest companies. The world has ever known trillion dollar companies with bandaids and duct tape. And that's why senator grassley has join me on a portion of this bill to up the fees on megamerger so we can put in over one hundred million dollars to each agency so they can actually do their job and this isn't just about tech. There's only to cat food. Companies that control most of the market. There's only two online travel agencies. You think you're getting all their choices. Go look at. Who owns them. And as john oliver closed in a segment on his. And if this all makes you wanna die good luck. Because the casket market is controlled by three companies which actually sadly no one purchase the other. It's down to

Amy Klobuchar Mark Zuckerberg FTC Senate Giant Senator Grassley Google Australia John Oliver
CDC recommends double masks to protect against COVID-19

Start Here

05:08 min | 2 weeks ago

CDC recommends double masks to protect against COVID-19

"New cdc report showing that tightly fitted masks. Make a difference and that a tightly fitted with a cloth mask over it. Double masking as it's called is also effective. A new study from the cdc suggested that double masking putting a second mask on you. That fits really tightly actually can protect you from covid better than a single mask. Let's get some info on this. We got someone who ran the cdc at one point. Dr richard besser was the former acting director there. He now leads. The robert wood johnson foundation. Dr beshir can we start with the practical stuff. What is the current recommendation at this point when it comes to wearing masks like how many do we need. What type do we need right. Well brad at the highest level. The recommendation is that everybody should be wearing masks. Glad that we have a reasonable thinking governor who has lifted the mandate. I don't wear a mask unless i am made to. I see so many people. Today who aren't wearing any mask and even wearing a single mask will reduce the likelihood that if you have cohen you'll spread to someone else and will reduce the chances that if someone near you has cova that you will breathing in and get infected date ever used from cdc today underscore the importance the importance of wearing a mask correctly and the cdc's said in their study and this and this was published in the wr which is their journal of record is is that wearing cloth mask on top of a surgical mask or or the procedure massive. They're the same thing will improve the fit. And that's what this is about when when you put a mask on. There are gaps around the side of that masks. There may be gaps around around your nose but if you wear a surgical mask that has a wire at the top and you pinch it on your nose and you put a cloth mask on top of that. It will ensure that there aren't the the leakages sides of that surgical. The surgical does a lot of the work. And then the cloth is there to prosecute against your mouth exactly because if you just put on a surgical mask with with doing anything else. What you're going to find is that it doesn't fit tightly on the sides there big gaps there but that cloth mask fits properly over over. Your ears will will hold that surgical mask in in place and in their studies found that this reduced the amount of particles by by over ninety percent well fitting mast provided the greatest performance Blocking emitted aerosols and exposure of aerosols to the receiver. They cautioned though that. Don't take those numbers and say and assume they're going to try to you because they tested one type of cloth mask and one type of surgical mask but the general principle is a good one. That wearing a cloth mask over surgical mask will help. They give some other alternatives as well. This includes wearing a mask with the most mold. Fire nodding the ear loops on your mass. You cannot decides of a surgical mask and if you go to their website they'll show you what they mean by that so that it will fit better on the sides of your face or you can you can purchase. What's called a mask fitter which is like a plastic or nylon device. That goes over your mask that that helps it fit on. your face. looks the neck gaiter. That were always saying. They're not great mask but this looks like a neck gaiter. It's good for that yes some of our navigators and some are like a plastic frame that holds it on your face but the takeaway from it is is really this that wearing a mask as good but making sure it fits properly is is really important and will increase the benefits that you get well so okay so i understand that scientific conclusions change with more data right. I get that but just so we're clear like can we walk this back early on. Cdc was saying hey. We have no reason to recommend mask. We haven't seen any in july of last year. Data does come in. They they change it to what we do recommend mask. It's really there to protect other. People won't necessarily protect you. Then november comes around like actually does protect you. We started to see that data and now a full year after covid reaches american shores. Say oh actually. I just want us to masks are actually really good. Like is that counterproductive at one point when when we feel like the guidance shifts month after month well you know one of the advantages. We have now that we didn't have last year is that we're having cd scientists out front explaining what they're learning. How someone who are tired of hearing about masks as well as tired about of wearing masks can be cumbersome they can be inconvenient mass growing is not to make your life mess comfortable and we're seeing our political leaders stand up and say the exact same thing next few months masks not vaccines are the best defense against cove nineteen and hopefully that will allow people to take this in and say you know. I've been hearing a lot about these. These strains of the virus these mutants that can spread more easily. There's actually something i can do until you get vaccinated. Hopefully that will help people you know not feel like no one knows what they're doing but i feel like people providing answers as this is changing and that is a good thing. We can adapt ever ever so slightly if we need to.

CDC Dr Richard Besser Dr Beshir Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Cohen Brad
"ninety percent" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

02:43 min | 1 year ago

"ninety percent" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Ninety percent of my guys of strain guys would be a guy one on one and I think that's what the thing is done with put him in a position where you know to maybe have a direct angle with if you can at apart and then say Hey we want to try to get you matched up one on one and we believe if we can do that we got a great opportunity and Ethan has taken advantage of because of his F. because of his attitude and his belief in that what a blocked punt can do is change the momentum of the game if and when he gets credit for the one he had it easy you he'll be number one in the country in that category we got back at basketball coming up tonight at seven against Alabama a and M. football team is on the road at U. S. F. this Saturday night at seven and you'll hear those games on newsradio seven hundred WLW reason and I C. B. T. S. one seven hundred WLW the home of the Bearcats traffic and weather news radio seven hundred W. L. Cincinnati school shooting in southern California with the twelve o'clock afford a bright combs breaking now police are at Saugus high school in Santa Clarita right now massive complex in northern LA Callie's being cleared after shooter entered one of the buildings there earlier this morning at this point there's word to three people have been hurt the latest now from ABC news a search continues for a suspect after a shooting at a California high school today it happened at Saugus high school in Santa Clarita in Los Angeles county authorities now say at least one person was shot and at least three others injured ABC's Alex stone on scene the copters are circling they don't know where they suspect there they've got another ambulance now coming out they got all the walk through all of the hills around here rounded by police they're looking for the suspect right now ABC's Alex stone schools in the district about an hour north west of Los Angeles remained on lockdown and student sheltering in place Los Angeles deputy Eric Ortiz a lock down we stand that results in responding now I can confirm how many people or how many victims we have down at this moment medic crews are on scene at that high school campus barricades have been set up police are also also asking parents and the public to remain clear of that area I'm Michelle Franzen ABC news latest traffic and weather together from the you see how traffic center you see health our clinical research and scientific discoveries allow us to offer new treatments for epilepsy patients learn more you see health dot com slash epilepsy highways are in pretty good shape right now I'm not seen any major problems or delays the heaviest as north bound seventy one heading towards Red Bank in the construction barrels crews are working with the wreck on.

seven hundred W Ninety percent
"ninety percent" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

03:44 min | 1 year ago

"ninety percent" Discussed on 790 KABC

"State is paying ninety percent the taxes is that how that works at at it to be but think about this used to be that let's set it in a sense it is a black were relatively affordable in California luxuries were expensive the necessities of life in this station it is state are now becoming unaffordable for so many when you add fuel that's a Buck and a half more than the cross the state line when you are told to use less water but you're gonna pay a whole lot more for it when you don't use electricity we're gonna make time a day so you can't use your electricity at four o'clock five six o'clock when you get home you need to get ready for the next day and put our food this is a state that I hope is beginning to wake up your listings and people up and down the state of California need to ask themselves are we in a good place and then ask what what who did this to us and might I submit its one party dictatorial rule and I keep saying to folks look give folks like me got me comments it it it folks like you others cut common sense individuals who want to look out to the people of California and and do the right thing give others a chance to govern and if we mess it up the way that the the the the the way that the Democrats have been thrown out but folks are in California Ellen they got it got it take back they really must take back their state or for that if you imagine how what it is today if this park continues another decade or longer I hi we're we're just I hope that that that people begin to recognize it and ask I don't see I don't see how they can get around it and slid because only ends we spent on the high speed rail you know about that every every is reminded every time they pull into a gas station everyone is reminded every time they drive out on to the disk decaying the functional roads every time they ask us for more one is reminded when they look to the right or the left and see the the the humanitarian catastrophe on the streets I mean this is all failed policy doctor do I I got this I I want to make sure I'm clear about this and that but there are symptoms of what one party political rule looks like and the decade that that it brings and you can point to Venezuela as of the example I'm not suggesting California's heading that way although there are symptoms here that if we pay attention to it number one eight eight eight eight a protected elite ruling class that does things to others but those things don't happen to them a a a have and have not decided he a high poverty rate for way too many a a a declining opportunity economy and what have flight I mean people are leaving California they're crossing borders to get out I would do I would do anything to get out here yeah I would if I could I would immediately but I'm certain that trencher but Jim where if you wanna hang out we go across the break here I got a call and the last week whatever you want to do whatever you want to Jim Patterson is here with us eight hundred two two two five two two two is a fun every apology I'm at Jim Patterson five five nine on Twitter it's midday live hymns of ninety KABC KBC dependable traffic.

ninety percent
"ninety percent" Discussed on News Talk KOKC 1520

News Talk KOKC 1520

03:01 min | 1 year ago

"ninety percent" Discussed on News Talk KOKC 1520

"Ninety percent ninety percent did not show up caress. Okay. Well, well, now it's almost like Trump had a point. Of course, people you give people summons you give people papers to say, okay. Come back and we'll process your claim. And of course, they wouldn't show back up with you. No. If you if you really had risked, what you risked to get into this country. And you knew that you could say, I'm gonna claim asylum, and they would say, okay, we'll go on your way. Go live in America, come back at a later date to face a judge, if you're already willing to take the risk that you've taken, why in the world. Would you put yourself in danger of being deported later, of course, you know, and for anyone that says, well, it's breaking the law? Okay. If you're going five mile an hour over the speed limit what happens more times than not nothing. Yeah. Because, you know you five is fine. But man, if all of a sudden you started getting pulled over for one two mile an hour over you'd like gosh, dang, are you kidding me? You're pulled me over for that, when you let the gopher so long. I mean they're kids had soccer game scheduled on those days. They were supposed to show. Okay. You got to be a good dad. You know, that's true. Not show up, of course. I mean you're going to get away with whatever you can get away with is the point. Yes. Yes. Well, sure but and, and the longer this is allowed to go on the more you're going to have people showing up the more death. You're going to have at the southern border, the more problems, you're going to have because the resources are overwhelmed right now and nobody seems to be wanting to do anything. But if you're a political party say, yes, but it's also the more voters we will have for the future bra. Then what are you gonna do? Absolutely freak enough. And yes, yes, of course, if I hear one more person say, that's not who we are to. I'm going to put my face in a fan. I don't know who we are. What does that mean? I don't even know what his open borders. It's not who we are. We're not. Really? That's not who we are. Okay. So what we have the stats. Right. This is from the last year and a half or so. Yeah. It's been over eighteen months. Since administration ask for the legislative fixes. It would have prevented the current crisis in forty days since we asked for the emergency funding necessary to manage it in the last forty days, sixty thousand children, have entered into custody unaccompanied as part of family in its last month, as you noted, Mr Chairman, win Kennard a modern record of one hundred forty four thousand border crossers. It record day of over five thousand eight hundred mortar trough things in a single twenty four hour period in the largest single group, ever apprehended, our border, one thousand thirty six individuals. Though, k congress. And once again, thank you for failure. That's great..

Trump Mr Chairman America Kennard forty days twenty four hour eighteen months Ninety percent ninety percent
"ninety percent" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"ninety percent" Discussed on WLAC

"Eighty to ninety percent of that joint. How does that sound to you year from now without surgery and without crazy medications, you could be thriving and running and regarding joint tissue back to its original condition, and it's phenomenal. As if you have more questions on this. I'm doing to workshops on this in my office this month because I know you're going to have some questions here. This is not for everybody either. So if even if you have remote questions, I encourage you to come okay, we're doing two of these. So we're gonna do one Saturday November tenth at eleven thirty AM. And then we're going to do one Tuesday afternoon, November thirteen. Eighteenth at six thirty PM. So we've got one over lunchtime on Saturday and one in the evenings on Tuesday night. Okay. So this should be able to encompass almost everybody and get somebody at some point. You should be able to fit into one of those two classes an hour long each. There is absolutely zero cost for this. Okay. We're going to cater this. We're going to do food for you. You will be fad. You will not be hungry. I'm a pretty exciting guy. I love what I do. I'm high energy. This is not boring. I will answer your questions, and what it is. Everybody's got questions about it. Because this is I knew subject, and it's exciting, and it's exhilarating and it works. So well that nobody you sometimes you just go no way, doc. But remember this is here for you. I got so call us up. Now, if you want to take it to either one of these events so that is six one five four four five seven seven zero one that is four four or five seven seven zero one. So that is a free ticket. Tell him I wanna free tickets, and then you can tell them you want Saturday November tenth at eleven thirty AM or do you want to stay November thirteen at six thirty pm. And we're going to call you back..

ninety percent
"ninety percent" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"ninety percent" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"The world wants to see us get along we are the two great nuclear power ninety percent of the nuclear not a good thing it's a bad thing and i think we hopefully can do something about that because it's not a positive force the negative forest so we'll be talking about that a moment but and with that the world awaits and i look forward to our personal discussion which i think's gonna meet our whole you have quite a few representatives we all have a lot of questions and hopefully will come up with answers great to be with you i bet you heard it president trump and russia's president vladimir putin sitting down for the first time here the they're just exchanging pleasantries at this point and talking through translators and talking to the media in then just moments here they're going to be whisked away we're told and the two world leaders with only their translators so each each of them will have their own translator shaking hands right now and they're getting ready for their one on one meeting that'll be behind closed doors no cameras no recording no transcriptions no nothing we conceivably won't get a readout their meetings together but you can rest assured that the reporters will be asking them about what happened behind those closed doors during dare live joint news briefing which is coming up this this morning at nine fifty am you will hear that live here on news ninety six point five wdbo the reporters are now being shoved out of the room they're being asked to leave and then they'll have their.

trump russia vladimir putin president ninety percent
"ninety percent" Discussed on Rooster Teeth Podcast

Rooster Teeth Podcast

03:27 min | 2 years ago

"ninety percent" Discussed on Rooster Teeth Podcast

"Person the room for the ninety percent of them yeah my pup i'm amazed every everyone else who didn't raise their hand can't fucking i'm curious if you did not raise your hand can you raise your hand now right but you can still right everyone can it's a waste of time in the end if you think about it you end up having more time if you type quickly over the course of your life because you get through your typing a lot more quickly if you didn't take a class though are you can you definitely can definitely talk more quickly if you're taking a class all right teach me something from you'll typing class something i don't know about typing it's out that practice and repetition in on that i was on your website when i was fourteen but i'm sure i can still type faster than you can have a type off i will destroy you are we going to type before or after the office suck on which we have yet to you've heard me on them mechanical keyboard before you know i can tear it up well congratulations gus i'm over here trying to think of something that would be more boring than typing contest and i literally can't think of it five hundred episodes will still listening also i hate looking over and seeing you in that metal i don't know why feels like we just had a spelling bee or something math camp everything you do you took a class not everything have it's a normal thing to learn to type did you did you learn how to write how'd you do that learn learn language and stuff so i was told that so you've already passed the first day of typing class where the teacher the letter you're you're way ahead do you know the numbers too because that's a day to coming from the guy who doesn't wanna use twenty four hours because it's too hot to do max at twelve number i just want to use it because i'm american and this our way superior that's it country i was just talking about taking the trip over for london go into over london in london and we are talking about how it's handdrive but somebody who went from ireland to northern ireland and the only way they knew that they had changed countries they were expecting like a checkpoint or something like that but the only way they knew they hitching countries was they went from alama tres in ireland two miles and miles per hour in the uk so you guys just choose whatever you want basically you guys these miles per hour is in the uk i didn't know that either yeah i thought they would have been kilometers yeah it's a mess over that choose from so let's break brexit is not going to happen right it's definitely happening is it who's just resigned resigned because breakfasts political portion of the podcast theresa may's brexit outline was not hard enough she's aiming for a soft brexit and not a hard brexit so three ministers have resigned in protest over that how do you let your brexit brexit over easy i like.

twenty four hours ninety percent
"ninety percent" Discussed on Very Bad Wizards

Very Bad Wizards

04:41 min | 2 years ago

"ninety percent" Discussed on Very Bad Wizards

"Suicide rate with the state with the lowest rate what do you think nobly mass now massachusetts is low i i would say southern state with heavy black population so ninety percent of suicides in the us are going to white people right because you know it's a weird fighting the buzzer a big racial effect new jersey new york had lowest suicide rate the highest rates are out in you know western states not california so nevada while you'll be and so on what we think of that has to do with at least in part population density that new jersey is new york very densely populated as you go out west people are more spread out and so perhaps more socially isolated we also did not yet published so don't share this but i i don't think any wasn't says podcast noble data from new smartphone study where we look at people's calls and texts going in and out and we see that you know the less people are are getting sending texts the more likely they are thinking about suicides have more severe there seems to be something across multiple levels of this connectedness being protective against suicidal thinking this is there's a huge always this like very weird discomfort in talking about people who attempt suicides and some people really want to say it wasn't serious you know the whole cry for help thing but from what i read in the literature that you reviewed it seems as if suicide attempts you are pretty strong predictors of future suicide attempts there's obviously you never want to not take somebody's suicide attempt seriously i guess that's that's right right yeah so i would say you know anytime a person says they're suicidal should take it seriously any type person makes it suicide attempt you should think seriously but we don't have a good understanding when someone says there are suicidal which of those people are going to die by suicide and which ones aren't when sewing makes the suicide attempts which of those is going to be lethal which one isn't twothirds of people who die by suicide told someone added time they were thinking about suicide so you take it seriously eighty percent of people who die by suicide explicitly denied suicidal intention in their last communication before time which is contra rights most telling others they're going to kill themselves but most people are also saying i'm not gonna come itself it's hard to know which cases were in which instance should be really concerned and in which instance might be still concerned but less oh and the same suicide attempts so we didn't know a lot of the biggest effects that are out there like for for gender for age for race they've been there for years and years and we just don't have been standing of of wider there so you don't there's no good hypothesis for why the rates are much lower among black people their hypotheses are they good as african is among african american right it's not even among like i don't know what the rates are in africa but is it's african americans in the us a much lower suicide rate and i thought sees people tend to to offer our will his greater social connectedness grabby more tied into community and so so perceive more social support the suicide rate is high as among white men it really skyrockets older white men and the idea you mentioned tamla earlier isolation than i bought this is older white men and not be as naked and they retire from their jobs and you know they lost their social network another on their own longer providing and so you know perceive that they have no leading in life their verdict to others and so are more likely to die suicide do you work in terms of suicidal suicide prevention with individual people i know if are you still in clinical psychology are you working with patients i'm a licensed clinical psychologist so i i have the ability to see patients i haven't seen patient from purely clinical purposes in over ten years about a lot of the work that we do is in hospitals and with patient so we have studies running in local emergency rooms in psychiatric inpatient units where we are trying to the one way.

massachusetts eighty percent ninety percent ten years
"ninety percent" Discussed on AM 590 The Answer

AM 590 The Answer

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"ninety percent" Discussed on AM 590 The Answer

"And ninety percent i agree with you but when i read zachariah fourteen versus sixteen and on we not talk about the holidays that jesus cats and pull kept after jesus why is it that you don't why i don't believe in keeping the jewish state's yes yes because you know jesus kept it is kept the sabbath you just kept the holidays and poor kept it and roll artless let me just run out of time i want to try and give you some answer just because jesus did something does not mean it's a law for all christians jesus was also very jesus was also circumcised and there's nothing wrong if someone wants to be but the bible's pretty clear that it's not required for a christian to be circumcised paul you read pulses circumcision is nothing uncircumcised is nothing keeping the commandments is what matters so we believe that the ceremonial laws they were nailed to the cross and you read about that in colossians chapter to the bible tells us in second corinthians crisis are passover which is offered for us and so to keep the old testament feasts the whole different category than the ten commandments and i you know if someone wants to their fine but they shouldn't mandated for others they all pointed to jesus jesus came by bracing jesus it's much more than the feast we don't sacrifice lambs anymore all friends we're out of time if we didn't get your question tonight i apologize give us another chance god willing we're going to be back again next week.

paul zachariah ninety percent
"ninety percent" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

The No Film School Podcast

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"ninety percent" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

"Groman hanke wits and roman i apologize if that's not how you pronounce your last name there's a bunch of seasons ease and they are so i think it's a great guest romans awesome and we go in there to do the color grade at harbor i don't know how many days we had a pretty tight schedule again there's a lot in this movie and there's sort of like the the first feature template for how many days you have in the in the sound mix and the color and i was always fighting for more time because it's not again you have always different looks and you have always seen there's one hundred scenes in the movie and there's action and there's high speed in slow motion in multi format i should mention in addition to sony f fifty five which is ninety percent of the movie there is phantom flex four k and then a lot of the social media stuff or the mix tape stuff was either shot on an iphone with the film acc pro app or my samsung note for i think it was at the time and some cannon consumer camcorder and just webcam stuff in the film there's panasonic h vx mix tape footage in there there's a whole lot of different formats in their takes more time in the grade not to mention visual facts take more time in the grade too because you're being given elements that are right there's a look up table for what you shot in the movie and in that has to be applied in match on what you're being given from the visual effects plates that go on top of the screen because of one if the if the surrounding world isn't one color space and then the cell phone screen isn't another color space now you're having issues and there's a matt around it to make sure that works the law in the film to deal with and we were definitely rushing through the color great but the the best part about the color great is the sort of creative side and this was finally in our our opportunity to say not only to be shoot all the basketball with panavision primo primes and all the off the court stuff with much less precise panavision ultra speeds but we want to grade these things differently and then we want to transition between this two looks so we.

basketball samsung panavision ninety percent four k
"ninety percent" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

The Axe Files with David Axelrod

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"ninety percent" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

"And is to expand participation in these exchanges you guys and i wanna talk to you about your tenure as hhs secretary but you you cut the budget for marketing of the aca by ninety percent that doesn't seem like a good plan to get more people to participate amazingly the same number of virtually the same number of people signed up this year as last despite the fact that the budget was cut by ninety percent but that's like a strategy would you conclude from that i would conclude that if you had invested more in in the marketing and making acceptable information about the that millions more people would have signed that's an illogical conclusion if the amount of money that was spent last year got the virtually the same number of individuals insured in on the exchanges did this year but we but was spent ten percent of what was spent exa sheer then then the conclusion could be reached that would say there was too much money being spent but we should point out also the the days to sign up or cut the number of days to senate were cut in half as well i think it's ill illogical to suggest that if you cut the sign up dates in half and you cut the marketing budget by ninety percent that the result yields exactly what it would have yielded if you had actually had a long sign up period and invested more money in and it just feels as if for ideological reasons that there was an effort to try and depress the number of people who signed the sign up time period we were trying to harmonize with medicare so the time period that we defined for the when i was there for that that short period of time was the same time period for sign up from from eddie care it works extremely well for medicare and we wanted to harmonize the two for for a ease of of administration but again the premise of your question is that the aca is the be all in the end all and that's the direction that we ought to be heading when in fact.

hhs medicare aca secretary senate eddie ninety percent ten percent
"ninety percent" Discussed on The Chalene Show

The Chalene Show

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"ninety percent" Discussed on The Chalene Show

"Whatever that is in maybe you're addicted to food then you know that it's not always about hunger it's about this feeling and it becomes more mental than physical right like where you like i just don't feel like i can rest or that i'm going to be happy until i get my drug whatever that is so if you think about an addiction or craving in terms of an addiction and what we know about the brain is that it has neuro transmitters did you know though that fifty percent of your body's dopamine and you know it dopamine is it's that feeling that high that so many of us can become addicted to well okay now get this you know that dopamine and serotonin produced naturally in your body they should be produced naturally in your body they are responsible for regulating a lot of things like mood and happiness right like if you get too much dopamine or not enough dopamine you're going to experience mood swings the same is true of serotonin and most people think of these things happening in the brain but did you know that more than fifty percent of your body's dopamine is actually produced in your gut and ninety yeah ninety percent of your body's serotonin is produced in your gut and both dopamine and serotonin are known to have a direct correlation on regulating behaviors specifically behaviors that make us happy or behaviors that sued an addiction behaviors like eating in other words dopamine and serotonin when out of balance can create intense cravings food cravings and it all starts in your gut all of this is going to help you curb your own cravings i promise you this is all going to come together before the end of this podcast i give you my word.

dopamine fifty percent ninety percent
"ninety percent" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

TalkRadio 630 KHOW

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"ninety percent" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

"A lot easier we have a modest seasoned homebuyers and home sellers listening to the burien larry's show we know that from the attendance at the boot camps and we love that this wonderful it's good it's fitting so some of them have bought a home in exile monitor years tuesday qualify for down payment assistance of course say deal well i say of course i we know about but what i thought most of us associate those programmes with first time homebuyer it's not that at all anymore is no you don't have to be a first time home buyer tu utilize ninety percent of the programs that are out there so like ninety percent of what these loan a payment assistance broken down payment assistance programs zeal for instance chaffeur csak mma unlike larry always point so who or they are cousins or who who i am a consumer i have no idea what a cheque is is that what is i do i buy that at target or there is a very actually government assistance programs that give you the money or burien she the money give you a second mortgage there are so many aspects to downpayment assistance that it's important that you sit in you talk with your lender and you say this is where i can afford this is what i can do this is what i need this is what i have what you just demonstrated jodie with no rehearsal at all well i thank you for putting up with me is i have these questions as consumers have and let's see what did we just here mm answers there were pertinent to our questions that's who jobe years she is with finance of america you wanna give.

larry jodie burien ninety percent
"ninety percent" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"ninety percent" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"The blood flowing it's great to maintain a healthy heart rhythm fish oil is now being shown to have an incredible role in cognitive functioning we're talking about memory mood brain ageing infant development cell the cell communication focus fish oils will enhance or increase performance in the brain actually been shown to increase gray matter and it goes to work and only minutes when taken as a supplement new study showing immediate benefits studies showing longterm cognitive benefits they're looking at fish oil oil in just about every area of health joint health weight management prostate health skin health the list goes on and on the big issue for the average person out there in fact 9 out of ten of you out there right now are clinically deficient in e f azf as or called essential fatty acids and the two most essential fatty acids are the two that are found in fish oil dha and epa that's the business and the fish oil purity's fish oil products have three times more concentration of these two key fatty acids than standard fish oils these are called pharmaceutical grade fish oils meaning they're manufactured in one of only a handful of pharmaceutically licensed facilities right out in norway they make the best fish oil in the world ninety percent concentrations completely pure no mercury issues no fish taste no fish odors nothing like that just the incredible concentrated delivery system of dha and epa and if you're deficient in those two key fatty acids there's a a long list of symptoms that you could suffer from fatigue poor memory poor immunity certainly poor skin health dry skin obviously your cardiovascular health might be impaired you will potentially have mood issues very clear correlations now between mood problems and low blood levels of epa and dha circulatory concerns all of these things are associated with low omega three blood level most of us don't eat enough fish fish is really the only great source of these two compounds fish oil supplementation has now become the biggest category in the vitamin business because of all the benefits all the clinically proven benefits of epa and dha purity's really taken a leading role because we feel we have the.

norway dry skin epa ninety percent
"ninety percent" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

02:41 min | 3 years ago

"ninety percent" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"The memo potentially is what you could point out too a some kind of law in the end the fis accord or in that in the petitioning of those warrants you brought up something early ninety percent of those warrants bohm their stamped and they they move on they okay is that because they're backed up by something or is it because there has been a level of integrity that's automatically assigned to certain positions and the intelligence community or in any administration if this guy brings us this stuff it's legit exactly which we asked earlier uh we probably asked for the first time sometime last year and and that's the you know the idea that somebody that it wasn't the content of the dossier that was presented to the fis accord that convinced the fis accord that a warrant should be issued it was the person it was the pro the it was the petitioner whether it's based on the actual individual and their own integrity or just their position and it within that apartment all of these questions have to be answered about the process and then of course we can then go on to the motivation behind what was presented uh who presented it who presented it knowingly how it was all brought about i mean we note there are so many things that we know already without warrant you talked about earlier about army without the memo what we learned uh from the when would circa news unveiled some of those those documents the concerns of the visor court and how far they go back and what the previous administration did on october twenty six 2016 oh yeah uh yeah we uh we know that you told us this years ago but we are uh sorry are bad uh we didn't do that but uh yeah we're almost on here so that's this again this arrogance or that behavior continued after being a reprimanded by the fis courts or now we still don't doubt or is one of the specifics it it rise possibly to any kind of criminal behaviour or did it rise between 2011 in 2016 to criminal behaviour this is what we don't now this is why the.

fis courts fis ninety percent
"ninety percent" Discussed on The Ken Coleman Show

The Ken Coleman Show

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"ninety percent" Discussed on The Ken Coleman Show

"You can baby step your way into hiring some people think oh i need help therefore i have to hire a fulltime teammember well maybe or maybe you don't and there are so many baby steps between where you are today doing it yourself and having a fulltime team member a contract employ is an example that a temporary employee is an example that parttime and poet ploy and seasonal employ now these are all ways to gradually baby step your way into make sure you really do justify needing the help that they are going to create the roy for you in your business and making more than they cost you and then you can always increase the commitment you can increase the position to say hey you work contract but this is worked out really well i'd like to renegotiate and bringing on fulltime or parttimers taiwan um but i would say it really depends on your goals in your position so if you have the demand where you are maxed out you can't work a minute more you have the money the margin in your business finances to pay and other person and here's the kicker you'll love the surmonter leadership can you want to lead someone just because you're maxed out and even if you have the money doesn't mean you have the desire to lead another person and you can actually still grow your business and make more money through sources of passive income and you never hire another team member everyone doesn't want only people i don't know if you know this but ninety percent of women on businesses don't have team members many of them make that choice because they don't want to lead the team and that's okay but you need to think through because i think there's a myth out there to think okay if a higher people they're going to take all this responsibility off my plate yes and they add a layer of responsibility to it you're now responsible for paying in leading and training and hold accountable other people and that was a big thing so it really depends on her goals and she has the option to hire a contract person to kind of dipper toe in the water of leadership validate that she has the demand and our business and then could always increase that to fulltime that would be would our record.

ninety percent
"ninety percent" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"ninety percent" Discussed on WCPT 820

"Ninety percent of what i want but because it's only ninety percent of what i want i'm vetoing the bill and because it gives the city chicago to some money which he defer called too much money uh which he called a bail out right which it simply was not in fact if you'll look you'll see the city chicago poor student is getting less than a lot of areas and illinois that are in republican areas he vetoed the bill out let me ask you just poses rhetorical question to you and to the listeners who gets ninety percent of what they wanted lie and who gets ninety percent of what they want in springfield nobody nobody gets ninety percent and yet when he vetoed the bill did he get involved in any discussions or any compromises earning to go she asians no and he threatened the very opening of schools now it turns out every cool in illinois every public school analyze going to open thank goodness but every public school in illinois particularly those in areas that rely on taxpayer dollars uh public dollars not property textile dollars but state dollars to stay open some of them were to close in a month to three all whole bunch of them would not have made it through the school year and we have a responsibility under the constitution of illinois to fund schools by try as we may to find that any republican votes to override the governor's veto we could not and so we embarked on what was necessary which was a compromise to make sure schools stayed open and i'm happy to talk to you about their criminal let me let me back up a little bit though clothes there were school superintendents across the state republican and democratic areas who didn't care about governor rounders feelings you didn't care about the politics they were ready for this legislature to override that veto because the need was for the children of elon knowing and and i and i and i in this fight this guy played down state against chicago divisive politics in the state of illinois let me even go farther there's not a single school superintendent that came forward who was not for the override of the.

chicago springfield illinois elon superintendent ninety percent Ninety percent
"ninety percent" Discussed on KELO

KELO

02:07 min | 4 years ago

"ninety percent" Discussed on KELO

"To ninety percent but i still still some white scratches in there and i'm just water to fight i stay come on the goal overly doing i'm again but i was sick i would yeah fighting don't be for the fourth that eighty career that could have been i mean it's it's certainly able to get all those scratches how and i was just thinking when you're doing i can't remember the the great that's but when i had been involved in refinished we did three grips almost like a would floor i'm and and i can't remember oh's an eighty you're a fifty were what we started with but yeah if you still have i'd i'm sure you don't remember but are those small scratches since scratches up pretty much where the deep ones or don't know yeah that it's hard to tell because there are so many on you know just over the years and just kind of you know ben i guess center improved the eighty ninety percent numb one or are discord again i should maybe they can be for what the eighty and then just what i worry down and even gone the a lighter and no one fifty maybe go top or honor yeah i would say on all the above this away i would address it okay i would look at it and and you can you have a hard time looking at this one i think because you just it all this work but look at it as this is now the scout our top that you have that now has some scratch isn't it okay and i think amigo de koreans website it'll have a progression of grit you should use because i'd be guessing and followed that process i would say you know you're going to have i'm i'm going to be pretty certain that they have a three step process so it's eighty one eighty three sixty or whatever but there's going to be a process and you don't you'll get about the pair you'll get a matter i can go deep aside that there's with that after that's sticking up for like i'm not gonna you're not where it out with the a's course the more the more grit you haven't the more you take off the more you know you run the risk of having a not real smooth yeah you know me.

eighty ninety percent ninety percent